Star batsman expects a last day BIg Bash explosion from Glenn Maxwell


Five balls could determine whether the Melbourne Stars make the finals or miss out, and Marcus Stoinis is happy to take responsibility either with the bat or the ball.

Last year’s Big Bash runners-up have to take down their conquerors from last season in an Australia Day showdown with the Sydney Sixers that could shape the entire finals series.

The MCG clash will be the last game of the regular season, giving both teams all the information needed to know what will be required to keep their title hopes alive.

The Stars, who have only missed the finals once in the previous nine BBL seasons, sit seventh on the table, three points out of the top five but with a positive net run rate in their favour.

The Sixers are second but could jump to first with a win and a Scorchers loss earlier in the day.

Losses in the past two games have put the Stars on the edge, but Stoinis said in any T20 game the difference between winning and losing could come down to the finest of margins.

And as his team’s leading run-scorer again this year, last year’s player of the tournament said he enjoyed the “responsibility” that could come with shaping those make-or-break moments for his team.

“In T20 it’s usually five balls with the bat and five with the ball that can change the game,” Stoinis said on Monday.

“It’s only little things. It’s never something big. It’s going to be important to stay calm and clear with what we want to do and look to take the game on. There’s no point playing safe.

“It’s all or nothing. It’s not the ideal position to be in. It’s still in our hands, we win this game, pretty much we go through.

“Personally, I enjoy the responsibility. You have to see it like that. Me batting to win the game, to take the game on, gives the team the best chance and myself the best chance to succeed.”

With just one run in his past two innings, Stars captain Glenn Maxwell needs to find his best. Stoinis said his skipper knew that.

“He’s one of the best in the world in T20 cricket. He’s every chance to come out tomorrow night and make 100,” Stoinis said.

“He’s as eager to do well as everyone in the team. He’ll be fine to put on a show.”

Stoinis said his team would “keep an eye” on the other final-round games that could determine the Stars’ future.

But the simpler scenario is the only one in his mind.

“None of it matters if we don’t put on a good performance. We just look after that. We are the last game, so we’ll know what’s going on when we rock up to the ground,” he said.

“Yes, it is a big game, but what an opportunity to put on a show, get a win, march into the finals and then see what you can do.”

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Pfizer COVID vaccine approved by TGA, NSW Police to watch 2021 Australia Day celebrations, Victoria records no local COVID-19 cases


However, there are many unknowns –this is a provisional approval, rather than full registration. It remains unclear if the vaccine will have any effect on reducing the transmission of the virus. It also remains unclear what effect the vaccine has on asymptomatic COVID-19, as people in the trial were only tested for COVID-19 if they had symptoms.

It also remains unclear just how long the vaccine will be effective. In monkeys, declining antibody and immune-cell levels over five weeks were noted.

On the basis of the data at hand, the TGA decided to approve the vaccine only for people aged over 16.

For the very frail – people aged over 85 – the TGA recommends nurses and doctors vaccinate on a “case by case basis”, as the potential benefits of the vaccine must be weighed against the risks of exposing a very frail person to the vaccine’s standard flu-like side-effects.

They will also need to decide themselves whether to jab pregnant women, with the TGA saying there is only limited human data to guide advice. The same goes for people with autoimmune disorders or those with compromised immune systems.

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Australia Day is a contentious day for many. Here are the events being held on January 26


Australia Day, one of the most polarising dates on the Australian calendar, is back, though this year the coronavirus pandemic could mean fewer crowds at events around the country.

January 26 is typically seen as a celebration of the nation or a day of sorrow for the colonisation of an ancient culture.

For many, it’s a chance to spend time with family and friends at the beach or around barbeques.

But for many First Nations people, it is Invasion Day, a day to mourn the past and galvanise the community to address ongoing systemic racial injustice.

However you plan to spend the day, these are some of the big events in the capital cities.

Melbourne

There’ll be no Australia Day parade in Melbourne this year due to fears of another coronavirus outbreak.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews cancelled the event and has urged residents to follow health advice to avoid gathering in large numbers.

A crowd of people waving small Australian flags line the stret in front of Flinders St Station.
Thousands of people attended last year’s Australia Day parade in Melbourne.(Supplied: Channel Seven)

Smaller events are happening around the city, starting early with a 5:00am start for the Invasion Day Dawn Service at King’s Domain Resting Place.

The Victorian NAIDOC Committee has requested that people register in advance to comply with coronavirus restrictions.

Later, an Invasion Day rally will be held on the steps of Parliament House in Melbourne from 10:30am.

The organisers, the Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance, say they have a COVID safety plan in place with marshals to control attendees.

Elsewhere, the Share the Spirit Festival returns to Melbourne’s Treasury Gardens on January 26, bringing together artists, musicians and dancers to celebrate Aboriginal music and culture.

Australian of the Year, legendary singer Archie Roach, will be performing at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl. Gates will open for the free event at 12:00pm.

Archie Roach sings into a microphone
Archie Roach was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2020.(Supplied: ARIAs)

Sydney

Events in Sydney will be smaller than in previous years due to limits on crowd sizes amid the pandemic.

Those up early can catch the raising of the Australian and Aboriginal flags on Sydney Harbour Bridge at 5:15am.

Circular Quay will be much quieter than usual. There will be no Ferrython, Harbour Parade or Tall Ships race this year due to the pandemic, although the annual Oz Day 10km Wheelchair Race starts at 9:00am at The Rocks.

Brydi Saul digs deep to keep going in a wheelchair race.
Brydi Saul in action at the Oz Day 10K wheelchair race on January 26, 2020.(Supplied: Karen Watson)

Other annual events will be broadcast live, including the Lord Mayor’s Citizenship Ceremony at the Opera House and fireworks over the harbour.

One of the biggest Invasion Day events is a planned march through the city starting at 9:00am.

Organisers say the demonstration is calling for “Australia Day” to be abolished and for “sovereignty, not constitutional recognition”.

The New South Wales Government has restricted protest gatherings to 500 people under current COVID-19 regulations.

But rally organiser and Gumbaynggirr, Bundjalung and Dunghutti woman Elizabeth Jarrett said the community needed to “come together and fight back”, even if that breached health directives.

“Unlike COVID, the virus of colonial racism that came to these lands in 1788 cannot be defeated by self-isolation or quarantine,” she said.

NSW Police Minister David Elliott said people attending the march would be breaching health orders.

“Anybody who attends tomorrow will be exposed to fines and imprisonment because they’ll be in breach of the public health orders,” he told 2GB.

A man holds a sign that says 'Always was.. Always will be Aboriginal Land.'
A protest sign at Hyde Park as part of last year’s Invasion Day march.(Getty: Don Arnold)

Perth

Perth would usually play host to the nation’s largest Australia Day fireworks display, but local coronavirus restrictions mean this year’s Skyworks won’t go ahead.

In its place, the City of Perth has planned a five-day festival, which includes a water projection show that tells the stories of the Whadjuk Nyoongar people. There’ll also be markets and live music performances.

The city has also planned a children’s carnival, motocross and BMX displays, and skydivers twirling through the sky with Australian flags, all in Langley Park.

In the Supreme Court Gardens, the annual Birak Concert will feature Aboriginal entertainment, food trucks and other activities.

An Invasion Day rally will be held in Forrest Place from 1:00pm, before the space transforms into the City of Perth’s food markets from 4:30pm.

The City of Fremantle, which made headlines when it attempted to move its Australia Day citizenship ceremonies to January 28 in 2016, will hold its One Day in Fremantle event today.

It will feature a smoking ceremony at Bathers Beach from 8:00am, before a community barbecue at the nearby Kidogo Arthouse.

Fireworks on the Swan River viewed from the South Perth foreshore.
Fireworks on the Swan River viewed from the South Perth foreshore. Date unknown.(Supplied: Unsplash/Sebastian Davenport-Handley)

Brisbane

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk will kick off the Australia Day celebrations at a flag raising ceremony in Townsville at the Jezzine Barracks.

In less formal celebrations, Mackay locals will enjoy the unveiling of the Big Thongs while Sunshine Coast residents head to a beach parade at Buderim.

The traditional Australia Day egg-tossing championships will take place at Yeppoon along with the Capricornian Beach Games and the Bare Bottom Boat Regatta.

An Invasion Day rally and march will be held in Brisbane as well as Survival Day celebrations in Cairns.

A giant Aboriginal flag is carried by members of a large crowd as they walk across a bridge as part of a protest.
Last year crowds carried a huge flag at the Brisbane Invasion Day protest.(ABC News: Julie Hornsey)

Adelaide

South Australia is used to hosting more than 40,000 people in Adelaide’s Elder Park for Australia Day celebrations — but the day will look a little different this year.

The biggest events will be two free concerts featuring Birds of Tokyo and the Australian Girls Choir at the Adelaide Entertainment Centre.

Tickets will be limited to 5,000 at separate two-and-a-half-hour shows.

Tickets for a Smoking Ceremony at Botanic Park at 8:00am have already been exhausted, but people will be able to attend the Adelaide Central Market for free cooking demonstrations and an art installation.

On the Fleurieu Peninsula, the Victor Harbor council will host a free barbecue and citizenship ceremony at Soldiers Memorial Garden from 8:00am.

Australia Day Council of SA CEO Jan Chorley said that was one of dozens of events being planned at local council level across the state.

“There’s a jam-packed program comprising 85 events put on across 64 councils,” Ms Chorley said.

Ms Chorley said the theme of “reflect, respect, celebrate” was particularly relevant this year, with emergency and first responders to be singled out for praise.

She said no councils had scrapped events because of a push to change the date, but said there was strong focus on ensuring events were inclusive.

“First Nations people have been integral in shaping the events that are taking place across the city of Adelaide,” Ms Chorley said.

“There’s a very strong understanding and commitment to making a day of meaning for all.”

Australia Day awards ceremony in Canberra
For some, Australia Day is a time to celebrate the nation and spend time with family and friends.(ABC News: 666 ABC Canberra, David Flannery)

Hobart

Australia Day in Tasmania will be more subdued this year.

In the state’s north, dozens of small planes from around the country are expected to fly into The Vale, at the foot of Mount Roland near Claude Road for a charity fundraiser and barbeque.

On Tasmania’s west coast, the 123rd Mount Lyall Strahan picnic will be going ahead, with up to 1,000 people permitted to attend in line with the state’s coronavirus gathering restrictions.

Several councils around the state are also hosting Australia Day awards and citizenship ceremonies, along with smaller community celebrations.

Two Invasion Day rallies have also been planned in Tasmania, with one protest to be held on Parliament House lawns in Hobart, and another in Devonport in the state’s north-west. Both rallies begin at midday.

Protesters in an Invasion Day rally in Hobart.
Last year, large crowds turned out in Hobart for the Invasion Day protest.(ABC News: Katri Uibu)

Darwin

The Territory’s largest running event, the annual Oz Run, is on again and is expected to attract up to 4,000 people.

Energetic locals can walk or run along the waterfront, or just turn up for the sausage sizzle.

Participants are encouraged to dress up.

A group of people in Darwin adorn Australia flag hats as they prepare to participate in the annual fun run
Runners are encouraged to have fun and dress up for the the Territory’s largest running event.(ABC News: Jacqueline Breen)

For those who prefer their action to be wheel-based, the annual Ute Run kicks off at 9:30am at Hidden Valley Race Track before winding through the northern suburbs streets and concluding at Noonamah.

The city’s largest Invasion Day/Survival Day event will be held at Civic Park at 10:00am, on Larrakia (Saltwater) country.

Canberra

Australia Day events remain significantly pared back in the capital despite having no new infections for several weeks.

The main community event is The Great Aussie Picnic at the edge of Lake Burley Griffin where Daryl Braithwaite, among others, will perform.

Chief Minister Andrew Barr said the “re-imagined” Australia Day event “will ensure Canberrans have a COVID-safe acknowledgement of Australia Day”.

Each year Canberra also hosts the major citizenship event.

Twenty-five new Australians will be welcomed at Rond Terrace, in view of Parliament House.

A Survival Day march from the city to the lawns of Parliament has also been planned.

People waving Australia flags in Canberra to watch Australian citizenship ceremonies.
Citizenship ceremonies will go ahead on January 26, but on a smaller scale.(ABC New:)

Editor’s note (25/01/2021): This story makes use of the terms Australia Day and Invasion Day. Here’s the ABC’s guidance on the use of those terms.

Thank you for stopping to visit My Local Pages. We Hope you enjoyed reading this news release on National and Northern Territory News and updates named “Australia Day is a contentious day for many. Here are the events being held on January 26”. This news article was presented by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our national news services.

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Farmers’ protest: Cavalcades of tractors from Punjab, Haryana set out for Republic Day parade


CHANDIGARH: Several batches of farmers from Punjab and Haryana set out on Saturday in their tractor-trolleys and other vehicles to take part in the proposed tractor parade on January 26 in Delhi. Carrying some ration, mattresses and other essentials, cavalcades of tractors left for Delhi to press the Centre to accept their demands.

Tractors carried the flags of the unions, some sported the tricolour, and also posters with slogans of ‘Kisan Ekta Zindabad’, ‘No Farmer, No Food’ and ‘Kaale Kanoon Radd Karo’.

Farmer unions protesting the Centre’s three farm laws had said they would go ahead with their tractor parade in Delhi on Republic Day.

They had announced to take out the tractor parade on the Outer Ring Road in Delhi.

Farmer leaders said that the tractor parade would be peaceful.

“Over 30,000 tractors and trolleys today moved from Khanauri (in Sangrur, Punjab) and Dabwali (in Sirsa district, Haryana) to join the tractor parade in Delhi,” said Bharti Kisan Union (Ekta-Ugrahan) general secretary Sukhdev Singh Kokrikalan on Saturday.

They are expected to reach the Tikri border on Saturday night.

Some farmers even mounted tractors on trailers and a few even towed their tractors in order to save diesel, said the farmer leaders.

“Some loaded their tractors in trailers and some even towed their vehicles in order to save fuel,” said Kokrikalan.

Similarly, a cavalcade of around 1,000 tractors left from Phagwara area and 150 tractors from Hoshiarpur in Punjab to become part of the parade, said the farmer leaders.

A farmer leader in Barnala said they were getting a very good response to the call for joining the tractor parade.

“Youth and elders are going in their tractors towards Delhi in a peaceful manner,” he said.

A batch of tractors and other vehicles from Fatehabad in Haryana also left for Delhi to join the parade, they said.

Many farmers from Karnal and other districts would leave for the national capital on Sunday.

Independent MLA from Dadri in Haryana, Sombir Sangwan, who recently withdrew his support to the Khattar government over farmers’ issue, told reporters on Saturday that the Centre will have to agree to farmers’ demands.

Sangwan, who had gone to meet protesting farmers at the Haryana-Rajasthan border near Rewari, also told reporters that farmers should be freely allowed to take part in tractor parade on January 26.

Kirpal Singh Moosapur, Vice-President, Bharati Kisan Union (Doaba) in Phagwara, Punjab, said, “More farmers with tractors will leave tomorrow as well. We expect over 5,000 tractors from Doaba region (in Punjab) alone to reach Delhi for the parade.”

Moosapur slammed the Centre for not accepting farmers’ demands.

“Farmers have been agitating at Delhi borders for the last several weeks but the Modi government has turned a deaf ear to their demands,” he said.

Before heading for Delhi, many farmers got their tractors inspected from mechanics for any fault so they can have a hassle-free journey, said the farmer leaders.

At many places in Punjab and Haryana, tractor marches were taken out on Saturday to mobilise more people for the tractor parade.

Meanwhile, some women in Bathinda said they have asked their male members who are at the Delhi borders not to worry about homes.

“We are taking care of the farm and other works. We have told our male members to stay put until the demands are met,” said an elderly woman in Bathinda.

Thousands of farmers from Punjab and Haryana have been camping at Delhi’s borders for several weeks, demanding the repeal of the farm laws and a legal guarantee on the minimum support price for crops.

They claim that the new laws will weaken the minimum support price (MSP) system. But the Centre says the MSP system will remain and the new laws only provide more options for farmers to sell their produce.



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Australia Day 2021: Scott Morrison controversial photos, David Pocock hits out, reaction, Cricket Australia, BBL


Wallabies great David Pocock has joined the chorus of athletes hitting out at Scott Morrison for controversial claims made about Australia Day and sport’s role in debating the significance of the date.

After consulting with Indigenous leaders, Cricket Australia decided to omit any reference to Australia Day ahead of its Big Bash League games on Tuesday, instead referring to them as “January 26” matches in promotional material.

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That prompted an angry rebuke from Morrison, who called it a “pretty ordinary” decision from cricket’s governing body.

“A bit more focus on cricket, a little less focus on politics would be my message to Cricket Australia,” he told Queensland’s 4RO Radio on Thursday.



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Australia Day/Invasion Day 2021 events guide for Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Hobart and Darwin


One of the most polarising dates on the Australian calendar is back, though this year the coronavirus pandemic could mean fewer crowds at events around the country.

January 26 marks Australia Day or Invasion Day, typically seen as a celebration of the nation or a day of sorrow for the colonisation of an ancient culture.

For many First Nations people, it is a day to mourn the past and galvanise the community to address ongoing systemic racial injustice.

For others, it’s a chance to spend time with family and friends at the beach or around barbeques.

However you plan to spend the day, these are some of the big events in the capital cities.

Melbourne

There’ll be no Australia Day parade in Melbourne this year due to fears of another coronavirus outbreak.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews cancelled the event and has urged residents to follow health advice to avoid gathering in large numbers.

Thousands of people lined the street for Melbourne’s annual Australia Day parade on January 26, 2022.(Supplied: Channel Seven)

Smaller events are happening around the city, starting early with a 5:00am start for the Invasion Day Dawn Service at King’s Domain Resting Place.

The Victorian NAIDOC Committee has requested that people register in advance to comply with coronavirus restrictions.

Later, an Invasion Day rally will be held on the steps of Parliament House in Melbourne from 10:30am.

The organisers, the Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance, say they have a COVID safety plan in place with marshals to control attendees.

Elsewhere, the Share the Spirit Festival returns to Melbourne’s Treasury Gardens on January 26, bringing together artists, musicians and dancers to celebrate Aboriginal music and culture.

Australian of the Year, legendary singer Archie Roach, will be performing at the Sidney Myer Music Bowl. Gates will open for the free event at 12:00pm.

Archie Roach sings into a microphone
Archie Roach was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2020.(Supplied: ARIAs)

Sydney

Events in Sydney will be smaller than in previous years due to limits on crowd sizes amid the pandemic.

Those up early can catch the raising of the Australian and Aboriginal flags on Sydney Harbour Bridge at 5:15am.

Circular Quay will be much quieter than usual. There will be no Ferrython, Harbour Parade or Tall Ships race this year due to the pandemic, although the annual Oz Day 10km Wheelchair Race starts at 9:00am at The Rocks.

Brydi Saul digs deep to keep going in a wheelchair race.
Brydi Saul in action at the Oz Day 10K wheelchair race on January 26, 2020.(Supplied: Karen Watson)

Other annual events will be broadcast live, including the Lord Mayor’s Citizenship Ceremony at the Opera House and fireworks over the harbour.

One of the biggest Invasion Day events is a planned march through the city starting at 9:00am at Djarrbarrgalli, or Sydney’s Domain.

Organisers say the demonstration is calling for “Australia Day” to be abolished and for “sovereignty, not constitutional recognition”.

The New South Wales Government has restricted protest gatherings to 500 people under current COVID-19 regulations.

But rally organiser and Gumbaynggirr, Bundjalung and Dunghutti woman Elizabeth Jarrett said the community needed to “come together and fight back”, even if that breached health directives.

“Unlike COVID, the virus of colonial racism that came to these lands in 1788 cannot be defeated by self-isolation or quarantine,” she said.

A man holds a sign that says 'Always was.. Always will be Aboriginal Land.'
A protest sign at Hyde Park as part of last year’s Invasion Day march.(Getty: Don Arnold)

Perth

Perth would usually play host to the nation’s largest Australia Day fireworks display, but local coronavirus restrictions mean this year’s Skyworks won’t go ahead.

In its place, the City of Perth has planned a five-day festival, which includes a water projection show that tells the stories of the Whadjuk Nyoongar people. There’ll also be markets and live music performances.

The city has also planned a children’s carnival, motocross and BMX displays, and skydivers twirling through the sky with Australian flags, all in Langley Park.

In the Supreme Court Gardens, the annual Birak Concert will feature Aboriginal entertainment, food trucks and other activities.

An Invasion Day rally will be held in Forrest Place from 1:00pm, before the space transforms into the City of Perth’s food markets from 4:30pm.

The City of Fremantle, which made headlines when it attempted to move its Australia Day citizenship ceremonies to January 28 in 2016, will hold its One Day in Fremantle event today.

It will feature a smoking ceremony at Bathers Beach from 8:00am, before a community barbecue at the nearby Kidogo Arthouse.

Fireworks on the Swan River viewed from the South Perth foreshore.
Fireworks on the Swan River viewed from the South Perth foreshore. Date unknown.(Supplied: Unsplash/Sebastian Davenport-Handley)

Brisbane

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk will kick off the Australia Day celebrations at a flag raising ceremony in Townsville at the Jezzine Barracks.

In less formal celebrations, Mackay locals will enjoy the unveiling of the Big Thongs while Sunshine Coast residents head to a beach parade at Buderim.

The traditional Australia Day egg-tossing championships will take place at Yeppoon along with the Capricornian Beach Games and the Bare Bottom Boat Regatta.

An Invasion Day rally and march will be held in Brisbane as well as Survival Day celebrations in Cairns.

A giant Aboriginal flag is carried by members of a large crowd as they walk across a bridge as part of a protest.
Last year crowds carried a huge flag at the Brisbane Invasion Day protest.(ABC News: Julie Hornsey)

Adelaide

South Australia is used to hosting more than 40,000 people in Adelaide’s Elder Park for Australia Day celebrations — but the day will look a little different this year.

The biggest events will be two free concerts featuring Birds of Tokyo and the Australian Girls Choir at the Adelaide Entertainment Centre.

Tickets will be limited to 5,000 at separate two-and-a-half-hour shows.

Tickets for a Smoking Ceremony at Botanic Park at 8:00am have already been exhausted, but people will be able to attend the Adelaide Central Market for free cooking demonstrations and an art installation.

On the Fleurieu Peninsula, the Victor Harbor council will host a free barbecue and citizenship ceremony at Soldiers Memorial Garden from 8:00am.

Australia Day Council of SA CEO Jan Chorley said that was one of dozens of events being planned at local council level across the state.

“There’s a jam-packed program comprising 85 events put on across 64 councils,” Ms Chorley said.

Ms Chorley said the theme of “reflect, respect, celebrate” was particularly relevant this year, with emergency and first responders to be singled out for praise.

She said no councils had scrapped events because of a push to change the date, but said there was strong focus on ensuring events were inclusive.

“First Nations people have been integral in shaping the events that are taking place across the city of Adelaide,” Ms Chorley said.

“There’s a very strong understanding and commitment to making a day of meaning for all.”

Australia Day awards ceremony in Canberra
For some, Australia Day is a time to celebrate the nation and spend time with family and friends.(ABC News: 666 ABC Canberra, David Flannery)

Hobart

Australia Day in Tasmania will be more subdued this year.

In the state’s north, dozens of small planes from around the country are expected to fly into The Vale, at the foot of Mount Roland near Claude Road for a charity fundraiser and barbeque.

On Tasmania’s west coast, the 123rd Mount Lyall Strahan picnic will be going ahead, with up to 1,000 people permitted to attend in line with the state’s coronavirus gathering restrictions.

Several councils around the state are also hosting Australia Day awards and citizenship ceremonies, along with smaller community celebrations.

Two Invasion Day rallies have also been planned in Tasmania, with one protest to be held on Parliament House lawns in Hobart, and another in Devonport in the state’s north-west. Both rallies begin at midday.

Protesters in an Invasion Day rally in Hobart.
Last year, large crowds turned out in Hobart for the Invasion Day protest.(ABC News: Katri Uibu)

Darwin

The Territory’s largest running event, the annual Oz Run, is on again and is expected to attract up to 4,000 people.

Energetic locals can walk or run along the waterfront, or just turn up for the sausage sizzle.

Participants are encouraged to dress up.

A group of people in Darwin adorn Australia flag hats as they prepare to participate in the annual fun run
Runners are encouraged to have fun and dress up for the the Territory’s largest running event.(ABC News: Jacqueline Breen)

For those who prefer their action to be wheel-based, the annual Ute Run kicks off at 9:30am at Hidden Valley Race Track before winding through the northern suburbs streets and concluding at Noonamah.

The city’s largest Invasion Day/Survival Day event will be held at Civic Park at 10:00am, on Larrakia (Saltwater) country.

Canberra

Australia Day events remain significantly pared back in the capital despite having no new infections for several weeks.

The main community event is The Great Aussie Picnic at the edge of Lake Burley Griffin where Daryl Braithwaite, among others, will perform.

Chief Minister Andrew Barr said the “re-imagined” Australia Day event “will ensure Canberrans have a COVID-safe acknowledgement of Australia Day”.

Each year Canberra also hosts the major citizenship event.

Twenty-five new Australians will be welcomed at Rond Terrace, in view of Parliament House.

A Survival Day march from the city to the lawns of Parliament has also been planned.

People waving Australia flags in Canberra to watch Australian citizenship ceremonies.
Citizenship ceremonies will go ahead on January 26, but on a smaller scale.(ABC New:)

Thank you for stopping by and checking this news article about SA news called “Australia Day/Invasion Day 2021 events guide for Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Hobart and Darwin”. This news article was shared by My Local Pages Australia as part of our news aggregator services.

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Scott Morrison incriminating photos, Australia Day 2021, David Pocock, sports world erupts, Cricket Australia decision, BBL


Wallabies great David Pocock has joined the chorus of athletes hitting out at Scott Morrison for controversial claims made about Australia Day and sport’s role in debating the significance of the date.

After consulting with Indigenous leaders, Cricket Australia decided to omit any reference to Australia Day ahead of its Big Bash League games on Tuesday, instead referring to them as “January 26” matches in promotional material.

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That prompted an angry rebuke from Morrison, who called it a “pretty ordinary” decision from cricket’s governing body.

“A bit more focus on cricket, a little less focus on politics would be my message to Cricket Australia,” he told Queensland’s 4RO Radio on Thursday.

Morrison also angered many when he said: “You know on Australia Day, it’s all about acknowledging how far we’ve come. When those 12 ships turned up in Sydney all those years ago, it wasn’t a particularly flash day for the people on those vessels either.”

Cricketers Usman Khawaja, Dan Christian and Megan Schutt were among high-profile athletes to criticise Morrison, while Olympic icon Cathy Freeman and boxer Anthony Mundine also hit out.

Now rugby star Pocock has joined in, posting photos of Morrison on Twitter in an attempt to point out what he says are double standards.

The 78-Test veteran uploaded pictures of the Prime Minister wearing his Cronulla Sharks hat and polo shirt at a public event, talking to the Australian cricket team, posing with the Prime Minister’s XIII rugby league team and running drinks out to the Prime Minister’s XI cricket side.

RELATED: Cricket photo comes back to haunt Morrison

RELATED: ScoMo deeply offends Cathy Freeman

Pocock said on social media it was unfair for political leaders to tell sport to stay out of politics, when they regularly use sport for their own gain.

“If you’re a young or aspiring athlete: here in Australia we hear a lot of talk — often from our Prime Ministers — that sport and politics shouldn’t mix,” Pocock wrote on Twitter.

“That’s just not true and politicians know it — that’s why they use sport for their own political agenda.

“Australia even uses it for diplomacy.

“Politics is about our shared life together, about who we are and who we want to be. You have as much right as anyone to be part of the conversation, many issues at hand will affect your life and future more than the politicians making the decisions

“The issues our generation faces are real and serious and the decisions our politicians make today will affect what kind of future we have. We all have a role to play.”

Morrison later tried to dispel criticism of his Australia Day comments after the fierce backlash, saying it was “false” to suggest he was comparing the experience of Indigenous Australians to that of the first settlers.

“I’ll simply say this — Australia is more than 25 million stories,” Morrison told reporters in Brisbane.

“Each of us can trace our stories back into our own Australia, Indigenous Australia, First Nations Australia. All the stories are important. All stories should be respected.

“Australian stories are unique in this country. But the thing they celebrate most about Australians, despite the hardship, whether that be that of dispossession and the terrible disease and destruction faced by the First Nations or whether it was the convicts who came, all those stories are important.

“They’re not competing with each other. They’re just part of who we are.”

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Watch an iconic Aussie film this Australia Day | The Border Mail


news, local-news, films, Australian films, australian movies

Australia’s film history goes back to the earliest days of cinema – The History of the Kelly Gang (1906) was the world’s first feature film. Here are some of the many Australian movies worth a look. Walkabout (1971): This adaptation of James Vance Marshall’s novel is a haunting story of a white schoolgirl (Jenny Agutter) and her younger brother (Lucien John), abandoned in the Australian outback, who are helped to survive by an Aboriginal teenager (David Gulpilil). Wake in Fright (1971): This US/Australian co-production, directed by Ted Kotcheff and adapted from Kenneth Cook’s novel, follows the experiences of a young schoolteacher (Gary Bond) who gets caught up in violence and debauchery while stuck in an outback town. The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972): Director Bruce Beresford and Barry Humphries collaborated on the script for this comedy. It’s based on Humphries’ Ocker comic-book character (played by Barry Crocker), who travels to Britain with his aunt Edna (Humphries). Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975): Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel about some schoolgirls and a teacher disappearing in the bush on Valentine’s Day in 1900 was long believed to be based on a true story. Director Peter Weir’s film maintains an atmosphere of mystery and unease. Storm Boy (1976): This poignant adaptation of Colin Thiele’s 1966 novel won the AFI for best film. A lonely boy (Greg Rowe), living on the coast of South Australia with his reclusive father (Peter Cummins), becomes involved in caring for three orphaned pelicans. Remade in 2019. The Devil’s Playground (1976): Writer-director Fred Schepisi based this sensitive film on his own experiences as a boy in a Catholic juniorate. Don’s Party (1977): David Williamson adapted his dark stage comedy about a Melbourne teacher who hosts an election-eve party in 1969 that descends into alcohol-soaked nastiness. Directed by Bruce Beresford. Patrick (1978): Richard Franklin (Psycho II) directed this Ozploitation horror movie about a comatose young man with destructive psychic powers. The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978): Fred Schepisi adapted and directed Tom Keneally’s novel about Jimmie Governor, an exploited Aboriginal man who went on a murderous rampage. Mad Max (1979): This post-apocalyptic action movie launched George Miller’s directorial career and gave a big boost to Mel Gibson who starred in the title role. Followed by two sequels and a reboot. My Brilliant Career (1979): Gillian Armstrong directed this screen version of the 1901 novel by Miles Franklin, about a young woman (Judy Davis) who wants to become a writer but is tempted by romance. Anna Senior’s costumes were nominated for an Oscar. Breaker Morant (1980): Bruce Beresford co-wrote and directed this historical drama about the court-martial of controversial Harry “Breaker” Morant (Edward Woodward) and two other soldiers for murdering prisoners and a missionary during the Boer War. Fatty Finn (1980): Maurice Murphy directed this colourful family film based on Syd Nicholls’ comic strip. During the Depression, Hubert “Fatty” Finn (Ben Oxenbould) is raising money to buy a crystal set. Gallipoli (1981): David Williamson and Peter Weir collaborated on this tragic drama about two runners, played by Mel Gibson and Mark Lee, who enlist during World War I. Puberty Blues (1981): Two teenage Sydney girls join a surfie gang in this adaptation of the novel by Gabrielle Carey and Kathy Lette. The Man from Snowy River (1982): Bruce Smeaton’s score and beautiful cinematography are among the attractions of this film based on Banjo Paterson’s poem. Tom Burlinson plays the title role and Sigrid Thornton plays the daughter of the wealthy Harrison (Kirk Douglas). Turkey Shoot (1982): Notorious Ozploitation shocker about a future dystopian society where convicts are hunted for fun. The Pirate Movie (1983): Fans of bad movies are the best audience for this loose adaptation of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance with lots of new pop songs. Stars Christopher Atkins and Kristy McNichol. The Return of Captain Invincible (1983): A curio, this is a musical comedy superhero movie in which the title hero (Alan Arkin) comes out of retirement to battle his old rival Mr Midnight (Christopher Lee). Bliss (1985): Darkly comic, slow-paced adult story written by director Ray Lawrence and Peter Carey (based on the latter’s novel) about Harry Joy (Barry Otto), a man who dies and is revived into a nightmarish world. Crocodile Dundee (1986): This fish-out-of-water comedy starring Australian TV comedian Paul Hogan as a bushman who goes to New York City was a big international hit. It’s a little dated but still has its moments. Malcolm (1986): Nadia Tass directed her husband David Parker’s whimsical comedy script about a shy inventor (Colin Friels) who becomes a bank robber. The Year My Voice Broke (1987): In 1962 in an Australian country town, gawky teenager Danny (Noah Taylor) and rebel Trevor (Ben Mendelsohn) vie for the affections of Freya (Loene Carmen). Writer-director John Duigan followed this with the 1991 sequel Flirting. Proof (1991): Writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse’s striking drama focuses on the triangle of blind, untrusting Martin (Hugo Weaving), his possessive housekeeper Celia (Genevieve Picot) and restaurant worker Andy (Russell Crowe), who befriends Martin. Romper Stomper (1992): Russell Crowe had an early lead role as Hando, leader of a group of Melbourne skinheads who attack the Vietnamese community in writer-director Geoffrey Wright’s violent drama. Strictly Ballroom (1992): Despite stiff acting from Paul Mercurio, this comedy about the competitive world of ballroom dancing is charming and lots of fun, before director Baz Luhrmann’s excesses took hold. The Piano (1993): Jane Campion wrote and directed this brooding historical drama about a mute woman (Holly Hunter) sent to New Zealand with her daughter (Anna Paquin) for an arranged marriage but who falls in love with another man (Harvey Keitel). Muriel’s Wedding (1994): Writer-director PJ Hogan balances comedy and drama well in this story of a lonely, ABBA-loving young woman (Toni Colette) who longs to get married. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994): Two drag queens and a transsexual (Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce and Terence Stamp) embark on a road trip in this tart-tongued Stephen Elliott comedy that won an Oscar for its costumes. Babe (1995): Charming family film about a pig with sheep-herding abilities. Adapted from Dick King-Smith’s book by George Miller and Chris Noonan (the latter also directed). Followed by a sequel. Shine (1996): Geoffrey Rush won the best actor Oscar for his impressive performance as mentally ill pianist David Helfgott who finds love and hope when he meets an astrologer (Lynn Redgrave). Directed by Scott Hicks. The Castle (1997): This comedy about a Melbourne family’s battle to save their home was a big hit and produced lines that entered the vernacular (like “straight to the pool room”). The Interview (1998): Director and co-writer Craig Monahan’s suspenseful film centres on a battle of wits between a suspect (Hugo Weaving) and a police detective (Tony Martin). Two Hands (1999): In Gregor Jordan’s comedy crime film, Jimmy (Heath Ledger) loses $10,000 belonging to gangster Pando (Bryan Brown) and must find a way to repay it. Lantana (2001): Ray Lawrence’s second film is an an involving multi-character drama involving adultery, violence and death, adapted by Andrew Bovell from his play Speaking in Tongues. Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002): In 1931, three Aboriginal girls escape from a training school and undertake a long journey to return home, pursued by police. Based on a true story. Wolf Creek (2005): John Jarratt plays outback psychopath Mick Taylor in Greg McLean’s violent horror movie. Jindabyne (2006): Ray Lawrence’s third film, based on a Raymond Carver short story, begins with men on a fishing trip who discover and do not report a dead body. Happy Feet (2006): George Miller’s film about a penguin who can’t sing but can dance was the first Australian movie to win an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film. Australia (2008): This lavish, star-studded melodrama was liked by some but, like his earlier Moulin Rouge!, betrayed director Baz Luhrmann’s weaknesses – style over substance and frenetic camp. Samson and Delilah (2009): In Warwick Thornton’s acclaimed drama, two Aboriginal teenagers (Rowan McNamara and Marissa Gibson) leave their outback village and head to Alice Springs. Animal Kingdom (2010): David Michod’s impressive debut feature about a crime family gave veteran Australian actress Jacki Weaver, who played the matriarch, a Hollywood career. Red Dog (2011): Koko the kelpie plays the title character in this appealing outback film. The Dressmaker (2015): Co-writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse’s darkly comic film stars Kate Winslet as a woman who returns to her home town bent on revenge. Based on Rosalie Ham’s novel.

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Canberra doctor hands back OAM in protest against Margaret Court’s Australia Day honour



The fallout from Margaret Court’s controversial Australia Day honour has continued with a Canberra doctor handing back her own award in protest.

Clara Tuck Meng Soo says the decision to award Australia’s highest honour to the controversial tennis great promotes discrimination.

Court’s appointment as Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in this year’s Australia Day Honours List leaked on Friday before the official unveiling.

The 78-year-old Pentecostal minister has come under fire in recent years for her public disparaging of same-sex relationships and transgender people.

Dr Soo received an Order of Australia Medal in 2016 for her work as a medical practitioner with the LGBTIQ+ community and people with HIV.

A statement issued by Just Equal on Saturday identified her as one of the first GPs to undergo gender transition in Australia.

“I have spent a significant amount of my working life working with and advocating for disadvantaged communities in Australia,” Dr Soo said in the statement.

“I may also add that I have spent most of my adult life as a gay man before my gender transition to a woman in 2018.

“I therefore have both professional experience as well as lived experience of the communities that Mrs Margaret Court makes these derogatory and hurtful remarks about.”

Just Equal spokesperson Ivan Hinton-Teoh urged the Council of the Order of Australia to reconsider its decision.

He said there would be “many distinguished Australians” reconsidering their association with the awards system in light of the honour.

In an interview with AAP this week, Court – the winner of an unparalleled 24 grand slam singles titles – described the honour as a great privilege.

“All my life I’ve had those views and I was just saying what the Bible says,” she said.

“I should always be able to say my views biblically, being a pastor and helping people with marriages and family. And I’ll never change those views.

“I have nothing against people – I love the people. We have them come into our community services, all kinds – whether they’re gay, transgender, whatever they are.

“We never turn a person away and I think it’s been tried to be made out that I’m somebody that I’m not really. And I think that is very sad.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said compilation of the Honours List was an independent process.

Federal Labor has questioned why Court was given the top honour when she had already been recognised for her sporting prowess with an Order of Australia Medal.

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Watch an iconic Aussie film this Australia Day | Goulburn Post


news, local-news, films, Australian films, australian movies

Australia’s film history goes back to the earliest days of cinema – The History of the Kelly Gang (1906) was the world’s first feature film. Here are some of the many Australian movies worth a look. Walkabout (1971): This adaptation of James Vance Marshall’s novel is a haunting story of a white schoolgirl (Jenny Agutter) and her younger brother (Lucien John), abandoned in the Australian outback, who are helped to survive by an Aboriginal teenager (David Gulpilil). Wake in Fright (1971): This US/Australian co-production, directed by Ted Kotcheff and adapted from Kenneth Cook’s novel, follows the experiences of a young schoolteacher (Gary Bond) who gets caught up in violence and debauchery while stuck in an outback town. The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972): Director Bruce Beresford and Barry Humphries collaborated on the script for this comedy. It’s based on Humphries’ Ocker comic-book character (played by Barry Crocker), who travels to Britain with his aunt Edna (Humphries). Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975): Joan Lindsay’s 1967 novel about some schoolgirls and a teacher disappearing in the bush on Valentine’s Day in 1900 was long believed to be based on a true story. Director Peter Weir’s film maintains an atmosphere of mystery and unease. Storm Boy (1976): This poignant adaptation of Colin Thiele’s 1966 novel won the AFI for best film. A lonely boy (Greg Rowe), living on the coast of South Australia with his reclusive father (Peter Cummins), becomes involved in caring for three orphaned pelicans. Remade in 2019. The Devil’s Playground (1976): Writer-director Fred Schepisi based this sensitive film on his own experiences as a boy in a Catholic juniorate. Don’s Party (1977): David Williamson adapted his dark stage comedy about a Melbourne teacher who hosts an election-eve party in 1969 that descends into alcohol-soaked nastiness. Directed by Bruce Beresford. Patrick (1978): Richard Franklin (Psycho II) directed this Ozploitation horror movie about a comatose young man with destructive psychic powers. The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978): Fred Schepisi adapted and directed Tom Keneally’s novel about Jimmie Governor, an exploited Aboriginal man who went on a murderous rampage. Mad Max (1979): This post-apocalyptic action movie launched George Miller’s directorial career and gave a big boost to Mel Gibson who starred in the title role. Followed by two sequels and a reboot. My Brilliant Career (1979): Gillian Armstrong directed this screen version of the 1901 novel by Miles Franklin, about a young woman (Judy Davis) who wants to become a writer but is tempted by romance. Anna Senior’s costumes were nominated for an Oscar. Breaker Morant (1980): Bruce Beresford co-wrote and directed this historical drama about the court-martial of controversial Harry “Breaker” Morant (Edward Woodward) and two other soldiers for murdering prisoners and a missionary during the Boer War. Fatty Finn (1980): Maurice Murphy directed this colourful family film based on Syd Nicholls’ comic strip. During the Depression, Hubert “Fatty” Finn (Ben Oxenbould) is raising money to buy a crystal set. Gallipoli (1981): David Williamson and Peter Weir collaborated on this tragic drama about two runners, played by Mel Gibson and Mark Lee, who enlist during World War I. Puberty Blues (1981): Two teenage Sydney girls join a surfie gang in this adaptation of the novel by Gabrielle Carey and Kathy Lette. The Man from Snowy River (1982): Bruce Smeaton’s score and beautiful cinematography are among the attractions of this film based on Banjo Paterson’s poem. Tom Burlinson plays the title role and Sigrid Thornton plays the daughter of the wealthy Harrison (Kirk Douglas). Turkey Shoot (1982): Notorious Ozploitation shocker about a future dystopian society where convicts are hunted for fun. The Pirate Movie (1983): Fans of bad movies are the best audience for this loose adaptation of Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance with lots of new pop songs. Stars Christopher Atkins and Kristy McNichol. The Return of Captain Invincible (1983): A curio, this is a musical comedy superhero movie in which the title hero (Alan Arkin) comes out of retirement to battle his old rival Mr Midnight (Christopher Lee). Bliss (1985): Darkly comic, slow-paced adult story written by director Ray Lawrence and Peter Carey (based on the latter’s novel) about Harry Joy (Barry Otto), a man who dies and is revived into a nightmarish world. Crocodile Dundee (1986): This fish-out-of-water comedy starring Australian TV comedian Paul Hogan as a bushman who goes to New York City was a big international hit. It’s a little dated but still has its moments. Malcolm (1986): Nadia Tass directed her husband David Parker’s whimsical comedy script about a shy inventor (Colin Friels) who becomes a bank robber. The Year My Voice Broke (1987): In 1962 in an Australian country town, gawky teenager Danny (Noah Taylor) and rebel Trevor (Ben Mendelsohn) vie for the affections of Freya (Loene Carmen). Writer-director John Duigan followed this with the 1991 sequel Flirting. Proof (1991): Writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse’s striking drama focuses on the triangle of blind, untrusting Martin (Hugo Weaving), his possessive housekeeper Celia (Genevieve Picot) and restaurant worker Andy (Russell Crowe), who befriends Martin. Romper Stomper (1992): Russell Crowe had an early lead role as Hando, leader of a group of Melbourne skinheads who attack the Vietnamese community in writer-director Geoffrey Wright’s violent drama. Strictly Ballroom (1992): Despite stiff acting from Paul Mercurio, this comedy about the competitive world of ballroom dancing is charming and lots of fun, before director Baz Luhrmann’s excesses took hold. The Piano (1993): Jane Campion wrote and directed this brooding historical drama about a mute woman (Holly Hunter) sent to New Zealand with her daughter (Anna Paquin) for an arranged marriage but who falls in love with another man (Harvey Keitel). Muriel’s Wedding (1994): Writer-director PJ Hogan balances comedy and drama well in this story of a lonely, ABBA-loving young woman (Toni Colette) who longs to get married. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994): Two drag queens and a transsexual (Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce and Terence Stamp) embark on a road trip in this tart-tongued Stephen Elliott comedy that won an Oscar for its costumes. Babe (1995): Charming family film about a pig with sheep-herding abilities. Adapted from Dick King-Smith’s book by George Miller and Chris Noonan (the latter also directed). Followed by a sequel. Shine (1996): Geoffrey Rush won the best actor Oscar for his impressive performance as mentally ill pianist David Helfgott who finds love and hope when he meets an astrologer (Lynn Redgrave). Directed by Scott Hicks. The Castle (1997): This comedy about a Melbourne family’s battle to save their home was a big hit and produced lines that entered the vernacular (like “straight to the pool room”). The Interview (1998): Director and co-writer Craig Monahan’s suspenseful film centres on a battle of wits between a suspect (Hugo Weaving) and a police detective (Tony Martin). Two Hands (1999): In Gregor Jordan’s comedy crime film, Jimmy (Heath Ledger) loses $10,000 belonging to gangster Pando (Bryan Brown) and must find a way to repay it. Lantana (2001): Ray Lawrence’s second film is an an involving multi-character drama involving adultery, violence and death, adapted by Andrew Bovell from his play Speaking in Tongues. Rabbit-Proof Fence (2002): In 1931, three Aboriginal girls escape from a training school and undertake a long journey to return home, pursued by police. Based on a true story. Wolf Creek (2005): John Jarratt plays outback psychopath Mick Taylor in Greg McLean’s violent horror movie. Jindabyne (2006): Ray Lawrence’s third film, based on a Raymond Carver short story, begins with men on a fishing trip who discover and do not report a dead body. Happy Feet (2006): George Miller’s film about a penguin who can’t sing but can dance was the first Australian movie to win an Oscar for Best Animated Feature Film. Australia (2008): This lavish, star-studded melodrama was liked by some but, like his earlier Moulin Rouge!, betrayed director Baz Luhrmann’s weaknesses – style over substance and frenetic camp. Samson and Delilah (2009): In Warwick Thornton’s acclaimed drama, two Aboriginal teenagers (Rowan McNamara and Marissa Gibson) leave their outback village and head to Alice Springs. Animal Kingdom (2010): David Michod’s impressive debut feature about a crime family gave veteran Australian actress Jacki Weaver, who played the matriarch, a Hollywood career. Red Dog (2011): Koko the kelpie plays the title character in this appealing outback film. The Dressmaker (2015): Co-writer-director Jocelyn Moorhouse’s darkly comic film stars Kate Winslet as a woman who returns to her home town bent on revenge. Based on Rosalie Ham’s novel.

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/fdcx/dc5syd-6qr9hq5ap50agud6cme.jpg/r0_101_2712_1633_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg



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