Queensland Health says ‘all protocols followed’ when woman left hotel quarantine to accompany father to hospital


Health authorities say “all protocols were followed” when a woman in Brisbane hotel quarantine accompanied her father to and from hospital wearing full PPE before she later tested positive for the UK strain of COVID-19.

A report by the Courier Mail on Thursday afternoon said the woman had been left unattended at the hospital and travelled back to the hotel in either a taxi or ride-share.

In a statement on Thursday night, a Queensland Health spokesperson said, “some early reporting has misrepresented this situation”.

“In circumstances where a person accompanies a relative to hospital for medical treatment, full PPE [personal protective equipment] and safety guidelines are followed,” the spokesperson said.

“This occurs even if a patient is being transported for non-COVID-related medical issues.

“Quarantine guests are transported to and from the hospital by Queensland Ambulance Service, who have been safely transporting hotel quarantine guests for almost a year.

“All protocols were followed in this case. Guests were transported from and returned to the hotel by Qld Ambulance Service while in appropriate PPE.

“The suggestion the person caught a ride-share back to the hotel is untrue. Full and proper COVID-19 PPE protocols were followed while these guests were in the hospital.” 

Just hours after the woman went back to quarantine in the hotel, she and her father were formally notified they were carrying the mutant UK strain of COVID-19.

The woman, aged in her 20s, arrived from Lebanon with her father, aged in his 40s, on New Year’s Day.

They had been quarantining at the Hotel Grand Chancellor in inner-city Brisbane where four cases of the mutant strain have now been detected, along with a hotel cleaner and her partner.

The spread of the virus on level seven of the hotel sparked a mass evacuation of all 129 guests in a major medical emergency on Wednesday.

It is understood police are investigating after Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young said earlier she could not be confident all guests stayed inside their rooms during the 14-day isolation, as per Queensland Health’s hotel quarantine protocol.

Overnight on Wednesday, all guests were moved by ambulance to other quarantine hotels, including The Westin in Brisbane’s CBD.

The Westin in Brisbane's CBD.
Overnight all guests were moved by ambulance to other medi-hotels including The Westin in Brisbane’s CBD.(ABC News: Liz Pickering)

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Father in induced coma after hit-run in Deer Park


Mr Topia, from Albanvale, suffered severe leg injuries and underwent surgery on Sunday.

Police have released an image of the SUV, possibly a Ford Territory, which investigators believe may have had two female occupants at the time of the incident. Credit:Nine News

“It’s been a horrible, horrible couple of days,” his daughter Tiffany Topia told Nine News.

Mr Topia video-called his daughters while he was waiting for help.

Nick Topia's daughter Tiffany.

Nick Topia’s daughter Tiffany. Credit:Nine News

“It was heartbreaking hearing my dad screaming for help, asking me to come and help him. It just broke my heart,” Ms Topia said.

His other daughter, Nikkia, called on the driver to come forward.

“Own up; you’ve possibly ruined my dad’s whole life,” she said.

Mr Topia is in an induced coma.

Mr Topia is in an induced coma. Credit:Nine News

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the car, possibly a Ford Territory, fled the scene before witnesses rushed to help.

“We’ve had witnesses, luckily, who have seen the incident rushing to the rider’s aid and could have saved his life with the severe blood loss,” he said.

“It’s absolutely disgusting for someone to flee the scene, whether they’ve seen what they’ve done or not you definitely would have felt it, and to not go to the rider’s aid like all the witnesses have done on this occasion, it’s disgusting.”

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the driver fled the scene.

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the driver fled the scene. Credit:Nine News

Mr Topia was dragged about 100 metres from the point of impact.

Anyone with information or who has dash-cam footage of the vehicle in Deer Park on January 1 is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or submit a confidential crime report at www.crimestoppersvic.com.au

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Father in induced coma after hit-run in Deer Park


Mr Topia, from Albanvale, suffered severe leg injuries and underwent surgery on Sunday.

Police have released an image of the SUV, possibly a Ford Territory, which investigators believe may have had two female occupants at the time of the incident. Credit:Nine News

“It’s been a horrible, horrible couple of days,” his daughter Tiffany Topia told Nine News.

Mr Topia video-called his daughters while he was waiting for help.

Nick Topia's daughter Tiffany.

Nick Topia’s daughter Tiffany. Credit:Nine News

“It was heartbreaking hearing my dad screaming for help, asking me to come and help him. It just broke my heart,” Ms Topia said.

His other daughter, Nikkia, called on the driver to come forward.

“Own up; you’ve possibly ruined my dad’s whole life,” she said.

Mr Topia is in an induced coma.

Mr Topia is in an induced coma. Credit:Nine News

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the car, possibly a Ford Territory, fled the scene before witnesses rushed to help.

“We’ve had witnesses, luckily, who have seen the incident rushing to the rider’s aid and could have saved his life with the severe blood loss,” he said.

“It’s absolutely disgusting for someone to flee the scene, whether they’ve seen what they’ve done or not you definitely would have felt it, and to not go to the rider’s aid like all the witnesses have done on this occasion, it’s disgusting.”

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the driver fled the scene.

Senior Constable Zach Baker said the driver fled the scene. Credit:Nine News

Mr Topia was dragged about 100 metres from the point of impact.

Anyone with information or who has dash-cam footage of the vehicle in Deer Park on January 1 is urged to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or submit a confidential crime report at www.crimestoppersvic.com.au

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Woman tackled, falsely accused Black teen of stealing her phone in NYC hotel, father says


NEW YORK —
A confrontation in which a man said a woman tackled his 14-year-old Black son in a New York City hotel lobby as she falsely accused the teen of stealing her phone is under investigation, city prosecutors said Monday.

Keyon Harrold, a prominent jazz trumpeter, posted a widely viewed video of the confrontation Saturday at the Arlo Hotel. He said the unidentified woman scratched him and tackled and grabbed his son, Keyon Harrold Jr., at the lower Manhattan hotel where the pair were staying.

“He’s the sweetest, most genuine kid you could ask for,” Harrold said in an interview Monday evening. “I was just appalled at how he was treated.”

The video shows an agitated woman demanding her phone be returned while a hotel manager tries to settle the situation. At one point, the woman appears to rush forward and says, “I’m not letting him walk away with my phone!”

Harrold said the phone was returned by an Uber driver shortly afterward.

The confrontation prompted comparisons to recent incidents involving false accusations against Black people.

A white woman was charged with filing a false report for calling 911 and saying she was being threatened by “an African American man” during a dispute with a Black man in New York’s Central Park in May. That case inspired New York state lawmakers in June to pass a law that makes it easier under civil rights law to sue an individual who calls a police officer on someone “without reason” because of their background, including race and national origin.

“There are thousands of Black men sitting in prison who have been falsely accused,” Harrold said. “That’s why we have to address incidents like this now, before they become life altering, life impacting issues that negatively and devastatingly affect Black people.”

The parents of Keyon Harrold Jr. and civil rights attorney Ben Crump issued a statement Monday, calling on the Manhattan district attorney to bring assault and battery charges against the woman “to send the message that hateful, racially motivated behaviour is unacceptable.”

“As this year of racial awareness is drawing to a close, it’s deeply troubling that incidents like this one, in which a Black child is viewed as and treated like a criminal, continue to happen,” read the statement.

Crump and the Harrold family also called for a civil rights investigation into the Arlo Hotel “for its implicit bias” in its treatment of the teen.

New York City police did not identify the woman, saying only that there was a harassment complaint on file for an incident Saturday inside the hotel. A spokesperson for Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance said the office is “thoroughly investigating this incident” but did not elaborate.

Hotel management said in a posting Sunday they reached out to Harrold and his son to apologize.

“We’re deeply disheartened about the recent incident of baseless accusation, prejudice, and assault against an innocent guest of Arlo Hotel,” they said in a Facebook post.

Keyon Harrold is originally from Ferguson, Missouri, and lives in New York City. He has performed with musicians including Beyonce, Rihanna and Eminem, according to his website.

——

Associated Press journalist Mary Esch contributed to this report from Albany, New York.





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His father developed the polio vaccine. This is what he thinks about COVID-19.


Dr. Peter Salk vaguely remembers the day he was vaccinated against polio in 1953.

His father, Dr. Jonas Salk, made history by creating the polio vaccine at the University of Pittsburgh and inoculated his family as soon as he felt it was safe and effective.

Although the vaccine hadn’t undergone any trials yet, 9-year-old Peter was among the first children to ever receive the vaccine.

“My father had brought home some vaccine (and) these terrifying pieces of equipment that neither I nor my brothers very much enjoyed seeing,” Salk told USA TODAY. “Big glass syringes and reusable needles that needed to be sterilized by boiling over the stove.”

Salk remembers getting the shot while standing alongside his brothers in the kitchen of their family home outside of Pittsburgh. Two weeks later, the boys visited their father at the D.T. Watson Home for Crippled Children to receive their second shot. This time, cameras were waiting for them.

More: What the COVID-19 vaccine owes to Dr. Jonas Salk and the end of ‘polio season’

“I remember hiding from injections. There was a big wastebasket next to the refrigerator and I chose one occasion to squat down behind that and try to make myself invisible,” Salk said. “Which, of course, didn’t work.”

Cases of polio peaked in the early 1950s, but it arrived every summer disabling an average of more than 35,000 people each year for decades, sometimes causing paralysis and death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public officials closed swimming pools, movie theaters, amusement parks and other places associated with summer vacation.

The highly infectious disease spread through contact with infected feces, often when children didn’t wash their hands correctly, according to the University of Rochester Medical Center.

Dr. Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine, holds a rack of test tubes in his lab in Pittsburgh on Oct. 7, 1954.

Jonas Salk’s vaccine helped wipe polio from most of the world, something that many people hope will happen with the coronavirus vaccine. However, Peter Salk warns eradicating polio from the United States was a long and difficult journey, and he doesn’t expect eliminating COVID-19 will be any easier.

Salk is a doctor and part-time professor of infectious diseases at the University of Pittsburgh, where his father developed the polio vaccine. He also heads the Jonas Salk Legacy Foundation.

“It’s going to be a long road, just even getting enough vaccines out to people around the world. … This virus does not respect borders,” he said. “It travels by airplane everywhere in the world and unless this virus can be contained everywhere, it’s going to continue to spread and be a problem.”

Dr. Jonas Salk gives a vaccine injection to a girl at Colfax Elementary School in Pittsburgh in 1954.
Dr. Jonas Salk gives a vaccine injection to a girl at Colfax Elementary School in Pittsburgh in 1954.

Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine was proven safe and effective in 1954 after the largest trial in the nation’s history, which included about 1.8 million child participants. However, it took the U.S. more than 20 years to eradicate polio. According to the CDC, no polio cases have originated in the U.S. since 1979.

About 3 million people, mostly frontline health care workers, have been vaccinated against the coronavirus after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna.

Federal officials expect 20 million doses to be manufactured and available for shipping by early January, another 30 million doses by the end of that month and 50 million more by the end of February.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said vaccines should be available for the general public as soon as late February or early March. However, most experts think vaccines won’t become widely available until late spring or early summer, assuming there are no production problems and the FDA authorizes two additional vaccines by sometime in February.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis watches nurse Christine Philips administer the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for COVID-19 to Vera Leip, 88, a resident of John Knox Village on Dec. 16 in Pompano Beach, Fla. Nursing home residents and health care workers are the first in the state to receive the vaccine.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis watches nurse Christine Philips administer the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for COVID-19 to Vera Leip, 88, a resident of John Knox Village on Dec. 16 in Pompano Beach, Fla. Nursing home residents and health care workers are the first in the state to receive the vaccine.

Logistics aside, another hurdle that will continue to take time to overcome is vaccine hesitancy, Salk said.

In a recent USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll of 1,000 registered voters, 46% said they will take the vaccine as soon as they can. Meanwhile, 32% said they will wait for others to get the shots before they do so themselves.

Two-thirds of Democrats, 67%, are willing to take the vaccine as soon as possible. The percentage of Republicans ready to take the vaccine is a stitch lower than the percentage who say they would never take it, 35% compared with 36%.

Vaccine hesitancy is not new to America, Salk said. According to a Gallup Poll from 1954, when the field trial began, only 53% of Americans said they thought the vaccine would work.

People receive the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital in Iowa City on Dec. 14, 2020.
People receive the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital in Iowa City on Dec. 14, 2020.

“So even back then, given the degree to which people were frightened about polio and wanting a vaccine,” there was still hesitancy, Salk said. “I was surprised to see that.”

Salk’s father attempted to get ahead of this setback by vaccinating his family and co-workers to instill a level of confidence before expanding clinical trials to the greater Pittsburgh area and, later, the rest of the nation. (Government oversight laws wouldn’t permit this today.)

The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis – now called the March of Dimes – also enlisted the help of some of the most famous celebrities at the time such as Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Marilyn Monroe, Louis Armstrong, Grace Kelly and Elvis Presley.

Actress Marilyn Monroe with 1958 March of Dimes poster children Linda and Sandra Solomon, and the 14th annual March of Dimes fashion show in 1958.
Actress Marilyn Monroe with 1958 March of Dimes poster children Linda and Sandra Solomon, and the 14th annual March of Dimes fashion show in 1958.

The U.S. government has begun to take part in a similar campaign for the coronavirus vaccine; high-profile figures choosing to get publicly vaccinated include Vice President Mike Pence, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci and President-elect Joe Biden.

While the U.S. is far from eliminating COVID-19, Salk is impressed with the coronavirus vaccines and hopeful for the future.

“Even with polio vaccines, it’s been a very complex road that we’ve traveled,” he said. “This is still early in the game and we’ve got to keep a close eye on all of the people who were vaccinated … (but) we’re on a good track and the results are extremely promising.”

Follow Adrianna Rodriguez on Twitter: @AdriannaUSAT.

Health and patient safety coverage at USA TODAY is made possible in part by a grant from the Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare. The Masimo Foundation does not provide editorial input.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: COVID vaccine: Salk’s son talks polio vaccine, future of coronavirus



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Man allegedly stabbed girlfriend’s father Warren Toby


A 33-year-old man has been charged after allegedly stabbing his girlfriend’s father to death following a family Christmas gathering at a Queensland home.

Police have launched a homicide investigation after the body of 53-year-old Warren Toby was found with significant stab wounds in the front yard of a Hall Street address at North Ipswich at 11.40pm on Christmas Day.

Despite efforts from officers and paramedics to revive him, Mr Toby was pronounced dead at the scene.

Mr Toby’s daughter’s partner, 33, was arrested at 5am at a Woodridge address on Saturday.

By the afternoon he was charged with murder, assault occasioning bodily harm and wilful damage.

He has been denied police bail and is due to appear in the Ipswich Magistrates Court on Monday.

Detective Inspector Heath McQueen said they would be alleging from preliminary investigations that a “disturbance” erupted at the home and spilt into the front yard.

He said the arrested man was in a relationship with Mr Toby’s daughter, who is 30.

Police will allege that alcohol had been consumed.

“Preliminary investigations have identified there were a number of persons present at that address yesterday known to each other, either related or in de facto relationships,” Insp McQueen said.

“As the evening has gone on there has been a disturbance within the dwelling.

“As a result of that disturbance inside the dwelling it has moved into the front yard.

“There was a relationship there between the male that’s in custody who is assisting us and the deceased’s daughter.”

Crime scenes have been established at both locations and police are urging anyone with vision of the incident or further information to come forward.

Mr Toby had changed his profile picture just weeks before his death.

Friends and family posted cheeky comments, including one who said he looked like “Santa”.

Mr Toby replied to another comment saying that he was feeling good about himself.

According to his social media, he was a fan of the Broncos and the Maroons and liked country music.



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King Felipe appears to criticise exiled father in Christmas speech



Nevertheless, Spain’s Supreme Court this year began investigating him after reports of a Swiss probe into the payment of tens of millions of euros in kickbacks from Saudi Arabia’s late King Abdullah in 2008.

The former king is also the target of another probe into the alleged use by him, former Queen Sofia and other members of the royal family, of credit cards linked to foreign accounts not in their names.

Earlier this month, his lawyer said Juan Carlos had paid tax authorities nearly €680,000 (about £611,000) following a voluntary declaration of previously undisclosed income.

Juan Carlos has not been charged with any crime, and his lawyers have said he would return to Spain immediately if required for legal reasons.

Felipe, who became king after his father’s abdication in 2014, has tried to distance himself from Juan Carlos.

In March, the Spanish monarch renounced any future personal inheritance he might receive from his father. He also stripped Juan Carlos of his annual stipend, which in 2018 was €194,232.

The scandal has encouraged some left-wing parties to revive calls to change Spain’s form of government from a constitutional monarchy to a republican state. The party of Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez, however, is firmly backing Felipe, along with the conservative opposition.

Read more: The King and I: My two weeks with Juan Carlos, Spain’s exiled caballero





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Charlie Woods shows uncanny likeness to his father Tiger Woods, but deserves to grow up unburdened by expectation


The sight of Tiger Woods’s 11-year-old son Charlie perfectly imitating his father’s swing at an exhibition event in Orlando will have drawn two distinct responses from golfers.

First “Awww, isn’t that cute”. And then, under the breath, “That’s just not bloody fair!”

That Charlie Woods was not merely a cute accessory but has clearly inherited at least some of his father’s sublime gifts with the sticks seems like another slap in the face to those of us from the shallow end of the sporting gene pool.

Isn’t it enough that Little Chuck gets the billion-dollar inheritance and the enviable lifestyle without also turning up for a televised event and shaming public course hackers by splitting fairways and making an eagle on par five?

Stepping out of his father’s shadow could be tough for Charlie Woods.(AP: Phelan M. Ebenhack)

Yet the public coming out of Tiger’s cub raises rather more serious implications for Charlie’s immediate future and even his future wellbeing, than our petty jealousy.

As if his surname was not already a beacon for unfair comparison and premature judgement, Charlie’s uncanny resemblance to his father’s golfing style will excite immediate expectations about his career trajectory — before we even know if he wants to have a professional golf career.

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You need only ask Jack Nicklaus Jnr or Greg Norman Jnr how much lead the name of an all-time great can put in your golf bag, or how much an early public appearance with Dad on the links can excite the media.

Although neither of those famous sons was forced to resort to changing their surnames, as was the case with John Bradman who changed his name for a time to Bradsen to avoid the reflexive comparisons with his father’s unapproachable achievements.

Still, if Woods can’t stop the media and the public making the most outrageous predictions about sons’ potential, he can at least draw from his own experience being paraded on TV talk shows as a wunderkind not long after he first talked.

“I’m trying to make sure he has the right environment, that he’s sheltered and away from this,” said Woods, who you suspect would have more chance hiding a giraffe in his Tupperware cupboard than deflating the enormous and potentially unrealistic expectations about Charlie.

Meanwhile, as we consider Charlie’s apparent aptitude, the rest of us can ponder the nature vs nurture debate that at least seems to give the children of talented athletes a depressingly unfair advantage over mere sporting mortals.

While the name excites attention, what we tend to overlook when obsessing over sporting bloodlines is how greatly the environment in which the children of elite athletes are raised contributes to their own sporting success — the hours spent playing on the sidelines at a parent’s games and training, the constant exposure to top-level performance, the backyard coaching and the wisdom shared across the dinner table.

At the same time, the success of a handful of brilliant “children of” tends to overshadow the stories of those who either failed to repeat parental success, or who did not have the athletic ability, psychological disposition or simply the will to try emulating a parent’s endeavours.

Tiger Woods and son Charlie lean on their clubs
Having a famous father in your field isn’t always all it’s crack up to be.(AP: Phelan M. Ebenhack)

The best book written that touches on this subject is called Rose Boys.

It is the story of Collingwood great the late Bob Rose’s two sons Robert Jnr, whose own career as VFL footballer and Victorian state cricketer was tended by the car accident that left him a quadriplegic and the book’s author, Peter, who is a poet with sensitivities more attuned to those of his opera singing, piano-playing mother than his footballing father.

Bob Rose ... dead at 74
Collingwood legend Bob Rose was the subject of a book, Rose Boys.(ABC TV)

The book explores partly how Peter is considered by some to have “missed out” because he did not inherit his father’s sporting ability and, perhaps as a result, was denied the same level of affection and regard as his “talented” brother.

But, more hauntingly, there is also a stark portrait of the difficulty for the whole family both in living in the shadow cast by Bob’s reflected glory and, later, the bitter disappointment of a succession of losing grand finals as Collingwood coach and the tragedy of Robert Jnr’s plight.

I have spoken to the children of some renowned athletes who are bemused, even insulted, by the preconception that their own success is preordained and not the result of hard work, and sometimes even in defiance of the outsized expectations their parents’ achievements have created.

Tiger Woods hugs his son, Charlie, both wearing identical red polo shirts
Despite the pressure, there was no hiding the simple pride of Tiger watching his son play.(AP: Phelan M. Ebenhack)

The nature versus nurture argument applies in even less accomplished families.

In my own family there is a running joke that my youngest son has “thrown to the dam” by inheriting at least a skerrick of his mother’s family’s sporting ability and defied my own lumpen genetics. To strain the racing analogy, he is by Drongo out of Makybe Diva.

But whatever his modest sporting achievements, I suspect they will be as much due to the 9 million throwdowns he has faced from his park cricketer father and the long games of kick-to-kick as they are of the genetic inheritance of a maternal grandfather who played for the Waratahs and a Mum who was a state-level junior netballer and basketballer.

Of course, few of the more sobering thoughts on parental succession will be applied to Charlie Woods who has both the advantage and possibly the misfortune of being the son of the greatest golfer of this, and perhaps any, era.

But the one universally relatable image of Tiger and Charlie in Orlando was the proud glow the father emitted as he watched his son play.

You only hope he can continue to enjoy that simple feeling now that his cub has been released from his protective cage into the sporting wild.



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Father and 11-year-old daughter dead in double drowning south of Canberra


A man and his 11-year-old daughter have drowned at a popular swimming spot in the Murrumbidgee River, south of Canberra.

Police were called to the scene about 2:20pm, after the 48-year-old man’s other daughter, a 14-year-old, called for assistance.

On arrival, they pulled the man from the water and commenced CPR but could not revive him. His daughter was found downstream hours later.

Detective Acting Inspector Simon Coady said it appeared the man had entered the water to try and rescue his daughter.

“It appears as though the daughter had struggled with some swimming, the father has gone in to assist, and unfortunately both have been unable to get themselves to the shore,” he said.

“There was another family member, another daughter, present and she’s the one who called for assistance from police.”

Police say the man entered the water to try and help his daughter.(ABC News: Tom Lowrey)

Even after the man and his daughter had been recovered, a line of police vehicles — some towing water-rescue vehicles like jet-skis — and ambulances remained on the dirt road leading to the Tharwa Sandwash.

The area is a popular swimming spot on the Murrumbidgee River, just a few minutes south of Tharwa, and about 15 minutes south of Canberra’s southern suburbs.

Police said they expected to remain there until late in the evening, continuing investigative work into how the drowning occurred.

While the river is quite full, the swimming spot appeared calm on the surface.

Inspector Coady said it was too early to comment on whether the water conditions had been dangerous at the time of the deaths.

A report will be prepared for the coroner.



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AFL news 2020: Willie Rioli anti doping tribunal hearing, drugs, tampering with urine sample, father


Banned premiership Eagle Willie Rioli is “feeling a bit better” after he faced an AFL anti-doping tribunal and received a “fair hearing”, according to his father.

West Coast confirmed Rioli, who’s been provisionally suspended for more than a year, on Wednesday appeared at the Melbourne-based tribunal via a video link from Darwin. The NT News reported Rioli dialled in from the NT Institute of Sport in Marrara.

7 News Perth reporter Ryan Daniels wrote on Twitter that the hearing lasted “a few hours” and ample written evidence was submitted, which now needs to be analysed.

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Grand Final

The West Australian reported Rioli’s lawyer David Grace QC and Eagles minder Peter Staples were in Darwin to provide the forward with in-person support, but Staples claimed to reporters he “wasn’t involved” in the tribunal hearing.



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