Panic attacks – The “gay-panic” defence remains legally admissible in 39 American states | United States




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Erdoğan insists Turkey is part of Europe, but won’t tolerate ‘attacks’ – POLITICO



Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said he sees Turkey as part of Europe, but stressed that Ankara will not give in to “attacks” and “double standards,” amid months of tensions with Brussels.

“We see ourselves as an inseparable part of Europe … However this does not mean that we will bow down to overt attacks to our country and nation, veiled injustices and double standards,” Erdoğan said Sunday in a speech to members of his AK Party, according to Reuters.

He added in more conciliatory remarks that “we do not believe that we have any problems with countries or institutions that cannot be solved through politics, dialogue and negotiations.”

Turkey is still formally a candidate to become an EU member, although EU and foreign affairs ministers decided to effectively freeze accession talks in June 2018.

More recently, tensions between the EU and Ankara have been rising over Turkey’s drilling activities in the Eastern Mediterranean in search for natural gas in disputed waters also claimed by Greece and Cyprus. The EU earlier this month extended its sanctions by one year over what it described as “Turkey’s unauthorised drilling activities in the Eastern Mediterranean” and EU leaders will discuss whether to impose further sanctions at a meeting next month.

Further fueling the conflict, Erdoğan called last Sunday for a “two-state” solution in Cyprus during a high-profile visit to the Turkish-Cypriot north of the island, which has been divided since Turkey’s 1974 invasion.

The EU’s top diplomat Josep Borrell responded last Thursday, saying: “It is important that Turkey understands that its behavior is widening its separation from the European Union.”





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Seek puts short attacks behind it as investors applaud sunnier outlook


“We feel new guidance could still be conservative based on the strength of current listings momentum,” he said.

Mr Choi said earnings upgrades for the following financial years could be more moderate as he suspects part of the current upside is a “pull-forward” reflecting a return to pre-COVID volumes of job ads in Australia.

Meanwhile, Morgans analysts said the latest revenue upgrade from Seek helps to address concerns about debt leverage. More importantly, Morgan’s Anthony Porto said it demonstrates the growth potential of the company’s Australian operations.

“The insinuation that the core business is low growth doesn’t stack up in the near term at least, with a rebound in economic conditions post-COVID, and a yield improvement in the ANZ business, driving solid bottom line growth,” he said.

Blue Orca is yet to comment on the latest guidance from Seek. Last month the short seller said Seek’s shares could be worth as little as $7.20, alleging that Seek was using debt to hide the lacklustre performance of its businesses.

“Rather than valuing Seek as a fast-growing online recruiting platform, we value Seek for what it is — a slow or no-growth platform whose core business is shrinking and which carries a dangerous amount of debt,” the original report stated.

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Seek has refuted the allegations, with chief executive Andrew Bassat and company chairman Graham Goldsmith both labelling Blue Orca’s report inaccurate.

Morgan’s Mr Porto added that the potential sale of a stake in Zhaopin could be another catalyst for the recent rise in Seek’s share price, which last traded at $25.55.

He said a sale could introduce a strategic partner to help drive Zhaopin’s growth, but just as importantly, it would “provide external validation of the Zhaopin business model and valuation”.



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Australian officials respond angrily to fresh attacks from Chinese diplomat


Australian officials have responded angrily after a Chinese diplomat in Canberra reeled off a long list of grievances and perceived slights in a fresh attack on the Federal Government.

Late Tuesday, Nine Newspapers reported that an anonymous Chinese official had provided it with a document laying out more than a dozen complaints against Australia.

Many of the allegations have been previously made by Chinese officials in recent months.

The document says Australia has unfairly blocked Chinese investment, spread “disinformation” about China’s efforts to contain coronavirus, falsely accused Beijing of cyber-attacks, and engaged in “incessant wanton interference” in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Xinjiang.

It also lambasts the Federal Government’s decision to ban Huawei from 5G networks and criticises Australia’s push against foreign interference, accusing it of “recklessly” seizing the property of Chinese journalists and allowing federal MPs to issue “outrageous condemnation of the governing party of China”.

The relationship between China and Australia has nose-dived this year.

Beijing has hit several Australian exports with sanctions and has made thinly veiled warnings that more products will be targeted.

On Tuesday, China also responded angrily to a new defence pact between Australia and Japan.

But Australia is increasingly concerned by incessant cyber-attacks emanating from China, as well as what it believes are persistent attempts by the Chinese Government to interfere in domestic Australian politics.

A defence pact between Australia and Japan, agreed to by the prime ministers, upset China.(ABC News: Yumi Asada)

The Chinese embassy’s decision to hand the list to the media seems designed to ratchet up the pressure on Australia to make concessions on key issues.

Nine Newspapers reported that the Chinese embassy official said Australia might be able to repair its relationship with China if it changed some of its listed positions.

But the list drew a contemptuous response from some Australian officials. One told the ABC that it was a “very familiar recitation of grievances and false statements.”

Decisions made in the national interest, Government says

The Federal Government believes the complaints are unreasonable and misrepresent Australia’s position.

It also believes that the list shows Australia has done nothing to deliberately inflame ties with Beijing, but has simply stood by its principles and sovereignty.

The Government maintains there are sound national security reasons for blocking Huawei and stopping some investments from mainland China.

It believes Australia’s push for an independent inquiry into the COVID-19 outbreak was justified, and it has every right to publicly state its concerns about human rights abuses in China.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison told Channel Nine the Government would not compromise on its foreign investment or interference laws.

“In that list you would’ve seen the media and freely elected politicians apparently aren’t allowed to speak their minds, well, we won’t be changing that in Australia either,” he said.

“We’ll continue to be ourselves, we’ll stand up for our national interests, but we’ll engage with our partners respectfully.”

Trade Minister Simon Birmingham said he and his colleagues remained willing to speak to their Chinese counterparts about the relationship between the two countries.

“I’m not going to respond to nameless allegations that are being made by alleged officials,” he said.

“What I will do is reinforce from the Australian perspective, we value the bilateral relationship, we seek to have a mutually beneficial one.”

Former diplomat and Liberal MP Dave Sharma echoed Senator Birmingham’s calls for a “constructive relationship” with China.

“Recognising that we share some important interests and should work together on these, whilst acknowledging that we have significant differences,” he said.

“Exchanging lists of grievances is playground diplomacy, and not a constructive way forward.”

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The head of the National Security College, Rory Medcalf, said on Twitter that the latest tactic deployed by the Chinese Government was “unfortunate” and ineffective.

“Face matters in this country too.”

Labor senator Penny Wong said Australia “should always stand up for our values and assert our interests”.

She argued everyone must hold others to account over international commitments, but that Australia “cannot decouple” with China.

“It’s in our interests to engage and to foster a respectful relationship,” she said.

“That is obviously not helped by inflammatory comments that put domestic political interest before the national interest.”

A spokesperson for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said the Government made decisions in the national interest.

“We are a liberal democratic society with a free media and a parliamentary democracy, where elected members and media are entitled to freely express their views,” the spokesperson said.

“The Australian Government is always ready to talk directly in a constructive fashion about Australia’s relationship with China, including about our differences, and to do so directly between our political leaders.

“Such direct dialogue enables misrepresentation of Australia’s positions to be addressed in a constructive manner that enables our mutually beneficial relationship.”

Meanwhile Chinese state media is continuing to berate Australia.

Earlier this month the China Daily warned Australia would “pay tremendously for its misjudgement”.

Late yesterday, Xinhua also joined the chorus, warning Australia that its “ideological prejudice” was “poisoning relations between China and Australia.”

“For these China-bashers it is imperative to reflect on their words and deeds that have caused setback in the bilateral ties,” it said.



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George Soros Finally Responds To Insane Right-Wing Attacks – Jewish Business News


George Soros Finally Responds To Insane Right-Wing Attacks

The attacks on George Soros range from claiming that he was a Nazi collaborator who turned over Jews to the Germans during World War II to saying that he funds Antifa

George Soros Screen Shot from Soros

A new documentary about George Soros is being released titled simply “Soros.” The Daily Beast published an exclusive excerpt from the film in which Soros finally answers the people who slander him as both a Nazi and a communist.

The clip also shows a compilation of news channel celebrity hosts repeating such slanders on the air.

The attacks on George Soros range from claiming that he was a Nazi collaborator who turned over Jews to the Germans during World War II to saying that he funds Antifa. Soros was only fourteen years old when the war ended. Other more recent attacks have accused him of being behind a cabal which somehow “stole” the election from President Trump.

Even Newt Gingrich recently appeared on Fox News to promote the lie that George Soros funded some sort of left-wing conspiracy which brought down President Trump from behind the scenes.

Soros, a Holocaust survivor from Hungary, moved to England after World War II where he gained an education at the London School of Economics. George Soros then worked his way up from an entry level position with a bank.

In fact in the trailer for “Soros” George Soros himself says, “I chose the west because I sought freedom, and to make money.”


His is a Horatio Alger type rags to riches story. But he is also a Jew. Could that perhaps be the reason why he is so scorned? Does a rich Jew in America need to be a supporter of conservative causes to avoid such scorn?

So how does George Soros himself explain this? In the clip he says, “The fact that I have become involved in so many different issues, and have taken controversial positions, is now actually working against me.”

Robert Soros, when asked how he feels about the way that his father is treated, answers, “He’s become demonized by one community because he’s synonymous with liberal causes.”

In the clip journalist Nadine Epstein talks about what happened when she attended a conference on anti-Semitism. Apparently someone asked the panelists why they had not discussed why George Soros is a Nazi. According to Epstein half the people in the audience then applauded.

Soros is having an exclusive on line premiere tonight at 8 PM Eastern Standard Time. Immediately following the film will be an exclusive panel discussion. The panel will include Jesse Dylan, the film’s director.

About the movie:

Billionaire activist George Soros is one of the most influential and controversial figures of our time. Famous for betting against the Bank of England in 1992 and making a billion dollars in one day, he is maligned by ideologues on both the left and the right for daring to tackle the world’s problems and putting his money behind his fight – from free elections and freedom of the press to civil rights for minorities. With unprecedented access to the man and his inner circle, American director Jesse Dylan follows Soros across the globe and pulls back the curtain on his personal history, private wealth, and public activism. Soros reveals a complicated genius whose experience as a Jew during the Holocaust gave rise to a lifelong crusade against authoritarianism and hate.


Read more about: George Soros






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Australian officials respond angrily to fresh attacks from Chinese diplomats


Australian officials have responded angrily after a Chinese diplomat in Canberra launched a fresh attack on the Federal Government, reeling off a long list of grievances and perceived slights.

Late Tuesday, Nine Newspapers reported that an anonymous Chinese official had provided it with a document laying out more than a dozen complaints against Australia.

Many of the allegations have been previously made by Chinese officials in recent months.

The document says Australia has unfairly blocked Chinese investment, spread “disinformation” about China’s efforts to contain coronavirus, falsely accused Beijing of cyber-attacks, and engaged in “incessant wanton interference” in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Xinjiang.

It also lambasts the Federal Government’s decision to ban Huawei from 5G networks and criticises Australia’s push against foreign interference, accusing it of “recklessly” seizing the property of Chinese journalists and allowing Federal MPs to issue “outrageous condemnation of the governing party of China”.

The relationship between China and Australia has nose-dived this year.

Beijing has hit several Australian exports with sanctions and has made thinly-veiled warnings that more products will be targeted.

On Tuesday, China also responded angrily to a new defence pact between Australia and Japan.

But Australia is increasingly concerned by incessant cyber-attacks emanating from China, as well as what it believes are persistent attempts by the Chinese Government to interfere in domestic Australian politics.

A defence pact between Australia and Japan, agreed to by the prime ministers, upset China.(ABC News: Yumi Asada)

The Chinese Embassy’s decision to hand the list to the media seems designed to ratchet up the pressure on Australia to make concessions on key issues.

Nine Newspapers reported that the Chinese embassy official said Australia might be able to repair its relationship with China if it changed some of its listed positions.

But the list drew a contemptuous response from some Australian officials. One told the ABC that it was a “very familiar recitation of grievances and false statements.”

Decisions made in the national interest

The Federal Government believes the complaints are unreasonable and misrepresent Australia’s position.

It also believes that the list shows Australia has done nothing to deliberately inflame ties with Beijing but has simply stood by its principles and sovereignty.

The Government maintains there are sound national security reasons for blocking Huawei and stopping some investments from the mainland.

It believes Australia’s push for an independent inquiry into the COVID-19 outbreak was justified, and it has every right to publicly state its concerns about human rights abuses in China.

The head of the National Security College, Rory Medcalf, said on Twitter that the latest tactic deployed by the Chinese Government was “unfortunate” and ineffective.

“Face matters in this country too.”

Loading

A spokesperson for the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said the Government made decisions in the national interest.

“We are a liberal democratic society with a free media and a parliamentary democracy, where elected members and media are entitled to freely express their views,” the spokesperson said.

“The Australian Government is always ready to talk directly in a constructive fashion about Australia’s relationship with China, including about our differences, and to do so directly between our political leaders.

“Such direct dialogue enables misrepresentation of Australia’s positions to be addressed in a constructive manner that enables our mutually beneficial relationship.”

Meanwhile Chinese state media is continuing to berate Australia.

Earlier this month the China Daily warned Australia would “pay tremendously for its misjudgement”.

Late yesterday, Xinhua also joined the chorus, warning Australia that its “ideological prejudice” was “poisoning relations between China and Australia.”

“For these China-bashers it is imperative to reflect on their words and deeds that have caused setback in the bilateral ties,” it said.



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Judge not, that ye be not judged – Ukraine’s constitutional court attacks anti-corruption laws | Europe




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Saudi Prince Vows ‘Iron Fist’ Against Extremists After Attacks


Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman pledged Thursday to strike extremists with an “iron fist”, after a bombing against a gathering of Western diplomats was claimed by the Islamic State group.

The bomb blast struck a World War I commemoration at a non-Muslim cemetery in Jeddah on Wednesday, just two weeks after a guard at the French consulate in the Red Sea city was wounded by a knife-wielding Saudi citizen.

The attacks, which underscore Muslim fury over French satirical cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, come as Saudi Arabia prepares for the G20 leaders’ summit later this month — the first to be hosted by an Arab nation.

“We will continue to confront any extremist… behaviour and ideas,” Prince Mohammed said in an address to the Shura Council, the top government advisory body.

“We will continue to strike with an iron fist against all those who want to harm our security and stability,” he said, according to the transcript of his speech published by the official Saudi Press Agency.

Prince Mohammed, the kingdom’s de facto ruler, warned those seeking to carry out jihadist acts of a “painful and severe punishment”.

Wednesday’s attack in Jeddah left at least two people wounded, including a Greek policeman and a Saudi official.





A technician takes measures of a window with bullet holes at the Embassy of Saudi Arabia in The Hague, after it has been shot at on November 12, 2020
 ANP / Lex van LIESHOUT

A British citizen was also believed to have been wounded.

Diplomats from France, Greece, Italy, Britain and the United States attended the Armistice Day commemoration ceremony in Jeddah, their embassies said.

The Islamic State group on Thursday claimed responsibility for the bombing, saying it was to protest the cartoons printed by the satirical French magazine Charlie Hebdo.

A statement by IS’s propaganda arm Amaq said the attack “primarily targeted the French consul”.

The group offered no evidence of its involvement.

In a separate incident on Thursday, Dutch police arrested a man after multiple shots were fired at the Saudi embassy in The Hague, causing damage but no injuries.

It was not clear whether the incident, which the Saudi government condemned as “cowardly”, was linked to the attacks in the kingdom.



A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on November 12, 2020, shows Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attending a video meeting with the Shura council in the capital Riyadh


A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on November 12, 2020, shows Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attending a video meeting with the Shura council in the capital Riyadh
 Saudi Royal Palace / Bandar AL-JALOUD

The French embassy in Riyadh, meanwhile, has urged its nationals in Saudi Arabia to exercise “extreme vigilance”.

The warning followed an attack at the Jeddah consulate on October 29, the same day a knife-wielding man killed three people at a church in Nice in southern France.

French President Emmanuel Macron has vigorously defended the right to publish cartoons, but he has also tried to assuage Muslim fury over his remarks.

Macron’s stance has prompted protests in several countries at which portraits of France’s president were burnt, and a campaign to boycott French products.

Saudi Arabia — home to Islam’s holiest sites — has criticised the cartoons, saying it rejected “any attempt to link Islam and terrorism”.

In his speech, Prince Mohammed said he hopes “the world will stop attacking religious symbols under the slogan of freedom of expression” as that creates a “fertile environment for extremism and terrorism”.

Saudi Arabia, long accused of exporting its ultra-conservative Wahhabist Sunni doctrine around the world, is itself a victim of domestic terror attacks.

Prince Mohammed, who pledged in 2017 to return Saudi Arabia to an “open, moderate Islam”, has sought to roll back the influence of the ultra-conservative religious establishment.

“Extremism is no longer tolerated in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia,” Prince Mohammed said in his speech.

The heir to the Saudi throne has curbed the influence of the once-powerful religious police, as he permits mixed-gender music concerts, cinemas and other entertainment options that appeal to a majority young population.

But simultaneously, the prince has launched a sweeping crackdown on dissent and free speech, arresting women activists, clerics and journalists as well as royal family members.

Saudi Arabia is also grappling with a sharp coronavirus-led economic downturn, which has triggered unpopular austerity measures, including the tripling of its value added tax and the suspension of a monthly allowance to state employees.

While acknowledging the “great pain” caused by the austerity drive, Prince Mohammed spoke of government efforts to tackle high unemployment and fight rampant corruption.





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In rural Japan robot monster wolves are being used to keep bears out of towns, stopping potential attacks


The Japanese town of Takikawa has deployed robot “monster wolves” in an effort to scare away bears that have become an increasingly dangerous nuisance in the countryside.

Takikawa, located on the northern island of Hokkaido, purchased and installed a pair of the robots after bears were found roaming neighbourhoods in September.

City officials said that bears had become more active and dangerous as they search for food before going into hibernation in late November.

They also said a decrease of acorns and nuts in the wild this year may have driven the animals to venture closer to towns in search of sustenance.

The robot animals consist of a 65-centimetre-long, 50cm-tall body covered with realistic-looking fur, featuring huge white fangs and flashing red eyes.

When the sensors on them are triggered, the robot’s scare tactics kick into action.

The robot’s eyes light up red and it emits emitting a variety of sounds, some of which are ear-splintering.

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The sounds, of which there are over 60, are mixed up so animals such as bears do not get used to them and consistently remain in fear.

Machinery maker Ohta Seiki has sold about 70 units of the robot since 2018.

The company’s president, Yuji Ohta, has previously said the monster wolf is a deterrent for bears.

Wild bears have recently become a problem as they wander into rural Japanese towns.(Flickr: Michelle Bender)

“We have included many methods in its design to drive off bears, so I am confident it will be effective. If this can help create an environment that bears and people can both live in, I will be happy.”

For Takikawa, with its population of around 41,000 people, it appears the monster wolves are working like a charm.

City officials said there have been no bear encounters since the wolves were deployed.

However, bear sightings in the rural areas of western and northern Japan are at a five-year high, national broadcaster NHK has reported.

And there have been dozens of attacks so far in 2020, two of them fatal, prompting the Government to convene an emergency meeting last month to address the threat they pose.

The real Japanese wolf roamed the central and northern islands of the country before being hunted to extinction more than a century ago.

Reuters/ABC



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Brexit: Government suffers huge defeats as top Tories join attacks on ‘ridiculous and immoral’ bill | Politics News


The House of Lords has voted to remove parts of the government’s Brexit legislation that ministers have admitted will allow them to break international law.

In two votes, peers voted overwhelmingly (433 votes to 165, majority 268, and 407 votes to 148, majority 259) to strip out the controversial clauses in the UK Internal Market Bill.

The government has already vowed to reinstate them when the legislation returns to the Commons.

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Brexit: UK open to ‘2-3 year’ fishing deal

Reacting to the defeats, a government spokesperson said: “We are disappointed that the House of Lords has voted to remove clauses from the UK Internal Market Bill, which was backed in the House of Commons by 340 votes to 256 and delivers on a clear Conservative manifesto commitment.

“We will retable these clauses when the bill returns to the Commons.

“We’ve been consistently clear that the clauses represent a legal safety net to protect the integrity of the UK’s internal market and the huge gains of the peace process.”

The bill, which has been condemned by critics both in Westminster and abroad, seeks to allow ministers to override the Withdrawal Agreement signed with the EU.

Former prime minister Sir John Major said the legislation had “damaged our reputation around the world”.

“Lawyers everywhere are incredulous that the UK – often seen as the very cradle of the Rule of Law – could give themselves the power to break the law,” he added.

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Will Biden’s presidency affect Brexit talks?

Speaking in the chamber earlier, former Tory leader Lord Howard said the UK would be setting a “lamentable example” if it breaks international law.

Lord Clarke, a former chancellor, said the legislation was “immoral”, describing it as “intrinsically ridiculous and deeply damaging”.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Fox joined the criticism, telling the Lords: “A law-breaking government might have impressed President Trump.

“But when there is an Irish-American president in waiting, this bill is not a good look.”

Lord Falconer, a Labour peer and former lord chancellor, also warned over the impact of the US election result.

He said: “If these clauses were ever used they would be guaranteeing, as president-elect Biden has said, that the UK would go to the bottom of the pecking order with the US in Europe.

“Popular UK to Billy no-mates, all in 10 weeks from the 8th of September.”

Lord Newby, leader of the Lib Dems in the Lords, said the upper chamber was “within its constitutional right” to remove the clauses.

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“If we can’t take a view on a matter of deliberate law-breaking by the government we may as well pack up our bags now.”

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said a “primary function” of the Lords is to “defend the rule of law and to protect the balances of power and peace in our Union”.

As a result, he said the move by peers would have his “unqualified support”.

The fresh parliamentary row over the legislation is likely to again be closely watched in the US, where president-elect Joe Biden has previously warned about Northern Ireland’s Good Friday Agreement becoming a “casualty” of Brexit.

The Financial Times has reported Mr Biden will stress this point during his first call with Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the coming days.

Speaking to Sky News earlier, Environment Secretary George Eustice said the government would stand firmly behind its legislation.



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