NSW North Coast cattle farm Dyraaba Station sells for $1.5m


Robyn and Peter Clarke have sold their NSW North Coast cattle farm.


The historic NSW North Coast cattle farm, Dyraaba Station has been sold for $1.5 million. The homestead, built of hand-sawn hardwoods, has been sold by Robyn and Peter Clarke, the parents of fashion ­designer Sarah-Jane Clarke, the Sass who co-founded the fashion label Sass & Bide.

The Clarkes listed the Casino district property just over two years ago with a $1.8 million asking price.

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It originally had a $1.8 million guide.



The beef industry veterans will miss the locals, as well as the lifestyle, serenity and the cattle calving.

“We fell in love with Dyraaba Station the moment we first saw it as it truly is a colonial homestead with out buildings,” Robyn said on its listing, adding they appreciated the quality of the axemanship.

The Clarke’s, who have been in the beef industry for two decades consider themselves hobby farmers. Their interest has been restoring the historic buildings while running a few head of cattle.

The couple listed the property two years ago.


The Kyogle farm has been home to 50 Angus and wagyu cows and calves that rest under the historic fig trees after drinking from Dyraaba Creek. The farm dates back to the 1840s when it was one of the great squatter runs, with its then shield-brand Herefords being the largest herd in the southern hemisphere.

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The original homestead and out buildings, that date back to the days of the Bundook and Barnes families, are lasting insights into the pioneering era, Ray White Rural selling Peter Douglas said.



Henry Barnes, its longtime stud-master, was born at Low Braithwaite, Cumberland, England, one of the 13 children of cattle farmer, Robert Barnes. Excelling in bookkeeping, mathematics and the principles of land measurement, with a reference as a ‘practical English farmer’ signed by several ministers and yeoman farmers, Barnes migrated to NSW in 1840.

“A true piece of Australian history,” Douglas advised this week on its sale to a couple from Brisbane.

No longer on the original 80,000ha, after its soldier settlement division following World War I, Dyraaba is now 60ha, with 14 paddocks.



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