North Melbourne Kangaroos player Majak Daw signs with North Heidelberg after split with partner Emily McKay


Majak Daw is excited to link up with his younger brother, and former Kangaroos teammate Brent Harvey, after signing to play footy with North Heidelberg in 2021.

Unable to secure a second chance in the AFL after being axed by North Melbourne at the end of last season, Daw was then rocked on the personal front as his relationship with the mother of his son Emily McKay ended.

But he’s begun the New Year on a bright note by signing to play with the Northern Football League club in Victoria.

“Pumped to play alongside my brother and my good mate Boomer this year,” Daw wrote on Instagram.

Daw and McKay celebrated the birth of their son, Hendrix, last year as the footballer continued to make his slow recovery towards the AFL.

The ruckman was hospitalised in December 2018 after he fell from the Bolte Bridge in Melbourne — he broke his hips and pelvis during the incident.

The 29-year-old’s comeback was delayed further after he tore a pectoral muscle during a gym session in May.

But Daw finally made his highly-anticipated return to the AFL in August, facing the Adelaide Crows at Marvel Stadium in round nine.

Daw marked the fairytale moment with a goal in the fourth quarter, which remains a highlight of the 2020 premiership.

McKay posted a heartfelt message to Instagram after the match: “Every nurse, doctor and surgeon we met along the way. Words can’t describe how grateful we are and how amazing you are.”

Unfortunately, Daw was one of 11 players advised in September they would not be offered a new contract.



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AFL news: North Melbourne Kangaroos player Majak Daw signs with North Heidelberg after split with partner Emily McKay


Majak Daw is excited to link up with his younger brother, and former Kangaroos teammate Brent Harvey, after signing to play footy with North Heidelberg in 2021.

Unable to secure a second chance in the AFL after being axed by North Melbourne at the end of last season, Daw was then rocked on the personal front as his relationship with the mother of his son Emily McKay ended.

But he’s begun the New Year on a bright note by signing to play with the Northern Football League club in Victoria.

“Pumped to play alongside my brother and my good mate Boomer this year,” Daw wrote on Instagram.

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We hope you enjoyed checking out this news article about current Australian Sports news called “AFL news: North Melbourne Kangaroos player Majak Daw signs with North Heidelberg after split with partner Emily McKay”. This news release is brought to you by MyLocalPages as part of our World sports news services.

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Majak Daw split with Emily McKay, North Melbourne


Former North Melbourne star Majak Daw has reportedly split from his long-term partner Emily McKay.

As revealed by The Herald Sun’s Jackie Epstein, the pair have separated after a rollercoaster couple of years.

Daw and McKay celebrated the birth of their son last year as the footballer continued to make his slow recovery towards the AFL.

Majak Daw and Emily McKay.Source:Instagram

Majak Daw and Emily McKay.

Majak Daw and Emily McKay.Source:Instagram

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The ruckman was hospitalised in December 2018 after he fell from the Bolte Bridge in Melbourne — he broke his hips and pelvis during the incident.

The 29-year-old’s comeback was delayed further after he tore a pectoral muscle during a gym session in May.

But Daw finally made his highly-anticipated return to the AFL in August, facing the Adelaide Crows at Marvel Stadium in round nine.

Daw marked the fairytale moment with a goal in the fourth quarter, which remains a highlight of the 2020 premiership.

McKay posted a heartfelt message to Instagram after the match: “Every nurse, doctor and surgeon we met along the way. Words can’t describe how grateful we are and how amazing you are.”

Majak Daw of the Kangaroos celebrates a goal with teammates.

Majak Daw of the Kangaroos celebrates a goal with teammates.Source:Getty Images

Majak Daw and his Kangaroos teammates.

Majak Daw and his Kangaroos teammates.Source:Getty Images

READ MORE: Utter disrespect in AFL star’s text

Unfortunately, Daw was one of 11 players advised in September they would not be offered a new contract.

Despite the setback, manager Adam Ramanaukas confirmed Daw would be eager to play on elsewhere if another club picked him up.

“Hopefully we can find another club for Majak,” Ramanaukas said on ABC Grandstand’s The Lead.

“He can play multiple positions. He’d be an asset.”

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A post shared by Majak Daw (@majak_daw)





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What does Emily Murphy’s GSA letter mean? Has Donald Trump conceded the US election to Joe Biden?


The US federal agency responsible for the presidential transition process has recognised Joe Biden as the “apparent winner” of the election in a letter.

The letter came from the General Services Administration’s Emily Murphy after weeks of delay.

What does the letter do and why is it important? Here are answers to five quick questions.

What is the GSA letter?

The GSA must “ascertain” the winner of the US election to formally begin the transfer of power and allow crucial transition planning to begin.

In today’s letter, GSA administrator Emily Murphy made that critical move, declaring Joe Biden as the “apparent winner” of the election.

Ascertainment is a routine administrative process that usually passes without any fanfare.

And it usually happens in short order after the winner of the US election is called by media networks (with rare exceptions, like the 2000 election race that involved a Supreme Court ruling).

But this time around, Ms Murphy’s letter came 20 days after the election and 16 days since major US networks announced Mr Biden as the winner.

That is unusual. In fact, Denise Turner Roth, the GSA administrator during the Obama administration, had urged Ms Murphy to declare the winner in a CNN opinion piece published days ago.

Former GSA administrator Denise Turner Roth has criticised the transition delay.(GSA)

Ascertainment letters can be dull and procedural, but Ms Murphy’s mentioned “numerous threats” which she said were made “in an effort to coerce me into making this determination prematurely”.

Ms Murphy had been under immense pressure to authorise president-elect Joe Biden, with Republicans, national security experts and business leaders all having called for that process to move forward.

What does the letter actually do?

With the official GSA declaration of Mr Biden as the “apparent” winner, this is what can happen:

How did Trump and Biden react?

Mr Biden’s Twitter account simply listed a transition website, buildbackbetter.gov, in a tweet following the announcement.

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The .gov domain is only available to government entities, and the fact that it’s at the end of the Biden transition website is more recognition that Joe Biden has won this election.

President Donald Trump continues to baselessly call his race against Joe Biden “the most corrupt election in American political history,” and has said he will still pursue court battles in an effort to overturn the election results.

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Meanwhile, the Pentagon has been the first US Government agency to recognise Mr Biden’s win after today’s news out of the GSA. Here’s the statement:

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So does that mean Trump has conceded the election to Biden?

Not at all.

This is as close as Mr Trump has gotten to recognising he has lost the US election.

But it’s not a concession.

The President made it very clear that he still thinks his legal strategy will overturn the results, and hasn’t said anything close to “Joe Biden has won”.

But there’s nothing stopping Mr Trump from saying whatever he wants about the election, while also clearing the way for the official processes to happen.

What happens now?

Yohannes Abraham, the Biden-Harris transition executive director, said the GSA decision “is a needed step to begin tackling the challenges facing our nation, including getting the pandemic under control and our economy back on track”.

All states must certify their results before the Electoral College meets on December 14, and any challenge to the results must be resolved by December 8.

The Biden team are preparing for a pandemic-modified inauguration on January 20.

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Trump campaign lawyer Sidney Powell spreads the Dominion conspiracy theory



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‘Emily in Paris’: Darren Star’s Millennial Fairy Tale


Younger, Star’s ongoing TV Land comedy about a 40-something posing as a 20-something, corrected Star’s course. Rather than attempt a story that tackled the theme of How Women Live Now, the series, from its debut in 2015, started leaning into the fairy-tale formula. The protagonist, Liza (Sutton Foster), gets a makeover to pass as a Millennial, and in doing so, she revives both her career and her love life. Yet Star also infuses the show with a heavy dose of reality and angst: Liza can’t neglect her duties, for instance, as a mom to a college-age daughter. That dramatic tension helps the series strike a relevant chord. “It offers, almost in spite of itself, deep insights into the culture of the moment,” my colleague Megan Garber wrote of the second season. “Because, for Liza, and for the age-obsessed universe she inhabits, youth is social standing.” The fantasy in Younger, as Garber puts it, is clearly that of “extended youth.”

Emily in Paris, on the other hand, mixes multiple fantasies. There’s the fantasy of a perfectly maintained work-life balance. Unlike Liza’s 20-something confidante Kelsey (Hilary Duff) in Younger or other Millennial characters on air today—such as the ones on The Bold Type and Good Trouble—Emily never laments having a job that affects her social life. The show portrays her ability to find inspiration for pitches through her adventures around the city as her superpower as an outsider. She’s ambitious, but not in the #girlboss way; she leaps at the opportunity to work abroad for a year, but doesn’t aim to run the firm. There’s also the fantasy of success without risk: In Younger, Liza’s lies threaten to undermine her success. Emily, however? She builds a following on Instagram, but at one point deletes and restarts the account without losing a single fan.

And finally, there’s the fantasy of indifference. The Millennial protagonists of other female-fronted shows actively deal with topical, social issues. Emily, though, doesn’t even use Twitter. The show treats every conflict with a breezy touch: Emily’s friend Mindy (Ashley Park) has money troubles and a difficult relationship with her Chinese family, but discussions about her finances and her heritage amount to little more than jokes. The finale, called “Cancel Couture,” isn’t about the source of its pun at all, but about Emily’s fashion-designer client deciding not to put on his show.

Perhaps that’s the ultimate fantasy of Emily in Paris: peace of mind. American Millennials, in reality, have been saddled with an uncertain future of economic turmoil and climate change. But Star has given Emily a lifestyle of blissful unreality—and allowed himself the privilege of dispensing with real-life matters. Sex and the City’s foursome dealt with the changing dating scene and their fears of being unmarried well into their 30s. Younger focuses on a protagonist who’s climbing the ranks of her industry, but who’s also constantly at risk of being exposed as a liar. But Emily in Paris doesn’t pretend to have any larger cultural insights; it’s just a show about a young woman confident in her future as she works her dream job in her dream city, with several romantic prospects to boot.



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Coronavirus: Emily Maitlis misses Newsnight after BBC rules Cummings coverage breached impartiality rules | UK News


Emily Maitlis was notably absent from her role as Newsnight’s presenter on Wednesday after the BBC ruled the programme breached impartiality rules over its Dominic Cummings coverage.

The presenter introduced Tuesday’s show by saying the prime minister’s chief adviser had “broken the rules” and “the country can see that, and it’s shocked the government cannot”.

Newsnight’s coverage focused on a trip by Mr Cummings from London to Durham during the early stages of the coronavirus lockdown which he said was “reasonable and legal”, with Boris Johnson defending him and refusing to heed calls to sack him.



Boris Johnson appeared before the Liaison Committee of the House of Commons



PM suggests inquiry into Cummings ‘not a good use of time’

Maitlis had been scheduled to present the next edition of the programme, the BBC said, but Newsnight’s UK editor, Katie Razzall, instead took her place.

Razzall confirmed that Maitlis had not been asked to take the night off and said she “certainly wouldn’t have agreed to present the show” if she thought that was the case.

She did not address the controversy during the programme.

In reply Maitlis tweeted: “So grateful to my friend and excellent colleague for stepping in this evening . She did so because I asked for the night off -knowing tonight’s prog would be in the most excellent hands.”

Newsnight editor Esme Wren also said Maitlis had not been “replaced” because of the ruling and the programme’s staff “work as a team throughout”.

In Tuesday’s opening, Maitlis said: “The longer ministers and the prime minister tell us he worked within [the rules], the more angry the response to this scandal is likely to be.

“He was the man, remember, who always got the public mood, who tagged the lazy label of elite on those who disagreed.

“He should understand that public mood now – one of fury, contempt and anguish.”

After the BBC ruled that breached its impartiality rules the National Union of Journalists criticised the BBC’s handling of the row.

General secretary Michelle Stanistreet said: “At a time of national crisis, frank and fearless journalism that scrutinises and holds this government to account is more necessary than ever.”

She added that it was “clear as day” that Mr Cummings breached lockdown rules, adding: “Journalists should be congratulated for holding policymakers to account for actions that risk a monumental breach of trust during a public health crisis.”

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The BBC said on Wednesday staff had been “reminded of the guidelines” around impartiality after the broadcast, adding that the corporation must “uphold the highest standards of due impartiality in its news output”.

The statement added: “We’ve reviewed the entirety of last night’s Newsnight, including the opening section, and while we believe the programme contained fair, reasonable and rigorous journalism, we feel that we should have done more to make clear the introduction was a summary of the questions we would examine, with all the accompanying evidence, in the rest of the programme.

“As it was, we believe the introduction we broadcast did not meet our standards of due impartiality.”

Good Morning Britain presenter Piers Morgan called the statement “utterly disgraceful” and said the BBC is “chucking one of its best journalists under the bus for telling the truth”.



CUMMINGS STILL



‘I behaved reasonably’, says Cummings

Former Newsnight economic editor Paul Mason said the decision made him “sick”.

He tweeted: “Every word Maitlis said was true: truth is the criterion of real journalism.”

However, Conservative MP Chris Green said the programme’s introduction “had a clear bias and had nothing to do with the BBC’s mission to inform and educate”.

“We do not need Newsnight to behave as poor quality entertainment,” he added.

Next week from Monday to Thursday, Dermot Murnaghan will be hosting After the Pandemic: Our New World – a series of special live programmes about what our world will be like once the pandemic is over.

We’ll be joined by some of the biggest names from the worlds of culture, politics, economics, science and technology. And you can take part too. If you’d like to be in our virtual audience – from your own home – and put questions to the experts, email afterthepandemic@sky.uk



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