Australia cricket 2020 ODI vs India, Marcus Stoinis injury, second ODI game teams, Cameron Green, Moises Henriques, Ashton Agar, Sean Abbott


Marcus Stoinis is set to miss Sunday’s second game of the ODI against India after picking up an injury on Friday night.

He left the field two balls into the seventh and in a statement, Cricket Australia confirmed he would be monitored overnight due to left side pain.

The all-rounder is also set for scans but with just one day between matches, you would have to think Stoinis is at long odds to play on Sunday, meaning there is a spot open in the squad.

Here are the contenders including a seasoned veteran and a potential debutant.

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Sean Abbott, Australia Test squad vs India


New South Wales paceman Sean Abbott concedes he fought back tears upon discovering he had been included in Australia’s 17-man Test squad to face India.

Abbott put himself in the running for a potential Test debut after a series of impressive performances in the Sheffield Shield.

Despite competing in batting-friendly conditions in Adelaide, the 28-year-old snared 14 wickets at 17.92 to become the competition’s third-highest wicket-taker.

Abbott has also developed into a formidable all-rounder this summer, scoring 261 runs in five innings and averaging 130.50 with that bat. He brought up a maiden first-class century against the Tasmanian Tigers in round four.

Since November 2018, he has averaged 47 with the bat in 20 Sheffield Shield innings.

National selectors rewarded Abbott’s stellar form, including him in a talented pace attack which featured Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood, James Pattinson and Michael Neser.

“I had to fight back tears there for a minute,” Abbott told reporters on Sunday.

“I’d be happy to put my hand up for any spot that would come up. I’d take that opportunity with both hands.

“I probably see myself as more of a bowling opportunity as someone who can bat.

“But if there’s that opportunity to bat higher up the order and the selectors and (Tim Paine) think I can do that job, then I’m not even going to think twice when I’m walking out there.

“I’ll bat as a batsman and do whatever job is in front of me.”

Abbott was also named in the Australia A squad, and will get an opportunity to push for Test selection when he faces the touring Indians in early December.

The Sydney Sixers star admitted he was happy to miss the Big Bash League in pursuit of a Baggy Green.

“I’d certainly prefer to be in the place where I’m closer to hopefully playing for my country,” Abbott said.

“That could mean I’m playing a little bit less cricket considering the form that the Test squad is in at the moment, especially the bowling group.

“We’ve got some great depth at the Sixers, and I’m not too concerned that they’d be missing me too much.”



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Cricket news 2020: Sean Abbott, Australia Test squad vs India


New South Wales paceman Sean Abbott concedes he fought back tears upon discovering he had been included in Australia’s 17-man Test squad to face India.

Abbott put himself in the running for a potential Test debut after a series of impressive performances in the Sheffield Shield.

Despite competing in batting-friendly conditions in Adelaide, the 28-year-old snared 14 wickets at 17.92 to become the competition’s third-highest wicket-taker.

Abbott has also developed into a formidable all-rounder this summer, scoring 261 runs in five innings and averaging 130.50 with that bat. He brought up a maiden first-class century against the Tasmanian Tigers in round four.

Since November 2018, he has averaged 47 with the bat in 20 Sheffield Shield innings.

media_cameraSean Abbott of New South Wales.

National selectors rewarded Abbott’s stellar form, including him in a talented pace attack which featured Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc, Josh Hazlewood, James Pattinson and Michael Neser.

“I had to fight back tears there for a minute,” Abbott told reporters on Sunday.

“I’d be happy to put my hand up for any spot that would come up. I’d take that opportunity with both hands.

“I probably see myself as more of a bowling opportunity as someone who can bat.

“But if there’s that opportunity to bat higher up the order and the selectors and (Tim Paine) think I can do that job, then I’m not even going to think twice when I’m walking out there.

“I’ll bat as a batsman and do whatever job is in front of me.”

Abbott was also named in the Australia A squad, and will get an opportunity to push for Test selection when he faces the touring Indians in early December.

The Sydney Sixers star admitted he was happy to miss the Big Bash League in pursuit of a Baggy Green.

“I’d certainly prefer to be in the place where I’m closer to hopefully playing for my country,” Abbott said.

“That could mean I’m playing a little bit less cricket considering the form that the Test squad is in at the moment, especially the bowling group.

“We’ve got some great depth at the Sixers, and I’m not too concerned that they’d be missing me too much.”

Originally published as Uncapped Abbott fought back tears after Test call-up



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The ghost of Tony Abbott paralyses Canberra on climate action


The incoming American leader intends committing the US to a policy of zero net-carbon emissions by 2050. This is a policy that Morrison dare not endorse, or even speak. Instead, he told reporters: “I raised with the President-elect the similarity between the President-elect’s comments and policies regarding emissions reduction and technologies that are needed to achieve that and we look forward to working on those issues.”

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So he emphasises the common ground – the obvious fact that all countries need new energy technology to cut carbon emissions. And avoids the difference – that Biden has a long-term target, and Australia does not. The Biden office issued a readout saying the pair discussed “common challenges” including “confronting climate change”.

This is all fine within the Australia-US relationship. It’s just sad. The US was the wayward nation. Under Donald Trump it withdrew from the Paris climate accord and wantonly removed a host of environmental protections.

Australia, of course, has remained committed to Paris. And the Morrison government quietly has supported billions of dollars’ worth of new renewable investments in the states, granted major project status to the $22 billion Sun Cable project to export solar power from the Northern Territory under the ocean to Singapore, invested in hydrogen technology, and much more.

But rather than being able to welcome home the prodigal son of the global climate effort in a full-throated greeting to post-Trump America, Morrison is suddenly mute when it comes to the forbidden words. It’s just sad that a national leader can’t speak the taboo words of targets or deadlines in an area of policy on which the fate of his country depends.

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The government’s climate scientists reported this week that Australia has warmed an average of 1.44 degrees since 1910. And continues to warm. “In terms of national daily average maximum temperatures, there were 33 days that exceeded 39C in 2019.”

For perspective, they added, that’s “more than the number observed from 1960 to 2018 combined”. In that 58-year span there were only 24 days that hot. In scrupulously neutral language, the report makes plain that last year, which seemed such an outlier with such intense and wide-ranging fires, will become a normal year. Unless the trend is interrupted.

The State of the Climate report, issued every two years, compiled by the Bureau of Meteorology and the CSIRO, says southeast Australia has lost 12 per cent of its annual April-October rainfall since the late 1990s. And when rain does come, it’s in more intense bursts. And we know what that means. Longer droughts and bigger floods.

Australia’s carbon emissions are falling. It’s just that, on the current trajectory, we won’t hit net zero for another four centuries. Or, more precisely, until 2393, as the Climate Council researcher Tim Baxter told my colleague Mike Foley.

It’s not that Morrison is hostile to the concept of going carbon neutral. When asked, he agrees that he would like Australia to hit net-zero emissions “as quickly as possible”. He just won’t put a date to it, and says it’d be dishonest to do so without being able to specify the cost to the economy.

This runs contrary to two iron rules of politics. One is that the more distant the date, the more likely the commitment, and 2050 is 30 years hence. Morrison will be 82, assuming he lives that long and the planet is still habitable. He’d be long retired and unaccountable.

The other iron rule is to emphasise the benefits of a policy you support, and dissemble on the costs. For instance, the government is raising hundreds of billions of dollars in fresh Commonwealth debt in the bond market. It boasts about how it’s supporting the economy today. And what costs will Australia’s next generation pay to carry and repay that debt? Crickets.

All Australia’s most important trading partners have now announced a target of net zero around mid-century. China is promising net zero by 2060. The others – including the US, Japan, South Korea, Britain, Germany, France, Canada, NZ – are aiming for 2050.

Morrison’s obduracy is even more bizarre when you realise that every state and territory in the Commonwealth has pledged to get to net zero by 2050. The real reason Morrison dare not break the taboo? Two words: Tony Abbott.

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Recall that John Howard and Kevin Rudd reached a broad bipartisan agreement in 2007. They converged on the idea of an emissions trading scheme. This remained the consensus under Liberal leaders Brendan Nelson and Malcolm Turnbull. Until Abbott decided to break ranks, demonise the policy and lead a conservative insurrection against Turnbull.

Under the Abbott rule, it is illegitimate for politicians to commit to a carbon-cutting target. Even his own. As prime minister Abbott committed Australia to its Paris target. But once he’d been unseated by Turnbull, Abbott started campaigning against his own target.

That approach enabled him to bring down Turnbull, but also Julia Gillard. It was instrumental to his political successes.

It also was instrumental in Australia’s national failures. Today Australia has the highest electricity prices in the world, uncompetitive power-intensive industries such as aluminium, an electricity grid groaning under the strain of merely keeping the lights on during summer, and the oncoming collapse of a habitable planet.

No matter the need or the urgency. Morrison knows that to campaign openly, ambitiously, is to risk another conservative insurrection from his own Coalition. Instead he sticks to the safe ground of talking up new technology and more investment.

And then there’s Labor. The party’s spokesman on resources, Joel Fitzgibbon, had planned to announce his retirement from the opposition frontbench on December 7 under an internal deal in the NSW right faction. He decided to accelerate the plan and go out in a blaze of angry dissent instead.

Since last year’s federal election he’d made a point of talking up coal mining. There’s a lot of it in his NSW seat of Hunter Valley. He suffered a big swing against him at the 2019 election and blamed Labor’s climate activists for being disdainful of coal mining and Labor’s traditional blue-collar base.

An inconvenient fact? Two adjacent Labor-held seats, also heavy with coal mining, suffered much smaller swings at the same election. But rather than look within, Fitzgibbon chose to blame his party. He also relished the easy publicity that comes with attacking your own team.

When he saw the election of Joe Biden in the US, he fretted that this would animate Labor’s climate activism. On Monday he gave a half-dozen media interviews to try to head this off.

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This frustrated his colleagues mightily. Anthony Albanese’s opening salvo against Scott Morrison in Monday’s question time was to point out that 70 countries including Biden’s America were committing to net-zero targets by 2050: “Why is the Prime Minister leaving Australia behind by refusing to?”

This was planned as a Labor theme for the week. Fitzgibbon’s high-profile dissent within Labor sabotaged that effort and opened Labor to attack from the government. And when Albanese chided Fitzgibbon at Monday evening’s shadow cabinet meeting, it erupted into an angry exchange. Without a discussion of the actual policy. Fitzgibbon resigned from the front bench the next morning. Three weeks early. He plans to continue his destabilising campaign of criticism.

Is he planning a tilt at the leadership? He doesn’t have leadership ambitions, which is just as well because he certainly doesn’t have the numbers. Most of his party is furious at his self-indulgence.

And he’d already told colleagues he wasn’t planning to contest the next election in any case. “He’s just striking a pose,” Albanese has told his colleagues. The working hypothesis is that he’s auditioning for a post-parliamentary job in the fossil fuels sector.

Once again, Labor is acting out the Abbott rule – Fitzgibbon by noisily campaigning against climate activism, and Labor as a whole by withholding its climate policy. Still shaken by its loss last year, Labor is postponing announcements of most of its policy plans across the board.

NSW announced a new $32 billion renewable energy investment plan this week. Woolworths committed to powering all its stores with solar. And Australia’s richest entrepreneur, Andrew Forrest, hatched a plan to make his company the world’s biggest renewable energy supplier. While in Canberra, government and opposition remain twitching in fearful spasms at the ghost of Tony Abbott. Pathetic but true.

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Sean Abbott hammers home Test message with maiden first-class ton


Abbott can enhance his claims by bowling the Blues to victory against Tasmania on Wednesday after they were skittled for 64 on the first day.

He and Starc shared an undefeated 189-run stand for the seventh wicket to swing the match firmly in the Blues’ favour.

Blues captain Peter Nevill declared after Abbott reached triple figures, leaving Starc stranded on 86. The Test paceman, who has a highest first-class score of 99 at Test level, angrily flung his bat upon leaving Gladys Elphick Park.

The case to blood Will Pucovski under lights in Adelaide next month gained traction on Tuesday when Burns failed again.

After starting the season with back-to-back tons, Pucovski is breathing down Burns’s neck.

Selectors Justin Langer and Trevor Hohns recently said the Test squad was settled but Burns’s lean run must be a concern.

With the Shield going into hiatus after the current round of games finishing Wednesday, Burns and Pucovski do not have any top level cricket until the first of Australia A’s two games against India A.

Will Pucovski is in contention for Test selection.Credit:Getty Images

Hohns has flagged that Test players not involved in the limited-overs internationals may be picked in the first ‘A’ game at Drummoyne Oval.

A source familiar with the issue said Burns and Pucovski, along with other Test squad members, will be given a rest, with a decision on whether they would play grade cricket not to be made before next week.

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Test squad members not involved in the white-ball series against India and the A squad will report for duty in Sydney on December 2 or 3.

Usman Khawaja followed his first-innings hundred with an unbeaten 46 for Queensland, who are in a dominant position against South Australia.

It has been a timely return to form for Khawaja, whom Hohns said was still on the selectors’ radar at the age of 33.

Victoria’s clash with Western Australia appears headed for a draw after Josh Inglis’s 125 off 122 balls gave the Warriors a first-innings lead on day three.

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Cricket Australia, Sheffield Shield, scores, highlights, video: Joe Burns fails again, Sean Abbott scores century


Two quick Tasmanian wickets softened the blow for Test fast bowler Mitchell Starc who was left stranded not out on 86 by a declaration from NSW captain Peter Nevill which could yet prove a masterstroke.

Nevill called Starc and Sean Abbott in one ball after Abbott reached his maiden first class hundred, setting Tasmania 348 to win.

Abbott is having a season to remember with the bat with his unbeaten 102 coming after scores of 66, 18* and 15.

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The 28-year-old now has a whopping average of 130.50 for the season as he starts to build a strong case to be considered as a genuine all-rounder.



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Here’s something else Tony Abbott could do while he’s in London


The new labeling has it that: “James Cook sailed up the east coast in 1770, permanent British occupation began in 1788 with a ‘First Fleet’ of ships carrying convicts to establish a penal colony at present day Sydney”.

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The change, according to a spokesperson for the British Museum is because curators “were inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement to finally address it”.

I protest on two grounds. First, “while permanent British occupation began in 1788” is a commendable step towards acknowledging what happened, it makes it sound as if we are still British now, which we ain’t. (Despite our flag, our system of constitutional monarchy and … trust me, don’t get me started.)

The second problem is, no matter what the label, the outrage is that they still have the shield! If you Brits are truly going to respect the Black Lives Matter movement, it must include respecting black lives impacted defending Australian shores, and restoring that which was clearly stolen.

If only we in Australia had someone in London to take up the cudgels for us, someone to represent our interests on such an important matter. No, not our Head of State. When push comes to shove, the Palace always puts Britain ahead of Australia, an obvious structural problem with the whole system for an independent nation.

No, I am thinking if only we had someone of the stature of a former prime minister, thundering up and down the corridors of Whitehall, and knocking heads together to bring the Gweagal Shield home. Think . .

Here’s an idea that will make Sydney’s Circular Quay really sing

And where were we? I remember! Back in 2015, the NSW government announced a $200 million upgrade of Circular Quay. Nothing solid has happened since, bar its recent request of the NSW public to make some suggestions. I have one! It is the same one I’ve previously floated, and everyone I’ve explained it to has embraced it. See, as pushed by well-known north shore dentist David Eyles, what you do is push the ferry wharves out by a 100 metres or so, and create a world-class square that would make Vienna’s Piazza San Marco weep with envy. That’s not a square. This, this is a square! Cafes on four sides, the Opera House within aria distance, old man Harbour Bridge a yodel away, Barangaroo smiling benignly on the lot. And get rid of the whole Cahill Expressway, one of the greatest scars on Sydney.

Sydney could have a city square with the Opera House within aria distance.Credit:James Brickwood

Joke of the Week

With thanks to Jimeoin, who told this on Channel Nine on Friday. This is the best Dad’s joke of the week, for this Father’s Day.

This drunk, see, goes into the library and, slurring his words says, “I’d like some fish and chipsh, pleashe.”

The librarian, appalled, hisses at him: “This is a library!”

The drunk gets it, and leans in close, whispering: “Sorry… I’d like some fish and chips, please.”

Thank you! He’s here till Thursday! Try the veal!

Tweet of the Week

“Who among us hasn’t lined up an easy putt and ended up shooting the caddie seven times in the back.” – TV producer Krister Johnson, after President Trump tried to explain on Fox News how a police officer managed to shoot the unarmed black man Jacob Blake, by saying “They [the officers] choke, just like in a golf tournament, they miss a 3-foot putt.”

Quotes of the Week

“I just find this appointment absolutely staggering. On a personal level, I am disgusted that Boris Johnson thinks this offensive, leering, cantankerous, climate-change-denying, Trump-worshipping misogynist is the right person to represent our country overseas.” – Emily Thornberry, the British opposition’s trade spokeswoman.

“I am also asking you … to embrace your own responsibility as citizens – to make sure that the basic tenets of our democracy endure. Because that’s what is at stake right now: our democracy … Any chance of success depends entirely on the outcome of this election. This administration has shown it will tear our democracy down if that’s what it takes to win.” – Barack Obama to the American people.

“If this increase goes ahead, I would expect wage growth to be even lower than it otherwise would be.” – Reserve Bank Governor Philip Lowe in favour of the government delaying the planned increase to automatic superannuation payments.

“Pigs. Might. Fly. That is the biggest bullshit argument I have ever heard.” – Former prime minister Kevin Rudd about Philip Lowe’s thoughts.

“Under the cowardly talk of the COVID crisis, they want to gyp ordinary people by 2 .5 per cent of their income for the rest of their life.” – Former prime minister Paul Keating, also in reply to Philip Lowe.

“We have often been asked since January 2015 to produce other caricatures of Muhammad. We have always refused to do so, not because it is forbidden – the law allows us to do so – but because there was a need for a good reason to do it; a reason which has meaning and which brings something to the debate. Reproducing these caricatures this week … seemed essential to us. All the reasons that could be opposed to us relate only to political or journalistic cowardice. Do we want to live in a country that prides itself on being a great, free and modern democracy, and which, at the same time, gives up on asserting its deepest convictions? For our part, it is out of the question.” – From an editorial in Charlie Hebdo, the French magazine attacked by terrorists during a deadly wave of assaults in Paris five years ago. The magazine is reprinting its controversial cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad on the eve of a major court case.

“Just as the way we treat our koalas is a reflection on how we respect the environment, the way we treat our heritage buildings reflects how we respect the past. It is vital we pull out all stops to not only protect habitat but also the structures that help us define who we are as Australians.” – NSW Environment Minister Matt Kean as the 150-hectare Mount Gilead estate, near Campbelltown, a 19th century colonial property that also contains significant evidence of prior occupation of the land by Aboriginal people, is heritage listed by the NSW government in an effort to further preserve the area’s unique koala population following the announcement of a conservation reserve nearby.

“We’re currently working with the NSW government to determine the future of the event for 2020.” – The City of Sydney council in a statement, on the New Year’s Eve fireworks.

“In a decade, am I really going to care if I went to two or three Olympics if I’ve got a child? Being an athlete is one of the most selfish things you can do. It’s all me, me, me. It’s time to think about others.” – Sprinter Melissa Breen, currently Australia’s fastest woman, about retiring at age 29 when the Tokyo Olympics were postponed.

“I found my way through the wheels. Coming from behind, it’s a bit of a risk, but I found my way along the barrier and I came with a lot of speed and it worked in the end.” – Australian rider Caleb Ewan on winning a sprint finish to win the third stage of the Tour de France on Monday. He reached 68.8km/h.

So many people are working from home and they’re wanting coffee in the morning and they’re wanting lunch options as well, so that’s definitely gone up for us. We’ve found the support from our local community has been awesome . . . right now being in a residential area is a gold mine I think.” – Ashley Wilderink, owner of the Brothers Ben cafe in Petersham, saying that coffee sales during the week are up “a huge amount” compared with sales before the pandemic. Cafe spending in NSW is 18 per cent higher than the pre-crisis norm.

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Tony Abbott appointed to UK board of trade despite backlash in UK


Former Prime Minister Tony Abbott has been appointed as an adviser to the UK board of trade despite backlash over comments he has made in the past.

The appointment was confirmed on Friday local time.

It comes after UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson rejected claims he was unsuitable following his comments on women and LGBT people that made headlines in the UK this week.

Mr Johnson said he did “not agree with those sentiments”, but he “can’t be expected” to agree with everyone who works with the government.

He said Mr Abbott had been elected by the “great, liberal democratic nation of Australia,” saying, “I think that speaks for itself.”

Mr Abbott’s role is said to be as an unpaid adviser with no direct role in future trade negotiations, instead advising ministers and officials as part of an expert panel.
The board of trade is designed to take a “collaborative approach” focussing on promoting the UK as regions to do business with.

Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss, who is president of the board said: “The new board of trade will play an important role in helping Britain make the case for free and fair trade across the UK and around the world.

“At a time of increased protectionism and global insecurity, it’s vital that the UK is a strong voice for open markets and that we play a meaningful role in reshaping global trading rules alongside like-minded countries.

“The new Board will help us do that, bringing together a diverse group of people who share Britain’s belief in free enterprise, democracy, and high standards and rules-based trade.

It comes after Mr Abbot’s former Chief of Staff Peta Credlin defended him on UK radio on Firday morning.

“He was in Parliament for 25 years. Every single one of his chiefs of staff were women. The guy’s got three sisters, a very strong, independent wife and three daughters. He’s not a misogynist,” she said.

On Thursday, UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock was forced to defend his record to Sky News host Kay Burley when she questioned if he was the “right sort of person to represent us”.

Mr Hancock replied: “The proposal is that Mr Abbott supports the UK on trade policy which is an area in which he has a huge amount of expertise. We need to have the best experts in the world working in that field.”

“Even if he’s a homophobic misogynist?” Burley shot back.

“I don’t think that’s true,” Mr Hancock squirmed in reply.

“I’ve just told you what he said. I’m sure you don’t support some of his comments. He’s a homophobe and he’s a misogynist,” she pressed.

“Well he’s also an expert in trade,” Mr Hancock replied.

“So one plays off against the other, is that really what you’re saying Health Secretary, c’mon?” she asked.

More to come.



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British government defies backlash to approve Tony Abbott as new trade adviser


Abbott’s former chief of staff, Peta Credlin, and his sister, Christine Forster, defended the former prime minister on Friday, rubbishing claims from journalists and Labour MPs that his previous statements disqualified him from the trade position.

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Downing Street made its first official comment on the matter on Thursday, pointing out that no decisions had been made about Abbott’s appointment. That is the private line the government has held since it was first reported that Abbott would be advising the British on trade.

However, the appointment has now been approved and the government hopes confirmation of the position will end the damaging speculation.

Actor Sir Ian McKellen led fresh calls on Friday for Prime Minister Boris Johnson to reconsider appointing Abbott to the revamped trade board because of the former prime minister’s previous statements on abortion, climate change, gay people and women.

McKellen, who played Gandalf in Peter Jackson’s remake of the hit trilogy The Lord of the Rings, released an open letter calling on Britain’s arts community to support and sign.

The letter has so far been signed a string of prominent gay and lesbian figures in Britain, including Lord Cashman and Lisa Power, fellow founders of the Stonewall LGBT rights charity, and screenwriter Russell T. Davies who revived Doctor Who and wrote Queer as Folk.

“As committed equality and environmental activists, we the undersigned urge the government to reconsider its proposed appointment of Tony Abbott as a trade envoy to the UK Board of Trade,” the letter says.

Tony Abbott appointment is expected to be announced on Friday afternoon, local time.Credit:Getty Images

The list of those who have signed already is notable as it includes figures who rarely speak out on politics when it does not relate to their particular sector, including Ian Green from the Terrence Higgins Trust, Britain’s leading HIV and sexual health charity.

It also includes a Tory peer, Lord Hayward, who has become the second Conservative to voice disquiet about the appointment.

Australian actor David Wenham, who co-starred with McKellen in The Lord of the Rings, told The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, “Britain must feel very despondent if their government deems that there is no one in Britain capable of representing them re trade. And then the insult of choosing Tony Abbott, noted primarily for trading in misogyny and homophobia.”

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Abbott wrapped up his 10-day trip to Europe on Friday and was on his way back to Australia where he said he would go into hotel quarantine.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has described Abbott’s new role as a “good hire” by Johnson’s government.

“He knows a lot about trade and he did a lot of great work for Australia on trade when it came to the China free trade agreement and Japan and Korea,” Morrison told reporters in Canberra on Friday.

“He set Australia up very well and the fact that we now have a current account surplus, that we’ve had trade surpluses now for record periods of time, I think speaks very well to his trade credentials so I wish Tony well.”

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