Australia’s most wanted streets revealed


What Aussies want in their dream homes has become as varied as anytime in recent memory as house hunters ratchet up their search in increasingly uncertain times.

According to a fascinating look into Australia’s most popular streets, today’s home buyers are searching for big blocks, bargains, luxury and sentimentality as the key drivers to discover the abode they desire.

Search data from the last three years provided by realestate.com.au has revealed Australia’s most wanted streets and a window into the mind of buyers.

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In Sydney, the exclusive eastern suburbs have a lion’s share of the most popular streets, in Adelaide, the Adelaide Hills dominate, in Brisbane, the inner city suburbs bordered by the Brisbane River are highly sought-after and in Melbourne, many of the blue chips also areas dominate.

So what is motivating buyers in searching for their perfect street?

“There is a certain percentage of those searching, that are sticking beaking and want to check out certain homes and certain streets,” realestate.com.au chief economist Nerida Conisbee said.

“That is only one part of it though. Often those streets in those suburbs are particularly nice, even for those affluent areas. They might have a much better view, nicer houses or something else desirable that tends to lead to higher levels of interest.

“It might be close to the water, or be on a big block or have something unique about it.

“In some cases affordability is the key.”

There is also the aspiration lure of the big name streets that we come to know in the cities we live.

“If you have lived in these cities you get to know these streets,” Ms Conisbee said.

“They are aspirational. There are good schools close by and there is a lifestyle available there that people want.”

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And if you want to buy in these streets, or you have a home to sell you can expect a premium price.

“You’re going to be up against more competition in these streets,” Ms Conisbee said.

“As a result of that you will likely pay a higher price than for houses in other less popular streets in the same suburb.”

AUSTRALIA’S MOST POPULAR STREETS

SYDNEY

1. Tivoli Ave, Rose Bay

2. Jane Pl, Dural

3. Pacific St, Watsons Bay

4. Caloola Pl, Baulkham Hills

5. Carrara Rd, Vaucluse

6. Pioneer Pl, Castle Hill

7. Mitala St, Newport

8. Shellbank Pde, Cremorne

9. Martin Rd, Centennial Park

10. Carters Rd, Dural

MELBOURNE

1. Fairview Ave, Wheelers Hill

2. Regent St, Elsternwick

3. Barnard Rd, Toorak

4. Agnes Ave, Balwyn North

5. Jayson Ave, Eltham

6. Trindall Pl, Taylors Lakes

7. Belvedere, Kew

8. Bromham Pl, Richmond

9. Amberley Way, Lower Plenty

10. Kent Hughes Rd, Eltham

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BRISBANE

1. Ramsay Rd, Clear Mountain

2. Bridgeman Rd, Bridgeman Downs

3. West Mount Cotton Rd, Cornubia

4. Lisk St, Pullenvale

5. Becker Pl, Mount Ommaney

6. Banek Pl, Everton Park

7. Sutherland Ave, Ascot

8. Molonga Tce, Graceville

9. Jaora St, Graceville

10. Eatons Crossing Rd, Draper

ADELAIDE

1. Nation Ridge Rd, Aldgate

2. Carrick Hill Dr, Springfield

3. Sturt Valley Rd, Stirling

4. Laurel Rd, Stirling

5. Waverley Ridge Rd, Crafers West

6. Glades Lane, Aldgate

7. Howard Dr, Stirling

8. Prescott Tce, Rose Park

9. James Rd, Belair

10. Norton Summit Rd, Norton Summit



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Australia’s Hearing Services – 16 News


The Australian Government is committed to supporting Australians who are hard of hearing through improvements to its hearing services.

The social and economic impacts of hearing loss are significant, and it is vital the Hearing Services Program continues to keep pace with demand and improvements in technology.

As the nation’s population ages, the impact of hearing loss could double, with 7.8 million Australians predicted to be affected in 2060.

In order to address the challenges faced by Australians who are hard of hearing, the Commonwealth is working with State and Territory authorities to implement the 2019 Roadmap for Hearing Health and delivering investment and reforms that align with the Roadmap, including:

  • The national rollout of innovative hearing screening tools for primary health care clinics in remote areas, through a collaboration between Hearing Australia and the Royal Flying Doctors Service
  • The development of nationally consistent clinical standards for paediatric audiology and teleaudiology by the Ear Science Institute and Audiology Australia
  • Roll-out of a free sign language interpreting service for senior Australians, being delivered by Auslan Connections
  • Funding the National Acoustic Laboratory to examine the clinical and economic benefits of upgrading sound processors in clients aged over 65
  • A review of the Minimum Hearing Loss Threshold used under the Hearing Services Program, also being undertaken by the National Acoustic Laboratory

Minister Coulton reiterated his desire for the Government’s hearing services to be fit-for-purpose, client-focussed, and prepared for the future.

“The client must sit front and centre when we consider how best to deliver the services Australians need.

“Technology is changing, markets are changing, and our population is changing.

“If we are to ensure the best future for all Australians we must identify and address the barriers faced by all Australians in accessing services,” said Minister Coulton.

“It is therefore necessary and timely to conduct a review of settings in the Hearing Services Program.”

The Hearing Services Review, which will examine settings within the Hearing Services Program to ensure its continued performance, will be conducted by an expert panel consisting of Professor Michael Woods and Dr Zena Burgess PhD.

“Both Prof Woods and Dr Burgess bring with them a wealth of experience and understanding and having discussed the Review with them, they are ready and will launch into their work,” Minister Coulton said.

“I encourage all stakeholders, both within and beyond the sector, to contribute to this review to ensure it is informed with the most conclusive evidence it possibly can.”

This review is part of a suite of efforts underway to improve the lives of Australians who are hard of hearing, regardless where.

The Hearing Services Review is underway and will deliver its findings to Government in July 2021.

Further information about the review – including its Terms of Reference – is available at www.health.gov.au/hearing-review



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Australia’s powerful new supercomputer Gadi given Ngunnawal name in tribute to Canberra’s first people


Researchers are now making use of the Australian National University’s new supercomputer, Gadi, one of the most powerful of its kind and the most powerful in the southern hemisphere.

Gadi, based at the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI), was unveiled this week after a few months of early operation, described by the university as a “recognised powerhouse in the global supercomputing ranking”.

The supercomputer, which operates 24/7 for 360 days a year, uses the same amount of electricity as it takes to power a medium-sized suburb.

It is also significant for its name, which means ‘to search for’ in the language of the Ngunnawal people, the traditional custodians of the land where the university is located in Canberra.

Supercomputer symbolises a ‘gathering of knowledge’: ANU

The ANU said they chose the name in 2019, which the United Nations General Assembly declared the International Year of Indigenous Languages, to raise awareness of the “crucial role Indigenous languages play in people’s daily lives and culture”.

With a new supercomputer in the works that would become the most powerful in the southern hemisphere — and ranked 25th in the world — they decided to pay tribute to the Ngunnawal tradition of “searching for knowledge in the sky, water, stars and earth all around them”.

The name Gadi was chosen in consultation with the United Ngunnawal Elders Council.

Gadi, the NCI’s new supercomputer, features work by renowned Ngunnawal artist Lynnice Church.(Supplied)

Gadi was also adorned with its own artwork, hand-painted by renowned Ngunnawal artist Lynnice Church.

NCI director Professor Sean Smith said it was a “great honour … to have such a perfectly suited name and artwork as the face of Australia’s new supercomputer”.

“We are proud to be able to make this connection between the traditional owners of the Canberra region and its newest tool of scientific discovery,” he said.

Gadi sits 25th in world ranking

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.
A timelapse video shows the installation of the Gadi supercomputer.

The $70 million project to replace Gadi’s predecessor, Raijin, has lifted the supercomputer’s ranking from number 239 in the world to number 25.

Researchers have already been using the supercomputer for world-leading research since it first became available to some teams late last year, adapting their work to aim even higher.

They include the researchers behind an “industrial-strength” 24-hour build of a 4,012 human genome dataset for studies into cancer, diabetes, and heart disease.

ANU astronomers are also using their time with Gadi to better understand how stars form.

And a team of chemists has been incorporating the supercomputer into its search for a COVID-19 treatment since the pandemic forced them to turn away from their previous work on diabetes.

“We have over 5,000 users that rely on NCI’s unparalleled high-performance computer and data services to produce world-leading scientific research,” Professor Smith said.

“Gadi is, quite simply, a critical foundational infrastructure for Australia and Australian research.”

Supercomputer heralds improved climate forecasting

The rectangular grey NCI building, with steam billowing from the roof.
The NCI centre was designed to divert trapped heat emitted by the supercomputer to the top of the building.(Supplied: NCI)

Among the more than 5,000 individuals using the supercomputer — remotely from their offices — will be researchers from the Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO and Geoscience Australia.

Both CSIRO and Geoscience Australia will use the supercomputer to improve their systems aimed at predicting extreme weather patterns, including fires, earthquakes, tsunamis and cyclones.

The CSIRO’s executive director of Digital, National Facilities and Collections, Dave Williams, said having an asset like Gadi was “critical” for predicting Australia’s future.

He said its computational models would contribute to the CSIRO’s Decadal Climate Forecasting Project to produce “near-term” climate forecasts.

“The data that Gadi will process and analyse is collected here on Earth as well as by an increasing number of satellites orbiting our planet.”

Modelling could protect communities from bushfire: BOM

Kangaroo running from bushfire
It’s hoped the advance in supercomputer modelling will assist in helping predict bushfire behaviour.(ABC News: James Carmody)

The Bureau of Meteorology said they would use Gadi to create fire-atmospheric models in a bid to better understand how they might behave.

They hope its modelling will help them to better predict both the path of a fire and the spread of smoke, by representing the interactions between the heat of the fire, the release of moisture, and atmospheric circulations.

The Bureau’s Science and Innovation Chief Scientist and group executive Gilbert Brunet said the goal was to better protect communities and firefighters.

“Improvements such as those from the fire model and specific event case studies are used to better plan fire suppression operations, reduce risk to firefighters and assist the community in affected areas.”



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Electoral boundary redistribution could shake up South Australia’s 2022 state election


A redraw of South Australia’s electoral boundaries could see tighter margins in vulnerable Liberal-held seats, a major regional city split in two, and an independent MP jump to a neighbouring electorate.

The draft redistribution of the state’s electoral boundaries, released by the Electoral Boundaries Commission today, has proposed changes to all voting districts except for Mount Gambier.

The changes would directly affect about 240,000 voters.

Major adjustments include splitting the city of Port Augusta between the electorates of Giles and Stuart, and shifting the city of Port Pirie from the electorate of Frome into Stuart.

“The Government gains an advantage, in that Port Pirie has been transferred from Frome to Stuart, which means Geoff Brock, the independent, is now in a much safer Liberal seat,” ABC election analyst Antony Green said.

“That makes it much easier for the Liberal Party to win Stuart and Frome at the next election.”

Mr Brock, who has held the seat of Frome as an independent since 2009, said he was “frustrated and disappointed” with the proposed alteration, which would push Frome further south.

“I plan to run in Stuart for my own community,” he said of the 2022 election.

Geoff Brock, pictured in 2014, says he will still run but now faces an uphill battle.(ABC: Eloise Fuss)

He said the decision to split Port Augusta was an “insult to the people” of the city.

“I also think it is an insult to the Upper Spencer Gulf, to go from three representatives to two, irrespective of who they are,” he said.

The Member for Stuart, Energy and Mining Minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan, said he would comment once the final boundaries are decided.

“Before the last election, the draft boundaries announced were nothing like the actual final boundaries,” he said.

Marginal Liberal seats more vulnerable: Green

While the Liberals could benefit from those changes, the proposed boundary redraw could also pose other challenges for the Marshall Liberal government, Antony Green said.

The removal of the ‘fairness’ provision has sort of meant that rural electorates have been set closer to quota in terms of enrolments, and that flows through to the urban areas, and weakens a number of Liberal seats,” he said.

“The Government now has four seats [with margins of] under 4 per cent, as opposed to two seats under 4 per cent before the redistribution.”

Those four seats are King and Newland which include suburbs in Adelaide’s north, Elder in Adelaide’s inner south and the electorate of Adelaide itself.

A map showing South Australia's new electoral boundaries.
A map of South Australia’s proposed new electoral boundaries.(Supplied)

The same measure places Labor as having two seats at or under margins of 2 per cent: Mawson and Badcoe.

“There would be enough close seats here which the Government has to defend which the Labor Party would think, with a good campaign, it could win,” Green said.

“The results of the 2010 and 2014 election show the Labor Party has a very strong ability to run local campaigns to win seats.

But Green said the 2020 redistribution did not go anywhere near “deciding the next election” in 2022.

“The parties still have to win the seats on the boundaries that are drawn,” he said.

SA Liberal director Sascha Meldrum.
SA Liberal Party state director Sascha Meldrum.(Twitter)

State director of the SA Liberal Party Sascha Meldrum said today’s draft redistribution showed the party could achieve the “same result” in 2022 as it did in the 2018 election.

“The Liberal Party will immediately analyse the proposed boundaries and detail provided in the report and prepare a written response to the commission which is due next month.”

In a statement, Labor’s state secretary Reggie Martin said his party acknowledged “the commission has set the number of electors closer to the quota”.

“But we are disappointed that despite achieving 48 per cent of the state-wide vote, Labor only has 42 per cent of the seats on these draft boundaries,” he said.

Interested parties have until September 16 to give feedback on the draft report, after which the commission is expected to gazette the final boundaries in November.



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Opening Australia’s domestic borders a “priority”: tourism minister


CANBERRA, Aug. 13 (Xinhua) — Australian Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham has warned of repercussions for states and territories that keep their borders closed for longer than necessary.

Birmingham warned the state and territory governments on Thursday that their tourism industries will not receive federal assistance if they are affected by unnecessary border closures.

“State border restrictions need to be proportionate to the health risk and shouldn’t remain in place for one more day than they need to,” he told Nine Entertainment newspapers.

“If a state or territory border were to remain closed to a jurisdiction that had successfully suppressed the spread of COVID-19, then that state or territory government will need to be accountable to their tourism industry and will ultimately need to provide additional support.

“With our international borders expected to remain closed for the foreseeable future, our priority right now is getting Australians travelling to parts where we have successfully suppressed the spread of COVID-19.”

Domestic border closures have been a point of contention between state and federal governments since the beginning of the pandemic, with Birmingham and Prime Minister Scott Morrison repeatedly calling for them to be opened.

Strict border restrictions remain in place in Tasmania and Western Australia for travellers.

Michael Gunner, chief minister of the Northern Territory (NT), on Tuesday declared that the NT’s borders would remain closed to coronavirus-affected states for at least 18 months.

Tourism is the NT’s biggest employer with 11.8 percent of workers employed in the sector.

Simon Westaway, executive director of the Australian Tourism Industry Council (ATIC), said that confusion about domestic travel restrictions were a “handbrake” costing the industry billions of dollars.

“(There) now appears a genuine disconnect around how various governments are approaching what one hopes is a future pathway to reopening our internal borders,” he said.



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World Rugby boss Brett Gosper on Australia’s chances


“Coming to Australia puts us back on the Asian time zone and re-nourishes the importance of markets like Japan and other Asian markets that were created, in broadcast terms, during the 2019 World Cup,” Gosper said.

“You’ve got to look it in terms of what it could do for Australia but also what that time zone could do to build on what was created in 2019. That’s attractive for people evaluating this World Cup bid in Australia.

“We’ll have to see where broadcast values sit at the moment, they’re very centred in England and France. But Japan has become suddenly – or it was at the last World Cup – the third biggest (broadcast market), and it’s important that we sustain that broadcast market in Japan and Asia. So it will be interesting to see how the future evaluation and estimation of those revenues are.”

Australia will not know which nations it is up against until May next year when the formal bid compilation process starts, with World Rugby’s Council to vote on the bids a full year later in May 2022.

Rugby Australia’s bid team, headed by former Wallaby captain Phil Kearns, will have to win 27 of the 52 Council votes to secure the hosting rights.

Russia is its only declared rival at this stage, but will only be able to bid for the rights if the Court of Arbitration for Sport upholds its appeal against a four-year ban from international sport, handed down by the World Anti-Doping Authority late last year.

World Rugby boss Brett Gosper.

World Rugby boss Brett Gosper.Credit:PA

The CAS will hear Russia’s case in November, but Gosper said Russia’s interest was significant for the game either way.

“Russia is a former Olympic host, a former FIFA World Cup host, it is interesting that they see rugby as a major objective for the country,” he said.

“It’s an acknowledgement of the size of the Rugby World Cup now, but I think we need to take our time to see what is pronounced by CAS. There’s a while before this plays out so we have a timeline that will allow us to deal with that candidature at the time.”

World Rugby will award the 2027 and 2031 World Cups at the same time, as well as the 2025 and 2029 Women’s World Cups.

The United States and England’s RFU have declared their interest in hosting the world’s third biggest sporting event, but indicated they see 2031 as a more realistic prospect.

Gosper did not announce how the bid would be evaluated, but World Rugby sources indicated the governing body would scrap the board recommendation in favour of a two-step process of technical evaluation and Council vote – most likely held via secret ballot.

The change has not been confirmed but a streamlined process, with a World Rugby recommendation removed, could help avoiding the controversy that plagued the awarding of the 2023 World Cup.

The technical evaluation recommended South Africa win the hosting rights, the board endorsed the recommendation, but France won the rights in the Council vote, with Japan voting for the FFR.

If World Rugby does move to scrap the recommendation, it will essentially return the process to its political origins, placing as much pressure on Australia’s ability to win over hearts and minds as present a watertight commercial case.

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Rugby Australia chairman Hamish McLennan said it was time to bring the tournament to the southern hemisphere.

“With France set to host the next World Cup in 2023 and following previous editions in the United Kingdom and Japan in 2015 and 2019 respectively, we firmly believe that the World Cup in 2027 has to be in the southern hemisphere,” McLennan said.

“We have made significant headway in our preparation to bid for Rugby World Cup 2027, thanks in no small part to the support of the Australian Government to date.

“We look forward to working with World Rugby throughout the dialogue phase to develop a compelling business and delivery model. This is an exciting and important opportunity, not only for Rugby here in Australia, to ensure that hosting this tournament provides maximum economic stimulus to the country, as we continue to rebuild from the financial impact of COVID-19.”

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Canberra is expanding Australia’s biggest free public Wi-Fi network, but how many people use it?


Canberra has the country’s biggest free public Wi-Fi network, covering a larger combined area than similar networks in other cities.

It is about to get even bigger: the ACT Government is installing another 81 internet access points throughout the suburbs, adding to the existing 334.

But six years after the network was set up, far fewer people are actually using it — raising questions about its value.

Canberra’s mobile phone and laptop users were initially quick to embrace free Wi-Fi.

Within a year, almost 50,000 different devices were accessing the network each month.

Yet the number of Canberrans using the service had almost halved before the coronavirus outbreaks, as the cost of mobile internet fell.

The amount of data downloaded on the network also plummeted, even though people were using the web to share larger files, such as videos.

Anecdotally, the free service remains popular among school students and overseas tourists.

Free Wi-Fi ‘important for social equity’

ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr rejected the notion that the public Wi-Fi network was becoming redundant.

“Having the free network around the city has been an important part of our community-service provision for Canberrans.”

The Government has been spending about $500,000 a year on the service, which is supplied by telco iiNet, now owned by TPG.

As well as expanding the network, the Government says it will allow users to download 1 gigabyte of information a day, up from the current limit of 250 megabytes.

A woman smiles at the camera holding a card that reads 'CBRfree'.
The ACT’s then chief minister, Katy Gallagher, launches the network in 2014.(Facebook: SenKatyG)

Mr Barr said that money was “an important investment in digital connectivity”.

“It also supports local businesses in each of the precincts — it provides another reason for people to spend time in those precincts.”

The ACT’s free Wi-Fi access points are installed in town centres, light-rail stations and bus interchanges, and near some shopping centres, theatres, sports precincts and public gardens.

The expansion, which will take just under a year to complete, will extend the network in Gungahlin town centre, and provide access in 13 new suburbs as well as Belconnen’s basketball centre.

Expansion ‘long overdue’: ACTCOSS

The ACT Council of Social Service (ACTCOSS) welcomed the decision to expand and upgrade the network, saying it was “long overdue”.

The council’s chief executive, Emma Campbell, said her organisation had recommended the move in 2017 after a study of how Canberrans used digital services.

“It seems like a long time ago — and it was three years ago — that we sat down with ACT Government staff to begin to map where there was the greatest community need for Canberra’s free public Wi-Fi,” she said.

Dr Campbell said Australia-wide research had found that one in four low-income households used public Wi-Fi to access the internet, but many found it slow, unreliable and difficult to access.

The study also found public libraries played an important role in helping people access digital services.

Where to access free internet in Canberra:



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Australia’s ‘Titanic’ economy is sinking


In a lot of techniques immediately after just about 30 decades with out a economic downturn, the hubris bordering the Australian overall economy is rather very similar to that which surrounded the Cunard ocean liner, Titanic.

When the Titanic set off for its fateful maiden voyage in April 1912, a lot of of the travellers aboard thought the vessel was unsinkable — that absolutely nothing could probably impede the Titanic’s voyage to New York.

Currently quite a few imagine that after dodging so quite a few crises and economic shocks that severely impacted nations throughout the environment for a long time, Australia’s overall economy is unsinkable.

But as 2020 carries on to unfold, like the Titanic, Australia’s economy has strike the iceberg that is the demise of its history operate of headline GDP growth — in the kind of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In an ironic twist of destiny, the reaction of the Titanic’s travellers and members of the Australian general public to their respective crises has been remarkably comparable.

In the minutes pursuing the Titanic’s collision with the iceberg, some travellers refused to consider that the condition was serious. With some going as far as participating in a recreation of soccer with chunks of ice that experienced been strewn throughout the deck all through the collision.

Inspite of warnings from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and a legion of other organisations that the globe faces the “worst financial crisis given that the Wonderful Depression”, numerous Australian’s go on to behave as if almost nothing is erroneous.

But inspite of the great scope of the existing issues and the consensus that the road to recovery is a long a person, the Morrison Government seemingly continues to imagine that its overly optimistic narratives of a swift economic restoration will someway appear to move.

In actuality, economists have usually concluded that the Morrison Government’s ideologically pushed plans dependent on tax cuts, workplace relations reform and fossil gas subsidies are probable inadequate to travel a solid financial recovery.

But with billions of bucks a 7 days flowing in to the economy from many Government stimulus systems and superannuation withdrawals, several Australian’s seem convinced that the Morrison Government will supply the country from the crisis — as every other federal government has for pretty much 30 yrs.

With Prime Minister Scott Morrison at this time keeping near-file level acceptance rankings in the polls, the community appears to have provided the Coalition’s financial response strategy their seal of approval. Irrespective of warnings from analysts that the economic system may possibly be deteriorating additional, even with report peacetime deficit shelling out from the governing administration, and forecasts from Treasury and the Reserve Lender that unemployment will continue on to increase, consumer spending proceeds. 

In current months, retail sales have skyrocketed to degrees perfectly earlier mentioned the pre-coronavirus trend and they keep on to continue being strong, even nevertheless the initial bounce due to pent up demand from the lockdowns back again in March and April has extensive handed.

Supply: Australian Bureau of Figures

Like the travellers aboard the Titanic, Australians are in for a splash of cold drinking water on their relatively rosy outlook, albeit on a for a longer time timeline.

It has been approximated that just about $84 billion truly worth of stimulus will be removed from the financial system in the course of the fourth quarter of the year. That represents a whopping 17 per cent of pre-coronavirus quarterly GDP.

Melancholy is occasionally defined by a ten for each cent reduction in GDP. Successfully, the tapering of stimulus actions quantities to some thing resembling a mini-despair in and of alone.

While the steepness of the “cliff” will be lowered by the Government’s current loosening of the conditions to qualify for JobKeeper, the scale of the withdrawal of stimulus is unparalleled in the peacetime record of the country.

As considerably as we may wish it was not so, the composing is on the wall that the financial state and the Australian men and women facial area a difficult road in the yrs in advance. For that purpose, now extra than at any time the Morrison authorities demands to be giving a much more sensible picture of the economy’s prospective clients for the months and many years ahead.

Eventually, a lengthy time period approach for sustainable financial growth and broader prosperity for the Australian public is required. Not a continued force for the Coalition to fulfil its ideological wish record as the overall economy carries on to sink beneath the icy waves.

Tarric Brooker is an IA columnist, freelance journalist and political commentator. You can follow Tarric on Twitter @AvidCommentator.

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Poor decisions are wrecking Australia’s economy, not the virus


Australians don’t have far to look to see governments effectively guiding their economies through the COVID-19 pandemic. Alan Austin surveys successful nations nearby.

ACROSS THE TASMAN, New Zealand’s jobless rate has just declined from 4.2% in the 2020 first quarter to 4% in the second.

New Zealand’s exports have grown impressively over the last year, with June exports 2.2% higher than the year before. The trade balance has been in healthy surplus for six of the last seven months. Retail trade is up 2.3% over the last year, inflation is at the optimum 1.5% and building permits are at an all-time high.

Not far to the north, Malaysia also improved its jobless rate from 5.3% in May to 4.9% in June. It reported a positive annual rate of gross domestic product (GDP) growth in March and impressive outcomes on exports.

Further north again, Taiwan’s economy is advancing steadily. The jobless rate fell from 4.16 to 3.97% in June, wages are growing steadily, exports remain buoyant and the trade balance is in strong surplus.

Further afield, in Europe, economies with jobless rates below 5% include Switzerland, Iceland, Germany, the Netherlands, Hungary, Norway and Estonia. Most are enjoying positive wage rises and strong export performance as well.

Impact of the pandemic

These economic winners are also succeeding against the coronavirus. Taiwan, New Zealand, Iceland and Estonia recorded zero deaths in July. Malaysia recorded four, Norway five and Hungary 11.

At the other end of the table, economies struggling with the economy and infection and death rates include the United States, Chile, Brazil, South Africa and Australia.

Australia no longer winning

In dramatic contrast to the last global economic crisis, Australia is failing in most areas except exports and corporate profits – which are both booming.

Australia’s jobless rate blew out to 6.37% in April, then to 7.08% in May and 7.45% in June. That is the highest since November 1998 when Paul Keating’s reforms were still taking effect. Productivity has been jammed at 100 index points for the last 16 quarters.

Quarterly economic growth fell in the first quarter this year to -0.3%, the first negative quarter since 2011 when floods ravaged much of Northern Australia and the worst since 2008 when the global financial crisis (GFC) whacked every developed economy.

Annual economic growth tumbled to 1.39%, the lowest since the fourth quarter in 2000 when Treasurer Peter Costello was battling the early 2000s global recession.

Gross debt expanded to a staggering $741.4 billion last Friday bringing the Coalition’s total debt to $469.7 billion. Just since April 2018, the Coalition has added more gross debt than Labor took on during its entire five years and nine months contending with the GFC.

By May, Australia’s net worth had plummeted under the Coalition from negative $205.9 billion at the 2013 Election to negative $624.2 billion. It will be worse now, as we shall see next month in the final budget outcome.

There is no excuse for this. Exports are at record highs. The trade balance has been in surplus for the last 30 months, recording a new all-time monthly high above ten billion dollars in March this year. Corporate profits have been soaring since September 2016.

The primary reason the budget is still in deep deficit, debt is deepening, wages are stagnating, benefits are far too low and the Aussie dollar is down the S-bend is that proceeds of the current export and profits boom have not been shared fairly.

This is the outcome of poor government decision-making over the last six years, not external global conditions – and not the recent pandemic.

Stand-out world economy 2009

Australia’s performance through this global emergency is in dramatic contrast to its success through the financial crisis which devastated the developed world in 2008 and lingered until 2013.

Through that period Australia clearly had the world’s most impressive economy, being the only OECD or G20 member country to avoid recession, deep unemployment and widespread bankruptcies and suicides. As shown more fully here, Australia shone on productivity, wages growth, job creation, economic freedom, income per person and wealth.

These were the results of the courageous policies adopted by the Rudd Government in 2008 on the advice of then-Treasury Secretary Ken Henry. Those initiatives – including the school buildings program, cash payments to families, investment in community housing and the falsely-maligned national insulation scheme – rocketed Australia to the top of the world’s economies, where it stayed until 2014.

As economist Guy Debelle recalls,

Morrison’s stimulus with your retirement savings

Superannuation accounts are dwindling as millions of Australians fund their own rescue during the pandemic.

Stand-out world economy 2020?

No single economy is leading the world today as Australia was between 2008 and 2013. No government as yet has had the wisdom to implement anything as far-reaching and visionary as the Rudd/Henry programs.

Of the 42 major OECD and G20 member countries which reported GDP growth for the March quarter, only five reported positive growth: Chile, Ireland, Russia, Turkey and Sweden. Of the 16 countries to report June quarter GDP growth so far, only China is positive. We may get a clearer picture of which economies are faring best through the current crisis when we see more June quarter GDP figures in the coming days.

Current leaders – on jobs, wages growth, retail sales, exports and construction – are Ireland, Estonia, Germany, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

Australia could yet recover its rightful place at the top of the world. For this to happen, however, it must abandon virtually all current economic policies and return to those which actually serve the people of Australia.

Alan Austin’s defamation matter is nearly over. You can read an update HERE and help out by contributing to the crowd-funding campaign HERE. Alan Austin is an Independent Australia columnist and freelance journalist. You can follow him on Twitter @AlanAustin001.

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Poor decisions are wrecking Australia’s economy, not the virus


Australians don’t have far to look to see governments effectively guiding their economies through the COVID-19 pandemic. Alan Austin surveys successful nations nearby.

ACROSS THE TASMAN, New Zealand’s jobless rate has just declined from 4.2% in the 2020 first quarter to 4% in the second.

New Zealand’s exports have grown impressively over the last year, with June exports 2.2% higher than the year before. The trade balance has been in healthy surplus for six of the last seven months. Retail trade is up 2.3% over the last year, inflation is at the optimum 1.5% and building permits are at an all-time high.

Not far to the north, Malaysia also improved its jobless rate from 5.3% in May to 4.9% in June. It reported a positive annual rate of gross domestic product (GDP) growth in March and impressive outcomes on exports.

Further north again, Taiwan’s economy is advancing steadily. The jobless rate fell from 4.16 to 3.97% in June, wages are growing steadily, exports remain buoyant and the trade balance is in strong surplus.

Further afield, in Europe, economies with jobless rates below 5% include Switzerland, Iceland, Germany, the Netherlands, Hungary, Norway and Estonia. Most are enjoying positive wage rises and strong export performance as well.

Impact of the pandemic

These economic winners are also succeeding against the coronavirus. Taiwan, New Zealand, Iceland and Estonia recorded zero deaths in July. Malaysia recorded four, Norway five and Hungary 11.

At the other end of the table, economies struggling with the economy and infection and death rates include the United States, Chile, Brazil, South Africa and Australia.

Australia no longer winning

In dramatic contrast to the last global economic crisis, Australia is failing in most areas except exports and corporate profits — which are both booming.

Australia’s jobless rate blew out to 6.37% in April, then to 7.08% in May and 7.45% in June. That is the highest since November 1998 when Paul Keating’s reforms were still taking effect. Productivity has been jammed at 100 index points for the last 16 quarters.

Quarterly economic growth fell in the first quarter this year to -0.3%, the first negative quarter since 2011 when floods ravaged much of Northern Australia and the worst since 2008 when the global financial crisis (GFC) whacked every developed economy.

Annual economic growth tumbled to 1.39%, the lowest since the fourth quarter in 2000 when Treasurer Peter Costello was battling the early 2000s global recession.

Gross debt expanded to a staggering $741.4 billion last Friday bringing the Coalition’s total debt to $469.7 billion. Just since April 2018, the Coalition has added more gross debt than Labor took on during its entire five years and nine months contending with the GFC.

By May, Australia’s net worth had plummeted under the Coalition from negative $205.9 billion at the 2013 Election to negative $624.2 billion. It will be worse now, as we shall see next month in the final budget outcome.

There is no excuse for this. Exports are at record highs. The trade balance has been in surplus for the last 30 months, recording a new all-time monthly high above ten billion dollars in March this year. Corporate profits have been soaring since September 2016.

The primary reason the budget is still in deep deficit, debt is deepening, wages are stagnating, benefits are far too low and the Aussie dollar is down the S-bend is that proceeds of the current export and profits boom have not been shared fairly.
This is the outcome of poor government decision-making over the last six years, not external global conditions — and not the recent pandemic.

Stand-out world economy 2009

Australia’s performance through this global emergency is in dramatic contrast to its success through the financial crisis which devastated the developed world in 2008 and lingered until 2013.

Through that period Australia clearly had the world’s most impressive economy, being the only OECD or G20 member country to avoid recession, deep unemployment and widespread bankruptcies and suicides. As shown more fully here, Australia shone on productivity, wages growth, job creation, economic freedom, income per person and wealth.

These were the results of the courageous policies adopted by the Rudd Government in 2008 on the advice of then-Treasury Secretary Ken Henry. Those initiatives – including the school buildings program, cash payments to families, investment in community housing and the falsely-maligned national insulation scheme – rocketed Australia to the top of the world’s economies, where it stayed until 2014.

As economist Guy Debelle recalls,

‘Fiscal stimulus in Australia in my view was absolutely necessary and was a critical factor behind Australia’s good economic outcomes. While one can argue about the exact nature of the implementation, the fact that it was designed to take effect quickly was vital in the circumstances: “go hard, go early, go to households”, as Ken Henry put it.’

 

Morrison's stimulus with your retirement savings

Stand-out world economy 2020?

No single economy is leading the world today as Australia was between 2008 and 2013. No government as yet has had the wisdom to implement anything as far-reaching and visionary as the Rudd/Henry programs.

Of the 42 major OECD and G20 member countries which reported GDP growth for the March quarter, only five reported positive growth: Chile, Ireland, Russia, Turkey and Sweden. Of the 16 countries to report June quarter GDP growth so far, only China is positive. We may get a clearer picture of which economies are faring best through the current crisis when we see more June quarter GDP figures in the coming days.

Current leaders – on jobs, wages growth, retail sales, exports and construction – are Ireland, Estonia, Germany, the Netherlands and New Zealand.

Australia could yet recover its rightful place at the top of the world. For this to happen, however, it must abandon virtually all current economic policies and return to those which actually serve the people of Australia.

Alan Austin’s defamation matter is nearly over. You can read an update HERE and help out by contributing to the crowd-funding campaign HEREAlan Austin is an Independent Australia columnist and freelance journalist. You can follow him on Twitter @AlanAustin001

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