Sentence more than doubles for woman’s ‘abhorrent’ teen sex crimes | The Border Mail


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A woman who had a relationship with a boy less than a third her age has had her sentence significantly increased. Heather Elizabeth Allen received a one-year minimum jail term despite having sex with the vulnerable boy multiple times per week. The Wodonga woman was 51 and the boy 15 when the offending occurred in 2015. The pair first communicated over Facebook when the teenager sent Allen a friend request. He told her he was 18 and they shared sexual messages and videos. The boy later told her he was 15 and that he had been brought up in state care and Allen went to visit him in Western Australia. She said she would help him get his life back on track and on July 7, 2015, the boy flew to Wodonga with Allen to live with her. IN OTHER NEWS: The 51-year-old claimed government benefits for having him in her care but they had sex two or three times per week. They argued a month after he boy moved in and he locked Allen out of the house. Police attended and arranged for the victim to be put into state care. He told a foster mother about what had occurred in January 2017 and the boy set up a phone call to discuss what occurred and demanded $10,000 not to go to police. Allen said if the boy reported her, she would end up “six foot under” as it would kill her. Judge Gabrielle Cannon sentenced Allen to a one-year minimum term, three-year maximum, which an appeal court recently heard was inadequate. Three Supreme Court justices found Allen’s behaviour was “egregious”. “In our view, this was serious offending, made all the more so by the fact that the respondent chose to assume a ‘quasi-parental’ role in relation to the complainant,” they said. “A significantly higher (maximum) sentence, and non-parole period, were called for. “The respondent’s conduct was abhorrent, and deserved powerful denunciation.” Allen must now spend two-and-a-half years in jail with a four-year maximum.

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Mick Malthouse slammed for ‘abhorrent’ response to Robert Muir bombshell


Former St Kilda defender Mick Malthouse has suggested Robert Muir’s ‘Mad Dog’ nickname “served him well”.

Last week, ABC News sports journalist Russell Jackson penned an eye-opening feature which outlined the racial vilification Muir endured throughout his VFL career.

The Indigenous footballer was regularly subjected to racial abuse by players and spectators, which resulted in several on-field outbursts — he was reported 13 times and suspended for 22 matches during his career.

Last week, the St Kilda Football Club issued an apology in response to the bombshell story, which was widely praised by the Australian sporting community.

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The disturbing revelations include Muir’s private anguish at being given the nickname “Mad Dog” by his own teammates.

“I’m sick of people being frightened to ask for an autograph or talk to me,” Muir said.

“I want my grandkids to be proud of me. I want them to say, ‘That’s my grandfather, he played for St Kilda.’ I don’t want people to say, ‘There goes Mad Dog’.”

But speaking on ABC radio’s WA Sports Talk, Malthouse remarkably claimed Muir tried to “live up to the nickname” and suggested the racist slur “served him well”.

“Don’t forget this is the 1970s and I still think that Robbie lived up to that name,” Malthouse said on Saturday.

“I think he was quite happy with that name. I question that he questioned it. It served him well to get recognised. He never said to me ever that he was upset by the nickname because we never discussed it.

“He may well have been, but it wasn’t something to discuss. That was a public name, and I think in the end he tried to live up to that name.”

Malthouse also claimed Collingwood legend Lou Richards was the first to call Muir “Mad Dog”, which contradicts his teammate’s recollections — the 66-year-old asserted St Kilda great Kevin Neale gave him the nickname in the ABC feature.

“When he was nicknamed ‘Mad Dog Muir’, that was basically Lou Richards,” Malthouse said.

“Lou wouldn’t have had any intent to hurt. It was just Mad Dog Muir. I never knew him as that. It was always ‘Robbie’.

“But he picked up that nickname. I think Robbie tried to live by that name. And that’s a shame. It really wrecked his ability to say ‘I was a good footballer’. He was a very good footballer.”

Jackson responded to the premiership coach’s “disgusting” remarks on social media.

“It becomes easier to understand how far Robbie fell when you consider the sorts of people who called themselves his friends,” Jackson tweeted.

“A few things — he refused to be interviewed; he evidently hasn’t read the article; speaking on Rob’s behalf and diminishing his abuse as “a little bit” of racism is disgusting; victim-blaming; blatant factual errors; ‘I think he was quite happy with that name.’ Where do you start?

“Something else I suggest to football fans after spending a long time researching Robert Muir’s life, listening to him, and immersing myself in the issues at play — listen closely to Héritier Lumumba. Try to understand his experience — not what others say about him. Listen.”

Sports writer Richard Hinds posted: “That’s abhorrent victim blaming by Malthouse. Clearly hasn’t read the story or chose to completely disregard Muir’s version.”

Sports photographer Wayne Ludbey tweeted: “The Post Truth Whitewash has arrived.”

Fox Sports reporter Tom Morris bluntly posted: “Mick has lost it.”

On Sunday, a GoFundMe page was created for Muir’s much-needed shoulder surgery, and has already raised over $112,000.



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Man charged with murder over ‘abhorrent’ death of Nambour woman



A 34-year-old Burnside man has been charged with murder following the death of a woman on the Sunshine Coast after her body was found with “horrific” injuries on a road in Nambour.

Detective Inspector Dave Drinnen said officers were called to Matthew Street in Nambour around 1:30am on Saturday after they received tip-offs from the public.

“We got some triple-0 calls from members of the public who advised that there was an altercation occurring between a male and a female on the top of the bridge at Nambour,” he said.

He said they found a 31-year-old woman suffering “horrific” head and chest injuries lying on the road.

Police began CPR until paramedics arrived on the scene.

The woman from Buddina died at the scene.

“It was horrific injuries on this female victim,” Detective Inspector Drinnen said.

Police officers, along with the Sunshine Coast dog squad, searched the area and tracked a Burnside man who was found at the Nambour Hospital.

The man was taken into custody at the Maroochydore police station. He is expected to appear in Maroochydore Magistrates Court on August 24.

Police revealed “a number of weapons” were located, but would not go into detail for “operational reasons”.

Detective Inspector Drinnen said police believe the man and woman were known to each other.

“As to how that relationship, or how that acquaintance goes, it’s too early to know,” he said.

An autopsy will be conducted to establish the cause of the woman’s death.

Officers have been doorknocking the Nambour area in search of witnesses or CCTV vision of the incident.

Anyone with information has been asked to contact CrimeStoppers.



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Police investigate the ‘abhorrent’ death of a Sunshine Coast woman after her body was found with ‘horrific injuries’



Police are investigating the suspicious death of a woman on the Sunshine Coast after her body was found with “horrific” injuries on a road in Nambour.

Police said a 34-year-old man had been taken into custody.

Detective Inspector Dave Drinnen said officers were called to Matthew Street in Nambour around 1:30am on Saturday after they received tip-offs from the public.

“We got some triple-0 calls from members of the public who advised that there was an altercation occurring between a male and a female on the top of the bridge at Nambour,” he said.

He said they found a 31-year-old woman suffering “horrific” head and chest injuries lying on the road.

Police began CPR until paramedics arrived on the scene.

The woman from Buddina died at the scene.

“It was horrific injuries on this female victim,” Detective Inspector Drinnen said.

Police officers, along with the Sunshine Coast dog squad, searched the area and tracked a Burnside man who was found at the Nambour Hospital.

The man was taken into custody at the Maroochydore police station, but no charges have been laid.

Police revealed “a number of weapons” were located, but would not go into detail for “operational reasons”.

Detective Inspector Drinnen said police believe the man and woman were known to each other.

“As to how that relationship, or how that acquaintance goes, it’s too early to know,” he said.

An autopsy will be conducted to establish the cause of the woman’s death.

Officers have been doorknocking the Nambour area in search of witnesses or CCTV vision of the incident.

Anyone with information has been asked to contact CrimeStoppers.



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Boris Johnson vows to ban ‘absolutely abhorrent’ gay ‘conversion therapy’ | Politics News



Boris Johnson has vowed to ban “absolutely abhorrent” practices aimed at changing someone’s sexual orientation.

The prime minister promised the government would conduct a study into so-called “gay conversion” therapies before bringing forward plans to prohibit it.

It is two years since the government, then led by former prime minister Theresa May, promised to bring forward proposals – as part of its LGBT action plan – to end the practice of conversion therapy in the UK.

That action plan built on the results of a national LGBT survey of more than 108,000 people, which found 2% of respondents had undergone conversion or reparative therapy in an attempt to “cure” them, and a further 5% had been offered it.

Speaking on a visit to a Kent school on Monday, Mr Johnson described gay conversion therapy as “absolutely abhorrent” and said it “has no place in a civilised society, has no place in this country”.

“What we are going to do is a study right now on, you know, where is this actually happening, how prevalent is it, and we will then bring forward plans to ban it,” he added.

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The prime minister also reiterated the government would publish its response to a public consultation on the Gender Recognition Act over the summer.

It was reported last month that, as part of the government’s response, Mr Johnson was set to ditch plans developed under Mrs May’s government to allow transgender people to change their birth certificates without a medical diagnosis.



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Kosciuszko National Park brumbies causing ‘abhorrent’ damage, says Indigenous river guide


When Richard Swain describes the condition of Kosciuszko National Park, he uses words like “disgusting”, “disrespectful” and “a mess”.

The pain he feels as he explains the damage he sees in the Snowy Mountains high country every day is clear across his face.

Mr Swain, a Wiradjuri man and alpine river guide, is not talking about the impact of the summer bushfires.

The problem, according to him, is the thousands of feral horses roaming through the iconic alpine landscape, trampling sensitive ecosystems and pushing already threatened native species further towards extinction.

“It’s a desecration of country and the country is crying out for help — the damage is abhorrent,” Mr Swain, a campaigner for the Invasive Species Council, said.

A man with brown hair and stubble wearing a flannelette shirt and standing in a burnt out part of Kosciuszko National Park.
Richard Swain has been fighting to have brumby numbers in Kosciuszko National Park drastically reduced for years.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

Plan is to trap and rehome

That decision was the passing by the New South Wales Government of the so-called ‘Brumby Bill’ in 2018 — legislation championed by Deputy Premier and Member for Monaro John Barilaro.

It recognised the cultural heritage of wild horses to Kosciuszko National Park and prohibited their culling.

Instead, brumbies in sensitive parts of the park are to be trapped and then rehomed.

Three brown brumbies with a small, brown foal stand in an open plain in Kosciuszko National Park.
Packs of brumbies can easily be spotted roaming through Kosciuszko National Park.(ABC News: Greg Nelson)

“What we’ve achieved in New South Wales is a balanced approach to reducing numbers in the most sensitive areas of Kosciuszko National Park in a humane way that has brought both sides of the debate together,” Mr Barilaro said.

“We’re not shooting them from helicopters like in Victoria.

“We’ve ruled out aerial culling. We’ve ruled out shooting horses and letting their carcasses rot on the forest floor.

A bitter war

Two clear horse hoof prints on a dirt track.
Evidence of horse hooves can be seen all over the national park.(ABC News: Greg Nelson)

But brumby numbers have not declined in Kosciuszko National Park.

Survey data collected by the Australian Alps Liaison Committee last year found the population was booming; up from around 5,000 in 2014 to 20,000.

“The problem has just gotten bigger,” Mr Swain said.

And the two sides of the debate are still very much at odds, with Mr Swain and his family’s property often being the target of vandals.

“The behaviour of the pro-feral crowd is disgusting, and Barilaro’s created this,” he added.

Alan Lanyon, the president of the Snowy Mountains Brumby Sustainability and Management Group, has been defending the plight of the brumbies for decades.

“The Snowy brumbies are part of our cultural heritage and the history of the mountains,” Mr Lanyon said.

An older man wearing a red cap stands at a farm gate with a brown horse.
Alan Lanyon believes the brumbies are an important part of Australia’s history and need to be protected — not culled.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

It’s not often Mr Lanyon and Mr Swain see eye to eye, but he agreed there was little harmony or agreement between those on opposing sides of the brumby debate.

“It is a war,” Mr Lanyon said.

“We’ve challenged a lot of the scientific facts they put out there and proved them to be wrong.

“Sadly, at the end of the day, Kosciuszko National Park suffers because we can’t get a broad consensus on any particular issue.”

A pack of six brumbies standing in an open plan within Kosciuszko National Park.
Some people argue the hard-hooved animals are destroying the unique alpine ecosystem.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

Impact of the bushfires

Last month Mr Barilaro called for a halt to the planned removal of wild horses from three sensitive areas within the park in July, claiming it would be “reckless” to remove horses without an additional survey after the summer’s bushfire season.

But Professor Geoff Hope, a scientist at the Australian National University, said aerial surveys had shown few brumbies were directly impacted by the bushfires.

“The horses mostly outran the fires,” Professor Hope said.

“And there was a substantial amount of rain afterwards and a lot of re-sprouting, which would have stopped them from going hungry, so the horse numbers haven’t significantly dropped.”

An older man wearing purple glasses and a beanie, standing on a plain in Kosciuszko National Park.
Professor Geoff Hope has grave concerns for a number of native species under threat because of alarmingly high wild horse numbers.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

And that concerns Professor Hope gravely.

“With these really high densities of horses, we’re seeing streamlines change, swamps being trampled in and the whole landscape becoming more like a grazing paddock,” he said.

“The trampling affects things like the alpine spiny crayfish and the corroboree frog, as well as animals like the smoky mouse.

“And the horses are out-grazing a lot of the grazers, that’s the small wallabies and larger kangaroos.

A crayfish claw sits in a puddle with flattened reeds in Kosciuszko National Park.
The alpine spiny crayfish is one native species experts say is under threat because of booming brumby numbers.(ABC News: Greg Nelson)

A tourist drawcard

For people living in small towns in and around the Snowy Mountains, there seems to be agreement that brumby numbers in Kosciuszko National Park are too high.

What they don’t agree on, though, is what to do about them.

A smiling woman with brown hair wearing a purple polo shirt and standing outside a bakery.
Linda Squire has lived in Adaminaby for 23 years and believes the brumbies bring a lot of tourists through the small town.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

“A lot of people come here to see the brumbies — they’re a tourist attraction,” Linda Squire, who has lived in Adaminaby for 23 years, said.

“I do think they need to reduce them but not by aerial shooting or shooting of any kind: they shouldn’t suffer.”

Scott O’Brien, who owns a property near Cooma, spends a lot of time exploring the national park.

“I work with a lot of international tourists, and a lot of them come to Australia for the native wildlife,” Mr O’Brien said.

“Horses are beautiful, spirited animals but they’re not native — you can see them anywhere.

A young man wearing an Akubra, sitting at a table in a park with a coffee and his laptop.
Scott O’Brien spends a lot of time exploring Kosciuszko National Park.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

For Mr Swain, there is no question: “We should be using every tool in the toolbox to reduce numbers, including aerial culling.”

Professor Hope agreed.

“The numbers are now at the point where it’s acknowledged that we can’t rehome them all and trapping is very expensive — up to $1,200 a horse — and the maximum trap rate, when it occurs, is about 1,000 horses per year,” he said.

“We need to remove, on our present population estimates, around 4,000 horses a year.

“I’m afraid we’re going to have to go into more direct control methods and naturally, shooting horses is much cheaper and can be done pretty efficiently.”

Mr Lanyon disputes the population estimates, the evidence of damage in Kosciuszko National Park and the need for greater control methods.

A brown brumby with a blond mane stands in the sun in Kosciuszko National Park.
Many Australians consider the high country brumbies to be a national icon, immortalised by Banjo Patterson.(ABC Riverina: Rosie King)

Where to from here?

Given the bitter division that remains in New South Wales and the legal battle raging in Victoria to stop 600 brumbies from being shot in the Alpine National Park, Mr Swain believes it is time for the Federal Government to intervene and develop a national brumby management plan.

“It’s definitely time for the Federal Government to step in, follow the science and do what’s right for this country,” he said.

“We have an opportunity to have a feral-free Australia — we’re an island.

“Future generations will hold us to account for the decisions we’re making now,” Mr Swain said.

Two brown wild horses stand among the trees in Kosciuszko National Park.
A survey of Kosciuszko National Park last year estimated the brumby population had hit around 20,000.(ABC News: Greg Nelson)

Mr Barilaro does not agree Commonwealth intervention is needed and neither does Mr Lanyon.

“We’ve always had an open-door policy on this side, but they retreat behind the wall of so-called scientific fact.”



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Merkel condemns ‘abhorrent’ Stuttgart rampage


Berlin (AFP) – German Chancellor Angela Merkel sharply condemned as “abhorrent” a rampage in Stuttgart where hundreds of partygoers brutally attacked police officers, her spokesman said Monday, as concerns grow that law enforcers are increasingly treated with contempt.

Hundreds of people unleashed a riot of an “unprecedented scale” in the early hours of Sunday in the city centre of Stuttgart, attacking police and plundering stores after smashing shop windows.

Two dozen people, half of them German nationals, were arrested provisionally, as police reported at least 19 colleagues hurt

“Whoever has done this has turned against their city, against the people with whom they live and against the laws that protect us all,” Merkel’s spokesman Steffen Seibert said of the riots that erupted over the weekend.

Tensions had built up shortly after midnight when officers carried out checks on a 17-year-old German male suspected of using drugs, Stuttgart deputy police chief Thomas Berger said.

Crowds milling around the city’s biggest square, the Schlossplatz, immediately rallied around the young man and began flinging stones and bottles at police.

The groups of mostly men also used sticks or poles to smash windows of police vehicles on the square, which is next to the regional parliament of Baden-Wuerttemberg as well as the state’s finance ministry.

At the height of the hours-long clashes, as many as 500 people joined in the battle against police officers and rescue workers.

Interior Minister Horst Seehofer travelled to the city on Monday. He paused at a police vehicle with its windows smashed out as he took stock of the trail of destruction.

Calling the violence a “sign of alarm for the rule of law,” Seehofer said the perpetrators must be prosecuted and punished as “punishment is the best means of prevention”.

– Contempt –

He also pointed to the worrying trend that police and emergency workers were increasingly coming under attack, both physically and verbally.

“Besides the attacks and insults, there is also disparagement — and that can hurt just like physical violence,” he said, stressing that politicians must stand behind the police.

In a speech on Monday, President Frank-Walter Steinmeier sent the same message.

“We must resolutely oppose anyone who attacks police officers, who shows contempt for them or gives the impression that they should be ‘disposed of’,” he said.

Police unions and emergency workers have been warning of authorities increasingly coming under attack as they go about their work.

Tensions have also spilled over from the Black Lives Matter demonstrations in the United States where officers are accused of being racist.

In a separate incident in Germany’s Lower Saxony state, several police officers were injured while enforcing a coronavirus quarantine imposed on 700 residents of a high-rise building.

And the police union DPolG has filed a lawsuit against a columnist of left-leaning daily TAZ over an article titled: “All cops are unfit for the job”.

On Monday, Seehofer said he too was considering filing a complaint against the writer, warning that irresponsible speech can lead to dramatic consequences.



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Nurse assaulted in ‘abhorrent’ spitting attack in Adelaide while walking to work


A woman has been arrested for assaulting an emergency worker after she allegedly spat on an Adelaide nurse who was walking to work on Tuesday morning.

Police said the 42-year-old woman spat a drink over the nurse, who was wearing blue scrubs, as she walked along Hindley Street in Adelaide’s CBD about 7:30am yesterday.

Her alleged attacker, who is homeless, was arrested and charged with assaulting a prescribed emergency worker.

“We are resolute in taking action against any incidents where emergency services workers, including health workers are assaulted in this way,” SA Police Commissioner Grant Stevens said today.

The incident was revealed by Commissioner Stevens at a media conference on coronavirus restrictions easing in South Australia.

SA Police Commissioner Grant Stevens described the incident as “abhorrent”.(ABC News: Nick Harmsen)

The woman did not apply for bail and appeared in the Adelaide Magistrates Court yesterday.

South Australia created the specific offence of assaulting an emergency worker in October last year.

It carries a maximum penalty of five years in jail for the basic offence, and 15 years in jail for intentionally causing harm.

In March, a woman was arrested after allegedly speeding through a South Australian border checkpoint and coughing on two police officers.

Last month, a Whyalla man was charged with aggravated assault of an emergency worker after he allegedly told a police officer he had the coronavirus and then coughed in the officer’s face.

The law has since been amended to include a presumption against bail for those charged during the state’s coronavirus emergency declaration.



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