Joe and Jill Biden were left awkwardly standing in the cold outside White House on Inauguration Day


President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill were momentarily left standing in the cold on Inauguration Day after the front doors of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue weren’t opened for them – a breach of protocol caused by the firing of the chief usher of the White House hours earlier.

With the world watching on, the 46th US President and his wife walked up the steps of their new home for the first time on Wednesday, as a small crowd of family members followed behind.

The couple posed for photos outside the large wooden doors of the North Portico, waiving to the crowd as a military band played ‘Hail to the Chief’ nearby.

They then embraced one another, before turning to venture on inside. But there was a problem: the doors didn’t open.

For an awkward but fleeting period of around 10 seconds, Biden stares puzzlingly at the door before turning back to shoot a confused look at his approaching family members.

Eventually the doors swing open, though it’s unclear whether Jill and Joe were forced to open them themselves, or whether someone on the inside finally notice the mistake.

It remains unclear exactly what caused the delay, though the firing of the chief usher of the White House, Timothy Harleth, likely had a part to play.

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With the world watching on, the 46th US President and his wife walked up the steps of their new home for the first time on Wednesday, with a small crowd of family members following behind

They then embraced one another, before hugging and turning to venture on inside, but the doors didn’t open

They then embraced one another, before hugging and turning to venture on inside, but the doors didn’t open

It remains unclear exactly what caused the delay, the firing of the chief usher of the White House, Timothy Harleth (shown right), likely had a part to play

It remains unclear exactly what caused the delay, the firing of the chief usher of the White House, Timothy Harleth (shown right), likely had a part to play

Though the White House doors are typically opened by Marine guards, the chief usher is in charge of greeting the incoming president and his family, in addition to overseeing operations at the residence.

However, Harleth wasn’t there to greet the Bidens when they arrived because he had been fired around five hours earlier.

Harleth, the Trumps’ chief usher and a former rooms manager of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, told the New York Times he was moving furniture on Inauguration Day when he was told at 11:30am that his services were no longer needed.

Biden’s aides had reportedly called the White House on Wednesday, saying the incoming president planned to bring in someone else to take over his role.

Harleth was personally chosen by Melania Trump to act as chief White House usher in 2017.

At the time, then-First Lady Melania said he was selected ‘because of his impressive work history and management skills.’

Harleth’s duties primarily included overseeing budgets, planning the family’s dinner menus and handling any personal issues. His salary was estimated to be around the $200,000 mark.

While the job is traditionally considered non-political, the Times noted Melania’s decision to hire a Trump Organization employee added a partisan implication to Harleth’s tenure.

For an awkward but fleeting period of around 10 seconds, Biden stares puzzlingly at the door before turning back to shoot a confused look at his approaching family members.

For an awkward but fleeting period of around 10 seconds, Biden stares puzzlingly at the door before turning back to shoot a confused look at his approaching family members.

Eventually the doors swing open, though it’s unclear whether Jill and Joe were forced to open them themselves, or whether someone on the inside did

Eventually the doors swing open, though it’s unclear whether Jill and Joe were forced to open them themselves, or whether someone on the inside did

Harleth was reportedly personally chosen by Melania Trump to act as chief White House usher in 2017

He was the former rooms manager of the Trump International Hotel in Washington

Harleth (right) was reportedly personally chosen by Melania Trump to act as chief White House usher in 2017, when she was first lady. He was the former rooms manager of the Trump International Hotel in Washington

After Election Day, Harleth found himself in the increasingly difficult position of attempting to prepare the White House for a new tenant while the current occupant was still refusing to concede the race.

Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows reportedly became angered at Harleth for attempting to send briefing books about the residence to the Biden transition team after he was confirmed to be the winner.

In a statement to the Times, Harleth said: ‘It has been an honor to serve as chief usher, a position whose loyalty is not to a specific president, but rather to the institution of the presidency.

‘I am proud that I had the opportunity to lead the residence staff to receive the incoming first family with the utmost respect and dignity, not just for this administration, but for the future success of the office of the president.’

It’s currently unclear who Jill Biden will appoint to replace Harleth. A number of his deputy chief ushers have remained in their positions under the new administration.

While the incident involving the front doors was only fleeting, it apparently did not go unnoticed among former White House workers.

‘There was a protocol breach when the front doors were not held open for the first family as they arrived at the North Portico,’ Lea Berman, White House secretary for George W. Bush told the Times.

Former White House curator Betty Monkman added: ‘The delay in opening the door did puzzle me a bit.’

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100-year-old zinc works to house inclusive music performance as part of Mona Foma festival


Only 10 minutes from downtown Hobart there’s a mini city within a city, but it’s a no-go zone to the general public.

For 100 years, the zinc works in Lutana have loomed as a tangle of dusty, rusty-looking buildings, conveyor belts and smoke stacks.

The ferry to Mona gives the public a taste of what’s on the site and by nightfall its array of lights creates an even more intriguing sight.

Now, in the name of art, current owners Nyrstar are allowing the public in … well, past the “front door” at least.

Award-winning social change arts organisation Big hART has embedded artists and musicians to create an audio-visual installation.

It, and a series of 30-minute performances, are being staged inside the smelter as part of the Mona Foma festival.

Big hART CEO Scott Rankin describes it as “a remarkable visual and audio work” that’s “very hypnotic to watch”.

The zinc smelter is one of the world’s largest in terms of production volume.(ABC News)

“Time kind of stands still, the combination of slick video and hand rendered images is very strong,” he said.

The genesis of the work was “part fascination and part personal contact”, after a friend of Rankin’s began working there.

“It is very ingrained in Hobart, and it is very unusual to have an industry of this size so close to the heart of the city.”

Rusty pipes and conveyor belts at a zinc smelter
Hundreds of sounds were recorded around the working smelter.(ABC News: Luke Bowden)

Mention the zinc works to locals and many will talk about about the environmental legacy of a bygone era — a legacy the current owners are still managing.

Big hART wants to focus on another, perhaps now overlooked, story about its social legacy — in the early years the smelter set up social programs to support struggling families.

It even had an early insurance scheme funded by the business and zinc workers.

“It helped build the city of Hobart with whole suburbs building up around it, and thousands of families working there,” Rankin said.

“It has been great to see people who have worked on site for many years seeing and hearing the zinc works in brand new ways.”

A group of people stand on a footpath
Cinematographer Anna Cadden was embedded on site with musicians Paul Corflatis, Aaron Hopper and Curtis Poke.(ABC News: Luke Bowden)

A hallmark of the Tasmanian-based company is its ethos of being inclusive.

As well as Nyrstar, the “other big partner” is North West Support Services, an organisation helping people living with a disability to create lifestyles and opportunities.

“For Zinc there are two talented musicians who live with autism working on this project — bass player Curtis Poke, and electronica artist Paul Corfiatis, who is actually the co-composer and working alongside lead artist/mentor of the project Aaron Hopper,” Rankin said.

“As well as that, there’s also visual artist Jacob Rish, who is super-talented and has done a lot of drawing. His work has been amplified through a collaboration with cinematographer Anna Caden, young Sydney media artist Jordan East and Hobart artist Eddie James.”

Music from a zinc ingot

A man hits a zinc ingot with a drum mallet
The company provided ingots for the artists to create music.(Supplied: Amy Brown)

While on site they collected 270 sounds to create the audio-scape, some using zinc itself.

Hopper said the process was a deep dive into the world of zinc.

“The goal for the Zinc project was that we would compose using only sounds recorded within the Nyrstar Zinc Works or directly related to zinc,” he said.

“We used words from the zinc lexicon to create melodies with a technique called alphabetic junction.

“We achieved our goal, and the tonal palette of the composition ranges from massive industrial to subtle and beautiful.”

A man plays a zinc ingot silhouetted against a black and white screen
Big hART performer Paul Corfiatis in front of art animations by Jacob Lish.(Supplied: Amy Brown)

Burnie-based Corfiatis began experimenting with sound as a kid “manipulating cassette tapes”.

He said he had revelled in the experience and challenges of reflecting the smelter in audio.

“Guitars plugged up to zinc samples, zinc blocks connected to pickups for percussion — this has been a challenging project totally out of my comfort zone,” he said.

“When I was younger I was super nervous but during these days I totally thrive on these opportunities.

“It’s been a good experience allowing others to get a taste of my capabilities.”

‘Creating positive futures’

A man with silver hair smiles as he looks to the right
Rankin’s Big hART is renowned for staging works in unusual places.(ABC News: Luke Bowden)

Zinc is a spin-off of the company’s successful Acoustic Life of Sheds series, which takes well-known musicians into working farm sheds.

Be it in a shed or a shipping container, Big hART revels in staging performances in unusual places but that was not the main driver.

“It’s not just the site itself, Big hART is very interested in renewables and the environment and positive futures,” Rankin said.

“Zinc as a product has the ability to extend the life of steel by 20 times, which in turn can extend the life of things like reinforced concrete.

“Concrete production is the third largest emitter of carbon globally, so there are strong alignments there.

“We are interested in assisting young people to focus on positive aspects of where we live in Tasmania — things like renewables, rainfall, safety, community, clean air, wilderness, and for that to form the basis of feeling positive about creating futures here, rather than having to move away. Zinc fits into that.”

So why is a major industrial partnering with artists?

A woman in an orange hard and overalls hard looks to the right while standing at a zinc smelter
Nyrstar’s Caley Pearce says Zinc is a way for the smelter to engage with the community in new ways.(ABC News: Luke Bowden)

“Engaging with our community is and has always been important to Nyrstar,” said the company’s stakeholder engagement principal, Caley Pearce.

“This project provides the opportunity for Nyrstar to connect with thousands of people and show what we do at the zinc works.

“We’re really proud to be working on a project that celebrates inclusion and provides opportunities for young people living with autism and other needs.

“This project provides a unique opportunity for artists and the community to engage with Nyrstar in new ways.”

The artists were allowed into “all kinds of nooks and crannies” to record the sounds of the smelter and create the visuals.

A man's hands rest on a zinc ingot
The artists captured 270 sounds around the smelter for the installation, Zinc.(Supplied: Amy Brown)

“It took two days for the sound recording and around the same amount of time to get the video footage,” Ms Pearce said.

“While Aaron Hopper, the lead composer and mentor was onsite, we were hunting for big mechanical sounds, as well as smaller sounds, like glassware clinging in the labs, and the sound of air compressors.”

Zinc also opened doors for the young women of the organisation’s long-running Project O, which aims to empower those from disadvantaged rural communities.

They have helped stage the event and spent a week on site getting a first-hand look at STEM career paths.

Mona Foma’s Hobart’s season runs until Sunday.

Wharf at Nyrstar zinc works Hobart
The Nyrstar zinc works is a familiar and imposing sight for Hobartians.(ABC)

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Thriving Manchester publishing house attempts to level up north side divide


A rapidly growing gaming and tech publishing house is to create 30 new jobs to further enhance Manchester’s reputation as an economic powerhouse in digital and creative industries.

The new jobs in multimedia and digital content follow a successful investment round completed by the team at By Gamers for Gamers.

The Manchester-based firm, which announced its move to popular workspace Use Space in September 2020, raised significant monies via angel investment to facilitate working growth capital and support its acquisition ambitions.

As a result, it is now commencing a major recruitment drive to attract talented people from across the UK to support the development of its growing online media outlets, which include WePC.com, PCGuide.com and EsportsVerdict.com

The company intends to tap into Manchester’s potential for growth and help ‘level up’ the economic North-South divide.

Co-Founder Craig Kirkcaldy, who headed up the investment round, said: “Manchester is an exciting, growing and vibrant place with a burgeoning digital and creative business scene coming together to produce a collective force.

“The latest investment means we can push ahead with our plans to increase the talent in our business and create 30 new jobs.

“We are looking to recruit the best people from across the UK and introduce them to Manchester and the North, maybe for the first time.

“The digital landscape of the UK is changing fast with some of the biggest names in media heading North, not least with the BBC who have invested heavily in Salford already. We aim to be in the vanguard as Manchester powers forward as it will as we emerge from the pandemic.”

By Gamers for Gamers, founded in April 2019 by brothers Andrew and Craig Kirckaldy and Will Blears, comprises a team of experienced, passionate individuals dedicated to bringing readers the best in unbiased PC tech, gaming, and Esports news.

With millions of readers each month, its continued purpose is to provide readers with hands-on reviews and practical buying advice as well as tips to get the most out of their tech and gaming setup.

Its network of sites, all work together to form a tight-knit family of consumer-focused brands with one goal: empowering readers.

Craig added: “We are lucky to already have a team comprising gamers from all walks of life that share a passion for the technology they play on, and now we want to enable others to join that team and be part of an excellent workplace culture.

“Being in Manchester and being in a warehouse-style space which includes an immersive racing Sim and a virtual reality station we have a workplace to match the lifestyle that people can enjoy in the North.

“We want to accelerate the momentum of Manchester being a leading digital and creative hub of the UK.  We have further ambitious plans for recruitment and growth. Manchester offers some incredible opportunities.”



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US President Donald Trump leaves White House for farewell at Joint Base Andrews


Donald Trump has left the White House and boarded Marine One for the last time as the 45th President of the United States.

The presidential helicopter landed on the South Lawn just before 8:00am Wednesday (local time) to pick up Mr Trump.

Mr Trump and his wife Melania emerged from the building Wednesday morning and strode across the South Lawn to board Marine One before addressing members of the media.

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump stop to talk with the media as they leave the White House.(AP: Alex Brandon)

“It’s been a great honour, the honour of a lifetime,” Mr Trump said.

“We love the American people and … it has been something very special. And I just want to say goodbye, but hopefully it’s not a long-term goodbye. We’ll see each other again.”

Mr Trump landed shortly after at Joint Base Andrews in suburban Maryland, where he was honoured with a red carpet arrival, military band and a 21-gun salute.

The President made a short speech in Maryland as part of his final official engagement, describing America as the greatest country in the world.

“It is my greatest honour and privilege to have been your president,” he said, and added he wishes the incoming government “great success”.

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“I will always fight for you. I will be watching, I will be listening. I will tell you the future of this country has never been better.”

“They have the foundation to do something really spectacular, and we put it in [that] position.

“Have a good life, we will see you soon.”

Mr Trump not attending Joe Biden’s inauguration represents the first time in more than a century that a sitting president has rejected the tradition of attending his successor’s inauguration.

By the time Mr Biden is sworn in as the 46th US president, Mr Trump will already have landed at his private Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida.

AP

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Court finds house with 17 bedrooms and bathrooms not a family home and orders changes


The owner of a 17-bedroom waterfront mansion on the Sunshine Coast, which was operating as an illegal boarding house, has been ordered to make structural changes after failing to convince a judge that it was just another family home.

The three-storey building on Birtinya has en suites for every bedroom, kitchens on each floor, plus power and water meters for each room.

There are no bathrooms in shared areas, no master bedroom, and multiple laundries.

Rooms in the building were rented out for $220 a week for more than 12 months to March last year.

If fully occupied, it would amount to almost $15,000 a month in income.

Michael Ivan Gavin’s operation of the house breached the Sunshine Coast Regional Council’s planning rules and landed him in the Planning and Environment Court.

Judge Glen Cash ordered Mr Gavin to make changes to his property to make it harder to operate as accommodation in a residential area.

The required changes included the removal of certain doors, sinks and kitchen sites, but the ruling stopped short of demolishing parts of the house — a request put to the court by council.

A neighbour told the court there were about 15 people living in the building, causing parking havoc on the suburban street.(ABC Sunshine Coast: Owen Jacques)

Two plans, one house

In the ruling handed down in late December, Judge Cash found Mr Gavin was warned first by a private certifier, then by council officers, that the house must be used as a home, not paid accommodation.

Councillor Peter Cox said he was pleased with the decision and that the house “did not comply with the local area plan”.

Judge Cash described how Mr Gavin misled authorities with two different building plans — one reflected the true nature of the project, while the other was designed to deceive council officers.

Large house on edge of waterway with hospital in background
The Birtinya house has been listed online to rent, as a whole, for $1,250 a week.(ABC Sunshine Coast: Owen Jacques)

When building began in early 2018, it took just weeks for a council officer to raise concerns during an inspection, only to be told by Mr Gavin that it was a home and nothing more.

Mr Gavin moved into the house with his family for about two months in late 2018, before attempting to rent out the rooms individually as “private rooms” or “one-bedroom apartments”.

One neighbour told the court there were about 15 people living in the building, causing parking havoc on the suburban street.

‘Not an impressive witness’

Judge Cash said Mr Gavin “was not an impressive witness” when questioned by the court over the property.

“He was garrulous, unresponsive and, at times, mendacious,” Judge Cash wrote.

The Sunshine Coast Regional Council wanted the court to order the demolition of eight of the 17 bathrooms and for officers be able to inspect the site at any time with 24 hours’ notice.

The council said it wanted to ensure such a misuse of the property was not allowed to happen again.

The court rejected both requests.

However, Judge Cash warned any attempt to undo or disobey the changes could cost the owner — whether Mr Gavin or a future buyer — more than $600,000 in fines or two years’ prison.

The ABC has tried contacting the homeowner for a response to the ruling.

The Birtinya house, now with 16 bedrooms and 16 bathrooms, has been listed online to rent, as a whole, for $1,250 a week.

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The gap between Australian house prices and incomes is only likely to grow | Australian economy


Australians love of housing continues with even more vigour during the Covid recession – powered by government incentives and record low interest rates, which look set to remain low for many years.

In November a record $23.96bn in new housing loans were taken out. This record reveals how weird this recession is – there is higher unemployment, but it is mostly driven by forces that have little to do with the underlying strength of the economy.

It means that for those still with a full-time job things are pretty good – especially if you are thinking about buying a home.

And so in November last year, the level of new housing loans was 24% above where it was 12 months earlier:

The big boost has come from owner-occupiers – up 31% over the 12 months compared to just a 4% growth for investors.

This lack of investor loans however is just a continuation of what has happened since 2016 when the surge of apartment building came to an end. In November the total of owner-occupier loans was 38% above what it was in January 2017, while investor loans were down 38%:

And among owner-occupiers the big surge has come for those looking to build a new home.

It has to be said that the government’s homebuilder grant of $25,000 for new builds and substantial renovations has worked as intended.

Since it came into effect in June last year, the number of home loans for the construction of houses has doubled from 3,491 in June to 7,107 in November.

So great has been the surge of home loans to build houses that in November the number of such loans was well above even the level that occurred during the GFC when the Rudd government also introduced measures to boost housing construction:

And yet there has also been a big jump in the purchase of established homes. This is less to do with government policies and grants and more to do with the record low interest rates.

It is true that even before the pandemic interest rates were at record lows, but the impact of the Reserve Bank dropping the cash rate to 0.1% might have had the opposite psychological impact that pushing it to 17% in 1989 had.

Back then rates were already high but that final increase knocked the stuffing out of those with a mortgage, and it scared the hell out of those thinking about taking out a home loan.

Similarly, if you were ever worried about holding off taking out a loan because of fears about interest rates, the RBA cutting the cash rate to 0.1% removed them. Even the most risk averse borrower was thinking now it’s the time to take out a loan.

For many this has not just meant a home loan but also a car loan – the number of which has completely recovered from the drop in April last year:

Partly this is because the option of a big spend on an overseas holiday has completely dried up, and as a result loans for travel remains barely above zero:

But will these low rates last?

We know that increases in home loans lead to an increase in house prices, and the Reserve Bank would not wish for a divergence of house prices while unemployment remains high – for such a level is unsustainable and risks a collapse once government grants end.

It also will lead to a decrease in housing affordability as incomes will not keep pace with house prices.

In the past that would have meant an increase in rates, but not now.

Shane Wright reported on Monday in the Sydney Morning Herald that the RBA is instead looking at tightening lending standards should house prices continue to rise.

It will need to do this because there is no prospect at the moment of any increase in wages and inflation that would force the RBA to lift rates.

The most recent market inflation expectations suggests inflation growth will be well below the RBA’s target of 2% throughout this year:

Last November, the Reserve Bank announced that it “will not increase the cash rate until actual inflation is sustainably within the 2 to 3 per cent target range”.

This was a change on its previous advice that it would not do so until it was “confident that inflation will be sustainably within the 2–3 per cent target band”.

As of now, actual inflation has not been above 2% for over five years – and when it was wages growth had been long above 2%:

The RBA has noted that to get inflation back above 2% “wages growth will have to be materially higher than it is currently” and this “will require significant gains in employment and a return to a tight labour market”.

In essence that means unemployment back around 5%. As a result the RBA “is not expecting to increase the cash rate for at least three years”.

And so home loans are likely to continue to grow and so too will the gap between house prices and household income.

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‘Squad’ members named to House financial services, oversight and reform committees


Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., were selected to serve on the House’s Financial Services Committee, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office announced Thursday.

Both “Squad” members were already chosen earlier this month to serve on the House Oversight Committee as well.

Fellow “Squad” member Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., was named to the Oversight and Reform Committee. 

“In the election, the American people elected a Democratic House Majority that not only will ensure that our nation recovers from this historic pandemic and economic crisis, but will Build Back Better,” Pelosi said in a statement announcing the dozens of assignments to committees such as Armed Services, Education and Labor, Foreign Affairs and the Veterans Affairs Committee.

SPEAKER PELOSI NAMES REP. SWALWELL TO RETURN TO THE HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE DESPITE SPY TIES 

She said the “outstanding Members” would be “relentless in leading Democrats’ work to combat disparities in our economy and country and to advance justice and progress For The People.”

Pelosi, 80, has been accused by Ocasio-Cortez, 31, and others of not bringing the younger members into leadership positions. 

Last month, the New York congresswoman told The Intercept, “I think one of the things that I have struggled with — I think that a lot of people struggle with — is [that] the internal dynamics of the House has made it such that there’s very little option for succession if you will.”

PELOSI ANNOUNCES NEW ‘SQUAD’ ASSIGNMENTS TOHOUSE COMMITTEES

She said she thought it was time for new and younger leadership to take over for Pelosi and incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, 70. 

“Why does AOC complain that you have not been grooming younger people for leadership?” “60 Minutes” reporter Lesley Stahl asked the speaker in an interview that aired last Sunday. 

Pelosi responded, “I don’t know. You’ll have to ask her — because we are.”

After Stahl called Pelosi’s answer “dismissive” of the congresswoman, Pelosi that wasn’t her intention, adding that Ocasio-Cortez is “very effective, as are others — many other members in our caucus that the press doesn’t pay attention to. But they are there and they are building support for what comes next.”

PELOSI GETS ‘SHARP’ WHEN ASKED ABOUT AOC DURING ’60 MINUTES’ INTERVIEW

Rep. Eric Swalwell, a Californian who Republicans have asked to step down from the House Intelligence Committee over his past ties to a suspected Chinese spy, will also return to the Homeland Security Committee.

He previously served on the Homeland Security Committee during his first term in Congress, from 2012 to 2014, which was before the FBI had briefed him on alleged Communist spy Fang Fang’s activities.

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After that, he cut ties. He has not been accused of wrongdoing, but critics have demanded he step down or be removed from the Intelligence Committee as part of standard counter-intelligence risk-management practices.

Former House impeachment manager Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., will join Swalwell on the Homeland Security Committee. 

Here’s the complete list of appointments announced Thursday:

Agriculture Committee: Reps. Cindy Axne, Iowa; Cheri Bustos, Illinois; Salud Carbajal, California; Lou Correa, California; Angie Craig, Minnesota; Josh Harder, California; Ro Khanna, California; Ann McLane Kuster, New Hampshire; Al Lawson, Florida; Sean Patrick Maloney, New York; Tom O’Halleran, Arizona; Chellie Pingree, Maine; Stacey Plaskett, Virgin Islands; Bobby Rush, Illinois; Gregorio Sablan, Northern Mariana Islands; Kim Schrier, Washington.

Armed Services Committee: Reps. Stephanie Murphy of Florida; Jimmy Panetta of California; and Marc Veasey of Texas.

Education and Labor Committee: Reps. Joaquin Castro of Texas; Mark Pocan of Wisconsin; and Mikie Sherrill of New Jersey.

Financial Services Committee: Reps. Alma Adams of North Carolina; Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania; Chuy García of Illinois; Sylvia Garcia of Texas; Stephen Lynch of Massachusetts; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York; David Scott of Georgia; Rashida Tlaib of Michigan.

Foreign Affairs Committee: Reps. Jim Costa of California; Vicente González of Texas; Juan Vargas of California.

Homeland Security Committee: Reps. Nanette Barragán of California; Yvette Clarke of New York; Emanuel Cleaver of Missouri; Val Demings of Florida; Josh Gottheimer of New Jersey; Al Green of Texas; Elaine Luria of Virginia; Tom Malinowski of New Jersey; Kathleen Rice of New York; Eric Swalwell of California; Dina Titus of Nevada; Bonnie Watson Coleman of New Jersey  

Natural Resources Committee: Reps. Ed Case of Hawaii; Diana DeGette of Colorado; Debbie Dingell of Michigan; Chuy García of Illinois; Donald McEachin of Virginia; Michael San Nicolas of Guam; Darren Soto of Florida; Nydia Velázquez of New York.

Oversight and Reform Committee: Reps. Danny Davis of Illinois; Mark DeSaulnier of California; Jimmy Gomez of California; Hank Johnson of Georgia; Robin Kelly of Illinois; Brenda Lawrence of Michigan; Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts; John Sarbanes of Maryland; Jackie Speier of California; Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida; Peter Welch of Vermont.

Science, Space and Technology Committee: Reps. Don Beyer of Virginia; Sean Casten of Illinois; Charlie Crist of Florida; Bill Foster of Illinois; Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania; Jerry McNerney of California; Donald Norcross of New Jersey; Ed Perlmutter of Colorado; Brad Sherman of California; Deborah Ross of North Carolina; Paul Tonko of New York.

Small Business Committee: Reps. Judy Chu California; Antonio Delgado of New York; Dwight Evans of Pennsylvania; Chrissy Houlahan of Pennsylvania; Scott Peters of California; Brad Schneider of Illinois

Veterans Affairs Committee: Reps. Colin Allred of Texas; Lauren Underwood of Illinois; Gregorio Sablan of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Fox News’ Michael Ruiz and Edmund DeMarche contributed to this report.

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US politics live updates: House Democrats set to vote to impeach Donald Trump for historic second time



A vote to impeach President Donald Trump is expected mid-afternoon in Washington DC. So here’s an overview in three posts

From the Associated Press: 

President Donald Trump is on the verge of being impeached for a second time with the House planning the unprecedented vote one week after he encouraged a mob of loyalists to “fight like hell” against election results and the US Capitol became the target of a deadly siege.

While the first impeachment of Mr Trump last year brought no Republican votes in the House, a small but significant number of politicians are breaking with the party to join the Democrats.

They are unwilling to put American decency and democracy at further risk, even with days remaining in the president’s term. 

The stunning collapse of Mr Trump’s final days in office, against alarming warnings of more violence ahead by his followers, leaves the nation at an uneasy and unfamiliar juncture before Democrat Joe Biden is inaugurated January 20. 

“If inviting a mob to insurrection against your own government is not an impeachable event, then what is?” said Representative Jamie Raskin, who drafted the articles of impeachment.

Mr Trump, who would become the only US president twice impeached, faces a single charge of “incitement of insurrection.”

The four-page impeachment resolution relies on Mr Trump’s own incendiary rhetoric and the falsehoods he spread about Biden’s election victory, including at a White House rally on the day of the January 6 attack on the Capitol, in building its case for high crimes and misdemeanors as demanded in the Constitution.

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U.S. House formally asks Pence to strip Trump of power with 25th Amendment


The U.S. House rushed ahead Tuesday toward impeaching President Donald Trump for the deadly Capitol attack, taking time only to try to persuade his vice president to push him out first. Trump showed no remorse, blaming impeachment itself for the “tremendous anger” in America.

Already scheduled to leave office next week, Trump is on the verge of becoming the only president in history to be twice impeached. His incendiary rhetoric at a rally ahead of the Capitol uprising is now in the impeachment charge against him — to be taken up Wednesday — even as the falsehoods he spread about election fraud are still being championed by some Republicans.

The House on Tuesday night approved a resolution urging Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to the Constitution to remove Trump with a Cabinet vote, although Pence had already said he would not do so. The resolution, passed 223-205 almost entirely along party lines, urged him to “declare what is obvious to a horrified Nation: That the President is unable to successfully discharge the duties and powers of his office.”

Hours before the vote Pence had said no. In a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, he said it would not be in the best interest of the nation and it was “time to unite our country as we prepare to inaugurate President-elect Joe Biden.”

Meanwhile, five Republican lawmakers, including third-ranking House GOP leader Liz Cheney of Wyoming, announced they would vote to impeach Trump on Wednesday, cleaving the Republican leadership, and the party itself.

“The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack,” said Cheney in a statement. “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

As lawmakers reconvened at the Capitol for the first time since the bloody siege, they were bracing for more violence ahead of Democrat Biden’s inauguration, Jan. 20.

“All of us have to do some soul searching,” said Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, an author of both pieces of legislation, imploring other Republicans to join.

Trump, meanwhile, warned the lawmakers off impeachment and suggested it was the drive to oust him that was dividing the country.

“To continue on this path, I think it’s causing tremendous danger to our country, and it’s causing tremendous anger,” Trump said.

In his first remarks to reporters since last week’s violence, the outgoing president offered no condolences for those dead or injured, only saying, “I want no violence.”

With Pence’s agreement to invoke the 25th Amendment ruled out, the House will move swiftly to impeachment on Wednesday.

Trump faces a single charge — “incitement of insurrection” — in the impeachment resolution after the most serious and deadly domestic incursion at the Capitol in the nation’s history.

Rep. Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, argued that Trump must go because, as she said in Spanish, he’s “loco” – crazy.

Republican Reps. John Katko of New York, a former federal prosecutor; Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, an Air Force veteran; Fred Upton of Michigan and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state announced they, too, would vote to impeach. Kinzinger was the lone Republican voting in favor of the resolution calling on Pence to act.

Republican Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio said the “cancel culture” was just trying to cancel the president. He said the Democrats had been trying to reverse the 2016 election ever since Trump took office and were finishing his term the same way.

Though a handful of House Republicans will join the impeachment vote — and leaders are allowing them to vote as they wish — it’s far from clear there would then be the two-thirds vote needed to convict from the narrowly divided Senate. Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania did join Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska over the weekend in calling for Trump to “go away as soon as possible.”

Unprecedented events, with just over a week remaining in Trump’s term, are unfolding in a nation bracing for more unrest. The FBI has warned ominously of potential armed protests by Trump loyalists ahead of Biden’s inauguration, and Capitol Police urged lawmakers to be on alert. The inauguration ceremony on the west steps of the Capitol will be off limits to the public.

With new security, lawmakers were required to pass through metal detectors Tuesday night to enter the House chamber, not far from where Capitol police, guns drawn, had barricaded the door against the rioters. Some Republican lawmakers complained about it.

A Capitol police officer died from injuries suffered in the riot, and police shot a woman during the violence. Three other people died in what authorities said were medical emergencies.

Biden has said it’s important to ensure that the “folks who engaged in sedition and threatening the lives, defacing public property, caused great damage — that they be held accountable.”

Fending off concerns that an impeachment trial would bog down Biden’s first days in office, the president-elect is encouraging senators to divide their time between taking taking up his priorities of confirming his nominees and approving COVID relief while also conducting the trial.

As Congress resumed, an uneasiness swept the halls. More lawmakers tested positive for COVID-19 after sheltering during the siege. Many lawmakers were voting by proxy rather than come to Washington, a process that was put in place last year to limit the health risks of travel.

One of Trump’s closest allies in Congress, House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy was among those echoing the president, saying “impeachment at this time would have the opposite effect of bringing our country together.”

The impeachment bill from Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Ted Lieu of California, Raskin of Maryland and Jerrold Nadler of New York draws from Trump’s own false statements about his election defeat to Biden.

Judges across the country, including some nominated by Trump, have repeatedly dismissed cases challenging the election results, and former Attorney General William Barr, a Trump ally, has said there was no sign of widespread fraud.

Like the resolution to invoke the 25th Amendment, the impeachment legislation also details Trump’s pressure on state officials in Georgia to “find” him more votes, as well as his White House rally ahead of the Capitol siege, in which he encouraged thousands of supporters last Wednesday to “fight like hell” and march to the building.

The mob overpowered police, broke through security lines and windows and rampaged through the Capitol, forcing lawmakers to scatter as they were finalizing Biden’s victory over Trump in the Electoral College.

While some have questioned impeaching the president so close to the end of his term, there is precedent. In 1876, during the Ulysses Grant administration, War Secretary William Belknap was impeached by the House the day he resigned, and the Senate convened a trial months later. He was acquitted.

Trump was impeached by the House in 2019 over dealings with Ukraine and acquitted in 2020 by the Senate.

More politics coverage from Fortune:

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House Vote Tracker: Live Updates of Impeachment, Trump and The 25th Amendment


Video

transcript

transcript

House Calls on Pence to Remove Trump From Power

The House of Representatives voted, 223 to 205, on Tuesday night to call on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to strip President Trump of his powers for inciting a mob to attack the Capitol.

“I think every member in this body should be able to agree that this president is not meeting the most minimal duties of office. He is not meeting the oath that he swore to uphold and defend the Constitution. We are simply asking Vice President Pence to exercise his powers under the 25th Amendment of the Constitution, Section 4, to convene the cabinet and to mobilize the cabinet to state and articulate what is obvious to the American people: This president is not meeting the duties of office and is clearly not capable of it.” The 25th Amendment specifically addresses the incapacity of the president to discharge the duties of his office. It was never intended as a political weapon when Congress doesn’t like the way he discharges those duties. Now, I’ve read that speech. He never suggested rampaging the Capitol and disrupting the Congress.” “The facts are very clear. The president called for this seditious attack Wednesday morning. He participated in a rally to encourage the rioters to March on the Capitol and fight. The president’s actions demonstrate his absolute inability to discharge the most basic and fundamental powers and duties of his office. Therefore, the president must be removed from office immediately.” “The adoption of this political resolution would be divisive rather than unifying. The vice president has said he has no intention of taking action under the amendment, so this process is pure political theater on the part of the majority.” “On this vote, the yeas are 223; the nays are 205. The resolution is adopted without objection. The motion to reconsider is laid on the table.”

The House of Representatives voted, 223 to 205, on Tuesday night to call on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to strip President Trump of his powers for inciting a mob to attack the Capitol.CreditCredit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

The House voted on Tuesday night to formally call on Vice President Mike Pence to use the 25th Amendment to strip President Trump of his powers after he incited a mob that attacked the Capitol, as lawmakers warned they would impeach the president on Wednesday if Mr. Pence did not comply.

Lawmakers, escorted by armed guards into a heavily fortified Capitol, adopted the nonbinding measure just before midnight largely along party lines. The final vote was 223 to 205 to implore Mr. Pence to declare Mr. Trump “incapable of executing the duties of his office and to immediately exercise powers as acting president.”

“We’re trying to tell him that the time of a 25th Amendment emergency has arrived,” Representative Jamie Raskin, Democrat of Maryland and the author of the resolution, said before the vote. “It has come to our doorstep. It has invaded our chamber.”

Only one Republican, Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, voted in favor of the resolution.

The House proceeded even after Mr. Pence rejected the call in a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday. “I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our nation or consistent with our Constitution,” he wrote. “I will not now yield to efforts in the House of Representatives to play political games at a time so serious in the life of our nation.”

With Mr. Pence’s rejection in hand, almost all Republicans lined up in opposition. They did little to defend Mr. Trump’s behavior but argued that Congress had no role telling the vice president what to do.

“The vice president has given you your answer, before you asked the question,” said Representative Dan Bishop, Republican of North Carolina. “Your ultimatum does violence to a core feature of the architecture of the Constitution.”

Democrats planned to reconvene on Wednesday to vote on a single article of impeachment charging Mr. Trump with “inciting violence against the government of the United States.” The rioters last week ransacked the seat of American government and killed a Capitol Police officer.

Every single Democrat was expected to vote to impeach, and Republicans were bracing for as many as two dozen of their members to follow suit.




The House, controlled by Democrats, holds a floor vote on one

or more articles of impeachment.

Less than a majority of the

House votes to impeach.

A majority of House

members vote to impeach.

Trump remains in office

for the duration of his

term, unless his cabinet

acts to remove him or

he resigns.

The House determines if

and when when to send the

article to the Senate. It

could do nothing further,

effectively holding out the

charges in perpetuity.

IF ARTICLE

SENT IMMEDIATELY

IF ARTICLE WITHHELD UNTIL

AFTER CHANGE IN CONTROL

Republican-led trial unlikely:

Mitch McConnell has said

the Senate will not return until

Jan. 19, the last full day of

Trump’s term, making

a trial unlikely before the

inauguration.

Democratic-led trial:

Later this month, control of

the Senate will flip to

Democrats. Upon receipt of

the article, the Senate must

soon begin a trial, but there

is discretion in the schedule

and pace of the process.

Afterward, the Senate holds

a vote to convict or acquit

the former president.

Fewer than two-thirds of

members present vote to

convict.

Two-thirds or more of

members present vote to

convict.

Trump is guilty.

 

Separate votes would

be needed to prohibit

Trump from receiving

benefits given to

ex-presidents and to

bar him from future

political office.

The House, controlled by Democrats, holds a floor vote on one

or more articles of impeachment.

Less than a majority of the

House votes to impeach.

A majority of House

members vote to impeach.

Trump remains in office

for the duration of his

term, unless his cabinet

acts to remove him or

he resigns.

The House determines if

and when when to send the

article to the Senate. It

could do nothing further,

effectively holding out the

charges in perpetuity.

IF ARTICLE

SENT IMMEDIATELY

IF ARTICLE WITHHELD UNTIL

AFTER CHANGE IN CONTROL

Republican-led trial unlikely:

Mitch McConnell has said

the Senate will not return until

Jan. 19, the last full day of

Trump’s term, making

a trial unlikely before the

inauguration.

Democratic-led trial:

Later this month, control of

the Senate will flip to

Democrats. Upon receipt of

the article, the Senate must

soon begin a trial, but there

is discretion in the schedule

and pace of the process.

Afterward, the Senate holds

a vote to convict or acquit

the former president.

Fewer than two-thirds of

members present vote to

convict.

Two-thirds or more of

members present vote to

convict.

Trump is guilty.

 

Separate votes would

be needed to prohibit

Trump from receiving

benefits given to

ex-presidents and to

bar him from future

political office.

The House, controlled by Democrats, holds a floor vote on one or more articles of impeachment.

A majority of House members

vote to impeach.

Less than a majority of the House

votes to impeach.

Trump remains in office

for the duration of his term, unless his

cabinet acts to remove him or

he resigns.

The House determines if and when to

send the article to the Senate. It could

do nothing further, effectively holding

out the charges in perpetuity.

IF ARTICLE SENT IMMEDIATELY

IF ARTICLE WITHHELD UNTIL

AFTER CHANGE IN CONTROL

Republican-led trial unlikely:

Mitch McConnell has said the Senate

will not return until Jan. 19, the last full

day of Trump’s term, making a trial

unlikely before the inauguration.

Democratic-led trial:

Later this month, control of the Senate will

flip to Democrats. Upon receipt of the article,

the Senate must soon begin a trial, but there

is discretion in the schedule and pace of the

process. Afterward, the Senate holds a vote

to convict or acquit the former president.

Fewer than two-thirds of members

present vote to convict.

Two-thirds or more of members

present vote to convict.

Trump is guilty.

 

Separate votes would be needed

to prohibit Trump from receiving

benefits given to ex-presidents

and to bar him from future

political office.


Breaking with Mr. Trump, Republicans were not formally pressuring lawmakers to oppose either vote. Their leaders were treading carefully, navigating an extremely complex and fast-moving political environment that threatened the cohesion of the party and that could inflict lasting damage on the country.

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, had told associates that he was fine with the House moving forward with impeachment and that Mr. Trump had committed impeachable offenses, according to people familiar with his thinking.

Mr. Trump met with Mr. Pence on Monday for the first time since their falling out last week over the president’s effort to overturn the election and the mob assault, which had put the vice president in danger. The two spoke for an hour or more in the Oval Office in what amounted to a tense peace summit meeting with the remainder of the Trump presidency at stake.

The impeachment drive came as President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. signaled more clearly that he would not stand in the way of the impeachment proceeding, telling reporters in Newark, Del., that his primary focus was trying to minimize the effect that an all-consuming trial in the Senate might have on his first days in office.

He said he had consulted with lawmakers about the possibility that they could “bifurcate” the proceedings in the Senate, so that half of each day would be spent on the trial and half on the confirmation of his cabinet and other nominees.

Vice President Mike Pence at the joint session of Congress at the Capitol on Jan. 6.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

[Read more on Trump and Pence’s blowup.]

Vice President Mike Pence late Tuesday rejected the possibility of stripping President Trump of his powers through the 25th Amendment, rebuking a resolution in the House calling on the vice president to do so.

“I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our nation or consistent with our Constitution,” Mr. Pence wrote in a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “I urge you and every member of Congress to avoid actions that would further divide and inflame the passions of the moment.”

Mr. Pence privately indicated last week that he did not support invoking the 25th Amendment, and his public rejection of the resolution all but ensured that the House would vote to impeach Mr. Trump on Wednesday.

“I will not now yield to efforts in the House of Representatives to play political games at a time so serious in the life of our nation,” the vice president wrote.

Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, walks to the Senate Chambers in the Capitol building on Wednesday.
Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times

Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, has told associates that he believes President Trump committed impeachable offenses and that he is pleased that Democrats are moving to impeach him, believing that it will make it easier to purge him from the party, according to people familiar with his thinking. The House is voting on Wednesday to formally charge Mr. Trump with inciting violence against the country.

At the same time, Representative Kevin McCarthy of California, the minority leader and one of Mr. Trump’s most steadfast allies in Congress, has asked other Republicans whether he should call on Mr. Trump to resign in the aftermath of the riot at the Capitol last week, according to three Republican officials briefed on the conversations.

While Mr. McCarthy has said he is personally opposed to impeachment, he and other party leaders have decided not to formally lobby Republicans to vote “no,” and an aide to Mr. McCarthy said he was open to a measure censuring Mr. Trump for his conduct. In private, Mr. McCarthy reached out to a leading House Democrat to see if the chamber would be willing to pursue a censure vote, though Speaker Nancy Pelosi has ruled it out.

Taken together, the stances of Congress’s two top Republicans — neither of whom has said publicly that Mr. Trump should resign or be impeached — reflected the politically challenging and fast-moving nature of the crisis that the party faces after the assault by a pro-Trump mob during a session to formalize President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s electoral victory.

As more violent images from the mayhem wrought by the rioters emerged on Tuesday, including of the brutal attack that ultimately killed a Capitol Police officer, and as lawmakers were briefed about threats of more attacks on the Capitol, rank-and-file Republican lawmakers grew angrier about the president’s role in the violence.

Yet as they tried to balance the affection their core voters have for Mr. Trump with the now undeniable political and constitutional threat he posed, Republican congressional leaders who have loyally backed the president for four years were still stepping delicately. Their refusal to demand the president’s resignation and quiet plotting about how to address his conduct highlighted the gnawing uncertainty that they and many other Republicans have about whether they would pay more of a political price for abandoning him or for continuing to enable him after he incited a mob to storm the seat of government.

Making their task more difficult, Mr. Trump has shown no trace of contrition, telling reporters on Tuesday that his remarks to supporters had been “totally appropriate,” and that it was the specter of his impeachment that was “causing tremendous anger.”

Mr. McConnell has indicated that he wants to see the specific article of impeachment that the House is set to approve on Wednesday, and hear the eventual arguments in the Senate. The House is expected to pass the single charge on Wednesday, and a senior administration official said the White House expects about two dozen Republicans to support it. Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the party’s No. 3 in the House, announced on Tuesday that she would be among them.

But the Senate Republican leader has made clear in private discussions that he believes now is the moment to move on from the weakened lame duck, whom he blames for causing Republicans to lose the Senate. Mr. McConnell has not spoken to Mr. Trump since mid-December, when the senator told the president that he would be recognizing Mr. Biden as president-elect after the Electoral College certified Mr. Biden’s victory.

On Monday, Mr. Biden telephoned Mr. McConnell to ask whether it was possible to set up a dual track that would allow the Senate to confirm Mr. Biden’s cabinet nominees and hold a Senate trial at the same time, according to officials briefed on the conversation who disclosed it on condition of anonymity. Far from avoiding the topic of impeaching Mr. Trump, Mr. McConnell said it was a question for the Senate parliamentarian, and promised Mr. Biden a quick answer.

David Popp, a spokesman for Mr. McConnell, declined to comment, pointing a reporter to a speech the senator made from the floor after the attack on the Capitol.

“This failed attempt to obstruct the Congress, this failed insurrection, only underscores how crucial the task before us is for our Republic,” Mr. McConnell said as the Senate reconvened on Wednesday to finish the electoral count disrupted by the siege. “Our nation was founded precisely so that the free choice of the American people is what shapes our self-government and determines the destiny of our nation.”

In the days since the attack, Mr. McCarthy has veered from asking Republican colleagues if he should call on Mr. Trump to resign to privately floating impeachment to his current posture, opposed to impeachment but open to a censure. He even approached Representative Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland, the majority leader, about a censure vote, saying he could deliver a large number of Republican votes for a formal rebuke if Democrats backed off impeachment.

Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming outside the Capitol last month. Ms. Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, said on Tuesday that she would vote to impeach President Trump.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican, announced on Tuesday that she would vote to impeach President Trump, saying there had “never been a greater betrayal by a president of the United States” than Mr. Trump’s incitement of a mob that attacked the Capitol last week.

In a stinging statement that drove a fissure through her party, Ms. Cheney dismissed fellow Republicans arguing that the impeachment was rushed, premature or unwarranted. Her words were unequivocal and likely to give cover to two dozen or so other House Republicans looking to break ranks and join an effort that was also said to have the tacit support of Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader.

“Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough,” said Ms. Cheney, the scion of a storied Republican political family. “The president of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the president.”

She added: “The president could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not.”

[Here is a list of Republicans supporting Trump’s impeachment.]

Ms. Cheney’s announcement came a short time after Representative John Katko of New York became the first House Republican to commit to voting to impeach.

“To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy,” Mr. Katko said in a statement to Syracuse.com. “For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this president.”

Representatives Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, Fred Upton of Michigan and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Illinois, all Republicans, followed them.

If Mr. Trump’s actions “are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?” Mr. Kinzinger said in a statement.

“The president’s offenses, in my reading of the Constitution, were impeachable based on the indisputable evidence we already have,” Ms. Herrera Beutler said in a statement.

House Republican leaders have decided not to formally lobby members of the party against voting to impeach Mr. Trump, making an implicit break with him as they scrambled to gauge support within their ranks for a vote on Wednesday to charge him with inciting violence against the country.

Not a single Republican voted in favor of impeachment during the 2019 proceedings.

This time, Mr. Trump’s encouragement of the mob “cannot be ignored,” said Mr. Katko, a moderate who represents a district in upstate New York that voted for President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.

“By deliberately promoting baseless theories suggesting the election was somehow stolen, the president created a combustible environment of misinformation, disenfranchisement and division,” Mr. Katko said. “When this manifested in violent acts on Jan. 6, he refused to promptly and forcefully call it off, putting countless lives in danger.”

Mr. McConnell of Kentucky has told associates that he believes Mr. Trump committed impeachable offenses and that he approves of the House moving forward with the Constitution’s most severe punishment.

If the impeachment charge were to result in a Senate conviction, the Senate could vote to bar the president from holding public office again. Two Senate Republicans had already called on Mr. Trump to resign, and advisers privately speculated that an additional dozen or so could ultimately favor convicting him at trial.

If all senators were voting, 17 Republicans would have to join Democrats to convict Mr. Trump of high crimes and misdemeanors; if they did so, only a majority would be required to disqualify him from being elected again.

Among the other House Republicans who were said to be considering voting to impeach were stalwart moderates from swing districts, like Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington, as well as newly seated freshmen, like Peter Meijer of Michigan.

Many tech companies have moved to curtail President Trump online since he urged on a violent mob of his supporters at the Capitol last week.
Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

YouTube said on Tuesday that it had suspended President Trump’s channel over concern about “ongoing potential for violence,” in the latest move by one of the large tech companies to limit the president online.

In a tweet on YouTube’s official account, the Google-owned video site said it had suspended Mr. Trump’s account after one of his recent videos violated its policy banning content that spreads misinformation about widespread election fraud. YouTube said Mr. Trump would not be able to upload new content for at least seven days to his channel, which had about 2.8 million subscribers. YouTube also said it was indefinitely disabling comments on the video in question.

It was not immediately clear which video resulted in the suspension of the president’s account.

Many tech companies have moved to curtail Mr. Trump online since he urged on a violent mob of his supporters, who stormed the Capitol last week. In the aftermath, Facebook suspended the president from its core social network as well as on Instagram, at least until the end of his term. Twitter followed suit by permanently barring Mr. Trump’s account on its service, depriving him of his favorite social media platform, where he had 88 million followers. Other sites such as Snapchat, Reddit and Twitch also curtailed Mr. Trump.

“It is their constitutional and patriotic duty to present the case for the president’s impeachment and removal,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi said of the impeachment managers.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday named nine Democrats as managers of the impeachment trial of President Trump on charges of inciting a violent mob of his supporters to storm the Capitol, where rioters ransacked the seat of American government and killed a Capitol Police officer.

The nine managers, all lawyers, have expertise in constitutional law, civil rights and law enforcement. They will serve as the new faces of the impeachment drive after Americans last year grew accustomed to seeing Representatives Adam Schiff, Democrat of California and the chairman of the Intelligence Committee, and Jerrold Nadler, Democrat of New York and the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, as the leaders of Mr. Trump’s first impeachment trial.

The managers come from across the country and represent different ideological wings of the party. Of the nine, seven are people of color, L.G.B.T.Q. or women.

With Democrats controlling the House, Mr. Trump is likely to become the first American president to be impeached twice.

“It is their constitutional and patriotic duty to present the case for the president’s impeachment and removal,” Ms. Pelosi said of the impeachment managers. “They will do so guided by their great love of country, determination to protect our democracy and loyalty to our oath to the Constitution.”

Ms. Pelosi named Representative Jamie Raskin, a constitutional lawyer from Maryland who drafted the impeachment article, as the lead manager of Mr. Trump’s trial. Mr. Raskin, who lost his 25-year-old son to suicide on New Year’s Eve and then survived the mob attack, is a professor of constitutional law at American University’s Washington College of Law.

“I’m honored to be on a team with extremely distinguished lawyers and representatives,” Mr. Raskin said. “We have a tremendous responsibility on our shoulders right now.”

The other impeachment managers are: Representatives Diana DeGette of Colorado, a lawyer with a civil rights background; David Cicilline of Rhode Island, a former public defender; Joaquin Castro of Texas, a lawyer; Eric Swalwell of California, a former prosecutor; Ted Lieu of California, a former Air Force officer and prosecutor; Stacey Plaskett of the Virgin Islands, a former prosecutor; Joe Neguse of Colorado, a lawyer; and Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania, also a lawyer.

Most Democrats are expected to support the impeachment of Mr. Trump after he spent weeks spreading baseless falsehoods about widespread election fraud and then held a large rally where he encouraged a mob to march on the Capitol as he sought to pressure lawmakers to overturn the results of a democratic election. Four Republicans have announced that they, too, will vote to impeach the president.

Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican, said on Tuesday that she would vote to impeach Mr. Trump, adding that there had “never been a greater betrayal by a president of the United States” than Mr. Trump’s incitement of the mob.

“Good for her for honoring her oath of office,” Ms. Pelosi said of Ms. Cheney, before adding that she wished “more Republicans would honor their oaths of office.”

President Trump asserted that it was the impeachment charge, not the violence and ransacking of the Capitol, that was “causing tremendous anger.”
Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

President Trump on Tuesday showed no contrition or regret for instigating the mob that stormed the Capitol and threatened the lives of members of Congress and his vice president, saying that his remarks to a rally beforehand were “totally appropriate” and that the effort by Congress to impeach and convict him was “causing tremendous anger.”

Answering questions from reporters for the first time since the violence at the Capitol on Wednesday, Mr. Trump sidestepped questions about his culpability in the deadly riot that shook the nation’s long tradition of peaceful transfers of power.

“People thought what I said was totally appropriate,” Mr. Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, en route to Alamo, Texas, where he was set to visit the wall along the Mexican border. Instead, Mr. Trump claimed that protests against racial injustice over the summer were “a real problem.”

“If you look at what other people have said, politicians at a high level about the riots during the summer, the horrible riots in Portland and Seattle and various other places, that was a real problem,” he said.

Mr. Trump’s defiance came despite near universal condemnation of his role in stoking the assault on the Capitol, including from within his own administration and some of his closest allies on Capitol Hill.

Earlier, he asserted that it was the impeachment charge, not the violence and ransacking of the Capitol, that was “causing tremendous anger.”

Mr. Trump had been largely silent since Friday, when Twitter permanently suspended his account. When asked directly on Tuesday morning if he would resign with just nine days left in office, Mr. Trump said, “I want no violence.”

He did not address his own role in inciting the mob of his supporters. Instead, Mr. Trump framed himself as a victim, calling impeachment a “continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics.”

“I think it’s causing tremendous anger,” he said.

The aim of the trip to the border with Mexico is to promote the partially built border wall, which the Trump administration views as an accomplishment. He visited a portion of the border wall in nearby Alamo, along the Rio Grande, where he gave a brief speech before heading back to Washington.

“The 25th Amendment is of zero risk to me,” he said. “But it will come back to haunt Joe Biden and the Biden administration. As the expression goes, be careful what you wish for.”

Reading from a script, Mr. Trump briefly addressed the mob attack on the Capitol, noting “we believe in respecting America’s history and traditions, not tearing them down. We believe in the rule of law, not in violence or rioting.”

Across the street from the McAllen airport, pedestrian fences were placed where the president’s motorcade was expected to travel. Vehicles from the McAllen Police Department and the U.S. Border Patrol, as well as unidentified unmarked vehicles, patrolled the area ahead of Mr. Trump’s arrival.

At the Aztek Barber Shop in Alamo, Alejandro Silva, 27, said he held nothing against Mr. Trump and did not have an opinion about the border wall.

“But he shouldn’t be visiting now,” said Mr. Silva, a mechanic. “He should leave office and leave everyone alone.”

The president’s supporters were planning two parades on Tuesday in Harlingen and McAllen, but a coalition of anti-border wall activists, led by La Unión del Pueblo Entero, circulated a petition to urge politicians to cancel Mr. Trump’s trip to Alamo.

“We cannot allow Trump to bring his racist mob to the Rio Grande Valley,” said John-Michael Torres, a spokesman for the organizers.

In response to fears, Mayor Jim Darling of McAllen said in a statement: “I understand that emotions are high on both sides, for or against the President and I hope that if there are demonstrations for or against, that they are peaceful with respect to our law enforcement personnel.”

National Guard troops protecting the Capitol from a mob of Trump supporters on Wednesday.
Credit…Kenny Holston for The New York Times

The Joint Chiefs of Staff issued an unusual message to the entire American armed forces on Tuesday reminding them that their job is to support and defend the Constitution, and to reject extremism.

“As we have done throughout our history, the U.S. military will obey lawful orders from civilian leadership, support civil authorities to protect lives and property, ensure public safety in accordance with the law, and remain fully committed to protecting and defending the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic,” said the one-page internal memo signed by the eight military chiefs.

That the chiefs found it necessary to remind their rank-and-file members of the oath to the United States was extraordinary. But the memo came as federal law enforcement authorities were pursuing more than 150 suspects, including current or former service members, involved in the mob that assaulted the Capitol last week.

“As service members, we must embody the values and ideals of the nation,” the memo continued. “We support and defend the Constitution. Any act to disrupt the constitutional process is not only against our traditions, values and oath; it is against the law.”

Defense Department officials have expressed concern that some of the rioters who stormed the Capitol are former military members. While the department has not announced a specific search for deployed National Guard troops with sympathies for the pro-Trump mob, officials said they were reviewing photographs and videos from Capitol Hill.

“We do not tolerate extremists in our ranks,” Jonathan Hoffman, a Pentagon spokesman, told reporters on Monday. Capt. Emily Rainey, an Army officer who told The Associated Press that she had transported more than 100 people to Washington for the Trump rally, is being investigated by the Army for any connection to the riots, according to a military official. Ms. Rainey had resigned from her post in October but was not set to leave until this spring.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is leaving the department with many of its diplomats and staff members expressing outrage at his behavior.
Credit…Pool photo by Andrew Harnik

The State Department is canceling all planned travel by department officials this week, including what would have been Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s last foreign trip to Europe, as part of a departmentwide effort to ensure a smooth transition to the incoming Biden administration, Morgan Ortagus, a department spokeswoman, said in a statement on Tuesday.

The cancellation order would also include a three-day trip to Taiwan planned by Kelly Craft, the ambassador to the United Nations. It would have been the first official visit by an American official after the State Department relaxed restrictions on such meetings — and it would almost certainly have angered the Chinese government, which views Taiwan as its sovereign territory.

Beijing has so far responded with characteristic bluster. The Xinhua state news agency ran an editorial this week calling Mr. Pompeo “the worst secretary of state in history,” while The Global Times, a state-backed tabloid, said he was pushing the Taiwan issue “deeper down the road of no return.”

The abrupt order comes as United States allies are making clear that they believe that Mr. Pompeo and President Trump presided over the most far-reaching damage in decades to America’s traditional role as an exemplar of democracy.

Mr. Pompeo’s itinerary for the Europe trip had already been shortened, with an initial cancellation of a planned stop in Luxembourg after its foreign minister, Jean Asselborn, called Mr. Trump a “criminal” and a “political pyromaniac” in an interview for feeding the riot at the Capitol.

Mr. Pompeo has not acknowledged Mr. Trump’s role in inciting the rioters who laid siege to the Capitol last week. And just weeks before, Mr. Pompeo had suggested that Mr. Trump won an election that he lost.

Elizabeth Neumann, who served as a deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security, will help lead the Republican Accountability Project.
Credit…Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press

[Read more on Trump and Pence’s blowup.]

A group of former administration officials and anti-Trump Republicans said they would make a $50 million commitment to support the re-election of Republican lawmakers who join Democrats in supporting impeachment of the president.

The financial commitment by the group, the Republican Accountability Project, is designed to incentivize Republicans who have appeared open to voting in favor of the new article of impeachment that is expected to be considered by the House on Wednesday.

“Donald Trump has made it clear he is going to try and politically punish anyone who stands against him,” said Sarah Longwell, a prominent Never Trump Republican who is behind the new group. “His ability to to do that is diminishing by the minute, but we want to provide a counterweight to say there is real money to back people who do the right thing.”

No House Republicans supported the president’s first impeachment in 2019. But as many as a dozen Republicans were said to be considering joining Democrats this time around, including Representative Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 House Republican.

If Ms. Cheney “continues to push for accountability,” Ms. Longwell, said, “she’s exactly the kind of person we would want to defend.”

The Republican Accountability Project will be headed up by two former Trump administration officials: Olivia Troye, a former aide to Vice President Mike Pence, who served on the coronavirus task force, and Elizabeth Neumann, who served as a deputy chief of staff at the Department of Homeland Security. During the election, both Ms. Troye and Ms. Neumann became outspoken critics of the administration. The group will operate under the umbrella organization of Defending Democracy Together, an advocacy group aimed at fighting Trumpism within the Republican Party.

Ms. Longwell said the group would even consider backing Mr. Pence in his future political endeavors if he “endorses the idea that the president should resign, be subject to the 25th Amendment, or support impeachment.”

The new group also planned to release a letter signed by over 100 Republicans and former national security officials calling for Mr. Trump’s removal from office. The list included Michael Hayden, a retired Air Force general who directed both the C.I.A. and the National Security Agency under President George W. Bush; and two former acting attorneys general: Peter D. Keisler and Stuart M. Gerson.

Rep. Jamie Raskin listening to Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s speech in the House chamber on the opening day of the 117th Congress, Jan. 3.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

A day after Representative Jamie Raskin, Democrat of Maryland, buried his 25-year-old son, he survived the mob attack on the Capitol. He is now leading the impeachment effort against President Trump for inciting the siege.

Mr. Raskin’s son, Tommy Raskin, a 25-year-old Harvard University law student, social justice activist, animal lover and poet, died by suicide on New Year’s Eve. He left his parents an apology, with instructions: “Please look after each other, the animals, and the global poor for me.”

As he found himself hiding with House colleagues from a violent mob, Mr. Raskin feared for the safety of a surviving daughter who had accompanied him to the Capitol to witness the counting of electoral votes to seal Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory.

Within hours, Mr. Raskin was at work drafting an article of impeachment with the mob braying in his ear and his son’s final plea on his mind. (It was introduced in the House on Monday.)

“I’ll spend the rest of my life trying to live up to those instructions,” the Maryland Democrat said in an interview on Monday, reading aloud the farewell note as he reflected on his family’s grief and the confluence of events. “But what we are doing this week is looking after our beloved republic.”

The slightly rumpled former constitutional law professor has been preparing his entire life for this moment. That it should come just as he is suffering the most unimaginable loss a parent can bear has touched his colleagues on both sides of the aisle.

“I’ve been in awe of the personal strength and character he has shown through all of this, and we’re all supportive of him as a person and his family,” said Representative Tom Cole of Oklahoma, the top Republican on the House Rules Committee, who voted with 146 other Republicans to block certification of Mr. Biden’s victory.

Alejandro Mayorkas, President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s nominee for secretary of homeland security, spoke in Wilmington, Del., in November.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s transition team hopes to persuade Senate Republicans to help him quickly confirm his top national security nominees with the goal of having them confirmed on Inauguration Day, next Wednesday.

Mr. Biden is particularly eager to see the confirmation of his nominee to run the Department of Homeland Security, Alejandro Mayorkas, given the department’s important role in monitoring and defending against extremist threats, including right-wing groups threatening violence against political leaders.

The transition team’s plan to lobby Republicans both publicly and privately was first reported on Tuesday, and confirmed by a transition official.

Republicans currently control the Senate, its committees and floor schedules. Democrats will take control of the chamber on Jan. 20 once Mr. Biden is sworn in, thanks to their two newly-elected senators from the Georgia runoffs and the tiebreaking vote ensured in a 50-50 Senate by incoming Vice President Kamala Harris.

Mr. Biden and his aides also hope to win quick confirmation for his nominee to lead the Department of Defense, Lloyd J. Austin III — an effort that will also require winning over Democrats who are reluctant to grant Mr. Austin a waiver that is required for recently-retired members of the military from leading the Pentagon. (Mr. Austin is a former four-star Army general who retired in 2016.) While it is the Senate that confirms cabinet nominees, both the House and Senate must approve the waiver for Mr. Austin.

Some national security analysts are concerned that foreign adversaries might take advantage of the unusually chaotic presidential transition — and the depleted leadership of national security departments in the waning days of Mr. Trump’s term — either to challenge the United States or take actions with relative impunity.

Mr. Biden’s other top national security nominees are Avril D. Haines to be director of National Intelligence, Antony J. Blinken to be secretary of state, and William Burns to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Lloyd J. Austin III retired within the past seven years, creating the requirement of a Congressional waiver for him to serve as secretary of defense. 
Credit…Hilary Swift for The New York Times

Democratic and Republican members of the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday expressed skepticism that Lloyd J. Austin III, a retired four-star Army general who is President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s pick for secretary of defense, should be given a Congressional waiver needed to serve in that role.

The waiver, the subject of a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing Tuesday, is required for any Pentagon chief who has been retired from active-duty military service for fewer than seven years. Mr. Austin, who would be the nation’s first Black defense secretary, retired in 2016.

Congress approved a similar measure four years ago for President Trump’s first defense secretary, Jim Mattis, a retired four-star Marine officer. But many Republicans seem reluctant to grant that to Mr. Biden’s pick, and Democrats, long skeptical of the practice, did not seem uniformly moved by the case to do it again either, in spite of the historic nature of Mr. Austin’s nomination.

“This is a very deep and difficult issue,” said Senator Angus King, independent of Maine. “General Austin is well qualified,” Mr. King said, “but on the other hand the whole idea of civilian control of the military is a fundamental part of who were are.”

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Democrat of New York, suggested that two presidents in a row have created “a new rationale” for such a waiver, creating a bad precedent. Senators Tammy Duckworth, Democrat of Illinois and a Iraq war veteran, and Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, said they would reject the waiver with Ms. Warren saying, “I believe in this principle.”

While the outgoing chairman of the committee, Senator James M. Inhofe, Republican of Oklahoma, has made it clear that he will support the waiver and doesn’t really believe in the requirement, other Republicans seemed unconvinced.

Mr. Biden had not provided “logic or full explanation as to why he has asked us to once again step away from what was established law,” said Senator Mike Rounds, Republican of South Dakota, who has previously approved such a waiver for President Trump’s nominee. “I am torn on this.”

Several other senators from both parties made similar comments, though Ms. Warren and others have said that a vote against a waiver did not mean they would vote against Mr. Austin’s confirmation.

Transition officials for the incoming Biden administration have expressed repeated confidence in his confirmation and waiver approval, and have urged members to speed up confirmation proceedings for their national security nominees generally.

Mr. Austin did not attend the hearing, and the vote on the waiver issue — required in both the House and the Senate — will likely not happen until after his Senate confirmation hearings begin next week.

Six thousand troops from six states have already arrived in Washington, according to the chief of the National Guard Bureau, Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson.
Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times

With the resignation of Chad F. Wolf, the acting secretary for the Homeland Security Department, on Monday, the task of coordinating the security of the upcoming inauguration, will now fall to Peter T. Gaynor, the administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, who will replace Mr. Wolf for the remaining days in the Trump administration.

The Secret Service, which falls under the Homeland Security Department, is leading the security operations for the event on Jan. 20, and officials are bracing for heightened threats of violence.

Before his resignation, Mr. Wolf announced that enhanced security measures would begin on Jan. 13 instead of Jan. 19 as initially planned.

Mr. Wolf said he did so “in light of events of the past week and the evolving security landscape leading up to the inauguration.”

On Saturday, the mayor of Washington, Muriel E. Bowser, sent a firmly worded letter to the Department of Homeland Security, asking officials to move up security operations and requesting a disaster declaration, which would free federal funding for the inauguration. President Trump granted the request on Monday night.

Ms. Bowser’s call to action came as law enforcement officers in several states made arrests related to the assault on the Capitol.

Security experts have warned that some far-right extremist groups have now started to focus attention on Inauguration Day and are already discussing an assault similar to the one on the Capitol last week. Sixteen groups — some of them armed and most of them hard-line supporters of Mr. Trump — have already registered to stage protests in Washington.

The National Guard plans to deploy up to 15,000 troops to the nation’s capital for the inauguration.

Six thousand troops from six states have already arrived, according to the chief of the National Guard Bureau, Gen. Daniel R. Hokanson. Defense officials have not made a decision on whether the troops will be armed, but they indicated that even if they were initially unarmed, the troops would not be far away from their weaponry.

Exterior view of the White House.
Credit…Doug Mills/The New York Times

With just days remaining in his term, House Democrats have introduced an article of impeachment in Congress charging President Trump for a second time with committing “high crimes and misdemeanors,” this time for his role in inciting a mob that stormed the Capitol last week.

Impeaching a president with less than two weeks left in his term presents an extraordinary challenge. But if Mr. Trump is impeached in the House and subsequently convicted by a two-thirds vote in the Senate and removed from office, the Senate could then vote to bar him from ever holding office again.

The Constitution says that the Senate, after voting to convict an impeached president, can consider “disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States.” This would be determined by a second vote, requiring only a simple majority of senators to successfully disqualify him from holding office in the future. Such a vote could be appealing not just to Democrats but also possibly to many Republicans who have set their sights on the presidency.

Mr. Trump, who is said to be contemplating another run for president in 2024, has just eight days remaining in office, presenting an impeachment timeline for congressional Democrats that is tight, but not impossible. As soon as the House votes to adopt an article of impeachment, it can immediately transmit it to the Senate, which must promptly begin a trial.

Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, has said that an impeachment trial could not be convened before Mr. Trump leaves office, but Constitutional scholars say that a Senate trial and a vote for disqualification could happen after Jan. 20.

Representative James E. Clyburn of South Carolina, the third-ranking Democrat in the House, suggested that the Senate trial be delayed several months into President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s presidency. And Mr. Biden said he had spoken to House and Senate Democrats about whether it would be possible to “bifurcate” Congressional business, splitting days between impeachment and confirming his nominees and passing his agenda.

But because of the stakes and the lack of a precedent for disqualifying a president from future office, the matter would probably go before the Supreme Court.

“We have to make sure the message is clear that you cannot be a sitting Congress member and incite an insurrection,” Representative Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, said.
Credit…Whitney Curtis for The New York Times

Progressive House Democrats on Monday introduced legislation that would allow a committee to investigate and potentially expel Republican lawmakers who had participated in efforts to subvert the results of the November election.

The legislation would direct the House ethics committee to “investigate, and issue a report on” lawmakers who had sought to overturn the election, and to determine if they “should face sanction, including removal from the House of Representatives.”

House lawmakers can be expelled from their seats under Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, which disqualifies elected officials who “have engaged in insurrection or rebellion” against the United States.

Representative Cori Bush, Democrat of Missouri, began drafting the bill as she and other House lawmakers sheltered in place during the storming of the Capitol last week. The resolution, which has 47 co-sponsors, names Representative Mo Brooks of Alabama and Senators Ted Cruz of Texas and Josh Hawley of Missouri as leaders of the effort by 147 Republicans to overturn the results of the election.

Ms. Bush said in an interview that she did not know ultimately how many members of Congress should be expelled, but expected to learn the number from an investigation of the Ethics Committee.

“Even if it’s just a few, we have to make sure the message is clear that you cannot be a sitting Congress member and incite an insurrection and work to overturn an election,” she said.

The disqualification clause of the 14th Amendment was originally enacted to limit the influence of former Confederates in the Reconstruction era.

Representative Jamaal Bowman, Democrat of New York called out one of his Republican colleagues, Representative Lauren Boebert of Colorado, in a post on Twitter on Sunday supporting the legislation.

“We didn’t come to the United States Congress to tolerate calls for insurrection from our colleagues,” Mr. Bowman wrote. “We need to pass @CoriBush’s resolution calling for their expulsion, and we need to do it immediately.”

James Ivialiotis received his second dose of a Covid-19 vaccine at a nursing home on Staten Island, N.Y., on Monday.
Credit…Christopher Occhicone for The New York Times

The Trump administration will recommend providing a wider distribution of a coronavirus vaccine, just days after aides to President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. said his administration would make a similar adjustment by using more of the already procured vaccines for initial doses.

Mr. Biden’s team has said it would aim to distribute the doses more quickly at federally run vaccination sites at high school gyms, sports stadiums and mobile units to reach high-risk populations.

The Trump administration plans to release the shots that had been held back and aims to make the vaccine available to everyone over 65 in an attempt to accelerate lagging distribution.

The doses had been held back to ensure that those who receive a first dose had the second and final inoculation available when it was needed. The change means all existing doses will be sent to states to provide initial inoculations. Second doses are to be provided by new waves of manufacturing.

The idea of using existing vaccine supplies for first doses has raised objections from some doctors and researchers, who say studies of the vaccines’ effectiveness proved only that they worked to prevent illness when using two doses.

The agency is expected to announce the new guidelines at a briefing at noon Eastern on Tuesday, according to an official briefed on the plans who was not authorized to speak publicly about the change. Axios earlier reported the new guidelines.

More than 375,000 people have died from Covid-19 in the United States since the start of the pandemic. In recent days, the number of daily deaths in the country has topped 4,000.



Thank you for spending your time with us on My Local Pages. We hope you enjoyed checking out this news release about USA and International news published as “House Vote Tracker: Live Updates of Impeachment, Trump and The 25th Amendment”. This news update is presented by My Local Pages as part of our USA news services.

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