Americans Are Dreaming Of A Green, Not White Christmas And Tree Sellers Are Enjoying The Results


For many years American families have been choosing artificial Christmas trees to decorate their homes. Of the nearly 96 million American households that put up a tree, 81% choose an artificial one and only 19% a real tree.

And what’s not to like? Artificial trees are plug-and-play. They are easy to handle, snap together in a flash, are perfectly proportioned with no holes or gaps, come pre-lit, leave no needles on the floor and once the holidays are over, they can be stored away for use next year. This saves families a lot of money, since most trees are kept for seven years.

But this year, more American families are choosing authenticity over convenience. And this may mark a turning point to return to the tradition of decorating with natural trees.

Unexpected surge in demand

Year-to-date, natural Christmas tree sales are up 29%, according to a survey of Christmas tree associations, farmers and retailers by Evercore ISI Research. Demand is so strong that many tree sellers are reporting shortages of the most popular seven-foot trees.

Christmas tree growers weren’t prepared for the sudden surge, since it takes between eight-to-ten years to grow a natural tree to that size. Ten years back, right after the recession, growers were leery of planting too many seedlings, resulting in a shortage this year.

Miller’s Christmas Tree Farm, which operates two choose-and-cut tree farms in Pennsylvania, has closed one of its locations to allow its smaller trees to grow. “Demand is good, but we don’t have the supply,” co-owner Susan Miller told the local Reading Eagle newspaper. “Most farms I know of are on the same page.”

Tight supplies are going to mean rising prices, with the average price expected to top $81 this year, up from $77 last and $66 in 2018.

“Due to smaller planting levels in earlier years, the supply of harvestable trees has been tight since 2015,” the National Christmas Tree Association (NCTA) reports, but reassuringly adds, “There has never been a true shortage where consumers were unable to buy a tree.”

Last year, Americans spent $2 billion buying some 26.2 million trees. This year’s takings are sure to be much greater, bringing much needed profits to the shrinking number of tree growers who took seven years after the 2008 recession to finally make a “reasonable profit,” reports the NCTA.

Return to the farm

Family farms and small retail businesses are going to share in this year’s windfall. While 24% of trees were sold last year at major retailers, like Walmart

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, Home Depot

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and Lowe’s

LOW
, the rest was split among smaller players, including 13% at local garden centers and nurseries, 17% at local retail lots, and 7% among non-profits.

However, the most popular destination to shop for a real tree is a choose-and-cut farm, like Miller’s. Some 32% of natural trees were bought there last year.

And after this year, many more American families are going to turn back the clock to recreate that early-American experience of hiking through the woods to find their perfect tree. Plus, there’s little danger of catching Covid out on the farm.

Millennial-generation families will take the lead going out to hunt for a real tree. Some 36% of millennials prefer a natural tree, as compared with 31% of GenXers and 20% of Baby Boomers, according to a survey conducted last year by ValuePenguin and Qualtrics with 1,000+ Americans.  

The natural tree contingent is drawn first to the experience of selecting the perfect tree (62%) to be the centerpiece of the holiday celebrations. Authenticity is a big part of it too, being more festive (48%) and bringing the natural scent of evergreens into the home (46%).

For nearly half of those who choose a natural tree, it’s all part of a family tradition and with so many new families expected to head to a Christmas tree farm, garden center or local lot to find a tree this year, those millennial families are likely to make it a tradition for many years to come.

Of course, as in every other retail category, natural Christmas trees are available online, with about 6% of consumers choosing this option last year. Amazon

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sells them through one of their third-party vendors, though at over twice the price one would expect to pay elsewhere. Home Depot and Lowe’s are fulfilling online orders for pick-up or home delivery too.

Natural is better

Regardless of how one chooses to buy, a natural Christmas tree is an environmentally-friendly, renewable choice. They preserve green space, with 350,000 acres in production across the country and with trees grown in all 50 states.

And after the holidays, those trees can be turned into valuable compost, mulch and wood chips for gardeners at the more than 4,000 local communities with a recycling program.

By contrast, most artificial trees are produced in China and made from metal and plastics, like polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which can be a source of lead. And these artificial trees inevitably end up in landfills where they don’t break down.

Interestingly, the first artificial tree was manufactured in the 1930s by Addis Brush Company, which adapted its technology making toilet bowl brushes to produce trees.

Call me a purist, but no matter how hard manufacturers work to make their fake Christmas trees look real, they will always look like over-sized toilet bowl brushes to me.

No matter how much they cost, the challenge of setting them up and stringing the lights, and the cleanup afterward, it will only be a natural tree for me, and I suspect for many more millennials as they continue to choose authenticity and environmentally-sustainable choices in their purchasing.



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Enjoying the spectacle of a bully’s downfall? Maybe you shouldn’t


When I was younger, I had no qualms about indulging in a bit of schadenfreude, and spent far too much time hoping that my enemies might suffer random misfortune, so that I could relish the pleasure of watching. Yet as I’ve aged, I’ve found myself putting a lot less energy into wishing catastrophe on others. I don’t think it’s because I’ve become a kinder, more forgiving person. It’s more that I’ve stopped caring so much. Other people might behave badly, but I tend to let it slide. I just don’t have the energy to take it all so personally.

Monica Dux: ”In a way, we were becoming the bullies ourselves.”Credit:Eddie Jim

Sadly, there is one gaping exception to this attitude, and that’s when it comes to anything involving my children. I always imagined that having kids would force me to grow up. To become more serious, measured, and mature. But in some ways, the opposite has happened, as I find myself vicariously drawn into their childish world.

As a parent, your kids’ victories generally bring you even more pleasure than your own. But the same rule applies to their hurts and defeats. You remember what it was like to be in the schoolyard yourself, helpless in the face of petty childhood cruelties. The difference is, you’re a grown-up now. No longer helpless. And the temptation to use that adult power to put things right can be overwhelming.

Recently, a friend called me, wrestling with just this problem. Her 12-year-old daughter had come home in tears, having been excluded from a birthday picnic, organised by one of her friends. Being snubbed was bad, but what was really hurtful was that other girls in the group kept contacting her daughter online, reiterating that she wasn’t welcome.

It was a textbook case of bullying, and my friend was raging, dreaming up schemes to exact revenge. She imagined subtly approaching the ringleader, and whispering blood-curdling threats in her ear. The sort that would haunt the child for years to come, but could also be plausibly denied as the figment of an overactive, 12-year-old imagination. I countered by suggesting that she should strike directly at the picnic itself. All she needed to do was walk my dog to the park, then unleash him while they were eating. Not only can he wolf down an entire birthday cake in seconds flat, but with the right encouragement, he’d also wee on their picnic blanket.

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But even these half-jokes fell flat, and we soon gave up on them, feeling slightly ashamed of ourselves. After all, adults being cruel to children is always ugly, even if it is only imaginary. And the momentary pleasure we gained from indulging such fantasies certainly wasn’t worth the dirty feeling it left us with. A feeling that, in a way, we were becoming the bullies ourselves.

Maybe that’s the real lesson to be learned from the international festival of schadenfreude that so many of us have participated in over the past weeks. Poking your tongue out and shouting na, na, na, nah, nah might be fun, and it might even be justified, but sometimes it also risks turning you into the bully. Deepening the hatreds, and the divides, and leaving a group of angry people, dreaming about the day they can crush and humiliate you.

@monicadux



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Why Penrith Panthers are enjoying rather than enduring grand final week


“Obviously with the restrictions, the COVID, you have to cross a lot of things off the list. I guess it helps both teams but for us, with a young group, we can focus on the task as much as possible. Obviously we’re trying to minimise as much outside noise as possible.”

Yeo, fellow Penrith forward James Tamou and coach Ivan Cleary were at ANZ Stadium on Thursday afternoon for one of their only promotional obligations for the week. The trio are among the most seasoned Panthers in a relatively inexperienced squad, one that hasn’t had to go through the hoopla that usually accompanies the most anticipated game of the year.

“I don’t want to upset anyone, but I’m a bit like Yeo-ey,” said Cleary. “Just the feeling of being in a grand final [is enough]. This year we had a fan day and you’re not exactly mingling like you normally would, but you can feel the excitement around town without actually getting immersed in it.

Grand final week has been just like every other one for the Panthers.Credit:SMH

“For example, if one of the boys was to go into a restaurant or something this week, it would be nuts. We’ve sort of been away from it but still get to feel it. At the end of the day, we’re here, our main concern this week is to prepare properly.”

Grand final week is nothing new to Melbourne. The Storm have contested four of the past five deciders and the build-ups that come with it. However, that advantage has been largely nullified given this week will be like most others for the young Panthers.

“The difference in grand final week because of COVID has fallen into our hands a little bit with the fact that, apart from a couple of days here and there, the rest of the week is very similar to every other week,” Cleary said. “We’ve prepared really well all year and the early signs have been very good this week too.”

Panthers coach Ivan Cleary and captain James Tamou with the premiership trophy.

Panthers coach Ivan Cleary and captain James Tamou with the premiership trophy.Credit:getty

It’s a point not lost on Apisai Koroisau. The Panthers hooker, thrust into the limelight when forced to replace suspended hooker Rabbitohs rake Issac Luke for the 2014 decider, appreciates this isn’t your usually build up.

Moments after booking another grand final appearance, courtesy over a nailbiting win against South Sydney, the Fijian international predicted the coronavirus would prove a leveller this time around.

“I remember the week leading up to the grand final was all promos and events,” he said of his initial grand final week experience. Nearly every day we had to do something, we were in Darling Harbour and all these other things.

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“It’s just evens the playing field because neither team has done this before. We’ll just go into the game pretty fresh, not doing as many promos and events. It does take it out of you during the week. To be able to roll in fresh will be a first for both teams.”

One player rolling in fresh will be Viliame Kikau. A member of the Dally M team of the year, Kikau missed the preliminary final after being suspended for a dangerous throw.

“One thing about Kiks is he isn’t overly emotional, he doesn’t give a lot away. After the siren last week he was visibly upbeat,” Cleary said.

“He feels as though he owes the boys. It’s an unfortunate situation where he didn’t play last week. He certainly showing good signs throughout the week. He’s asking when he can start training after the game, that’s pretty unusual for Kiks. Hopefully that’s a good sign.”

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Nightlife – Why raves are enjoying a revival | Britain


IT’S GROUNDHOG DECADE in Banwen, a small village in Wales. When the makers of the film “Pride” needed a location for an embattled Welsh mining community in the 1980s, they chose the tiny village on the edge of the Brecon Beacons. When 3,000 ravers arrived last weekend, that dubious decade seemed to be making a comeback.

Headlines about illegal raves recall the “second summer of love” in 1988, fuelled by the rise of dance music and party drugs such as ecstasy. The closure of clubs has revived that spirit this year, despite coronavirus restrictions banning gatherings of more than 30 people outdoors. The Metropolitan Police has recorded more than 1,000 raves (which it defines as unlicensed music events with more than 20 people) in London since the end of June. Between 2015 and 2018, the most raves reported to the Met in a single year was 133.

Even before the pandemic, raves were making a comeback. A combination of expensive rents in big cities and precarious operating licences has changed Britain’s nightlife. Big venues have passed their costs on to clubbers—entry to Printworks, a factory-turned-club in south-east London, can cost £40 ($54)—and drugs are less tolerated. In 2016 authorities revoked the licence of Fabric, a famous club in London, after two drug-related deaths. It reopened five months later, but with stricter rules, including ID-scanning and lifetime bans for anyone caught asking for drugs.

Smaller venues have taken advantage of big venues’ problems, and so have rave organisers. “You’ve got block parties, hippies in the woods, and London ones with middle-class people, thrown in a professional manner,” says James Morsh, who runs PillReport, a group that encourages people to rave responsibly. In May Mr Morsh organised the first socially distanced legal rave, with permission from Nottingham council. He had over 750 requests to attend, but could only allow 40 people to take part. He admits that it’s “not really what partying should be like”, although the arrival of 12 police officers gave the event an authentic feel. Once the police were satisfied that the revellers were not breaking any rules, they let them carry on.

Tougher punishments were introduced last month to deter people from partying. Eight organisers of the rave in Banwen were given fines of up to £10,000 each under the new regulations. But stopping determined ravers is hard, when locations are kept secret until the last minute and details shared through WhatsApp and Instagram. Mr Morsh thinks that the new penalties will have little effect: “The people throwing parties are going to keep throwing parties.”

The consequences for Banwen were not as grim as some feared. “When that many people turn up it’s a bit like ‘Oh shit, what have they come to do? Have they come to ruin the village?’,” says Alun, who lives nearby. But on checking it out, he found a fairly civilised event. Some attendees were even using hand sanitiser.

This article appeared in the Britain section of the print edition under the headline “Third summer of love”

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Young Sea Eagles enjoying life in Group 3 competition


GROUP-2 senior rugby league might not have gone ahead for the 2020 season but the Macksville Sea Eagles haven’t let that get in the way of their strong youth program.

Harbouring some of the best youth players in bush footy, Macksville have always put a great deal of effort into their juniors, and their under-18s are no exception.

Action in the Group 2 under-18s grand final between the Coffs Harbour Comets and Macksville Sea Eagles last year.

Despite the cancellation of the Group 2 senior competition, the Sea Eagles were determined to have their under-18s compete in 2020 and Group 3 has given them an avenue to continue.

Travelling south to take on the Port Macquarie Sharks on Saturday, Macksville earned a resounding 32-10 win to bounce back from their opening loss to Macleay Valley Mustangs.

“Proud of the way our under-18s conducted themselves on and off the field yesterday,” a Macksville spokesperson said after their first Group 3 clash.

“Even though the result didn’t go their way with a 12-6 loss to Macleay Valley Mustangs, the effort was there even if the polish wasn’t. But they never gave up and played right up to the final whistle …

“Let’s all get behind these young men as they are representing the whole Macksville Club and there was some positive signs … that it will be a great season for them.”

Macksville’s under-18s were dominant through the 2019 Group 2 season, earning the premiership with a thumping win over the Coffs Harbour Comets.

Action in the Group 2 under-18s grand final between the Coffs Harbour Comets and Macksville Sea Eagles last year.

Action in the Group 2 under-18s grand final between the Coffs Harbour Comets and Macksville Sea Eagles last year.

Without senior footy, its clear to see the priorities of the club on show as they continue to build for what is set to be a bigger and better year in 2021.





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Princess Beatrice’s new husband’s ex Dara Huang is seen enjoying drinks out on the town


Princess Beatrice’s new husband’s ex Dara Huang was seen enjoying an evening out on the town just hours after Edo Mapelli Mozzi married the royal in a secret ceremony at Windsor Castle yesterday.

The  Chinese-American architect, who shares four-year-old son Christopher, known as Wolfie, with ex-fiance Edo, looked in good spirits as she enjoyed drinks in Knightsbridge with friends last night.

Just hours after Beatrice, 31, married Italian property developer Edoardo, 37, at a ceremony at the Royal Chapel of All Saints, in the grounds of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson’s home of Royal Lodge, in Windsor Great Park, with just 20 guests – including the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99, Dara was pictured stepping out with friends. 

Dara was seen laughing with a male friend as she put on a casual appearance in ripped black jeans shorts and a white t-shirt, which she teamed with trainers and a quilted jacket at a local cafe.

The mother-of-one was then seen putting on a mask as she left the venue with a coffee and a shopping bag, as well as a large blue rucksack.

In January, a friend of the former couple told the Mail On Sunday they remain close, and that Dara still cuts Edo’s hair and occasionally buys him clothes. 

The Chinese-American architect, who shares four-year-old son Christopher, known as Wolfie, with ex-fiance Edo, looked in good spirits as she enjoyed drinks in Knightsbridge with friends last night

Dara was seen laughing with a male friend as she put on a casual appearance in ripped black jeans shorts and a white t-shirt, which she teamed with trainers and a quilted jacket at a local cafe

Dara was seen laughing with a male friend as she put on a casual appearance in ripped black jeans shorts and a white t-shirt, which she teamed with trainers and a quilted jacket at a local cafe

Beatrice, 31, married Italian property developer Edoardo, 37, at a ceremony at the Royal Chapel of All Saints, in the grounds of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson's home of Royal Lodge, in Windsor Great Park, with just 20 guests - including the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99

Beatrice, 31, married Italian property developer Edoardo, 37, at a ceremony at the Royal Chapel of All Saints, in the grounds of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson’s home of Royal Lodge, in Windsor Great Park, with just 20 guests – including the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99

The same morning, at 11am, Dara’s ex-fiance walked down the aisle in an intimate ceremony with Princess Beatrice, making the royal a stepmother.

Beatrice, who is ninth in line to the throne and is a granddaughter of the Queen, has become the only princess to marry someone with children and take on a stepchild.

The father-of-one has a young son, Christopher, whose nickname is Woolfie, with his former partner of three-and-a-half years.

Edo is said to enjoy an amicable relationship with Dara and prides himself on still being an active part of his son’s life.

In August last year he told the Telegraph: ‘I take [Christopher] to school a couple of mornings a week and finish in time to put him in bed three or four evenings.’

In January, a friend of the former couple told the Mail On Sunday they remain close, and that Dara still cuts Edo's hair and occasionally buys him clothes (Seen together with their son Wolf)

In January, a friend of the former couple told the Mail On Sunday they remain close, and that Dara still cuts Edo’s hair and occasionally buys him clothes (Seen together with their son Wolf)

Yesterday, the Queen shared her delight at Princess Beatrice's surprise secret wedding to Italian property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, saying it was a 'very nice' occasion

Yesterday, the Queen shared her delight at Princess Beatrice’s surprise secret wedding to Italian property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, saying it was a ‘very nice’ occasion

Princess Beatrice's new husband's ex Dara Huang was seen enjoying an evening out on the town just hours after Edo Mapelli Mozzi married the royal in a secret ceremony at Windsor Castle yesterday

Princess Beatrice’s new husband’s ex Dara Huang was seen enjoying an evening out on the town just hours after Edo Mapelli Mozzi married the royal in a secret ceremony at Windsor Castle yesterday

Beatrice has reportedly welcomed Dara into her life, adopting a stepmother role to Woolfie.

She is believed to have been on the guestlist for the wedding when it was first planned, but it’s not known if she made the cut for the slimmed down nuptials today.

Dara, who posted pictures yesterday enjoying a tennis lesson in Chelsea, has reportedly also found love following the break-up from her former fiancee.

The architect is thought to be with 37-year-old London-based financier, Filippos Kodellas de la Morena.

According to sources, Princess Beatrice opted to wear her original wedding dress. 

In January a source told the Daily Mail that Beatrice was looking at wedding dress at Italian designer store Caroline Castigliano.

The insider said: ‘Bea was seen popping into Caroline Castigliano in Knightsbridge. Though Caroline isn’t Italian, and takes her name from her first husband, she’s known as an Anglo-Italian designer because lots of her clients are from Italy.

‘Her gowns go for between £15,000 and £40,000, which gives us an idea of the budget!.’

The mother-of-one was then seen putting on a mask as she left the venue with a coffee and a shopping bag, as well as a large blue rucksack

Princess Beatrice's new husband's ex Dara Huang was seen enjoying an evening out on the town just hours after Edo Mapelli Mozzi married the royal in a secret ceremony at Windsor Castle yesterday

The mother-of-one was then seen putting on a mask as she left the venue with a coffee and a shopping bag, as well as a large blue rucksack

Beatrice, 31, and Edo, were due to tie the knot at the Chapel Royal of St James’s Palace, in London, on 29 May. But their ceremony was postponed due to Covid-19 and no new date was given by the palace at the time. 

Yesterday, the Queen shared her delight at Princess Beatrice’s surprise secret wedding to Italian property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, saying it was a ‘very nice’ occasion.

Proud grandparents the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99, were among the roughly 20 guests who watched the couple exchange vows at 11am this morning at the Royal Chapel of All Saints, in the grounds of Prince Andrew and Sarah Ferguson’s home of Royal Lodge, in Windsor Great Park. 

The couple chose to have an intimate ceremony attended by just ‘close family’, according to a statement released this afternoon by Buckingham Palace. The bride’s parents, Prince Andrew and the Duchess of York as well as her sister Princess Eugenie, 30, are thought to have been included. On marriage Beatrice becomes a stepmother to Edo’s son Christopher, known as Wolfie, who is also thought to have attended.

Dara was seen chatting with pals outside a Knightsbridge cafe just hours after Edo got married to Princess Beatrice on Friday

Dara was seen chatting with pals outside a Knightsbridge cafe just hours after Edo got married to Princess Beatrice on Friday

She appeared in good spirits as she appeared in casual clothing and chatted with a group of pals

She appeared in good spirits as she appeared in casual clothing and chatted with a group of pals

The Queen, who has now watched six of her eight grandchildren wed, shared her joy in a conversation with Captain Sir Tom Moore, whom she knighted at Windsor Castle just hours after the nuptials. She told Sir Tom and his family: ‘My granddaughter got married this morning both Philip and I managed to get there – very nice.’ 

The chapel, which can accommodate 180 people, was an ideal choice for social distancing, especially given the bride’s grandparents are both in their 90s and in a high risk group. Weddings of up to 30 people are allowed under current government guidelines. The reduced guest list means that the couple will have to celebrate with celebrity friends such as Ellie Goulding, Karlie Kloss and Cressida Bonas at a later date. 

Flowers from well-wishers were seen being unloaded from vans after the wedding, as Buckingham Palace confirmed no reception or other event was taking place. 

A statement released by the palace said: ‘The small ceremony was attended by The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh and close family. The wedding took place in accordance with all relevant Government guidelines.’ 

It is understood the couple will not be releasing a wedding photo today because they do not want to overshadow the investiture of Captain Tom Moore, who received his knighthood from the Queen at Windsor Castle this afternoon.

‘They needed to make the wedding Covid-secure and safe for the Queen so what better way than the All Saints Chapel with reception on site at the Royal Lodge.

‘They are just like a normal family and had to make sacrifices like many others have up and down the country and looking forward to having a wonderful celebration when the time is right.’ 

Edo is the son of Nikki Shale and Italian former Olympic skier Count Alessandro Mapelli Mozzi. Nikki split with Mapelli Mozzi when Edo was young, while her second husband Christopher Shale, a senior Tory and a close friend of former prime minister David Cameron, died of a heart attack at Glastonbury Festival in 2011.

The bride's grandparents the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99, who have both been in isolation at Windsor Castle, were in attendance and appeared in excellent spirits as they left the service, pictured

The bride’s grandparents the Queen, 94, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 99, who have both been in isolation at Windsor Castle, were in attendance and appeared in excellent spirits as they left the service, pictured

It is likely the bride's parents, Prince Andrew and the Duchess of York, both attended as the service was held in the grounds of their home. Pictured, Prince Andrew on Wednesday

It is likely the bride’s parents, Prince Andrew and the Duchess of York, both attended as the service was held in the grounds of their home. Pictured, Prince Andrew on Wednesday 

The chapel is on the grounds of the Royal Lodge, where the Duke and Duchess of York have been staying in lockdown

The chapel is on the grounds of the Royal Lodge, where the Duke and Duchess of York have been staying in lockdown

The dashing Italian property developer who won Bea’s heart: Father-of-one Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, 37, is a long-time family friend who swept her off her feet 

Princess Beatrice has married Italian property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in secret at Windsor Castle

Princess Beatrice has married Italian property developer Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in secret at Windsor Castle

Princess Beatrice married fiance Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in a secret wedding in Windsor earlier today – but who is the man that stole the royal’s heart?

The happy couple were due to wed at the Chapel Royal at St James’s Palace in London with 150 guests on May 29, but Covid-19 meant they had to postpone their big day. 

Having kept their plans quiet, they tied the knot this morning in front of just 20 guests including the Queen, 94, and Prince Philip, 99, at All Saints Chapel in Windsor Great Park. 

Beatrice, 31, and Edo, 37, are long-time family friends, but started dating in October 2018 and got engaged in September last year. 

The pair said of their 11-month whirlwind romance in a statement: ‘We are extremely happy to be able to share the news of our recent engagement. 

Property developer Edoardo is the son of former Olympic skier Count Alessandro Mapelli Mozzi and Nikki Shale, and has been a friend of the Yorks for some time. The father-of-one has a son, Christopher, with his former partner Dara Huang. He’s said to enjoy an amicable relationship with Huang and prides himself on still being an active part of his son’s life. Edoardo was educated at the prestigious Radley school in Oxfordshire before studying for a Master’s in politics at Edinburgh.

He is believed to have known Beatrice for years, the royal attended the funeral of Edoardo’s stepfather, Christopher Shale, who died at of a heart attack at Glastonbury in 2011; Shale was a close friend of David Cameron.

Father-of-one Edo has a young son, Christopher, whose nickname is Wolfie, with his former partner Dara Huang - meaning Beatrice is now a stepmother

Mozzi was Beatrice's first public boyfriend since she split from Uber executive Dave Clark in 2016 after 10 years together. The pair are seen pulling funny faces

Father-of-one Edo has a young son, Christopher, whose nickname is Wolfie, with his former partner Dara Huang – meaning Beatrice is now a stepmother. Right, Beatrice with Edo

 



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