Soviet Heroes of the War Brought Back to Life


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Ruth Wishart: Why we need the SNP MPs brought home to fight for indyref2


YOU will have noted that the Scotland team manager loaded the maximum number of players allowed on the plane to Spain. Over twice as many as will start on the park when the Euros begin in earnest. Because in the modern game the subs bench is crucial too.

I am proposing Team Indy follows suit. When the First Minister announced her new line-up, the leader of the tiniest party in Holyrood opined the Cabsecs had been recycled rather than refreshed. He might like to reflect that he doesn’t have enough MSP’s to fill a cupboard never mind a cabinet these days. Yet there is an underlying truth to his casual insult.

When a government has been in ­power for a long time, there is little room for surprise when it has a reshuffle. You can change portfolios which hopefully brings fresh thinking, but there’s limited scope to change personnel. Yet as we enter what all indy supporters hope will be a seminal term, you could argue that we are trying to win with only half the available players ­actually on the pitch.

READ MORE: Here’s a guide to the Scottish Government’s Cabinet reshuffle and new roles

A lot of the SNP’s big hitters are still parked on the green, green benches of the Commons, where they are routinely ­ignored, barracked, or both. Sometimes they post their speeches on social media in the hope that some of the Scottish ­electorate might tune in if they happen to be scrolling.

We know that when we first sent a sizable squad to Westminster it was as surprising to some of the victors as anyone else. They got caught up in the post indyref tartan ­tsunami which swept so many of the ­Unionist candidates from their berths.

From the point of view of fighting the good fight for independence, I’d argue that victory could turn out to be pyrrhic unless and until we can harness our southern ­talent on the side of the border where the real battles over independence will take place.

We need them up here adding to the ­cohort of MSP’s and grassroots players like Believe in Scotland, the Yes hubs, Voices For Scotland, the Scottish Independence Foundation and all the other folks who have been beavering away. There is no shortage of enthusiasts for independence, but the overall picture is currently too fragmented, and too often ignored.

The Westminster brigade would be better deployed as auxiliary ambassadors here at home than howling into a hostile void down by. I’m not daft enough to think this would be an easy gain. The sorry saga over Angus Robertson and Joanna Cherry battling for the same seat gave us an ­unsavoury insight into how much backstage manoeuvring comes into play when personal histories and clashing egos trump common sense. That episode, and the hasty rewriting of the rules, lost us the opportunity for several high profile performers to join Holyrood.

It was compounded by Ian Blackford’s subsequent decision to chuck Cherry off his front bench team altogether, a pretty classic example of surgically removing your nose to spite your face. The next independence campaign hasn’t a prayer if the broad Yes movement and the SNP’s NEC can’t manage to get beyond personality politics and put the basic cause front and centre.

There is a lot of talent languishing on the SNP benches in London, conversant with a whole range of issues including health, justice, social policy, broadcasting, finance, education and much more. There are a lot of great campaigning voices, bonny fechters, strong, articulate communicators and at the moment they are a largely wasted asset outside of their constituency work.

Among them, let’s be honest, are some who have also become way too ­comfortable in their Westminster clothes. There are some of the nationalist troops who have gone native over the years, ­convincing themselves that popping up in Commons committees or debates ­matters a row of beans in terms of ­progressing ­independence. It’s always counter ­productive when your sense of self importance overwhelms your memory of why you got elected in the first place.

We are kidding ourselves if we think a UK Government with an unassailable majority is suddenly going to pay attention to what the SNP Commons contingent is saying. We are kidding ourselves if that is going to materially change at the next election given that Keir Starmer appears to have as much chance of becoming the next PM as I have winning next month’s euromillions. Especially as I don’t buy a ticket.

READ MORE: Brexit: David Frost demands Scotland informs UK of all contact with EU

The Scottish Government is also kidding itself if it thinks the pro-indy natives are not going to get ever more restless. This week I read a stack of posts from Alba supporters saying they planned to undermine the SNP leadership at every turn from here on in.

As it happens I don’t think Alba is ­going anywhere any time soon. And I never believed another party was likely to be anything other than divisive. Equally, whilst some Alba members’ hostility to the SNP’s strategic planning may not be widespread, their impatience is echoed in many quarters.

THE Scotgov mantra is that horses must not be frightened, undecided voters must only be gently wooed, and those of a ­Unionist persuasion must on no account be made to feel mistaken. All Jock Tamson’s bairns must pledge undying tolerance. For the government is persuaded that only this softly, softly catchee voter policy has moved the dial to a regular 50 plus percentage in favour of decoupling from number 10’s serial chaos.

Some of that I can happily sign up to. Belligerence and hostility are poor weapons of choice in any debate. Yet gentle persuasion will only work when we ­become properly serious about giving those waverers enough hard facts and honest modelling to let them make informed choices.

There’s just not enough evidence that the government has had the appetite or bandwith to tackle this crucial research. Which is precisely why it has to be open to all the other players in the game who have been doing that work, but often finding their efforts ignored rather than taken on board for examination. We have the brains and capacity and talent to shape the arguments; we’re just not utilising it all, or being sufficiently welcoming of the available contributors.

If this last week has taught as anything at all, it’s that the UK Government has an even more slender grasp of reality than we feared. Taught us too that the dodgier its ministers behave, the more it seems to rise in the polling. You don’t have to like Dom Cummings – guilty as charged – to believe that the portrait he painted of an alarmingly dysfunctional PM with a hand to mouth, headline driven, handle on policy is all too accurate.

Last week Max Hastings, former ­Telegraph editor, former Johnson boss, and nobody’s idea of a raging lefty, wrote an excoriating piece reminding readers what a piece of shameless work Johnson is. He was scarcely less flattering of the current cabinet. Robert Jenrick and Gavin Williamson, he suggested, would be lucky to make the short leet for dogcatcher in a normal world.

YET it seems it’s not enough for some folks to know that the UK is being run by a bunch of second raters and strangers to the truth. It’s not enough to know that the chances of a change of UK Government four years down the road are minimal, regardless of how Scotland votes. And if it’s not enough to discredit a seriously shoddy crew, we have to make a solid case for why, and how, and with whom and what Scotland can do better. We have to ensure that team Scotland is a team of all the available talents.

Otherwise it’s not just game one of the Euros which will cause this fan to have anxiety attacks.



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Ancient tree species, northern sandalwood, brought back from brink of extinction in Victoria


Beneath the canopy of a pristine pocket of native bushland near the banks of the Murray River in northern Victoria stands a rather unassuming treasure.

Torrumbarry resident Tuesday Browell studied aromatic medicine and was doing some research on Australian sandalwood trees when she came across something interesting.

“I read two lines that said there was an old sandalwood tree in Torrumbarry on an old sandhill,” Ms Browell said.

Twenty-five years ago, Ms Browell trekked through rugged terrain and uninhabited lagoons to find that sandhill and stumbled across not one but 15 of the ancient and endangered trees.

She decided then and there to buy the land and put a conservation covenant on the property, so the trees can never be removed.

“They’re not a very stunning tree, you don’t go ‘Wow, look at that tree. Isn’t it gorgeous or isn’t it striking?’

“When you put them next to a gum tree, they look a little bit more green-grey, like an olive tree — they are hard to identify if you’ve never seen one.”

 But what they lack in looks, they make up for in value.

Glen Johnson, from Victoria’s Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, said for centuries sandalwoods were prized for their expensive wood and oil.

“Sandalwood is one of those aromatic woods and it’s got incredible value, really high value,” Mr Johnson said.

“That happened all around Australia, but it probably had the detrimental impact on what is the southern end of its geographical range in northern Victoria.”

He said about 1 per cent of what was once in northern Victoria now remained.

While relatively common in other Australian states, northern sandalwoods are on the brink of extinction in Victoria, due to large-scale clearing.

But Tuesday Browell and Wollithiga man, Henry Atkinson, are working together to change that.

“Some of my people would have eaten from that tree, they would have eaten some of the nuts that come out of the berry,” Mr Atkinson said.

Ms Browell said more protection was needed from the state government.

“Even though it has got an action plan, there’s very little assistance for private landholders such as myself, to preserve and take care of things, so I’d like to see that change,” Ms Browell said.

Mr Johnson said the state’s environment department had introduced fencing, pest animal controls, and attempted to propagate the species.

He said applications were also now open for Victorian Landcare grants for groups and individuals to help protect private land, via catchment management authorities.

But propagating the tree was not easy, as Ms Browell discovered.

“You can’t just put a seed in the ground and water it and grows. It has to have a host — it’s like a parasite,” she said.

“Some trees need a fire to go through, and orange needs a frost before it goes sweet. This is the same.

“It has to have a host, otherwise it dies, and when that tree dies, it needs to find another one, so you’ve got to have a lot of trees around for them to keep living.”

But despite the difficulties, she said the conservation effort must continue.

“We’re just using her as a resource, instead of learning to enjoy her for what she is.”

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What are you waiting for, Boris? UK’s Covid alert level is downgraded to THREE and PM will confirm easing of restrictions in England from Monday at 5pm briefing – but Tories and scientists demand June 21 date for ending lockdown is brought FORWARD



Britain’s Covid alert level was downgraded to three today because of the success of the vaccination roll-out and dwindling case numbers.

Health chiefs say infections, hospital admissions and deaths have ‘fallen consistently’ over the past few months, with social distancing efforts and the mammoth inoculation drive to thank.

The move to downgrade the alert level — agreed by all four of the UK’s chief medical officers and a senior NHS official — means the coronavirus is now only in ‘general circulation’ and transmission is no longer ‘high or rising exponentially’. 

It will be used as fuel for scientists and Tories desperate for a quicker return to normal. The Prime Minister has been repeatedly urged to stick to his ‘data, not dates’ pledge for easing restrictions in England.  

It comes as ministers hailed the prospect of ‘hugging and kissing again indoors’ today.

It comes as Boris Johnson prepares to announce a major loosening of Covid restrictions. The PM will use a 5pm briefing at Downing Street to confirm a significant relaxation of rules from May 17, saying the success of the vaccine rollout has given him room to manoeuvre.

With one in three adults now having had two jabs, friends and relatives will be able to hug for the first time in a year.

Pubs, restaurants and cafes across England will be able to seat customers inside again while gatherings of up to six people or two households will be allowed indoors.

Hotels, B&Bs, cinemas, theatres and museums are to reopen while limits on funeral mourners are scrapped.

In a round of interviews this morning, Health Minister Nadine Dorries said: ‘I am hopeful that we will all be hugging and kissing again soon indoors.’

Ms Dorries also set hares running by seeming to suggest the June 21 date for ending lockdown altogether could be brought forward – although No10 insisted Mr Johnson will not be making any announcements on that tonight. ‘It is data, not dates and the data is very good,’ Ms Dorries said.

Professor Sir John Bell said the nation was in a ‘very strong position’ to move forward with the easing of restrictions which will enable people to ‘try and get back to normal’.

Oxford University’s regius professor of medicine told ITV’s Good Morning Britain programme the prospect of people being able to hug their loved ones again was ‘great’.

On the Government’s roadmap, he said: ‘I think we’ll still probably go steady but perhaps a bit faster, I’ll be interested to see what the Government announces. I’m feeling pretty comfortable with where we are at the moment.’

Legislation in the Queen’s Speech tomorrow will be directed at the nation’s recovery from Covid-19, backing the NHS and spreading opportunity.  

As the daily Covid death toll fell to just two with 1,770 confirmed infections:

Mr Johnson will gather his ministers this morning to approve moving to step three of the roadmap out of lockdown next Monday after the Government said the latest data confirmed its four tests for easing restrictions had been met.

Officials believe that lifting the curbs is unlikely to risk a resurgence in virus infections.

At a press conference in Downing Street this evening, Mr Johnson will say: ‘The data reflects what we already knew – we are not going to let this virus beat us.

‘The roadmap remains on track, our successful vaccination programme continues – more than two thirds of adults in the UK have now had the first vaccine – and we can now look forward to unlocking cautiously but irreversibly.

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George W. Bush: Prince Philip ‘brought boundless strength and support’ to the Queen


Former President George W. Bush said the late Prince Philip “brought boundless strength and support” to Queen Elizabeth II, offering condolences to the Royal Family just after learning of the passing of the Duke of Edinburgh.

“Laura and I are saddened to learn of the passing of Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh,” Bush said in a statement Friday morning. “Throughout his long and remarkable life, he devoted himself to worthy causes and to others.”

PRINCE PHILIP, DUKE OF EDINBURGH AND QUEEN ELIZABETH II’S HUSBAND, DEAD AT 99

Bush said Prince Philip “represented the United Kingdom with dignity and brought boundless strength and support to the sovereign.”

“Laura and I are fortunate to have enjoyed the charm and wit of his company, and we know how much he will be missed,” the former president continued.

“We join those around the world offering heartfelt condolences to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and the entire Royal Family,” he said.

Prince Philip passed away on Friday at Windsor Castle. He was 99.

The royal family confirmed the Duke of Edinburgh’s death Friday in a statement.

“It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen has announced the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle,” the statement reads.

An announcement about Philip’s death was placed on the gates of Buckingham Palace on Friday.

During England’s coronavirus lockdown, he had been staying at Windsor Castle, west of London, with the queen, 94.

On Feb. 16, Philip was admitted to a London hospital after feeling unwell. On March 3, he underwent a procedure for a pre-existing heart condition at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital before being transferred back to King Edward VII hospital on March 5 and ultimately released home on March 16.

Philip married then-Princess Elizabeth in 1947 and is the longest-serving royal consort in British history. He and the queen have four children, eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. 

A former naval officer and keen polo player, Philip enjoyed robust health well into old age but had several health issues in recent years. 

PRINCE PHILIP RECOVERING AFTER HEART SURGERY, BUCKINGHAM PALACE SAYS 

At the time of his death, Philip’s full title was His Royal Highness Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich, Knight of the Garter, Knight of the Thistle, Order of Merit, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire, Companion of the Order of Australia, Companion of the Queen’s Service Order, Privy Counselor. 

He was the second person ever to bear the title “Duke of Edinburgh,” the first being his great-great-uncle, Prince Alfred Ernest Albert. His son, Prince Edward, will now assume the title. 

Although he married into the British monarchy, royalty was in Philip’s blood since birth. On June 10, 1921, he was born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark – the only son of Prince Andrew of Greece and Princess Alice of Battenberg, as well as the great-great-grandson of Queen Victoria. 

Philip’s deep-seated royal roots placed him in the line of succession to the thrones of 16 countries. 

Fox News’ Melissa Roberto and Stephanie Nolasco contributed to this report.

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‘He’s quite lucky they brought him to us’. Meduza special correspondent Maxim Solpov reports from Kolchugino, where Alexey Navalny was in custody until just recently




After being transferred from a Moscow remand prison in late February, opposition politician Alexey Navalny was sent to a detention center known as SIZO-3 in the city of Kolchugino (Vladimir region), northeast of Moscow. There, he was kept in “quarantine” along with other newly-arrived prisoners, until reports emerged on Friday, March 12, that he had been moved once again. Earlier, Meduza special correspondent Maxim Solopov travelled to Kolchugino and spoke to former prison employees, the people who built the detention center, and prisoners’ relatives, as well as local residents, activists, and politicians. Here’s what they told him about this town, where SIZO-3 and the police department’s brand-new complex are the most modern, public buildings.

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COVID brought us a year of epic uncertainty — but here’s what I know for sure


How are you? It’s been quite a year.

It’s exactly one year since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus public-health emergency a “pandemic.” Looking back, we can see how far we have come, and how we have already begun the return to a kind of normality, a New Normal. In New York, at least. Restaurants can expand to 50% capacity by March 19. Offices are preparing plans for a phased return to work.

There is a vaccine. In fact, there are vaccines. Just over 10% of New Yorkers are fully vaccinated, in line with the national average. The prospect of one vaccine seemed like a lifetime away last March, and it came too late for more than 500,000 Americans. The isolation doesn’t seem quite so intense one year later. Perhaps we have normalized it, but we can be forgiven if our stoicism turns to fatigue.

America has a new administration. Sixty-two percent of people approve of the job President Joe Biden is doing handling the pandemic, according to an NPR/PBS News Hour poll, conducted by Marist, released Thursday. He got a lower 49% job approval rating. Still, Biden signed a $1.9-trillion stimulus package on Thursday, the third such rescue package since the pandemic began.


‘Always expect the unexpected.’

“There’s a sense of progress,” said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. That progress may come at a cost. Texas has abandoned its statewide mask mandate, a move decried by health professionals and scientific studies on the effectiveness of masks in helping to stop the spread of COVID-19. Austin, the state’s fourth-largest city, will keep its mask mandate.

So what have we learned over the last 12 months? From a financial perspective, we have learned to always have an emergency fund, and to expect the unexpected. Stay on top of your taxes because you never know when the Internal Revenue Service will be enlisted to send out millions of stimulus checks. Don’t panic. Investment decisions made from fear rarely end up in a good place.

The pandemic exasperated a lot of inequality in our society. Millions of Americans did not have the luxury of working from home. And many of those frontline workers who showed up for work every day — bus and train drivers, supermarket and health-care workers — also paid a heavy price both in terms of their physical and mental health. They put their lives on the line for the rest of us.

Helping others is helping yourself. “Thinking about others actually has several benefits in times of crisis,” according to Andy Reed, Fidelity Investment’s behavioral economics research lead and psychologist. “First, we tend to be less biased when making decisions on behalf of other people or taking others’ perspectives.” And, he said, it can help alleviate our own stress and anxiety.

‘Stay above the flood plain’

Fidelity offered tips for dealing with a public-health crisis such as this: “To prepare for the future, spend some time learning from the past. Those who learned a new skill, found strength they didn’t know they had, or built resilience as a result of the pandemic.” And, “Tackle obstacles by breaking challenges down into pieces and solving them one at a time.” Don’t wait until they pile up.

“Don’t be afraid to get by with a little help from others, in good times or bad,” it added. “This isn’t easy, as many survey respondents indicated they receive the greatest support during joyous rather than challenging events.” The survey suggested people hold back on “sharing the negative.” We can use Zoom
ZM,
+5.70%,
Facebook
FB,
+3.39%
 and FaceTime
AAPL,
+1.65%
 to counteract that.

In the meantime, make a will, even if you are young and especially if you have kids and encouraging others to do so. Stay above the flood plain, both in your life and at work. You never know when you may have to adapt and change, and the more experience and ways you can think of sharpening your skills, the better. Keep thinking ahead. How can I do this differently? What more can I offer?


‘Things change without you noticing.’

Unfortunately, there’s a gap between how the rich and poor fared during the coronavirus pandemic, just like they did 100 years ago. During the 1918 influenza pandemic, wealthier people had a better chance of survival: Individuals of moderate and higher economic status had a mortality rate of 0.38%, versus 0.52% for those of lower economic status and 1% for those who were very poor.

Economically, women were disproportionately harmed by both pandemics. The International Labour Organization said women were in greater danger of contracting COVID-19 and less likely to have Social Security, “as they make up the vast majority of domestic, health and social-care workers globally.” A man who lost his wife to the virus in 1918 fared better than a woman who lost her spouse.

Change can happen without us noticing. The health-care system survived the initial flood of patients, many of whom were struggling to breathe. New York City did not run out of ventilators, even though it was the epicenter of the pandemic in the U.S. It has since been overtaken by California in the number of COVID-related deaths. But the regular fury of ambulance sirens slowly went away.

Some things are constant. The mysterious trumpet player in my neighborhood whose music appeared to beckon the clanging of pots and pans every evening at 7 p.m. continues, even if the neighborhood cheering for health-care workers and frontline staff has not. The music is soothing, and the player’s consistency is reassuring. But it is also a gentle reminder that it is not over yet.

Read more in the MarketWatch series, ‘Dispatches from a pandemic.’

New York was the epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic in the U.S. in March 2020. One year later, the city is slowly coming back to life.


Carrie Anne Tocci

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House passes HR-1: Bill enshrines new voting strategy that brought Democrats to power


Analysis by WorldTribune Staff, March 4, 2021 House Democrats on Wednesday passed H.R. 1, their election reform legislation which they call the “For the People Act”. The legislation passed in a mostly party-line vote of 220-210. Only Democrats voted in favor. All Republicans and Mississippi Democrat Rep. Bennie Thompson were opposed. The bill would void […]

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Buffalo Bill, Teddy Roosevelt and the gold rush are brought to life in restored photographs


The spirit of the Wild West has been brought back to life through a series of historical photographs which have been colourised for the first time in a new book.

The Wild West in Color: A photographic Account of our Nation’s Westward Expansion has been produced by John C. Guntzelman and published by Crestline Books.

The new book features more than 200 historical pictures which have been colourised for the very first time – bringing the history of the Wild West into the present day. 

Among the striking images is a photograph of the female outlaw Myra Maybelle Shirley Reed Starr, better known as Belle Starr, in 1886 on her horse after having been arrested for her suspected involvement in a robbery. 

Starr was known to associate with the James-Younger Gang and was fatally shot in 1889 in a case that is still unsolved. 

Another picture showed gutsy frontierswoman Augusta ‘Gusty’ Higgins Farnham standing with a shotgun next to a deer she shot dead. 

While the book also features a shot of the Native Americans from Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show standing in formation. 

Augusta ‘Gusty’ Higgins Farnham was one of the earliest female hunters in the western territories. This image of her, included in the new book was taken in Denver, Colorado, in 1898 and shows her standing above the corpse of a deer that she has killed. In her right hand she shows off the gun she used to kill the deer and in her other hand she is holding a knife. Colorado sits where the Great Plains meet the Rocky Mountains, which gives the state a diverse amount of areas for wildlife to roam, and made it the perfect place to hunt for sources of food

Myra Maybelle Shirley Reed Starr, who was better known as Belle Starr, was an outlaw in the Wild West whose grizzly death has remained an infamous tale from the West to this day. This colourised photograph shows her on her horse in Fort Smith, Arkansas in 1886. The picture is believed to have been taken after after she was arrested for her suspected involvement in a robbery. Starr was known to associate with the James-Younger Gang and was fatally shot after falling off of her horsein 1889 in a case that is still unsolved

Myra Maybelle Shirley Reed Starr, who was better known as Belle Starr, was an outlaw in the Wild West whose grizzly death has remained an infamous tale from the West to this day. This colourised photograph shows her on her horse in Fort Smith, Arkansas in 1886. The picture is believed to have been taken after after she was arrested for her suspected involvement in a robbery. Starr was known to associate with the James-Younger Gang and was fatally shot after falling off of her horsein 1889 in a case that is still unsolved

One of the most iconic images of the Wild West is that of a cowboy, and this colourised photograph shows a typically well-armed and outfitted cowboy sat on his horse. The image was taken in Sturgis, Dakota Territory, in 1888 and see the horse carrying a number of the cowboy's possessions. Cowboys would often be responsible for as many as 250 cattle during long drives to take the animals to market at the end of a season

One of the most iconic images of the Wild West is that of a cowboy, and this colourised photograph shows a typically well-armed and outfitted cowboy sat on his horse. The image was taken in Sturgis, Dakota Territory, in 1888 and see the horse carrying a number of the cowboy’s possessions. Cowboys would often be responsible for as many as 250 cattle during long drives to take the animals to market at the end of a season

The 26th President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt was a passionate hunter, the basis of which came from his experiences in the Old West. This picture of Roosevelt at the age of 27, which was taken in New York City in 1885, shows him with a rifle in his hands. He is seen sat down wearing a buckskin hunting suit with a carved Tiffany hunting knife on his hip. In 1883 Roosevelt first visited Dakota Territory to hunt bison and, after falling in love with the cowboy lifestyle, invested $14,000 in the hopes of becoming a prosperous cattle rancher

The 26th President of the United States Theodore Roosevelt was a passionate hunter, the basis of which came from his experiences in the Old West. This picture of Roosevelt at the age of 27, which was taken in New York City in 1885, shows him with a rifle in his hands. He is seen sat down wearing a buckskin hunting suit with a carved Tiffany hunting knife on his hip. In 1883 Roosevelt first visited Dakota Territory to hunt bison and, after falling in love with the cowboy lifestyle, invested $14,000 in the hopes of becoming a prosperous cattle rancher

A large group of people from Sioux City, Iowa, ride on a stagecoach which is transporting them to the plunge bathhouse. Their destination was an enormous interior hot-water swimming pool in the Hot Springs, Dakota Territory, in 1889. The southern area of the Black Hills in Dakota contains a reservoir of geothermal energy which created a number of water pools that were heated, with early settlers in the area using the pools as a way of soothing their aches and pains

A large group of people from Sioux City, Iowa, ride on a stagecoach which is transporting them to the plunge bathhouse. Their destination was an enormous interior hot-water swimming pool in the Hot Springs, Dakota Territory, in 1889. The southern area of the Black Hills in Dakota contains a reservoir of geothermal energy which created a number of water pools that were heated, with early settlers in the area using the pools as a way of soothing their aches and pains

The goldrush was a famous part of life in the Old West, and this picture, taken in Virginia City, Nevada, in 1866 shows three workers inside of a Gould & Curry silver mine pushing carts along two sets of tracks. Mr Gould discovered silver in his mine on January 6, 1859, and soon partnered with mine jumper Mr Curry, who forced him to make him a partner in the mine. Mr Gould originally struck a deal with a group of prospectors to dig up the silver in the mine, but upon discovering how rich in silver the mine was, they managed to take the riches for themselves, with Gould not seeing a penny

The goldrush was a famous part of life in the Old West, and this picture, taken in Virginia City, Nevada, in 1866 shows three workers inside of a Gould & Curry silver mine pushing carts along two sets of tracks. Mr Gould discovered silver in his mine on January 6, 1859, and soon partnered with mine jumper Mr Curry, who forced him to make him a partner in the mine. Mr Gould originally struck a deal with a group of prospectors to dig up the silver in the mine, but upon discovering how rich in silver the mine was, they managed to take the riches for themselves, with Gould not seeing a penny

Boomtowns were a common occurrence in western America during the days of the Wild West, as people rushed to the new territories to snatch their share of the goldrush. This collection of buildings, colourised in the new book, was photographed in 1866 and shows the early stages of Virginia City, in Nevada, which seemingly sprung up overnight. The town was started after the Comstock Lode was discovered, which was the first major silver deposit to be discovered in America

Boomtowns were a common occurrence in western America during the days of the Wild West, as people rushed to the new territories to snatch their share of the goldrush. This collection of buildings, colourised in the new book, was photographed in 1866 and shows the early stages of Virginia City, in Nevada, which seemingly sprung up overnight. The town was started after the Comstock Lode was discovered, which was the first major silver deposit to be discovered in America

William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was a soldier, bison hunter and showman whose show, Buffalo Bill's Wild West (pictured) transformed him into one of the world's earliest global celebrities. The group toured Europe eight times, with the first four coming between 1887 and 1892. The troupe, pictured in 1890, performed for Queen Victoria as part of her Golden Jubilee celebrations and was even invited to perform a private show for the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII

William Frederick ‘Buffalo Bill’ Cody was a soldier, bison hunter and showman whose show, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West (pictured) transformed him into one of the world’s earliest global celebrities. The group toured Europe eight times, with the first four coming between 1887 and 1892. The troupe, pictured in 1890, performed for Queen Victoria as part of her Golden Jubilee celebrations and was even invited to perform a private show for the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII

This photograph, taken in Holbrook, Arizona Territory, on an unknown date, shows a group of Aztec Land and Cattle Company's cowpunchers standing in front of a wooden building. Cowpunchers is another term used to describe cowboys and was first coined in 1878. Although famous for herding large numbers of cattle on horseback, cowpunchers would also perform a number of other duties around a ranch

This photograph, taken in Holbrook, Arizona Territory, on an unknown date, shows a group of Aztec Land and Cattle Company’s cowpunchers standing in front of a wooden building. Cowpunchers is another term used to describe cowboys and was first coined in 1878. Although famous for herding large numbers of cattle on horseback, cowpunchers would also perform a number of other duties around a ranch

A group of eight miners are seen standing outside of the entrance to the Montana Mine in South Dakota, in 1889. Some of the men are seen wielding pickaxes in their hands, while others are pictured leaning on spades and sledgehammers. The area of Montana is rich in copper, silver, gold, manganese, zinc, lead and molybdenum. Reports of gold having been found in Montana date back to as early as 1852, though only in small quantities. 10 years later though, Montana was hit by the gold rush after rich veins of the material were discovered

A group of eight miners are seen standing outside of the entrance to the Montana Mine in South Dakota, in 1889. Some of the men are seen wielding pickaxes in their hands, while others are pictured leaning on spades and sledgehammers. The area of Montana is rich in copper, silver, gold, manganese, zinc, lead and molybdenum. Reports of gold having been found in Montana date back to as early as 1852, though only in small quantities. 10 years later though, Montana was hit by the gold rush after rich veins of the material were discovered

This picture, included in the new book, shows a soldier sitting with his family at Fort Garland in Colorado in 1874. Fort Garland was established by the US Army in 1858 to protect settlers from indigenous tribes in the San Luis Valley - which at the time was part of the New Mexico Territory. The fort was abandoned by the army in 1883 after the native tribes were confined to the Indian reservation in Utah Territory and Colorado

This picture, included in the new book, shows a soldier sitting with his family at Fort Garland in Colorado in 1874. Fort Garland was established by the US Army in 1858 to protect settlers from indigenous tribes in the San Luis Valley – which at the time was part of the New Mexico Territory. The fort was abandoned by the army in 1883 after the native tribes were confined to the Indian reservation in Utah Territory and Colorado

This family photo was taken in Nebraska in 1887 and shows the Shores and Speese familied. Pictured are Moses Speese and his brother Jeremiah Shores, both of whom took the names of the men who had formerly owned them as slaves. The brothers had been separated during slavery but were later reunited in Nebraska

This family photo was taken in Nebraska in 1887 and shows the Shores and Speese familied. Pictured are Moses Speese and his brother Jeremiah Shores, both of whom took the names of the men who had formerly owned them as slaves. The brothers had been separated during slavery but were later reunited in Nebraska

A small boy and girl sitting patiently at a train station in March 1893 in this colourised photo. A sign on the wall says 'Burlington Route' which was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States and was founded in 1848. The girl is seen clutching a small umbrella and a doll, while the boy, who is sat on a bench, has a large coat draped over his shoulders and is clutching a walking cane in his left hand

A small boy and girl sitting patiently at a train station in March 1893 in this colourised photo. A sign on the wall says ‘Burlington Route’ which was a railroad that operated in the Midwestern United States and was founded in 1848. The girl is seen clutching a small umbrella and a doll, while the boy, who is sat on a bench, has a large coat draped over his shoulders and is clutching a walking cane in his left hand

The spirit of the Wild West has been brought back to life through a series of historical photographs which have been colourised for the first time in a new book, The Wild West in Color: A photographic Account of our Nation's Westward Expansion. Pictured: The front cover of John C. Guntzelman's new book which lifts the lid on the Wild West, with more than 200 colourised historical images

The spirit of the Wild West has been brought back to life through a series of historical photographs which have been colourised for the first time in a new book, The Wild West in Color: A photographic Account of our Nation’s Westward Expansion. Pictured: The front cover of John C. Guntzelman’s new book which lifts the lid on the Wild West, with more than 200 colourised historical images

Thank you for dropping in to My Local Pages and seeing this news release on State and Federal news called “Buffalo Bill, Teddy Roosevelt and the gold rush are brought to life in restored photographs”. This post is shared by My Local Pages Australia as part of our local news services.

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how Rihanna brought attention to the plight of farmers



A planned visit to India by Prime Minister Boris Johnson, on Jan 26, was postponed because of Covid. 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did publicly refer to the protests as “concerning” in December, under pressure from Canada’s sizeable Punjabi community, receiving a dressing down from the Indian Government in response.

What happens now?

To the surprise of many, the Indian Government published a statement on Wednesday in response to tweets from Rihanna and other public figures.

“Before rushing to comment on such matters, we would urge that the facts be ascertained, and a proper understanding of the issues at hand be undertaken,” it said. “The temptation of social media hashtags and comments, especially when resorted to by celebrities and others, is neither accurate nor responsible.”



Thanks for checking out this news update regarding United Kingdom and Political news titled “how Rihanna brought attention to the plight of farmers”. This news update was posted by MyLocalPages as part of our national news services.

#Rihanna #brought #attention #plight #farmers



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