Gaming Like It’s 1925: Last Week To Join The Public Domain Game Jam!


from the there’s-still-time dept

Sign up for the Public Domain Game Jam on itch.io »

It’s now been almost a full month since works published in 1925 entered the public domain in the US, and that means we’re nearing the end of our public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925 — but it’s not too late to get involved! After all, plenty of game jams only run for a couple of days, and you’ve still got an entire week to cook up an analog or digital game based on newly-public-domain material and compete for one of our great prizes.

Check out the game jam page for the full rules and some links to public domain works you could draw on, as well as game design tools for designers of all experience levels. Even if you’ve never tried making a game before, a week is plenty of time to learn the basics of Twine or Story Synth, and anyone can try their hand at thinking up a roleplaying or party game — we’ve had winning games that are nothing more than some rules in a text document.

The jam runs through January 31st and then our judges will begin playing the entries to select winners in six categories (the winners of the 2020 jam are linked below, and you can read our judges’ thoughts on them here):

We’ve already gotten a handful of submissions and we’re anticipating many more as the due date approaches, so hurry up and join the jam to get your game in the mix!

Sign up for the Public Domain Game Jam on itch.io »

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Filed Under: game jam, games, gaming like its 1925, public domain

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Australian Senator’s Alleged Website Domain Name Subject To Online Pranksters

Australian Senator

An Australian website domain paulinehanson.com.au, which is theoretically linked to the Australian Senator Pauline Hanson, has now been redirected to the Refugee Council of Australia by an alleged internet prankster.

Once you open the aforementioned domain, it will take you directly to the Refugee Council’s website, yet the council said they had no knowledge regarding this matter.

The Refugee Council said online, “Today we learnt that someone has purchased the domain http://paulinehanson.com.au and redirected it to our site. We had no knowledge of, or involvement with this, however, we welcome the off chance that Senator Hanson has changed her mind on refugee policy.”

It is still unclear whether the domain Paulinehanson.com.au was utilized by the Senator prior to the redirection. As of now, it appears that Ms Hanson uses the domains senatorhanson.com.au and onenation.org.au.

The media is still waiting for the Senator as she is yet to give public input to the online prank.

Website domains are widely used in many industries and are hotly contested among businesses because of the optimization to major search engine emphasis and the user-friendliness these domains can offer.

These domain names are basically built around brands and are the main way people find you on the internet, and its names are fundamentally rented from domain holders, thus, it can be registered for varying amounts of time from one year to more than a decade.

Should your domain name expire and not renew it after receiving reminders, the domain name would become obtainable to anybody wanting to purchase it.

Oftentimes, businesses would purchase numerous domain names which are similar to their brand, in order to stop competitors and pranksters from masquerading as them under a different URL.

(Image source: Yahoo News)

Gaming Like It’s 1925: There’s Still Plenty Of Time To Join Our Public Domain Game Jam!


from the mine-that-domain dept

Sign up for the Public Domain Game Jam on itch.io »

We’re just over a week into our third annual public domain game jam, Gaming Like It’s 1925, and it runs until the end of the month so there’s still plenty of time to sign up and start working on an entry! We’re looking for analog and digital games that are inspired by and/or make direct use of materials from works published in 1925, which have now entered the public domain, and giving away prizes for the best ones in multiple categories.

It doesn’t matter if you’re an experienced game designer or someone who’s never tried it before — the beauty of the public domain is that it supplies a growing wealth of inspiration and assets for you to use, and the beauty of modern game design tools is that you can dip your toe in without any particular expertise or technical knowledge (and we’ve got links to several tools that can help over on the game jam page). Entries can be as simple as a one-page set of rules for a game to be played in person (or perhaps over Zoom, given our current circumstances) or as complex as a full-fledged video game, and anything in between. There are six categories to compete in (the winners of the 2020 jam are linked below, and you can read our judges’ thoughts on them here):

Sign up for the game jam on itch.io where you can also read the full rules and find links to lists of 1925 books, plays, films, art and music, including stuff from many notable 20th century creators like Aldous Huxley, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, Pablo Picasso, Charlie Chaplin, Irving Berlin, and Louis Armstrong. You’ve got until January 31st to submit your entries after which they will be played by our amazing panel of judges from both the game design and copyright worlds.

Check out the winners of the 2019 and 2020 jams (which used works from 1923 and 1924 respectively) then sign up for the jam and get designing. We’ve already got a few entries this year, and we can’t wait to see more and play everyone’s games!

Sign up for the Public Domain Game Jam on itch.io »

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Thank you for reading this Techdirt post. With so many things competing for everyone’s attention these days, we really appreciate you giving us your time. We work hard every day to put quality content out there for our community.

Techdirt is one of the few remaining truly independent media outlets. We do not have a giant corporation behind us, and we rely heavily on our community to support us, in an age when advertisers are increasingly uninterested in sponsoring small, independent sites — especially a site like ours that is unwilling to pull punches in its reporting and analysis.

While other websites have resorted to paywalls, registration requirements, and increasingly annoying/intrusive advertising, we have always kept Techdirt open and available to anyone. But in order to continue doing so, we need your support. We offer a variety of ways for our readers to support us, from direct donations to special subscriptions and cool merchandise — and every little bit helps. Thank you.

–The Techdirt Team

Filed Under: game jam, games, gaming like its 1925, public domain

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Moved your business online during COVID-19? Remember these domain name tips


COVID-19 has accelerated the move to online shopping, driving many
brick-and-mortar stores online in the process. Business owners have quickly
transformed their business models to take advantage of the e-commerce boom.

For many, this is the first time their business has operated online. Data from au Domain Administration (auDA) shows that in the six months from April 2020, registrations of new Australian domain names increased by 31 per cent compared to the same period last year – an additional 80,000 new registrations.

Building an online store from scratch and at speed is a major project. Maintaining it is, too. Unfortunately, amidst the user experience and design decisions, some business owners overlook the DNA of their site – its domain name.

Here are my top tips in this area for business owners that moved online during the pandemic (or those considering it!).

Accurate contact details are essential

An essential aspect of domain name registration is keeping your contact information up to date. Most providers (registrars and resellers) use email to contact you and to send out renewal notices.

Unfortunately, from time to time businesses forget, or neglect, to
update information such as email addresses; and not all providers attempt to
use alternate means to contact those businesses.

To avoid missing out on important communications from your registrar or reseller, make sure you’re vigilant in keeping your details up to date – including the email address you use for your registration. If your domain name ends in .au, you can check your email contact details via the WHOIS service at: https://whois.auda.org.au/

You’ll need to renew your domain name

The length of a registration can span one to five years. Your registrar or reseller will send you a renewal notice but it’s helpful to set a calendar reminder for around 90 days before its expiration date so you know the renewal is coming up.

Keep in mind, if your domain licence expires your website and associated services such as emails will stop working. Your licence will also become available to other eligible applicants.

The impacts of this on your business can be significant – ranging from
some temporary downtime of your website to losing your domain name to another
business.

If that happens, it isn’t always possible to recover your original name, which is why it’s important to stay on top of your renewal.

Assuming your email address is up-to-date and you have a domain name ending in .au, you can confirm its expiry date via the retrieval tool at: https://pw.auda.org.au/

The type of domain name you have matters to customers

Now more than ever, Australians are looking to buy local when they shop online, and we know from research that the most common way online shoppers identify a local business is by the com.au domain name.

Businesses using com.au also twice as likely to have their website considered trustworthy and secure than businesses with other common commercial domain names.

So, if you haven’t yet registered a domain name for your business or your licence is coming up for renewal, consider a com.au domain name, which is trusted, reliable and a great option for Australian businesses.

Rebecca Papillo, auDA – the Australian domain name administrator





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