Biden’s dog Major bites another White House employee


President Biden’s dog Major on Monday afternoon bit another employee, who then required medical attention.

First Lady Jill Biden’s press secretary Michael de Rosa confirmed the “nip”  in a statement to Fox News. “Major is still adjusting to his new surroundings and he nipped someone while on a walk.  Out of an abundance of caution, the individual was seen by WHMU and then returned to work without injury.”

The encounter took place on the White House South Lawn Monday. CNN first reported the bite, adding that the employee worked for the National Park Service. 

Major was seen being walked by a White House employee on a leash Monday afternoon. 

Monday’s incident was the second time Major, a three-year-old German Shepherd, bit someone at the White House in less than a month. On March 8, Major sunk his teeth into a Secret Service employee, who also required attention from the White House medical unit. Psaki referred to that incident as “minor.” 

BIDEN’S DOGS ARE BACK AT THE WHITE HOUSE AFTER MAJOR BIT SOMEONE, PSAKI SAYS 

Biden told “Good Morning America” after Major first bit someone that he would be put in training. He said his dog just needed more time to adjust to life at the White House. 

“Every door you turn to, there’s a guy there in a black jacket,” he said of the serious security. “You turn a corner, and there’s two people you don’t know at all. And [Major] moves to protect.”

Biden also has a seemingly less rambunctious, older German Shepherd– Champ, 13. 

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After the first bite occurred, both pets were sent to Wilmington, Delaware to be looked after by a family friend, but the White House denied it had banished them for bad behavior. 

White House press secretary said the dogs returned to Biden’s hometown as part of a “pre-planned trip” as First Lady Jill Biden was going to be away that week. “The dogs will come and go,” Psaki said last week, confirming that they had returned to the White House from Delaware. 

Fox News’ Kristina Biddle contributed to this report.

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Brisbane dog trainer accused of running terror network sending fighters to Middle East


A man accused of co-running a terrorist network that sent Australian fighters to Syria has been identified as Brisbane dog trainer Gabriel Crazzi.

Crazzi, a 34-year-old father-of-three, could spend decades in jail after being arrested south of Brisbane on Thursday.

His alleged accomplice Ahmed Talib, 31, was taken into custody in Melbourne at the same time.

Australian Federal Police allege the men were part of a sophisticated terrorist syndicate based in Queensland’s south-east that helped get Australians to Syria where they joined terrorist groups fighting against the government.

Those groups included Jabhat al-Nusra, also know as al-Qaeda in Syria.

One of the men the group helped was Ahmed Succarieh, believed to be Australia’s first suicide bomber.

He blew himself up when he drove a truck loaded with explosives into a military checkpoint in Syria in September 2013, killing 35 people.

AFP counter-terrorism commander Stephen Dametto said the pair arrested on Thursday were part of a group that had tentacles in Australia, Turkey and Syria.

Police believe that between 2012 and 2014, as many as seven Australian fighters were helped to reach Syria.

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Melinda Schneider to give Canberra dog its day in Doris Day show




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Stranded campers and dog rescued by ADF after being cut off by floodwaters in Wollondilly Forest


Nine stranded campers and a pet dog have been rescued after being cut off by floodwaters south-west of Sydney.

The group, which included a nine-year-old boy, were stranded for six days in the in the Wollondilly Forest.

The heavy rains turned a creek into a raging torrent, washing away the campsite and the group’s food supplies.

Nine stranded campers and a pet dog have been rescued from the Wollondilly Forest. NSW Floods
Nine stranded campers have been rescued from the Wollondilly Forest. (9News)
The group, which included a nine-year-old boy and a pet dog, were stranded for six days. NSW Floods
The group, which included a nine-year-old boy and a pet dog, were stranded for six days. (9News)

A Royal Navy Taipan helicopter crew extracted the seven friends, a father and son, and dog yesterday in a delicate operation.

The evacuees were taken to Mittagong Sports field where they were met by members of the NSW SES.

A Royal Navy Taipan helicopter crew extracted the campers. NSW Floods
A Royal Navy Taipan helicopter crew extracted the campers. (9News)

East coast flood disaster now stretching 600km

There are currently two Navy helicopters supporting aerial search and rescue operations, with four Army MRH-90 Taipan helicopters arriving from Townsville today.

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Police dog, two Tasers to arrest man accused of threatening to burn partner | The Canberra Times


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A man was set on by a police dog, Tasered twice and still managed to flee from officers in what a magistrate described as the “biggest resist [arrest]” he’d seen in his career on the bench. Jason Buckley, 39, had been on the run since November for an incident in which he is accused of dousing his partner in methylated spirits and threatened to set her alight with a cigarette lighter. A first instance warrant was sworn against Mr Buckley, who managed to elude detection for more than three months until this week, when he was arrested in Bonner and appeared on Friday before Magistrate James Stewart. Police alleged that in November 2020, Mr Buckley had several arguments with his partner before threatening her with injury. He left the house but returned, when the arguments resumed. This time, they said, he splashed the woman with methylated spirits and threatened to set her on fire with a lighter held in his hands. READ MORE: As the victim attempted to flee the house in her car, Mr Buckley jumped on the bonnet and smashed the windscreen, police said. She escaped and returned home, where he again confronted her. Seeking Mr Buckley on four charges, police had been on patrol in Gungahlin on Thursday afternoon when they saw him standing in a doorway. He allegedly ran away and police began a systemic patrol search of the area, finally spotting him hiding in some bushes. As Mr Buckley rushed at one officer, a police dog grabbed him. He somehow managed to wrestle the dog off and continued advancing toward police, who fired the first Taser. Buckley fell to the ground “momentarily incapacitated” but when police attempted to handcuff him, he wriggled free, ran at another officer and received a second Taser shot. He was eventually apprehended by a second group of officers approaching from another direction. “That’s the biggest resist arrest I’ve seen in my career,” Magistrate Stewart said in court. Mr Buckley appeared on a number of family-violence related charges including one count of an act endangering life, reckless threat to inflict grievous bodily harm and resisting a public official. Mr Buckley’s defence attorney sought bail, and said that his client would be pleading not guilty to the family violence charges. However, Magistrate Stewart said that Mr Buckley was already serving an intensive corrections order in NSW, “clearly had no fear of police”, and there was the strong likelihood of him harassing the complainant. He was remanded in custody to appear again on May 11. Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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Work dog training program in Victoria tooling farmers with resilience in a bid to improve mental health


Dogs are known to be man’s best friend, and a new program being run in Victoria’s south-west is utilising this bond to bring farmers together.

Dunkeld’s Working Dog Training School not only improves farmers dog handling skills, but also breaks down the social barriers farmers can face when it comes to discussing their mental health.

Kelly Barnes is behind the program and was last year given $10,000 to run the training school when she was awarded the 2020 Victorian AgriFutures Rural Women’s Award.

Ms Barnes said the inspiration for the working dogs training school was how her pooch Dugald helped her in times of need, especially after needing to give up physical labour due to developing chronic pain condition fibromyalgia.

“Going through this experience made me realise how much of a benefit my dog was to me on the farm, but also as a support tool and company when I’m at home.”

But due to COVID-19, her vision was put on pause until this year as social gathering restrictions made holding the monthly event impossible.

“That was quiet crushing because we were ready to get up and running,” Ms Barnes said.

Ms Barnes said she was excited when she could finally run the program, with the help of working dog trainer Ian O’Connell.

‘We’ve got an awesome bunch of people here, we have 14 participants ranging from an 18-year-old to a guy in is 60s, a really diverse group of people.”

Jo Ward is a livestock vet who attends the program, and she said although it’s a stereotype, farmers aren’t comfortable talking about their feelings.

“Doing this course opens the doors for these conversations, but even if they don’t want to talk about it, it’s giving them an outlet to get off farm and meet like-minded people,” she said.

Dr Ward said the participants bond over their connections to their K9 friends.

“I know that no matter how bad of a day I’ve had, that I’ll get home and they’ll be happy to see me.”

Dunkeld station hand Dylan Dyer credits his dogs with saving his mental health, after struggling to cope with the passing of his father.

“It’s been quiet hard not to have that person you can ring and just let them know how you’re going, he played a big part in my life.”

Mr Dyer said getting the opportunity to meet new people has improved his confidence, and he got a feeling of accomplishment when he and his dog Swindle learn a new skill, which benefitted his mood.

“It’s good to get out and get out of that [on farm] rut, you just never know the opportunities that might come out of it.”

The rate of suicide for male farmers is significantly higher than for non-farming rural males.

In 2008, a study showed that 34 in every 100,000 male farmers die by suicide, significantly more than the 24 per 100,000 among rural men generally.

Hamilton psychologist Katrina Malin said in addition to farmers being exposed to stressful situations and isolation, a lack of resources in regional and remote communities was also damaging.

“Often farmers won’t even go to the GP to check on their physical health let alone their mental health, so it definitely is a major problem.”

Giving farmers a day off from working the land to train their animal companions provides a good distraction from any burdening mental health issues, Dr Malin said.

“There’s lots of research into dog therapy and equine therapy, that looks at blood pressure, heartrates, and dopamine and simple benefits that we can get [from animals],” she said.

“It’s such an untapped resource, especially in areas where people are isolated it can be of great benefit.”

Alison Kennedy from the National Centre for Farmer Health agrees.

“We can already see the benefits just even in the early days of people coming to the dog school and having conversations.”

“I think it’s always a challenge to weave mental health into anything when working with farming communities, so if we can take new opportunities to bring mental health into other activities it’s a real bonus.”

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Pet dog gets ‘very, very, sick’ after eating Woolworths Discovery Garden plant


A Sydney family has a warning for pet owners claiming their dog got sick after eating a Woolworths Discovery Garden plant.

Natasha Wilson, from Lilli Pilli, said Monty the Maltese Terrier ate one of the “bunching onion” seed pods – biodegradable pot and all.

“Well first he just started going off his food. I was feeding him… he wasn’t eating his food,” Ms Wilson told 9News.

Natasha Wilson, from Lilli Pilli, said her pet ate one of the "bunching onion" pods.
Natasha Wilson, from Lilli Pilli, said her pet ate one of the “bunching onion” pods. (9News)
A Sydney family say their pet dog got 'very, very, sick' after eating a Woolworths Discovery Garden plant.
A Sydney family say their pet dog got ‘very, very, sick’ after eating a Woolworths Discovery Garden plant. (Woolworths)

Monty joined the family as a friend for brother and sister Hugo and Evie last year, while they were being homeschooled during the pandemic.

But last month after eating the little herb sprout, including the coconut husk casing, he got increasingly sick and was vomiting repeatedly.

Anti-nausea medication at the vet didn’t help and he was taken to emergency.

“I didn’t know whether he would make it to be honest. He was very, very sick,” Ms Wilson said.

After X-rays and ultrasounds, the vet bill totaled $3,500.

Monty joined the family as a friend for brother and sister Hugo and Evie last year, while they were being homeschooled during the pandemic.
Monty joined the family as a friend for brother and sister Hugo and Evie last year, while they were being homeschooled during the pandemic. (9News)
Monty the Maltese Terrier has made a full recovery.
Monty the Maltese Terrier has made a full recovery. (9News)

“That’s not something we had readily available, so I had to withdraw it from our mortgage- I’m not sure who has $3500 just lying around,” Ms Wilson said.

Woolworths said the Discovery Garden plants are safe for humans but should not be fed to pets, like many household items and human foods.

“There are many household and gardening items that can be toxic for pets, including common pantry items like chocolate,” a spokesperson told 9News.

“The Woolworths Discovery Garden seedlings have undergone extensive quality testing and while the herbs and vegetables are safe for human consumption, customers should not feed or allow their pets to consume the seedlings, flowers, herbs, or vegetables in the collection.

“Customers should consult their veterinarian if they are unsure what foods are suitable for their pets.”

Dr Sam Kovac from Southern Cross Veterinary Clinic said there are also plants that can cause problems for animals.

“Monstera one of the most popular types of indoor plants is actually quite toxic, lilies can be toxic for cats,” he told 9News.

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Dog first aid: What you need to know to save your pet’s life in an emergency


When Marea Fox’s dog Chester was stung by a bee it was her pet first aid knowledge that helped her save his life.

“We’re out in a park are having a lovely time in the green grass. Chester started limping and we thought, ‘Ah, what’s he got in his paw?’ and it ended up being a bee sting,” she told ABC Radio Hobart.

Marea removed the bee stinger and gave Chester a quick check over.

She noticed his usually pink gums were quite white and she kept her eye on him.

When he got some diarrhea and vomited, she knew he was in trouble and got him to the vet as quickly as possible.

“He was having an anaphylactic reaction to the bee sting,” she says.

Marea says she never would have known to check her dog’s gums or what signs to watch for before doing a dog first aid course.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

What’s normal for your pet?

Pet first aid is mostly the same as human first aid. The main difference being you can’t ask your dog or cat how they are feeling or what’s happened to them.

Knowing what’s normal for your pet, so you can tell if they aren’t quite right, is one of the first things taught in pet first aid courses.

Dr Mark Hynes is a vet at the Kingston Animal Hospital in Tasmania and he often runs pet first aid courses.

He says while first aid knowledge can be applied to any animal, it’s mostly dogs they focus on in the course as dogs are more likely to be out and about and getting into trouble.

“First aid is something to do in the short term [before you] get professional help.”

Dr Hynes says the first thing all pet owners should do is to make sure they have their regular vet’s phone number and the number of an after-hours vet saved in their phone.

“Because any tricky situation that pops up, if the owner isn’t prepared, or if they don’t know what to do … call up their normal vet and the vet or vet nurses or even the admin staff, they’re trained to help out with these situations,” he says.

Just like human first aid, it’s best for you to do a course with a trained vet or pet first aid provider.

Contact your local vet to find a pet first aid course in your area that should cover situations tailored to your region.

First things to do in a pet emergency

Here are some basic tips on what to do in an emergency.

  • Have important phone numbers at hand. Save your regular vet and the nearest after-hours vet phone numbers in your phone or have them written in a pet first aid kit (read more about what that should contain here);
  • The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline is a free service for Australian pet owners to call if you think your animals has eaten something bad. Dial 1300 869 738;
  • Keep yourself safe before rushing to help. You can’t help your pet if you are injured or bitten by a snake yourself;
  • Watch your pet so you can tell the vet what’s happening — has their breathing changed? Are they holding a paw differently? Are they eating or drinking normally?
  • Treat bleeding wounds by applying pressure with a clean, non-stick bandage;
  • When removing bee stingers, avoid squeezing the top sack. Try to brush it sideways to remove;
  • Get your pet to the vet as soon as you can for medical help.

What to have in a pet first aid kit

  • A clean towel or blanket — this can be used to comfort a dog or cat or help restrain them if they’re panicking;
  • Non-adhesive wound dressings;
  • Gauze bandages;
  • Antiseptic wipes, spray and/or saline solution;
  • Disposable gloves;
  • Rectal thermometer;
  • Tweezers;
  • Hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting (only use with direction from a vet);
  • Muzzle, harness or pet carrier to help get your dog or cat to the vet.

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First veteran-trained PTSD assistance dog comes home to Canberra | The Canberra Times


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A local not-for-profit service that employs veterans to train psychiatric assistance dogs for other veterans has placed its first dog in Canberra after last year joining a federal veterans program. Labrador Belle has moved home with her handler Ben Jones, after the pair completed their intensive training program and passed the public access test. She’s the first to graduate from Integra Service Dogs Australia as part of the federal government’s Psychiatric Assistance Dog Program. Mr Jones thanked the veteran-founded service for helping manage his post-traumatic stress disorder. “They have worked closely with me to match me with a highly suitable and intelligent Labrador and developed us as a bonded team,” Mr Jones said. The 18-month training Belle received at Integra helped give her insight into Mr Jones’ condition and his unique triggers, allowing him to reclaim him place in the community and rebuild his life. Minister for Veterans’ Affairs Darren Chester welcomed Belle to the ranks of the assistance dogs who are helping change the lives of veterans and their families. “The dogs provided through this program, like Belle, play an important role for veterans and their families living with PTSD as they are trained to the individual needs of their veteran and perform specific tasks to help them with their recovery and general wellbeing,” Mr Chester said. “These dogs have such a profound impact on the day-to-day lives of our veterans and it is so encouraging to hear the stories of success and of veterans overcoming challenges with their dogs by their sides. “Thank you for your service, Ben. I wish you and Belle all the very best on your journey together.” Integra is currently training 38 assistance dogs for veterans across ACT and NSW. Last year Integra joined three other providers, who have between them trained 21 assistance dogs for veterans across Australia under the federal program. An additional 89 dogs are still in training. Veterans who have a diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder can access the assistance dogs program via dva.gov.au/dogs Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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Channel Seven will have no ‘top dog’ replacement for Bruce McAvaney, says commentator Brian Taylor


Taylor, 58, heaped praise on McAvaney on Monday and said he did not believe there would be a “top dog” or like-for-like replacement for arguably Australia’s greatest sporting commentator.

“I really don’t think there is such a thing as the No.1 role anymore. Everyone brings something different and I am not the same as Hamish, I am not the same as James. We are all different. I think in our own right we are all leading the pack, Darce, everyone brings something different and that is important,” Taylor said.

Brian Taylor has called alongside McAvaney for several years.Credit:Joe Armao

“I just think ‘how lucky was I?’ Everyone in the football world just wants to work with McAvaney. I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want the opportunity to work with McAvaney and I have had quite a few years there with him. You just learn so much so quickly from Bruce. It’s just his way of handling people behind the scenes. He is just brilliant.

“It’s sad for all of us because he was our leader and our coach and our mentor and also he was the height bar at which we all wanted to achieve and chase.”

Seven’s AFL team will have its annual pre-season meeting on Thursday, where rosters for the new campaign will be revealed. While there may not be a new figurehead caller, at least in the short term, industry insiders will have a close eye on just who is given the most prime-time slots, including on Thursday and Friday nights.

Whoever impresses the most on and off camera would then be in the running for the ultimate prize – calling the grand final.

Brayshaw is likely to partner Taylor early in the season on a Friday, with the role then rotated.

Garry Lyon, himself a prominent radio and television caller, said on SEN radio on Monday that “there are some egos” that would need to be managed, and floated whether Eddie McGuire could join the network, a claim Tim Watson, a long-time Seven AFL special comments man, shot down.

Like all commentators, Taylor can polarise viewers, an issue he said he had addressed with McAvaney.

“What I do know is that there is not one commentator in the world where they are loved universally by 100 per cent of the audience,” Taylor said.

“That is something that Bruce has taught me. The maximum you can ever get to like you as a commentator is 50 per cent. That means 50 per cent don’t like you, so it’s a tough world.

“I don’t know whether he has spoken publicly about that but I have spoken to him about that. That’s just a fact – there are a lot of people who love a certain commentator, and others don’t.”

In 2019, Seven considered poaching prominent caller Gerard Whateley to be its frontman but that plan fell through.

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Lewis Martin, Seven’s head of sport, said on Monday that the network had no intention now of adding any household names to its coverage, pointing out the likes of VFL callers Jason Bennett, Nigel Carmody and Jo Wotton were progressing well.

Seven said Talking Footy, its one-time flagship round-in-review show, which was cancelled last year as part of the financial fall-out of COVID-19, would not return but it had plans for a “footy magazine” style show.

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