Metro Manila kept under general lockdown


Manila and nearby cities will remain under a general lockdown next month amid a coronavirus pandemic, according to the presidential palace.

President Rodrigo R. Duterte also kept nine other areas — Apayao, Baguio City, Kalinga, Mountain Province, Batangas, Davao City, Tacloban City, Iligan City,  and Lanao del Sur — under a general community quarantine, his spokesman Harry L. Roque, Jr. told a televised news briefing on Saturday.

The rest of the country will remain under modified general lockdown, he added. Mr. Duterte earlier rejected a proposal from his economic planners to put the entire country under the most relaxed quarantine, citing the risk of a more contagious coronavirus variant.

The National Economic and Development Authority had pushed for the reopening of the economy to curb joblessness and hunger.

Meanwhile, an inter-agency task force also approved uniform travel protocols for local governments, Mr. Roque said.

Travelers would no longer be required to undergo swabbing unless ordered by a local government of destination, he said. Travelers must also not have coronavirus symptoms.

Travel authority as well as health certificates would no longer be required under the new protocols, Mr. Roque said.

“Authorities shall continue to strictly implement minimum public health standards, such as physical distancing, hand hygiene, cough etiquette and wearing of face masks and face shields across all settings,” Mr. Roque said. — Kyle Aristophere T. Atienza








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General Wellness Centre



Sunday, February 28, 2021, 2:45 – 3:45pm

General Wellness Centre

These group classes are run by a qualified exercise physiologist and are low impact with a high element of fun. The focus is on resistance training to decrease the rate of bone degeneration, improve muscle tone, improve stability and decrease the risk of falls. Call for class days and times.

Venue: General Wellness Centre
Address: Shop 3, 76 Robina Town Centre Drive, Robina
Suburb: Robina
Bookings required: Yes
Category: Active ageing, Active rehab, Mental health recovery
Contact name: General Wellness Centre
Contact phone: 5630 4466
Cost: From $7
More info: www.generalwellnesscentre.com

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General strike – A boycott by bureaucrats is undermining the coup in Myanmar | Asia


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New allegations of historic sexual abuse at Launceston General Hospital


Five minutes of alleged sexual abuse perpetrated against Ben Felton when he was only 13 has had a profound impact on the now 44-year-old’s entire life.

The alleged incident at the Launceston General Hospital, paired with what Mr Felton described as the protection of the nurse he accused of abusing him, has destroyed his trust in others, deeply affected his mental health and left him unable to bathe his own children or leave them unattended.

“It hurt, it shattered a lot of things,” Mr Felton said.

In 1989, teenage Mr Felton was admitted to the LGH paediatric ward with pneumonia.

Mr Felton alleges that when he asked for a glass of water one evening, the male nurse took him into a hospital kitchenette and “in his sick mind, decided to indulge himself”.

“I feel guilty, it made me feel dirty, and I don’t know how to comprehend it,” Mr Felton said.

Ben has sought the paperwork in his case, but records relating to allegations of child abuse are consistent only from 2002 onwards.(ABC News: Lincoln Rothall)

Records show the incident was reported by Mr Felton’s parents to hospital management and the nurse was moved to another role within the Tasmanian Health Service.

Mr Felton has repeatedly sought an apology and an explanation for what he alleges happened to him as a child.

He battled for years for the paperwork on his case, but Tasmania Police records relating to allegations of child abuse are consistent only from 2002 onwards.

Asked about the allegations, a State Government spokesman said: “The Tasmanian Government has stood down 13 state service employees in response to allegations of sexual abuse or misconduct in recent months”.

“It is fundamental that investigations are not prejudiced, as well as the need to acknowledge that legal considerations demand that no further comment can be made on these matters.

‘This is not about bad apples, we have to start looking at the tree’

Freelance journalist Camille Bianchi has shone a light on Mr Felton’s allegations in her latest episode of investigative podcast The Nurse.

Season one of her series focused on allegations against another male nurse at Launceston’s tertiary hospital — James Geoffrey Griffin.

Launceston General Hospital.
The Tasmanian Government is dealing with the fallout over allegations of sexual misconduct in the public service.(ABC News: Michael Brooks)

Mr Griffin, a paediatric nurse, took his own life in 2019 after being charged with multiple child sex offences.

“There are deeply troubling patterns of behaviour by hospital colleagues and management in [Mr Felton’s] story that I saw last year in investigating Griffin’s abuses on ward 4K,” Bianchi said.

“I felt a sense of urgency in publishing this ahead of the commission of inquiry, because it is increasingly clear this is not about bad apples, we have to start looking at the tree.”

Ben Felton displays his arm tattoo.
Ben said he’d had a “very interesting life” and the “five minutes in that hospital kitchen” has had the biggest effect on his life.(ABC News: Lincoln Rothall)

The commission of inquiry — Tasmania’s version of a royal commission — will examine how state government agencies have responded to historical allegations of child sexual abuse.

The Health Department’s handling of the allegations against Griffin have been singled out for particular attention.

“There will be emails and calls from distressed families who are now wondering if their child was targeted while they were in hospital, and I’ll have to say, ‘I don’t know’.”

A State Government spokesman said: “From a public interest perspective, the Tasmanian community can be assured that anyone in the care of a government agency are safe as the individuals have been stood down and appropriate assessment and further action taken.

“This matter was referred to Tasmania Police for investigation at the time of the allegation. No charges were laid.”

Mr Felton said the scars were long lasting.

“I have self-harmed, self-medicated, I have tried to run away,” he said.

“I’ve had a very interesting life, and that little five minutes in that hospital kitchen has had the biggest effect on my entire life.”

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Amazon sues New York attorney general to preempt COVID-19 lawsuit



FILE PHOTO: An Amazon truck exits the company’s JFK8 distribution center in Staten Island, New York, U.S. November 25, 2020. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid./File Photo

February 15, 2021

By Jeffrey Dastin

(Reuters) – Amazon.com Inc on Friday sued New York’s attorney general to stop the state from filing its own lawsuit over the online retailer’s early response to COVID-19, including its firing of activist Christian Smalls.

In a complaint in Brooklyn federal court, Amazon accused Attorney General Letitia James of overstepping her bounds by threatening to sue unless it met several demands including surrendering some profit and slowing down operations.

Amazon said federal labor and safety laws take precedence over New York’s, and is seeking an injunction to block James from suing.

The Seattle-based retailer had drawn scrutiny 10 months ago when workers protested conditions at a Staten Island warehouse, and Amazon fired Smalls for violating a paid quarantine.

James said at the time that Amazon may have broken the law. New York City announced its own probe, and senators questioned Amazon’s actions.

In a statement, James said she is still reviewing her legal options.

She called Amazon’s lawsuit “a sad attempt to distract from the facts and shirk accountability for its failures to protect hardworking employees from a deadly virus. Let me be clear: We will not be intimidated by anyone, especially corporate bullies that put profits over the health and safety of working people.”

It is rare for companies to file preemptive lawsuits to short-circuit threatened regulatory actions.

The lawsuit shows Amazon’s belief it was unfairly maligned despite its many COVID-19 precautions, most recently tests and plans for vaccine administration, and how it will not back down from criticism of its workplace conditions.

According to the lawsuit, Amazon passed an unannounced city inspection of its Staten Island facility on March 30, 2020, the day of the protest, with the lead inspector concluding that complaints about safety were “completely baseless.”

Amazon also accused James of ignoring evidence of its safety-related reasons for acting against Smalls, including photos of him not social distancing.

Smalls has said he would keep protesting until workers were protected. In November, he filed a class action lawsuit seeking damages for Black and Hispanic workers.

(Reporting by Jeffrey Dastin in San Francisco; Additional reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by Christopher Cushing and Diane Craft)



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General Arthur Percival: Military Failure or Convenient Scapegoat?


Here’s What You Need to Know: On February 15, 1942, the island fortress of Singapore surrendered with 130,000 men, thus ending the defense of Malaya as one of the largest military disasters in the history of British arms since Cornwallis’s capitulation to Franco-American forces at Yorktown in 1781 during America’s Revolutionary War. Lieutenant General Arthur Percival’s surrender to the invading Japanese Army permanently destroyed Britain’s military and colonial prestige in the Far East. Since Percival sought out the best terms with the Japanese, thereby refusing to participate in any “last stand” heroics, he failed to meet Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s standard as a military commander.

Although Percival was humiliated in both the surrender ceremony and as a prisoner of war, analysis of his prewar assessment and plans for the defense of Singapore demonstrates that he was not entirely culpable for the Singapore garrison’s defeat. Poor planning of the defensive aspects of the island coupled with an underequipped garrison to fight a modern battle with tanks and suitable aircraft ultimately may have been more causally related to the surrender than Army leadership. One must wonder whether Percival was a convenient scapegoat for a wider failure of British leadership and responsibility.

Receiving Command in Malaya

Arthur Percival was born on December 26, 1887, in Hertfordshire, England. After schooling at Rugby, he became a clerk for an iron mercantile company. When World War I erupted, Percival enlisted as a private but was quickly promoted to second lieutenant. Within three months he was again promoted to captain. Wounded during the Battle of the Somme, he was awarded the Military Cross. Further promotions ensued along with a Croix de Guerre and a Distinguished Service Order. He was described in his confidential report as very efficient, beloved by his men, and a brave soldier, and he was recommended for the Staff College.

After the Great War, Percival served with the Archangel Command of the British Military Mission in 1919 in north Russia during the Russian Civil War. This was followed by a posting brutally fighting the Irish Republican Army as an intelligence officer in 1920-1921. It was during this service combating the IRA that he was brought to the attention of Winston Churchill, then a cabinet minister, and Prime Minister David Lloyd George.

Percival was selected as a student for the Staff College, Camberley, from 1923 to 1924, upon a recommendation of Lloyd George. Thereafter, he served as a major for four years in the Royal West African Frontier Force as a staff officer, culminating in a promotion to lieutenant colonel in 1929. After studying at the Royal Naval College in 1930, he became an instructor at the Staff College in 1931-1932. With the assistance of his mentor, General Sir John Dill, Percival was given command of a battalion of the Cheshire Regiment from 1932 to 1936, becoming a full colonel in 1936.

Dill regarded Percival as an outstanding instructor and staff officer and wrote in his confidential report of 1932, “He has not altogether an impressive presence and one may therefore fail, at first meeting him, to appreciate his sterling worth.” Dill recommended that Percival should attend the Imperial Defense College in 1935. In 1936, his mentor again helped Colonel Percival become the GSO I Malaya Command, serving as chief of staff to General William G.S. Dobbie, the General Officer Commanding (GOC), Malaya.

In 1937, Percival returned home as a brigadier on the General Staff, Aldershot Command. However, it was during his posting with Dobbie that Percival made important observations about the defense of Singapore and conducted a detailed analysis of Singapore’s vulnerabilities not from the sea but rather from the Malay Peninsula. Again, however, critics would cite that Percival had a “gift for turning out neatly phrased, crisp memoranda on any subject…. He was excellent in any job which did not involve contact with troops.”

From 1937 to 1940, Dill enabled Percival to maneuver through a variety of staff and command positions, the latter including the 43rd (Wessex) Division and 44th Division. Then, as Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS), Dill appointed Percival GOC Malaya with the rank of lieutenant general, promoted over the heads of many senior and more experienced officers. Dill’s support of Percival was based on his evaluation of his protégé as an intelligent, efficient, tireless, and professional staff officer.

Concern over Singapore’s Defenses

Critics of Arthur Percival have claimed that he was a colorless character, more a staff officer than a commander and certainly not a natural leader. Furthermore, it was asserted that he played everything by the rules, however ludicrous these might be, and if he did not lack urgency, he certainly lacked passion. He was not a man for a crisis and certainly not a man for a desperate campaign.

Ironically, when General Sir Alan Brooke was appointed CIGS, he reflected on such appointments that “officers were being promoted to high command because they were proficient in staff work—which was quite wrong—and urged that fewer mistakes of this nature should be made in the future.”

As an example of Brooke’s concern about the future, it had also helped Percival that in 1937 he had written an appreciation of the defense of Malaya and Singapore. As CIGS, General Dill wanted more troops sent to the Malaya command; however, Churchill would not acquiesce to this request.

For over two decades, the combined British military establishment pondered how to best defend Malaya and the Singapore naval base. Unfortunately, there was interservice rivalry, and often the Royal Air Force (RAF) disdained to consult the Army in regard to the placement of airfields along the Malay Peninsula.

In 1937, Maj. Gen. Dobbie, along with Percival as his chief of staff, looked at the problem of defense using the Japanese viewpoint as a new perspective. Percival and Dobbie had as an operational tenet that a British fleet could not arrive in fewer than 70 days to carry out relief. The pair began conducting exercises with troops in October 1937 and reported that, contrary to the orthodox view, landings by the Japanese on the eastern seaboard of the peninsula were possible during the northeast monsoon from October to March, and this period was particularly dangerous because bad visibility would limit air reconnaissance.

Both Dobbie and Percival warned that, as a precursor to their attack, the Japanese would probably establish advanced airfields in Thailand and might also carry out landings along the coast of that country. If the evaluation composed by Percival, under Dobbie’s oversight, was accepted, large reinforcements would be sent without delay. Percival’s evaluation was ignored.

Furthermore, in July 1938, when Japanese intentions were more obvious, Dobbie warned that the jungle in Johore (i.e., southern Malaya) was not impassable to infantry, but again he was ignored. By 1939, all Dobbie and Percival were able to wring out of the government was the sum of 60,000 pounds, most of which was spent on building machine-gun emplacements along the southern shore of Singapore island and in Johore. The prewar defense of northern Malaya was, incredibly, left in the hands of the Federated Malay States Volunteers.

“Let England have the Super-Spitfires and Hyper-Hurricanes”

A newly arrived Indian brigade was held as a reserve for the defense of Johore. Singapore island was entrusted to five regular battalions, two volunteer battalions, two coastal artillery regiments, three antiaircraft regiments, and four engineer fortress companies. The six air force squadrons had a total of 58 aircraft. There were no tanks. It is no surprise that when Arthur Percival took up his new appointment he had little enthusiasm or confidence. He wrote after the war, “In going to Malaya I realized that there was the double danger either of being left in an inactive command for some years if war did not break out in the East or, if it did, of finding myself involved in a pretty sticky business with the inadequate forces.”

Upon his arrival, Percival discovered that the northern airstrips on the Malay Peninsula had not been situated in defensible positions, nor did they have sufficient men or planes to occupy them. Many of his troops, in fact, were dispersed to guard the RAF’s exposed airfields in northern Malaya. Construction of defense installations was stalled because of bureaucratic issues. There was not a single tank in the entire theater of operations. Apart from a few regular British and Australian army battalions, the remaining troops were of mediocre or low quality, undertrained and indifferently led.

The reinforcements still on the way were no better, and none had any idea of operating in the jungle. In fact, Dobbie’s recommendations of 1937 were still a plan rather than a realized defensive framework to fend off a Japanese Army attack from the north. Some of the other service chiefs had held erroneous beliefs that their meager resources and near-obsolete equipment would be sufficient to combat a battle-hardened Japanese war machine which was honed to a sharp edge after nearly a decade of conflict on the Chinese mainland.

Sir Robert Brooke-Popham, commander in chief Far East, remarked incredulously, “We can get on alright with (Brewster) Buffaloes out here…. Let England have the Super-Spitfires and Hyper-Hurricanes.”

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St George Illawarra Dragons pull pin on Israel Folau NRL deal after extraordinary general meeting


The Dragons had been awaiting direction from head office in regards to the steps they would need to take to submit a contract for registration. It became clear that process would be too arduous, and not worth the potential damage to the Dragons’ brand, if they continued their pursuit.

The Dragons board meeting came on the eve of Thursday’s ARL Commission meeting, where Folau’s future was meant to be on the agenda.

Israel Folau returned home from Catalans to be closer to his sick mother-in-law. Credit:AP

It is unlikely Folau will have much support on the ARLC if he chooses to pursue an alternative option at another NRL club, however the game’s leaders are adamant the 31-year-old’s application will be considered if a club provides the necessary paperwork.

What that paperwork needed to include was meant to be decided at Thursday’s commission meeting, with Folau likely to have had to meet with chairman Peter V’landys and chief executive Andrew Abdo as part of the process.

Folau had been in contact with Catalans during the past 24 hours to allay the Super League club’s concerns it had been lied to by the star centre, who has asked for a release from the final year of his contract on compassionate grounds to remain in Australia to be with his sick mother-in-law.

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Catalans could have demanded a transfer fee, believed to be worth about $200,000, before granting him a release. St George Illawarra left aside close to $400,000 in this year’s salary cap as part of a two-year, $1 million proposal for the former Melbourne and Brisbane centre.

Earlier on Wednesday, Blues coach Brad Fittler joked about Folau representing NSW, where he was born, instead of playing for Queensland in this year’s State of Origin series.

“I like watching Israel Folau play footy,” Fittler said. “I don’t necessarily listen to anything he says because I don’t have social media and I am not over any of that.

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Auditor general to probe jobkeeper after it was used to pay dividends and executive bonuses | Business


The auditor general is to investigate the operation of the Morrison government’s $100bn jobkeeper subsidy scheme after concerns money that was supposed to be used to keep workers employed during the Covid-19 crisis has been diverted to pay dividends or executive bonuses.

An audit of the scheme will examine issues including whether the Australian Taxation Office has put in place “effective measures to protect the integrity of jobkeeper payments”, the Australian National Audit Office said.

The move follows a request in December from the opposition frontbencher Andrew Leigh, who said it was vital that the scheme, which was the single biggest in Australian history, received proper scrutiny.

“The Morrison government has been extremely secretive about jobkeeper,” he said on Tuesday night.

“They’ve refused to tell the public how much jobkeeper was paid to firms that increased their profits in 2020, and refused to say how much went to firms that paid executive bonuses.”

Companies that initially claimed jobkeeper but did not need the payment to survive have come under increasing pressure to hand the money back.

So far, companies that have returned the subsidy include the Super Retail Group, Toyota and pizza chain Domino’s.

Leigh has poured pressure on other companies to follow suit, including the Premier Investments group controlled by the retail billionaire Solomon Lew, which received almost $70m in jobkeeper after an initial fall in trade that was later eclipsed by a 30% surge in profit.

Premier is among companies that received jobkeeper and then paid dividends to shareholders – in its case, about $57m, of which $24.25m flowed to Lew.

Lew denied the dividend had any relationship to the amount of jobkeeper received.

The use of jobkeeper by companies that went on to pay out hefty dividends has been under public scrutiny since August.

Research by corporate governance advisory group Ownership Matters, compiled before Premier declared its result for the year, shows that 17 companies in the top 300 listed on the Australian stock exchange received government subsidies and paid out dividends totalling more than $250m.

Companies that had benefited from jobkeeper and then paid large dividends also included retailer Harvey Norman, furniture chains Adairs and Nick Scali, and dental group 1300 Smiles.

In parliament, Leigh has also accused companies including IDP Education, which employs Australia’s highest-paid chief executive, casino operator Star Group and retailer Accent Group, of using jobkeeper to pay executive bonuses.

Separately, the ATO in December said it had launched 19 criminal investigations into potential rorting of the jobkeeper scheme.

It had also stopped or clawed back hundreds of millions of dollars in payments, the ATO said.

The ANAO said its audit would investigate whether the ATO had “effectively administered the rules for the jobkeeper scheme”, where it had “ implemented effective measures to protect the integrity of jobkeeper payments” and whether it had “effectively monitored and reported on the operational performance of the scheme”.

It said it planned to table its report in October.

The ANAO has launched the investigation even though it is suffering from a funding shortfall that has forced it to cut the number of performance audit it plans to conduct.

“The auditor general has had his budget cut by more than one-fifth in real terms since the Coalition came to office in 2013,” Leigh said.

“But even a lean watchdog should be more than a match for the Coalition’s record of waste and mismanagement.”

The jobkeeper scheme is due to expire at the end of March.

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Retired general among 9 dead in Somali hotel attack


Mogadishu: Nine people died in a weekend attack at a hotel in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, and security forces ended the assault by al-Qaeda-linked al Shabaab fighters early on Monday, a police spokesman said.

A suicide car bomb exploded early on Sunday evening and was followed by a shootout between al-Shabaab militants and security forces at the Hotel Afrik. The fighting lasted into early Monday.

A medical worker pushes the stretcher of a civilian man wounded in an attack on the Afrik hotel in Mogadishu, Somalia, on Sunday.Credit:AP

“The operation is over now. Nine people including four attackers died and over 10 civilians were injured. There is no electricity,” Sadik Ali, told reporters from the scene and via Facebook.

Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble said in a statement that among those killed was a retired military general and former defence minister, Mohamed Nur Galal.

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Waratahs general manager of rugby departs for role at Sydney school


“There’s nothing sinister about it,” Doorn told the Herald. “After eight years you want to stay fresh while you’re in your career and it’s a fantastic opportunity.

“We’re relatively comfortable our squad is set for this year and there is never a good time to see people leave but the timing works out well for him and for us.”

While Rapp was well liked amongst the playing group and in head office during his long stint at the Waratahs, he attracted stern criticism from former Wallabies coach Alan Jones last year in his weekly columns for The Australian.

“Rapp has poor judgment of talent and therefore is completely unfit to be running elite rugby in NSW,” Jones wrote.

Rapp is set to take up a role at Newington College as the school’s director of coaching across all sports. Rapp worked as the school’s director of rugby before moving into his role at the Waratahs.

“It’s hard to pick just one highlight over the last eight years,” said Rapp in a statement. “But certainly a few would be being part of the amazing 2014 Super Rugby win, watching our academy grow and seeing the great local NSW talent come through, and being there to witness the launch of the Super W competition and seeing our women dominate.

“I have had the privilege of working with so many great coaches but also players, who always bring such a passion for rugby in our state to everything they do.

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“As a player for NSW I never dreamed of doing this role one day but I feel very privileged to have had the opportunity.”

Doorn said a position would be advertised soon, pending sign-off from Rugby Australia.

“Before I press go on the position description, we’ll do an internal review on that ourselves and work with Rugby Australia,” Doorn said. “I believe all these positions are of national significance and you want to get a really good person in the job. We’ll liaise with Rugby Australia but we do want to get a job out there in the marketplace in the next couple of weeks that’s for sure.

“I think there will be a lot of people who will show interest but we’ll definitely be advertising and going through a proper process.”

The Waratahs start their season on February 19 with a clash against the Queensland Reds in Brisbane.

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