There is ‘no excuse’ for governments not to hold ANZAC Day commemorations



Sky News host Paul Murray says Australia must have an ANZAC Day this year identical to the one in 2019 and hopes state governments follow Queensland’s example to keep the commemoration.

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NFL news, scores 2020: Lamar Jackson poop excuse


The Ravens won 47-42 on Tuesday (AEDT), and despite much speculation, Lamar Jackson says he did not take the Browns to the Super Bowl in the process.

During the fourth quarter, Jackson, 23, jogged to the locker room for what was described by the ESPN broadcast as “cramps.”

But Jackson’s sudden departure, captured by the broadcast, led fans on social media to speculate that he needed to go for two.

Jackson returned a series later to throw a touchdown on fourth down to Marquise Brown that gave the Ravens a 42-35 lead with 1:51 to go in the game before eventually leading Baltimore on a game-winning drive in the final minute.

“I didn’t pull a Paul Pierce,” Jackson said in reference to the former Boston Celtics star, who was carried off the court in a wheelchair for an apparent bathroom break during the 2008 playoffs.

Instead, Jackson said, he had run to the locker room to get treatment for cramps because of the cold and required intravenous fluids.

But before Jackson’s explanation, fans on Twitter ran wild with speculation.

Even his teammate, and regular backup Robert Griffin III, added fuel to the fire.

After Cleveland tied the game later, Jackson led the Ravens back down the field, setting up Justin Tucker for the go-ahead field goal with two seconds left. A kick-off, a series of laterals and a safety later the Ravens moved to 8-5, a game behind the 9-4 Browns.

– New York Post



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NFL news, scores 2020: Lamar Jackson poop excuse


The Ravens won 47-42 on Tuesday (AEDT), and despite much speculation, Lamar Jackson says he did not take the Browns to the Super Bowl in the process.

During the fourth quarter, Jackson, 23, jogged to the locker room for what was described by the ESPN broadcast as “cramps.”

But Jackson’s sudden departure, captured by the broadcast, led fans on social media to speculate that he needed to go for two.

Jackson returned a series later to throw a touchdown on fourth down to Marquise Brown that gave the Ravens a 42-35 lead with 1:51 to go in the game before eventually leading Baltimore on a game-winning drive in the final minute.

“I didn’t pull a Paul Pierce,” Jackson said in reference to the former Boston Celtics star, who was carried off the court in a wheelchair for an apparent bathroom break during the 2008 playoffs.

Instead, Jackson said, he had run to the locker room to get treatment for cramps because of the cold and required intravenous fluids.

But before Jackson’s explanation, fans on Twitter ran wild with speculation.

Even his teammate, and regular backup Robert Griffin III, added fuel to the fire.

After Cleveland tied the game later, Jackson led the Ravens back down the field, setting up Justin Tucker for the go-ahead field goal with two seconds left. A kick-off, a series of laterals and a safety later the Ravens moved to 8-5, a game behind the 9-4 Browns.

– New York Post



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AFL 2020: Lachie Hunter drink driving sentence, court case, Western Bulldogs, ‘I sh*t myself’, excuse to cops


A former Western Bulldogs vice-captain was drinking UDLs the night he collided with four parked cars, his lawyer has told a court.

Lachie Hunter pleaded guilty in Melbourne Magistrates Court to drink driving, careless driving, and failing to give his name and address when property had been damaged.

He was sentenced to a $1000 fine and a 12-month licence disqualification without a conviction recorded, after magistrate Michelle Hodgson said he had experienced “significant” sanctions from the Western Bulldogs including a $5000 fine and a four-game suspension.

Lachie Hunter celebrates kicking a goal during the round 12 AFL match against the Adelaide Crows on August 16. Photo: Matt Roberts/AFL Photos/via Getty ImagesSource: Getty Images
Grand Final

Mr Hunter was also fined on the night for breaching COVID-19 restrictions.



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Bledisloe Cup 2020: Wallabies vs All Blacks, Inexperienced, Excuse, Dave Rennie, Noah Lolesio, Irae Simone


Rugby experts and pundits have clashed over the Wallabies’ heavy defeat to the All Blacks and just how lenient they can be given the inexperience of Dave Rennie’s outfit.

Rennie refused to use the injuries and loss of key veterans as an excuse following the 38-point loss.

He was forced to hand Noah Lolesio and Irae Simone their first caps and while the effort was there, the inexperience showed across the board as critical mistakes and impatient attack proved costly.

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Woeful Wallabies leak points

Woeful Wallabies leak points

1:18



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NDP won’t give Trudeau ‘excuse’ for election, Singh says ahead of confidence vote in Commons


NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said today that his party will not give Prime Minister Justin Trudeau an “excuse” to send Canadians to the polls in the throes of a global pandemic — an apparent signal that Trudeau’s government will survive today’s confidence vote.

In a news conference just two hours before a crucial confidence vote, Singh declined to say exactly how his MPs would vote or whether they might abstain.

“We are voting for Canadians. We are voting against an election,” he said.

Singh said the NDP will still work to get answers on the WE Charity scandal through the Commons ethics committee.

The Bloc Québécois had already confirmed it will support the Conservative motion, leaving the outcome in the hands of the NDP.

The vote is expected to happen around 3:15 p.m. ET and CBCNews.ca will carry it live.

The opposition day motion would create a special committee to probe the Trudeau government’s ethics and spending in response to the pandemic — including the controversial WE Charity contract to administer a student volunteer grant program.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not recuse himself from talks on the agreement, even though several of his family members had been paid for speaking engagements by the organization.

The Liberal government has declared the vote on the Conservative motion a matter of confidence – a high-stakes move that NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh has called a “farce.”

WATCH / Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland on possible election:

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland says she’s focused on passing legislation to support Canadians during the pandemic as a confidence vote looms in Parliament today.  1:39

Speaking to reporters after the Liberal caucus meeting, Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said the government needs the confidence of the House to do its job.

“I really believe at the end of the day common sense will prevail and we’re going to get through this,” she said.

Freeland also said that legislation for several new pandemic supports for Canadians and businesses need to be passed and an election could jeopardize that.

Heading into their weekly caucus meeting this morning, NDP MPs said they had not yet decided on a path forward and would talk about how to proceed behind closed doors.

“At the end of the day we have a lot of moving parts and we’re still in a pandemic and we’re still committed to fighting for Canadians and we’re going to continue to do that,” said Ontario NDP MP Matthew Green.

“We have to look at what all the variables are going in to this discussion and do what’s best for the country.”

Asked by reporters if the NDP had an obligation to support the Conservative motion, NDP ethics critic Charlie Angus said, “There’s many ways to skin a cat, my friends.”

WATCH / NDP MPs on today’s confidence vote:

NDP MPs arrived for their weekly caucus meeting in Ottawa on Wednesday. 1:26

Conservative House leader Gérard Deltell said the ethical questions surrounding the government require a special committee with a clear mandate. He said it’s the “duty” of opposition parties to hold the government to account.

“This is what the issue is all about with this motion, and what we see right now is a prime minister who will do whatever it takes to call an election,” he said.

“The only Canadian who would like to have an election today is the prime minister. The only Canadian who would like to freeze the government for a few months is the prime minister by calling an election.”

The Conservatives amended the original motion to state that voting to launch the committee should not be considered grounds to order an election.

It also dropped the “anti-corruption committee” label it initially proposed.

Bloc Québécois House leader Alain Therrien said the WE Charity issue is so complex that it requires a special committee to get answers.

He said the Liberals’ “scorched-earth” approach to politics is the product of a “club of cronyism” and renders compromise impossible.

He also criticized the NDP, suggesting the party’s MPs have obediently followed Liberal demands.

“The NDP have acted in the last little while a little like the Liberals’ lap dog,” he said.

‘Unwelcome drama’: Paul

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul issued a statement urging the parties to cool their jets, calling the brinkmanship “unwelcome drama.” 

“The Liberal and Conservative parties’ high-stakes, high-tech game of chicken can have no winner,” she said. 

“They should leave such games outside of Parliament, and focus on the urgent needs of people in Canada. I ask members of Parliament to dial down the rhetoric, which is not in keeping with the seriousness of this unprecedented moment, so that we can get back to working on the critical matters at hand.”



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Berejiklian slams Qld’s ‘excuse’ shut out NSW after new coronavirus cases


NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has accused Queensland of “thinking up every excuse” to keep its borders shut as three new cases threaten to derail a proposed reopening.

Queensland has given NSW Health officials 48 hours to determine the source of three new locally acquired cases of COVID-19 in western Sydney that ended the state’s 12-day streak of no community transmission.

Queensland has said it was willing to reopen its border to all of NSW on the condition it achieved 28 consecutive days of no locally acquired cases from mystery sources.

If the clock on the timeline resets today, the earliest NSW residents can hope to return to Queensland is November 4 — only if there is no community transmission before then.

NSW contact tracers are now in a race against time to identify the source of yesterday’s three new cases in Parramatta, Wollondilly and Camden.

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“The contact tracers in NSW will have 48 hours to see if they can scientifically link these cases to existing clusters,” Queensland Health Minister Steven Miles said.

“I really hope they can and, if they can, it won’t have any effect on our timeline.

“As far as we know for now we are still on track for that review towards the end of the month and a potential reopening on the first (of November).”

This morning Ms Berejiklian rubbished the 48 hour deadline, accusing Queensland of making up rules as it went along.

“I’m not going to waste my time trying to change is what clearly is a predetermined position. Because they keep changing the rules on us,” she told Channel 9’s Today.

“The Queensland government keeps changing the goalposts. I’ve never heard of this rule where you have to have two days to make sure you link your cases to an existing case.

“I mean, that’s just something they plucked out of, I don’t know where. I’ve never heard that advice before.”

Ms Berejiklian told 2GB Queensland’s expectation was “unrealistic” as it took time for genome testing to establish the source of infections and links to known clusters.

“It might take a couple of days for that to occur, if and when that occurs,” she said.

“I just think the Queensland Government is really just thinking up every excuse it can as it goes along and I don’t think that’s acceptable.”

The premier said it was “highly improbable” a state the size of NSW would meet Queensland’s expectations.

“For a jurisdiction the size of NSW, with the open economy we have, with the ability we’ve given to our citizens to do, in the main, what they would normally do in a COVID-safe way — I think it’s a benchmark no state our size would ever be able to meet,” she told the ABC.

“What the important questions that should be asked – and this is what I’ll be asking of Victoria — are, ‘How well do you manage a case when it comes up? How well do you make sure when a cluster emerges that you take action to get it under control?’

“They’re the questions that should be asked. Not these artificial days, not these benchmarks that will never be met.”

The cases reported in NSW yesterday were two women and a man, all aged in their 50s, spread across Parramatta, Camden and Wollondilly. The cases were not believed to be linked to each other.

Yesterday, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said she would not budge on the 28-day target for NSW.

“The 28 days is nothing new,” she told ABC Breakfast.

“This was actually the advice that, my understanding is, that the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee had given the Federal Government.

“And it was not followed through by National Cabinet. It never came to National Cabinet.

“So I’m not being inconsistent with what all of the health officers actually agreed on.”

Currently, Queensland’s notoriously strict border rules only allows travellers from the northern NSW areas of Tweed Shire, Ballina, Byron, Lismore, Richmond Valley and Glen Innes and a handful of border postcodes.

Queenslanders are able to visit these regions and residents can apply for a border pass to travel into Queensland.

All other approved NSW travellers to Queensland have to complete 14 days of self-funded hotel quarantine.



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Eddie McGuire nightclub visit, laughable excuse,


Eddie McGuire is the master of spin — and his defence over a controversial nightclub visit was laughable in all the right ways.

Hawthorn chief Jeff Kennett slammed the Collingwood president this week for being photographed in the Pink Flamingo on the Gold Coast while others in footy remain quarantined in hubs, saying: “While he is out there jiving at the Pink Flamingo, his players and coaches are in a hub breathing stale air.”

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McGuire didn’t break any rules because he is not part of the Collingwood “bubble”, and having completed his 14 days in isolation after arriving in Queensland, is now free to behave like any other citizens of the Sunshine State.

Defending his nightclub appearance on Triple M radio on Monday, McGuire said he was merely doing research about how venues are reopening in a COVID-19 world as part of his role with Visit Victoria — an organisation that aims to attract tourists to his home state.

“(I) speak extensively to people in the restaurant and hospitality industry about how we get Victoria going again,” McGuire said on the Hot Breakfast. “(That’s) part of what I was looking at the other night and how that all works.

“I went through the procedure on how you go about doing things if you are outside the hub.”

McGuire said he was conducting a reconnaissance mission, adding the people he was with told him: “‘The best place we can show you is this place called the Pink Flamingo’.”

Former Footy Show host Craig Hutchison and AFL reporter Damian Barrett, who used to work with McGuire on the Footy Show, both loved the way the Channel 9 star spun his way out of a sticky situation.

Discussing the episode on The Sounding Board podcast, both Barrett and Hutchison — who hosts Footy Classified on Monday nights — couldn’t help but chuckle at the Collingwood supremo’s confidence to shut down his critics.

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Barrett acknowledged McGuire had done nothing wrong other than be responsible for a “small bad look”, and gave him a proverbial hat-tip for using Visit Victoria as part of his defence.

“He can fall on his sword totally, or he can go another way,” Barrett said. “Now, knowing Eddie, he’s going to go the way that he is convinced is the right way to go.

“I laughed though because he almost doubled down on his right to be in the Pink Flamingo in whatever time it was, in those circumstances.

“And what I love most about it is, in part of his life, he is a member of Visit Victoria, which is the promotional body to bring people to Victoria.

“Victoria is in complete lockdown right now but Eddie, from the goodness of his heart, is helping Victoria, according to his statement.

“I started smirking as he was saying it, he was trying to do the right thing by Victoria in going to the Pink Flamingo to learn protocols on how we can re-open establishments.”

Hutchison agreed with Barrett and said McGuire only found himself in the limelight because he was too kind to refuse a photo when asked by a couple of men to pose in front of the camera.

“I say this with admiration, the reconnaissance mission defence — you know you’re a confident human being when you launch a reconnaissance defence on the Pink Flamingo,” Hutchison said.

“I say that in absolute admiration.

“How you would keep a straight face on a reconnaissance pitch is what made me laugh.

“He was in a no-win situation … the reconnaissance was a bold defence.

“I love the defence … I love the confidence to be able to attempt it.”



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The Pandemic Is No Excuse for Colleges to Surveil Students


It’s no secret that many universities go to great lengths to let these “amateurs” in demanding athletic fields do as little as possible academically so that they can keep training hard. But it’s supposed to be a wink-wink-nudge-nudge process, not outright fraud. A few years ago, my own university, the University of North Carolina, breached this unspoken rule. The school became embroiled in a high-profile scandal after a professor provided fake classes aimed at athletes that gave them the grades required to keep their eligibility in return for little to no attendance or work. That, of course, made the charade uncomfortably explicit, and UNC faced national attention and some minor sanctions.

As an immediate countermeasure, the university dispatched minders to classrooms. In classes where I had student athletes, especially those in high-profile sports, a man started to appear after each class to ask me if so-and-so athlete had shown up. (This has apparently become a practice at other universities too). It was a no-win situation, because if I refused to cooperate, the students would face sanctions, and maybe even lose their scholarship. And my students were showing up, but many times they were dozing off in class, exhausted from their punishing training regime. Surveillance had brought surface-level compliance, but it had not solved the underlying crisis.

Instead of snitching on them, I took these students aside and did my best to warn them that their interests were not aligned with those of the university and the athletic department. I gave the football players pamphlets and information about concussions. I talked about the low odds that they would actually become professionals after college, and offered to help guide them in any way I could toward the healthiest, most viable future path.

This wasn’t the first time I encountered extensive surveillance of athletes, only to watch it backfire. In the previous decade, just as Facebook was taking off as a college social network, my student athletes told me that they were forced to “friend” their coaches on Facebook, so the coaches could keep tabs on them. Their solution? Parties that were explicitly no Facebook, no phones. Later, when athletes at many universities were forced to download tracking apps, I have little doubt that some of them did the equivalent of “no Facebook, no phone” parties with these apps: sent their phone along to class with a friend, or left it in their dorm, “sleeping,” while they socialized elsewhere. Why would we expect any other kind of response to a draconian surveillance regime under an unfair system?

Mandatory COVID-19 apps could result in an even worse outcome than that of tracking athletes—whom universities may be able to coerce more effectively because many athletes need their scholarships—because public health rests on trust and cooperation. Knowing that they are being tracked, some students will no doubt let their phone “sleep” peacefully in their bed while they party elsewhere. If a few get sick, they may hide it, for fear of having their tech trickery found out. This is an extra challenge with the college-student cohort because many of them either experience COVID-19 as a mild illness or are completely asymptomatic, but still seem to transmit the virus efficiently, unlike young children. Universities will likely be hindered in their crucial contact-tracing efforts as students will be inclined to lie. The end result will be more surface-level surveillance, but less useful information—and worse public-health outcomes.



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