Magnitude 6.5 Earthquake Occurs on Russia-Mongolia Border



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Thank you for dropping in to My Local Pages and seeing this story regarding Russian news called “Magnitude 6.5 Earthquake Occurs on Russia-Mongolia Border”. This news release is shared by My Local Pages Australia as part of our Australian news services.

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6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Hits Near Vanuatu



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Thank you for dropping in and reading this article regarding current Russian and Political news titled “6.0-Magnitude Earthquake Hits Near Vanuatu”. This article is posted by My Local Pages Australia as part of our Australian news services.

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Croatia Hit by Strong Earthquake


At least seven people were killed, dozens were wounded and several towns in central Croatia were left in ruins after a powerful 6.4-magnitude earthquake struck on Tuesday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey and Croatian officials.

The full extent of casualties was not known and as daylight faded, emergency crews, assisted by the military, searched the wreckage for survivors.

The quake, which hit just after noon local time about 30 miles from the capital, Zagreb, could be felt across the Balkans and as far away as Hungary. It followed a smaller earthquake a day earlier and another in March, rattling residents in the earthquake-prone region.

The epicenter of the quake was near the towns of Petrinja and Sisak, which is home to the region’s largest hospital, rendered largely unusable because of damage. Although people injured in the quake were still being taken to the facility to be triaged, including two in critical condition, the government said it would evacuate the patients there. That effort would also include moving 40 coronavirus patients to other facilities.

“We have nowhere to come to work tomorrow — only the gynecology building remains, where we are currently taking care of the most seriously ill,” the director of the hospital, Tomislav Dujmenovic, told state TV. “We have nowhere to go tomorrow.”

At the moment the earthquake struck, he said, a woman was in labor and the procedure was moved outside. Both the mother and child are in good health.

The destruction caused by the earthquake was widespread across the city.

“Half the city’s capitol building collapsed — the city is in a very bad state,” the mayor of Sisak, Kristina Ikic Banicek, told state television. “We’re helping people as much as we can.” One person was reported to have been killed in the city.

In Petrinja, a town of around 25,000 people that still bears the scars from a major battle during the wars that followed the breakup of Yugoslavia, the mayor said he walked by the body of a 12-year-old girl on the street.

“This is a catastrophe,” said the mayor, Darinko Dumbovic. “My city is completely destroyed,” he said in an emotional telephone interview from the scene that was broadcast on Croatian state television.

“We need firefighters, we don’t know what’s under the surfaces, a roof fell on a car, we need help.”

He added: “Mothers are crying for their children.”

In the nearby village of Glina, local officials said four people who died had been pulled from the rubble.

Images from Petrinja on social media and local television stations showed streets strewn with rubble, buildings with roofs caved in and rescue crews rushing to search for people who may have been trapped.

In the moments after the earth stopped shaking, orange dust filled the air as car alarms sounded, church bells clanged and shouts for survivors echoed through streets.

In one dramatic rescue, a man and a child were pulled from a car buried under debris. The mayor told local reporters that he did not know the condition of the two people but that they appeared to be alive.

“I also heard that the kindergarten collapsed,” Mr. Dumbovic said, adding: “But fortunately there were no children” in the building at the time.

The Red Cross in Croatia said it was a “very serious” situation.

The earthquake on Tuesday came after a 5.2-magnitude tremor hit the area the day before, damaging buildings and rattling nerves in a region with a history of seismic activity.

And it came only hours after Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic and President Zoran Milanovic toured the center of Petrinja to survey damage from the first quake.

They returned on Tuesday to devastation.

“This 2020 is bringing us tragedy after tragedy,” Mr. Plenkovic said, adding that there were many small villages around the two larger towns that had also suffered damage.

While the first tremor on Monday caused no injuries, many buildings had been damaged, putting them in a precarious condition when the second quake struck.

The government lifted travel restrictions put in place to contain the coronavirus so that assistance could arrive more quickly and to allow those whose homes were destroyed to travel to relatives.

In neighboring Slovenia, the state news agency said the country’s sole nuclear power plant, about 60 miles from the epicenter, was shut down as a precaution.

The Paks nuclear power plant in Hungary said in a statement that it had not shut down production although the earthquake had been felt there.

Ursula von der Leyen, the president of the European Commission, said she had asked Janez Lenarcic, the European commissioner for crisis management, to stand ready to travel to Croatia to assist.

The region is prone to earthquakes, and experts have warned that the Balkan nations in southeastern Europe have failed to address the risks posed by aging buildings.

While many towns and villages trace their roots back hundreds of years, a building boom in the 1990s, during the transition to capitalism from communism, resulted in structures that were constructed without regard for safety standards.

Millions of people live in buildings that are unlikely to survive a major earthquake, experts say.

Alisa Dogramadzieva contributed reporting.





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At least six killed and many injured in Croatia earthquake | World News


A 6.4 magnitude earthquake has hit Croatia, with at least six deaths, many injuries and “demolished” towns.

The European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre said the tremor hit 28 miles southeast of the capital, Zagreb.

A 12-year-old child in the town of Petrinja – 31 miles from Zagreb – has been killed, according to Croatian government official Tomo Medved.

Image:
Rows of houses were destroyed in the town of Petrinja

Mr Medved said five more people died in the surroundings of the town of Glina.

Petrinja’s mayor, Darinko Dumbovic, announced on a local TV broadcast that his town has been “completely destroyed”.

“We have dead children,” he said.

“Half of the city no longer exists. The city has been demolished, the city is no longer liveable. We need help.”

Tomislav Fabijanic, head of the emergency medical service in Sisak, said there were many injured in the city and in Petrinja.

“There are fractures, there are concussions and some had to be operated on,” he said.

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Politicians fled as the building shook in the Slovenian capital

At least 20 people went to hospital with injuries, he said, with two seriously hurt.

“The army is here to help. We will have to move some people from Petrinja because it is unsafe to be here,” Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic said.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said on Twitter that she had spoken with Mr Plenkovic and ordered an envoy to urgently travel to Croatia.

Video footage showed people being rescued from rubble near the epicentre. Other clips showed houses caved in.

Patients and medical staff are evacuated outside the Sveti Duh Hospital after an earthquake in Zagreb
Image:
Hospitals in Zagreb have been forced to evacuate patients and staff

The same area was struck by a 5.2 magnitude quake on Monday, killing one person and injuring 27.

The earthquake was felt throughout the country and in neighbouring Serbia, Bosnia and Slovenia – even as far as southern Austria.

Mr Plenkovic and other government ministers arrived in Petrinja after the earthquake.

“They are searching through the rubble to see if there is anyone else there,” he said.

Earthquake strikes near Zagreb
Image:
The town of Petrinja was largely destroyed, its mayor says

“The biggest part of central Petrinja is in a red zone, which means that most of the buildings are not usable.”

Mr Plenkovic said the army has 500 places ready in barracks to house people, while others will be accommodated in places including nearby hotels.

“No one must stay out in the cold tonight,” the PM said.

Slovenia’s STA news agency said that the country’s sole nuclear power plant was shut down as a precaution.

Video footage showed politicians fleeing parliament in the capital city of Ljubljana as the building shook.

Zagreb residents were seen running out of their homes and into streets and parks. Many reportedly were leaving the capital, ignoring a travel ban imposed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Croatia is prone to earthquakes, but not big ones.

The last strong quake struck in the 1990s when the Adriatic coast village of Ston was destroyed.

Croatian seismologist Kresimir Kuk described Tuesday’s earthquake as “extremely strong,” far stronger than another one that hit Zagreb and nearby areas in the spring.

He warned of potentially strong aftershocks across the Mediterranean country.

Fear of further tremors made Sasa Umicevic, Orthodox archpriest of the Petrinja Parish, escape to a field outside Petrinja with his wife and three children.

The family told Sky News they fled their parish home on Monday morning when the first earthquake struck.

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The quake followed another, smaller tremor in the area on Monday

“It felt like an explosion – we ran out of the house in our pyjamas, and immediately there was a power cut,” Umicevic said.

He went back on Tuesday to inspect the damage on the 250-year-old house and escaped just 10 minutes before the bigger earthquake.

“The whole town centre was in the middle of a clearing operation,” he said.

“We surveyed the damage on the parish home… This time the walls and chimneys collapsed.”

Earthquake strikes near Zagreb
Image:
Residents are seen fleeing ruined homes in Zagreb

Umicevic said he can still feel tremors, and that even though the family is cold they will probably spend the night in their car in the field as they think it’s unsafe to go indoors.

“We thank God that we were not injured but our thoughts are with so many who have been hurt and the little girl who lost her life,” he said.

“There’s no water or power in the town of Petrinja – this has been a very traumatic experience.”





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Croatian earthquake claims at least 7 lives


A 6.2 magnitude earthquake hit central Croatia on Tuesday, killing seven people and seriously injuring at least 26. The tremors of the earthquake, whose epicentre was in Petrinja, 50 kilometres south of the capital Zagreb, could be felt as far away as Budapest and Vienna.

“My town has been completely destroyed,” Petrinja mayor Darinko Dumbovic said in a statement broadcast by the Croatian national broadcaster HRT.

“This is like Hiroshima — half of the town no longer exists.”

Some residents of Petrinja, a town of 25,000 that became known for being the location of a major battle during the wars that erupted in the 1990s after the collapse of Yugoslavia, told HRT the earthquake damage was worse than during the war.

Several officials including the Croatian prime minister Andrej Plenkovic and President Zoran Milanovic travelled to Petrinja to see the damage.

“This has been a difficult year and this [earthquake] adds insult to injury,” Mr Milanovic said.

Local officials said a 12-year-old girl died in the town, while the other fatalities were from nearby villages. The government said it would evacuate the hospital in the nearby city of Sisak, the region’s largest health facility, which was so badly damaged that most of its wings could no longer function properly.

Volunteers load rubble on to a truck as they clear debris from damaged buildings in Petrinja © AFP via Getty Images

Austria’s national broadcaster said the earthquake had been felt in 12 countries. Neighbouring Slovenia shut down its only nuclear power plant, 60 miles from the epicentre, as a precaution.

Interior minister Davor Bozinovic said Croatia was seeking and expecting EU assistance through the 27-member bloc’s emergency civil protection mechanism.

The earthquake, the second in Croatia in two days, struck while memories of tremors in March that heavily damaged Zagreb and displaced hundreds of people remain fresh.



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Earthquake hits Croatia, 1 death reported


A strong earthquake has hit central Croatia, killing at least one person and causing major damage to homes and other buildings in a town southeast of the capital.

The European Mediterranean Seismological Centre said an earthquake of magnitude 6.3 hit 46km southeast of Zagreb on Tuesday.

Initial reports said the earthquake caused wide damage, collapsing roofs, building facades and even entire buildings.

The same area was struck by a 5.2 quake on Monday and several smaller aftershocks were felt on Tuesday.

Croatian state broadcaster HRT said a young girl died in Petrinja, a town southeast of the capital that was hit hardest by the earthquake.

Other Croatian media also reported the death, quoting the town’s mayor.

“The centre of Petrinja as it used to be no longer exists,” HRT said in its report.

“One girl died and there are injuries and people inside collapsed buildings.”

Petrinja’s Mayor Darinko Dumbovic released a statement broadcast by HRT TV.

“My town has been completely destroyed, we have dead children,” he said.

“This is like Hiroshima – half of the city no longer exists.

“The city has been demolished, the city is no longer livable.

“We need help.”

Croatian Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic and other government ministers arrived in Petrinja after the earthquake.

Regional TV channel N1 reported live on Tuesday from the town that a collapsed building had fallen on a car.

The footage showed firefighters trying to remove the debris to reach the car, which was buried underneath.

A man and a small boy were rescued from the car and carried into an ambulance.

Fallen bricks and dust littered the streets, and many houses were completely destroyed.

The Croatian military has been deployed to help with the rescue operation.

Croatian seismologist Kresimir Kuk described the earthquake as “extremely strong,” far stronger than another one that hit Zagreb and nearby areas in March.

He warned people to keep out of potentially shaky, old buildings and to move to the newer areas of the city because of the aftershocks.

In Zagreb, people ran out into the streets and parks in fear, with reports of some leaving the city, ignoring a travel ban imposed because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The earthquake was felt throughout the country and in neighbouring Serbia, Bosnia and Slovenia.

It was felt as far away as Graz in southern Austria, the Austria Press Agency reported.

Authorities in Slovenia said the Krsko nuclear power plant was temporarily shut down following the earthquake.

The power plant is jointly owned by Slovenia and Croatia and located near their border.



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Strong earthquake strikes Croatia, Slovenia shuts power nuclear plant as precaution


Other footage showed a house with a roof caved in. The reporter said she did not know if anyone was inside.

Tomislav Fabijanic, head of emergency medical service in Sisak near Petrinja, said there were many injured in Petrinja and in Sisak.

“There are fractures, there are concussions and some had to be operated on,” he said,

Slovenia’s STA news agency said that the country’s sole nuclear power plant which is 100 km from the epicentre was shut down as a precaution.

There was no further information available on casualties.

The quake could be felt in the capital Zagreb, where people rushed onto the streets, some strewn with broken roof tiles and other debris. It was also felt in neghbouring Bosnia and Serbia.

Reuters



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Strong 6.3-magnitude earthquake hits central Croatia


A strong earthquake has hit central Croatia, causing considerable damage to homes and other buildings in a town southeast of Zagreb, the capital.

A man and a boy were pulled out alive from a car buried in rubble and sent to a hospital.

The European Mediterranean Seismological Centre said an earthquake of 6.3 magnitude hit 46km southeast of Zagreb on Tuesday (about 11.30pm AEDT). Initial reports said the earthquake caused wide damage, collapsing roofs, building facades and even some entire buildings.

The same area was struck by a 5.2 quake on Monday and several smaller aftershocks were felt Tuesday.

The regional N1 television reported live Tuesday from the town of Petrinja, which was hard-hit in the Monday quake, that a collapsed building had fallen on a car. The footage showed firefighters trying to remove the debris to reach the car, which was buried underneath. A man and a small boy were rescued from the car and carried into an ambulance.

In Petrinja, streets were littered with fallen bricks and dust and many houses were completely destroyed. The Croatian military was deployed in Petrinja to help with the rescue operation.

Croatian media said people were injured by the quake, but could not initially say how many amid the confusion and downed phone lines.

Croatian seismologist Kresimir Kuk described the earthquake as “extremely strong,” far stronger than another one that hit Zagreb and nearby areas in spring. He warned people to keep out of potentially shaky, old buildings and move to the newer areas of the city because of the aftershocks.

In Zagreb, people ran out into the streets and parks in fear. Many reportedly were leaving the city, ignoring a travel ban imposed because of the coronavirus outbreak.

The earthquake Tuesday was felt throughout the country and in neighbouring Serbia and Bosnia. It even was felt as far away as Graz in southern Austria, the Austria Press Agency reported.



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Picking up the pieces – Turkey recovers from one earthquake and braces for more | Europe




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Turkey earthquake: Search efforts continue for third day as death toll rises


Turkey earthquake: Hunt for survivors in collapsed block of flats



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