Chances of survival ‘quite good’ for missing protestor Christopher Fowell


About 40 people and a police helicopter are continuing the search for logging protestor Christopher Fowell today. 

Acting Inspector Wayne Rothwell said the search team was optimistic the 54-year-old would be found. 

“This morning I believe it’s about 40 personnel searching, and that’ll scale up throughout the day,” he said.

“At this point the assessment of his survivability is quite good still, so we haven’t determined any time we’d look at scaling back,” he said. 

Mr Fowell’s daughter, son-in-law, and granddaughter have travelled from New South Wales to join the search. 

Police and his family are concerned he was not dressed appropriately for the cold overnight weather conditions of the high country. 

“Witnesses indicate he didn’t have any shoes, was wearing some shorts and a light jacket,” Acting Inspector Rothwell said. 

“He is, from information from the family, an experienced bushwalker and has a good level of bush survival skill.”

Mr Fowell was last seen around a communal campfire at the Victorian camping ground on Playground Road, near Plantation Track, in Bendoc about 11am on Saturday.

Gunnai-Gunditjmara woman and Senator Lidia Thorpe said Mr Fowell had showed her around the camp when she first arrived to protest. 

“Any person who puts their body on the line and defends country is definitely a friend of mine,” she said. 

Alongside protesters, police, Bush Search and Rescue volunteers, logging security workers have also been helping search. 

“There’s a logger actually helping in the search, this is where we need to come together and find this fella as soon as we can,” Senator Thorpe said. 

Senator Thorpe said she hopes Mr Fowell is found safe and well. 

“He knows that bush, he’s very experienced and everyone walks through the bush when you’re on a camp, you’re surrounded by pristine country so it’s a beautiful thing to do,” she said. 

“Hopefully he’s somewhere out there keeping warm and waiting for us to find him,” she said. 

Thanks for checking out this news article about “What’s On in the Goulburn Murray Region titled “Chances of survival ‘quite good’ for missing protestor Christopher Fowell”. This post was presented by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local and national events & news stories services.

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Good Times Running Club



Thursday, April 15, 2021, 5 – 6am

Good Times Running Club

The Good Times Running Club was started to support others not just for their fitness and running, but to foster friendships, provide support and provide an outlet that enables like-minded people to connect with one another and enjoy the amazing active lifestyle that we have on the Gold Coast.
 
Running takes your body, mind, and spirit to a better place. The simple act of putting one foot in front of the other and moving forward can make you healthier, happier, and more confident. 

Venue: Tallebudgera Creek Park
Address: 1544 Gold Coast Highway, Palm Beach
Suburb: Burleigh Heads
Category: Running
Contact name: Good Times Running Club
Cost: Free
More info: www.facebook.com…

Thank you for visiting My Local Pages. We hope you enjoyed checking out this news release involving “What’s On in the City of Gold Coast” titled “Good Times Running Club”. This article was presented by My Local Pages Australia as part of our QLD events and what’s on news services.

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St Kilda forward Dan Butler says there’s never a good time to play former side Richmond


The crucial contest will carry even more importance with the game also representing the seventh instalment of ‘Maddie’s Match’, a fundraising tribute to Maddie Riewoldt, the late sister of Saints legend Nick Riewoldt, who lost her battle with aplastic anaemia in 2015.

Brad Crouch was particularly influential for the Saints on the weekend.Credit:Getty Images

St Kilda looked destined to head into the contest at one win and four losses when they trailed West Coast by more than five goals midway through the third quarter.

But a stunning turn-around saw the Saints kick the last eight goals and put their season back on track.

New recruit Brad Crouch, who was impressive with 26 disposals and 12 tackles, says he’s proud the team was able to work its way through difficult circumstances.

“It was a bit scary for us at times, we sort of felt like we were playing decent enough footy but weren’t getting the results early days,” Crouch said.
“We didn’t start well at all and at half-time we still felt like we were doing a lot right and it wasn’t far away from turning.

“It turned pretty quick when it did.”

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Meanwhile Nick Riewoldt isn’t at all surprised about the success of the man who took his number, Max King.

The 20-year-old, playing in his just 21st game, was one of the most influential players on the ground, booting five goals.

The man who wore the famous number 12 before him said it’s of little surprise that King is developing so early in his career.

“I’ve got my ear to the ground here and know how certain guys go about their work, and everything that I hear is that he’s a really diligent, professional person who wants to get the best out of himself,” Riewoldt said.

“You combine that with the raw natural talent that we’ve all seen, and it’s no surprise he got the result on the weekend.”

St Kilda’s current number 12, Max King, idolised Nick Riewoldt as a youngster.

St Kilda’s current number 12, Max King, idolised Nick Riewoldt as a youngster.Credit:Getty Images

Riewoldt, who will lead a bike ride for his late sister on Thursday, said he’s proud of what the annual game between St Kilda and Richmond has become.

“Six years ago when we started this journey, it was really under-resourced and an issue that not many people had much awareness about,” he said.

“We feel like we’ve been able to take some strides and make some significant gains in that area but there’s still a fight to be had, so that’s why we’ll continue to do things like Maddie’s Match and Ride for Maddie on Thursday.”

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Good Times Running Club



Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 5 – 6am

Good Times Running Club

The Good Times Running Club was started to support others not just for their fitness and running, but to foster friendships, provide support and provide an outlet that enables like-minded people to connect with one another and enjoy the amazing active lifestyle that we have on the Gold Coast.
 
Running takes your body, mind, and spirit to a better place. The simple act of putting one foot in front of the other and moving forward can make you healthier, happier, and more confident. 

Venue: Tallebudgera Creek Park
Address: 1544 Gold Coast Highway, Palm Beach
Suburb: Burleigh Heads
Category: Running
Contact name: Good Times Running Club
Cost: Free
More info: www.facebook.com…

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Vaccine Guilt Is Good – as Long It Doesn’t Stop You From Getting a Shot


By Elizabeth Lanphier, University of Cincinnati

Over 100 million Americans have now received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. If you are one of them, you might feel lucky, relieved and possibly a little guilty.

Vaccine guilt – a feeling associated with getting immunized before others – is a phenomenon that has been reported in both the U.S. and overseas.

With the vaccine rollout expanding to more and more people, those who are able to work from home, can safely socially distance, or don’t have underlying medical conditions increasing their COVID-19 risks might wonder: Isn’t there someone who needs this more than I do?

As a medical ethicist and social philosopher, I believe people have good reason to feel vaccine guilt. But at the same time, they have every reason to still get vaccinated.

Vaccine guilt began nearly as soon as COVID-19 vaccinations did. The first COVID-19 vaccines were authorized for emergency use in December 2020, and eligibility was narrowly restricted to front-line health care workers, other essential workers and those whose age or medical conditions placed them at greatest risk if they contracted COVID-19. But even among this first at-risk cohort, reports emerged of vaccine recipients feeling vaccine guilt.

With the U.S. now administering millions of doses a day and President Joe Biden vowing to expand eligibility to every adult by May 1, 2021, or possibly earlier – and some states reaching this target sooner – one might think vaccine guilt is going away. But it isn’t.

What vaccine guilt is – and isn’t

Vaccine guilt is different from the survivor’s guilt felt by some people who recognize that while they survived the pandemic to get vaccinated, others – perhaps including loved ones – did not.

It is also different from the guilt associated with lying about vaccine eligibility, or otherwise skipping the line – for which culpability, remorse or a guilty conscience would be the most appropriate response.

For some, vaccine guilt is the sense that other groups, such as those working in grocery, care-taking or public transportation jobs not initially included under “essential workers,” should have been prioritized before you. For others it is the wish that particular individuals – like specific family members – could be vaccinated in your place.

Vaccine guilt might be experienced as embarrassment over having the good fortune of a vaccine or shame over feeling undeserving of a coveted dose.

Fundamentally, vaccine allocation is about risk. Early or late vaccination eligibility is not, or at least should not be, an assessment of positive or negative personal worth or social value. Allocation should be about how best to mitigate COVID-19 risks and stem the spread of disease while working toward herd immunity.

Yet vaccine guilt reflects the reality that some risks have been unfairly assessed in vaccine allocation. For example, assessing risk based on age without accounting for disparities in life expectancy between white and Black Americans resulted in fewer Black Americans initially being eligible for vaccination – despite Black Americans experiencing higher rates of COVID-19 cases and fatalities.

Meanwhile some groups and individuals at increased risk for COVID-19 have been largely excluded from vaccine prioritization, such as incarcerated individuals or those with certain disabilities.

Reasons to feel guilty

Despite increased eligibility for vaccination, there remain significant barriers to access for some communities. Many of these barriers are structural and connect to social and economic inequities. Obtaining a vaccination appointment often requires time and access to resources, such as a phone or internet, to search for and book a slot. Speaking a language in which appointment information is available, having reliable transportation to and from the appointment, and being able to get the time off work or care-taking duties creates other barriers for some groups.

Data show that U.S. counties with the lowest share of people living in poverty and less COVID-19 community transmission have been vaccinated at higher rates. These counties also tend to have a higher share of residents with health insurance and fewer high-risk medical conditions than communities with more vulnerable populations. Similarly the rate of vaccination in whiter counties is higher than in counties with a higher proportion of racial and ethnic minority residents.

Additional data report significantly higher rates of COVID-19 cases and deaths among Black and Hispanic people in the U.S., yet in many states Black and Hispanic people have been vaccinated at lower rates than white people.

So even if someone follows the rules of vaccination eligibility, it doesn’t mean the rules are necessarily fair or do a good job ensuring those most vulnerable in society are being vaccinated.

What can we do about vaccine guilt?

My scholarship suggests that people have individual responsibilities as members of a society, including for the society’s health care practices. This is because we are interconnected in a shared society in which we rely on, benefit from, and can sometimes cause disadvantage to others.

As such, one good reason to feel vaccine guilt is it helps people recognize their participation in – and sometimes advantage because of – unjust and unfair systems. It can also spur a push for better accountability and equity within one’s social and political organizations in charge of health care systems in general and COVID-19 response specifically.

Although overall rates of vaccination are important and help protect those most medically vulnerable, the goal of herd immunity is not an excuse for unfairness in vaccine rollout. Plus data confirm that equitable vaccination is better for public health. Vaccinating highest-risk communities first reduces more cases, saves more lives and slows the pandemic faster.

So, where does this leave those feeling guilty about an upcoming vaccine appointment?

They should certainly keep the appointment. But perhaps they could consider ways to help others get vaccinated. Helping people who lack internet access to sign up and safely driving someone who lacks transportation to an appointment are two options.

Or people can donate to nonprofit organizations providing vaccination outreach in underserved communities or support community health centers.

People can also lobby political representatives for greater health equity in the first place.

In a country that can afford and produce vaccines in such a scale and timescale, perhaps there is good reason to feel some guilt. Although shots will soon be available to all, the burden of the virus has disproportionately fallen on low-income families and communities of color – the same communities that may face additional barriers to getting vaccinated.The Conversation

Elizabeth Lanphier, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Ethics Center Faculty, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

 

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Daydreaming Can Be Good for You


Dr. Nathanson often prompts patients to take this technique further by engaging with metaphors and visual symbolism. If her patients feel stuck, they might create a scene where they’re standing behind a brick wall that represents their impasse. She helps them interpret the symbol and can also use it as a tool. “I will say: ‘What are you wearing in front of the brick wall? What is underneath your feet? What is around you? What do you see? What do you smell?’” she said.

When purposefully engaging with your daydreams, the more senses you can call into action, the more real you can make the scene feel in your mind.

Dr. Nathanson then prods them to take action, “actively engaging in their spontaneous metaphor,” as she puts it. They could climb over the wall, knock it down or do whatever suits their imagination.

Although overcoming past trauma isn’t as easy as knocking down an imaginary wall, that action can have real, tangible effects. While reveling in the moment of success might actually de-motivate us from reaching future goals, visualizing the actions you take along the way can be powerful. Screening this movie in your head will make you more likely to follow through, and because you’ve imagined these scenarios before, you’ll be calm as they play out in real life.

Athletes like rugby players, golfers and martial artists who deliberately daydream about their techniques, using imagery and narrative, have found it can improve their performance. Studies of surgeons and musicians have found similar results. Yet, some have trouble engaging with their imaginative creative sides.

As Dr. Westgate’s study showed, volitional daydreaming is especially hard without inspiration. Cognitive flexibility and creativity peak in childhood and decline with age. That creativity is still there, but it might need prompting. So, when T.M. Robinson-Mosley, a consulting psychologist for the National Basketball Association, counsels players on how to harness the power of their daydreams, she first helps them break down their mental blocks and brainstorms ideas to focus on.

To help players lose their inhibitions, Dr. Robinson-Mosley starts them off by free writing, drawing or using whatever medium suits them. This “allows them to reconnect to some of the kind of creativity that we really enjoy as children,” she said.

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Good Friday fight in South Melbourne outside the Albion nightclub filmed on mobile phone


Shocking footage has captured the moment a man had his head stomped on outside a club in Melbourne.

The fight spilled out of the The Albion Rooftop & Club in South Melbourne and onto the street on Good Friday just after 2am.

It is believed to have started after a group of men were told to leave the nightclub.

Mobile phone vision shows a man laying motionless on the ground as he is kicked to the head.

He is then stomped on a number of times.

Another man was also punched and kicked by a group in the middle of Cecil Street in South Melbourne.

Police said the altercation started inside the Envy nightclub on The Albion rooftop.

Two men both aged in their 20s were taken to hospital and suffered non life-threatening injuries.

It is not known what started the brawl inside the club.

Thank you for stopping to visit My Local Pages. We Hope you enjoyed checking out this news article regarding “News in the City of Melbourne called “Good Friday fight in South Melbourne outside the Albion nightclub filmed on mobile phone”. This news article was brought to you by My Local Pages as part of our Australian events & what’s on stories services.

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New inquiry into deadly blaze being given ‘good consideration’


The New South Wales Government is looking at opening a fresh inquiry into the infamous Luna Park Ghost Train fire of 1979.

Seven people, including six children were killed in the Sydney theme park blaze, which was originally blamed on electrical faults.

However, new evidence uncovered in a recent investigation by the ABC alleged corrupt police covered up a plot masterminded by notorious Sydney gangster Abe Saffron.

The probe has magnified calls from the victim’s families, witnesses and dozens of former police to have the case revisited by the Coroner.

June 9
A fire that consumed the ghost train ride at Sydney’s Luna Park in 1979 killed one adult and six children when the fire tore through the ride. (Dallas Smith/The Sydney Morning Herald)

Today, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian confirmed her government are giving “good consideration” to holding an inquiry into the tragedy.

“We’ve heard the plight of families and I can confirm that relevant parts of the NSW government are considering that,” Ms Berejiklian said today.

“I think it’s always really difficult to consider what deserves reopening and what doesn’t and you always empathise with the families.

“I do want to confirm that we are giving it good consideration.”

The night of the fire was June 9, 1979.

There were believed to be more than 30 people on board the ghost train when it burst into flames.

The ride was completely engulfed and destroyed.

John Godson and his two children, Damien and Craig, and four Waverley College students; Jonathan Billings, Richard Carroll, Michael Johnson, and Seamus Rahilly were all killed.

The blaze was written off as an electrical fault by police, but new evidence indicates arson was a factor.

New evidence uncovered by the ABC has indicates Saffron ordered bikies to light the ghost fire train, which was subsequently covered up by corrupt police.

The funeral of the four boys who were killed in the Luna Park fire, from Waverly College. The funeral cortege moves off down College Street. June 15, 1979. (Photo by Kevin John Berry/Fairfax Media). (Kevin John Berry/Fairfax Media)

A mother’s plight after unthinkable tragedy

Jenny Godson helplessly watched on as her two children and husband burned alive in the ghost train fire.

She – along with family members of the other victims – have signed a petition demanding a review of the case.

“I would like a Royal Commission. Because it’s so deep, it involves all the people that we put the utmost trust in in our life,” Ms Godson said.

“Please set the truth free.

“This is what a Royal Commission can do.

“After struggling with the truth in my heart for so long, I just want it all brought out in the open.

“My husband John and my two sons Damien and Craig are deserved of justice, as we all are.”

It’s not just the victims’ families calling for justice.

A former Chief Magistrate, NSW Cabinet Secretary and Chief Executive of the High Court want the case reviewed.

A former police prosecutor at the original inquest, seven police officers who worked on the fire, two investigators from the National Crime Authority, two firefighters, and thirteen witnesses are also demanding action.

The process is currently at a standstill.

The Coroner has told families and witnesses their applications are invalid and need to go to the police.

The police – while open to looking at the new evidence – haven’t contacted any of the witnesses or families yet either.

Ms Berejiklian has the power to call a Special Commission of inquiry immediately should she wish.

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Good Times Running Club



Thursday, April 8, 2021, 5 – 6am

Good Times Running Club

The Good Times Running Club was started to support others not just for their fitness and running, but to foster friendships, provide support and provide an outlet that enables like-minded people to connect with one another and enjoy the amazing active lifestyle that we have on the Gold Coast.
 
Running takes your body, mind, and spirit to a better place. The simple act of putting one foot in front of the other and moving forward can make you healthier, happier, and more confident. 

Venue: Tallebudgera Creek Park
Address: 1544 Gold Coast Highway, Palm Beach
Suburb: Burleigh Heads
Category: Running
Contact name: Good Times Running Club
Cost: Free
More info: www.facebook.com…

We hope you enjoyed reading this story involving “What’s On in the City of Gold Coast” called “Good Times Running Club”. This news release was presented by My Local Pages Australia as part of our local and national events & what’s on news services.

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Why giving staff the title of “leader” is a good idea for your business


I have experienced firsthand how having a leader who deserves their title has been essential to the success of my business. One who can keep the team motivated and succeed in whatever action they were carrying out. Where the team would excel because they were being led by a leader who had earned their title, one who always led by example.

Be aware though the person you give the title of leader can make or shake your business. Therefore, great consideration should first be given before selecting someone for this title. Be sure exactly why you have chosen them; they must deserve it; they must be grateful for the opportunity and respect the honour that comes with having the title.

Many years ago, I worked in a corporate company where the role of leader was used as a power position, relationships came into play with who got promotions, preferred duties, higher wages, and other privileges depending on their relationship with the “leader and their title”. The work environment was one of untrust and despair, it did not matter what you produced in your workload, it was more important your social status with the leader as to how far you may go. At the time I really did not understand how wrong this misuse of power was, today I do.

You will know who to pick as your leader, they should be someone who follows all the rules, works smart, positive, has great communication skills, and is respected by their peers and most of all respects you, if you do not have that person, do not settle for less, try to find them or help someone become them.

Here are my four reasons why I think having a leader is a good one:

  1. To help steer your team toward success
    Having someone who has reason to uphold the standard you expect from all your team members. Who wants to be successful, not for power but because they have pride in what they are doing?
  2. Recognition and Reward for being an outstanding employee
    Some people do not want more than recognition from you to let them know you appreciate them and their efforts. Giving them a title of leader does this. It is giving them a reward for a job well done.
  3. They will take more ownership of their work
    When staff know they are appreciated by you they will endeavour to take on more ownership of their workplace. They will see their position as more than just a job.
  4. Help others grow
    If you have many employees, you may not have time to work with each of them and help them to grow and become better employees. When you give someone the title of leader, they will be able to help you to do this.

Over the years, the most success we have had with leaders is when we have had more than one at any given time, we spread them out, so we are covering most of our opening hours by having a leader present, someone who will always have our business in their mind and goes the extra mile to make sure things are being done right.

Marie Temby, author of “Simple Soulful Successful



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