India fined 20 per cent of match fee by ICC, slow over rate


The Indian cricket team’s players have been fined 20 per cent of their match fee for a slow over rate during Friday’s ODI at the SCG.

Although teams are allocated three-and-a-half hours to complete 50 overs in the field, Virat Kohli’s side required more than four hours.

The ICC confirmed Kohli had pleaded guilty to the offence and accepted the sanction, which was imposed by match referee David Boon.

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“Boon imposed the sanction after Virat Kohli’s side was ruled to be one over short of the target after time allowances were taken into consideration,” the ICC said in a statement.

“On-field umpires Rod Tucker and Sam Nogajski, TV umpire Paul Reiffel and fourth umpire Gerard Abood levelled the charge.”

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Friday’s ODI was scheduled to conclude at 10:10pm local time, but the final ball was eventually delivered at 11:09pm, eight-and-a-half hours after the game got underway.

Although pitch invaders briefly delayed proceedings in the afternoon, their five-minute escapade did not excuse India’s poor over rate.

Australian spin bowler Zampa acknowledged Friday’s late finish was not the best look for the game, but assured reporters both teams would do better during Sunday’s ODI at the same venue.

“I don’t know what the ruling should be or if there should be a punishment but something definitely has to be done about it,” Zampa said.

“It will definitely improve. And hopefully after getting those cobwebs out and getting those miles in the legs you’ll see some more intensity in the next two games.

“It does take a long while to get back in the swing of things, particularly in ODI cricket … if you haven’t played for a while the intensity isn’t quite there I think.”



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Virat Kohli’s India fined 20 per cent of match fee for slow over rate


The Indian cricket team’s players have been fined 20 per cent of their match fee for a slow over rate during Friday’s ODI at the SCG.

Although teams are allocated three-and-a-half hours to complete 50 overs in the field, Virat Kohli’s side required more than four hours.

The ICC confirmed Kohli had pleaded guilty to the offence and accepted the sanction, which was imposed by match referee David Boon.

“Boon imposed the sanction after Virat Kohli’s side was ruled to be one over short of the target after time allowances were taken into consideration,” the ICC said in a statement.

“On-field umpires Rod Tucker and Sam Nogajski, TV umpire Paul Reiffel and fourth umpire Gerard Abood levelled the charge.”

Virat Kohli during the wicket of Australia's David Warner.
Camera IconVirat Kohli during the wicket of Australia’s David Warner. Credit: News Corp Australia

Friday’s ODI was scheduled to conclude at 10:10pm local time, but the final ball was eventually delivered at 11:09pm, eight-and-a-half hours after the game got underway.

Although pitch invaders briefly delayed proceedings in the afternoon, their five-minute escapade did not excuse India’s poor over rate.

Australian spin bowler Zampa acknowledged Friday’s late finish was not the best look for the game, but assured reporters both teams would do better during Sunday’s ODI at the same venue.

“I don’t know what the ruling should be or if there should be a punishment but something definitely has to be done about it,” Zampa said.

“It will definitely improve. And hopefully after getting those cobwebs out and getting those miles in the legs you’ll see some more intensity in the next two games.

“It does take a long while to get back in the swing of things, particularly in ODI cricket … if you haven’t played for a while the intensity isn’t quite there I think.”



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A New Item on Your Medical Bill: The ‘Covid’ Fee


Occupancy levels are at a record low, according to Mark Parkinson, the chief executive of the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living, the largest industry trade group, representing about 4,000 centers. “Revenue is at record lows, and expenses are at record highs,” Mr. Parkinson said, adding that the industry, unlike other heath care sectors, received federal assistance only in September.

Most residents at assisted living facilities pay out of pocket, since federal programs like Medicare typically don’t cover the stays. Unburdened by federal oversight or existing insurance contracts, assisted living facilities have wide latitude to charge residents a variety of fees. Some have raised rents, while others have charged residents to cover rising cleaning costs and masks.

“There is a real desire to not have to pass on any of these costs,” Mr. Parkinson said.

Still, in more than a dozen states, ombudsmen, who advocate on behalf of residents in long-term care facilities, said in interviews they worried such fees were only a fraction of what’s being tacked into bills and slipped into monthly rent statements. With nursing homes and assisted living facilities restricting visitors, there is less scrutiny of their practices. And some residents may assume that the cost is theirs to bear.

Mr. Hambley, whose mother faced the $900 charge at her assisted living facility in Portage, Mich., had a particular reason to be skeptical: He works in the industry, running a continuous care facility in another state.

Some of the extra charges, including an $11 daily lunch fee, stood out, especially because his mother had been complaining about the quality of lunches since the start of the pandemic. “It seemed like this was an opportunity to take advantage of a population that is already vulnerable,” Mr. Hambley said. “They have no visits, no engagement. And on top of that they are scared.”

After Mr. Hambley complained to state regulators, the facility rescinded the fee. He asked that the place not be named because his mother still resides there, and he did not want to affect the quality of her care.

The charges may soon be coming to more doctor’s offices. Last month, the American Medical Associated lobbied Medicare to begin paying for a new billing code that covers increased protective costs.



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Nationals secure fee cuts for social work in changes to uni funding package


The Nationals say the government’s sweeping overhaul of university funding will be amended following a party room meeting on Monday, with fee hikes for social work and mental healthcare courses to be spared major fee hikes.

After going public with concerns about the package in recent months, Regional Education Minister Andrew Gee, a Nationals MP, said a number of “improvements” would be made to the government’s funding shake-up, which slashes fees for courses deemed “job-relevant” courses while raising the cost of others.

Nationals minister Andrew Gee says the government will now change the university funding overhaul.

Nationals minister Andrew Gee says the government will now change the university funding overhaul. Credit:Dominic Lorrimer

Mr Gee said he made good progress with Education Minister Dan Tehan in recent days and the Nationals had sought changes out of concern for the “great divide that still exists between the city and the country”.

“It goes to the very heart of the National Party’s mission. This includes the divide in educational attainment and also the divide that can still exist in relation to access to services, especially mental health,” he said.



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Apple fires back at Epic Games, saying it sought ‘side’ deal on Fortnite fee


Apple fired back at Epic Games in their fight over the iPhone maker’s app fees, saying the game developer’s boss sought a special “side” deal that would fundamentally upend how the App Store works.

“Having decided that it would rather enjoy the benefits of the App Store without paying for them, Epic has breached its contracts with Apple, using its own customers and Apple’s users as leverage,” Apple said in a court filing Friday.

Epic is set to ask a federal court on Monday to force Apple to restore the Fortnite app to the App Store, and block the company from cutting off Epic’s developer tools and limiting its ability to provide key graphics technology to other apps. Apple is urging a judge in Oakland, Calif., to reject Epic’s request.

The dispute is shaping up into a major antitrust showdown as friction between developers and Apple has been building for more than a year. Developers have been increasingly calling out Apple’s App Store fee policies and rules, complaining they are unfair and only benefit the company’s own services.

Apple has said Epic made trouble for itself by offering customers a way to directly buy items for Fortnite and circumvent the App Store fees. Apple said it won’t bend its rules for Epic.

Epic Chief Executive Officer Tim Sweeney emailed Apple on June 30 seeking to set up its own competing Epic Games Store app through the App Store but was rebuffed, according to Apple’s filing. Despite being told that “Apple has never allowed this,” Epic went ahead and launched its own storefront on Aug. 13, Apple said in its filing.

This is “egregious behavior” prohibited under Apple agreements that “can lead to removal from the Apple Developer Program,” Apple said in its filing.

“Apple has offered Epic the opportunity to cure, to go back to the status quo before Epic installed its ‘hotfix’ that turned into its hot mess, and to be welcomed back into the App Store,” Apple said in its filing. “All of this can happen without any intervention of the Court or expenditure of judicial resources.”

Epic didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Spotify also has been sparring with Apple, and this week news publishers confronted Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook over why they can’t qualify for a discounted fee — 15% — that Amazon.com Inc. gets for its Prime video app.

Match Group Inc., operator of many popular online dating apps, said it’s backing Epic but has stopped short of joining the court fight. “Apple uses its dominant position and unfair policies to hurt consumers, app developers and entrepreneurs,” Match.com said in a statement.

Of the 2.2 million apps available on the App Store, the 30% fee is billed to more than 350,000. Apple reduces the fee to 15% for subscriptions after a user signs up for more than a year.

More must-read tech coverage from Fortune:



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Here’s why Jacqui Lambie must reject university fee hike


Jacqui Lambie is in a special place to derail the government’s proposed college payment hike. Here is why she must.

Strolling in my head by way of Rome’s Tivoli Gardens, musing on Chapman’s Homer I… oh seem, this article is just a immediate communique to Jacqui Lambie (and to the weird DLP-Trendies mix — the Centre Alliance — a little bit) but the relaxation of you can read it if you want.

Jacqui, here’s why you really should vote versus Instruction Minister Dan Tehan’s better-ed funding proposals, and not even do that peekaboo horse-trading, get a new playground for Ulverstone in exchange for abolishing the Wellness Department stuff

1. The proposals limit higher schooling possibilities for middle and minimal income households

Dan Tehan’s improvements are introduced as increasing position-ready uni destinations by cutting down the charges for study course these kinds of as nursing, scientific psychology and engineering.

But they do so by rising expenses on classes such as enterprise, humanities and economics — to $15,000 a year — which are now needed for job paths in administration and admin employment. The purpose is to load folks who have to have these types of levels — numerous from very low or middle profits backgrounds — with up to $50,000 personal debt that will cross-subsidise nationwide advancement.

This works by using average workers’ occupation improvement as a hard cash cow for anything the federal government really should be paying for.

2. The plan can make minimal- and center-profits family members pay for upper-profits education

Engineering, veterinary science and dentistry are all to have their pupil costs minimized to $4000 a year (nicely underneath charge), though the other courses increase to $15,000 a calendar year. Healthcare and engineering courses remain dominated by elite non-public faculty graduates, and modifying that will only materialize through reform of secondary training and college entry treatments, not by means of fee variations.

In the present setup, the new payment structure will suggest reduced-middle earnings tertiary learners will be subsidising the schooling of the upper-center course.

3. The scheme helps make individuals pay out much more for programs that will gain them less when they get out

The present funding model matches service fees to equally the revenue graduates can count on in the workforce, and charge of training (increased for engineering than for arts or organization for example).

The new proposals reverse that, which signifies graduates on lower incomes shelling out off fifty thousand dollars of college student financial debt will be cross-subsidising the absence of university student financial debt of hugely-compensated gurus. It’s staggeringly unfair.

4. The scheme will make mature-age entry pupils subsidise school-leaver elite professional students

Quite couple mature-age students enter dentistry, vet science or engineering. Several analyze arts, business enterprise or law, both for professional improvement or to increase their head.

The new cost structure will make that impossible for numerous, particularly people with families and mortgages, simply because it will load them up with financial debt. All those who do do it will be cross-subsidising 18-year-aged students who are entering classes leading to substantial-paid professions.

5. The new proposal restricts the opportunity of research for its possess sake to those on higher incomes

Since the arts and humanities will be billed at (mostly) $50,000 for a 3-yr course, the option to research for its own sake, to pursue curiosity, to learn about our background and lifestyle, will as soon as once more be much much easier for those people from superior-profits, large-asset family members, who can pay the costs up front for their kids (or by themselves, as experienced learners). 

6. The proposals are an assault on the arts and humanities, which is how our society is transmitted

The Coalition states that universities are just an anarchist commune of woke statue destroyers. Yeah, effectively, ok, there is a handful of of these.

But most of the humanities consists of people today who have devoted their lives to teaching and exploring the literature, artwork and considered of Western civilisation. In the new proposals, it will price a college student $3000 dollars a yr to study gum flossing (dentistry) swampland (environmental science) or Mandarin (languages) but $15,000 a year to research historic Greece and Rome, the art of the Renaissance, or the record of Britain and Australia. That’s an assault on what would make us who we are, and our greatest achievements.

7. The proposal is badly built, not based mostly on audio investigate, and will not accomplish even the favourable things it wants to do

The proposal’s assert that rate discounting will persuade pupils to choose courses with extra post-graduate task options is not backed up by evidence, which demonstrates that the reasonably lower savings on offer really do not make a big difference, and students choose courses in phrases of interests and aptitude, individual to payment price.

The proposal will merely make over-all accessibility to increased education and learning additional unequal than it currently is.

8. The proposal distorts publish-graduation work info to get the outcome it wishes

By judging work readiness as immediate transfer from area of review to the exact industry of perform, the proposal wilfully ignores the employment sector need for “generalists”, people who have learnt numerous techniques of learning, investigate and adaptation by doing humanities or fundamental science courses.

Employer teams have repeatedly claimed that they favour generalist graduates who are capable of getting versatile and adaptive in the quickly-shifting present day workplace.

Why is this currently being dismissed? Because the Morrison federal government would like to wage a lifestyle war from humanities departments, and it is prepared to overlook great proof of their value to Australian economy and modern society in purchase to do so.

9. For the reason that of the hypocrisy

The Morrison govt is stuffed with ex-scholar politicians — which includes Dan Tehan — who went to elite private educational institutions, obtained legislation and humanities levels when they were being absolutely free or pretty low-cost, and who used individuals degrees to achieve political electricity.

They now want to deny low and middle-cash flow people obtain to the type of levels that would make it a lot easier for them to get obtain to politics. It’s a way of restricting political electricity to the higher-center class.

For all these causes, and…

10. Mainly because Education Minister Dan Tehan is a instrument

 …you ought to reject the proposals out of hand.

Peter Fray

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But to do that proficiently, we will need subscribers. Tons of them.

Sign up for Crikey now, and for the to start with time ever, opt for what you fork out.

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Editor-In-Chief of Crikey

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University fee cut for agriculture courses prompts warning that education quality might suffer


Universities from around Australia are warning that cheap fees for agriculture courses will make it easier for students to finance their study, but could result in lower quality education.

Under a Federal Government plan, the cost of studying most humanities subjects at university would double, but the cost slashed for students of what the Government deems to be “job-relevant” courses.

Professor Iain Young, Dean of Science at the University of Sydney and past president of the Deans of Agriculture, said the reduced contribution from students would leave a gap between what the universities get to deliver the course and the actual cost.

“Agriculture will be worse off by $3,500, environmental studies roughly $10,000 a year and science overall will be worse off by $4,759 per year per student.”

The issue is partly due to the high cost of delivering courses in agriculture and science.

“Things like labs, practicals are the high-cost things that will probably fall off because it becomes harder and harder to teach,” said Professor Young.

Professor Iain Young is concerned about the fee cuts and the impact it might have on the quality of education in agriculture.(Supplied: University of Sydney)

Professor Young is concerned that the changes will not improve agricultural and science education.

“It actually means it will cost more for the university to teach them, so it’s the opposite of what the Government is trying to do.”

While there is a commitment from the Federal Government to maintain funding at current levels until 2023, the universities are not clear what will happen after that, according to Professor Young.

“There is $200m earmarked for the National Priorities and Industry Linkage Fund, but that may not be enough for universities to maintain the labs, field trips and provide the specialist equipment necessary for science-based courses.”

Universities may change the way they deliver courses

Professor Wayne Hein, the head of Animal and Veterinary Science at the University of Adelaide, was more cautious about the likely impact of the changes on the quality of agricultural education.

He thinks universities will adapt.

“The way that universities manage that normally, is to complement a deficit in one program area from other parts of the business,” Professor Hein said.

“I don’t think that it necessarily leads to a reduction in quality; it will probably lead to some rethinking of how courses are delivered.”

Professor Hein said the decrease in fees was a move in the right direction and would hopefully address a “slight downward trend” in the number of students studying agriculture.

“Each year there are probably 50 to 60 new students entering the agriculture stream, it has been a little on the decline,” Professor Hein said.

“I think as an incentive to help students start a career in agriculture, this is a good development.”

Demand for agriculture graduates very high

University students in red lab coats in a laboratory in the University of Sydney
The cost of running agricultural science courses is high due to the need to fund laboratories, specialised equipment and field trips.(Supplied: University of Sydney)

Interim Director of the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture at UTAS Michael Rose said there would be more places in the system and job prospects remain very strong based on last year’s results.

But he is also concerned about the long-term outlook given the pressure universities face due to the absence of a large number of international students and the income they provide.

Mr Rose said no decisions had been made at UTAS about cost-cutting.

“There has been no discussion about staff numbers, and while the university is looking to control its costs, I’m not sure how that will pan out.”



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