John Travolta is selling his huge 30-room oceanfront mansion for $6.3 million


John Travolta at the Palais Theatre in 2019. Picture by Wayne Taylor


Actor John Travolta has decided to put his huge oceanfront mansion in New England on the market, complete with a $6.3 million (US$5 million) price tag.

The movie star had owned the longtime retreat with his wife, the actor Kelly Preston, who died last year at the age of 57 of breast cancer.

The couple purchased the 30-room estate, on the north end of Islesboro Island, in the early 1990s, according Architectural Digest.

RELATED: Robbie Williams buys dream villa in Switzerland for $42.9m

Inside Kim & Kanye’s ‘empty’ $76m mansion

Rare insight into Kamala Harris’ elite world

John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

John Travolta’s massive Maine mansion. Picture: Realtor


John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

Quite a long driveway. Picture: Realtor


They had heard about the area from Travolta’s actor friend Kirstie Alley, who also had a vacation home there at the time. Travolta and Preston also owned real estate in Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Florida, according to AD.

Built in 1903, the home is filled with a mix of antiques, plush custom seating, and dining areas, all in vibrant colours.

“‘They couldn’t quite put their finger on what they wanted, but when I showed up with lots of colour, they went nuts,’” Boshears told AD in 1999 of his celebrity clients.

John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

The living room has a large open fireplace. Picture: Realtor


John Travolta and Kelly Preston attend the “Gotti” New York premiere at SVA Theatre on June 14, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Jim Spellman)


The massive property is reached by a winding, tree-covered drive and includes a 1,006 sqm main house on four lots, with 48 acres of oceanfront property.

It also has a deepwater dock on Sabbathday Harbour.

Travolta and Preston purchased the property for the purpose of hosting their large extended families for holidays. It’s set up for large gatherings, and includes 20 bedrooms and seven bathrooms.

John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

The dining room. Picture: Realtor


John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

The sun room. Picture: Realtor


The living room has a large open fireplace, along with a custom-built bar area, a dining room with a fireplace, and a large, well-equipped kitchen with a walk-in fridge and pantry.

MORE: Inside Britney Spears’ $9.7m mansion she’s fighting conservatorship from

Australia’s new ‘Skyhomes’ could shatter records

Upstairs, the spacious main bedroom includes a private porch, a full bathroom with a claw foot tub, and a separate shower. The floor also houses 14 bedrooms and four bathrooms.

On the third floor is a children’s paradise, with a series of themed bedrooms, a full bathroom, play equipment, schoolhouse, library, and a built-in stage.

John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

The colourful kitchen. Picture: Realtor


John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

The large main bedroom. Picture: Realtor


The property also boasts two more large porches to enjoy the sun, and a sunny back deck overlooking the swimming pool. It also includes a detached barn for car storage.

The land, partially in conservation with the Islesboro Island Trust, includes open fields with ocean views, walking paths through the woods down to the shoreline, a beach, open ocean access, and garden areas.

Travolta is best known for his iconic roles in “Grease” and “Saturday Night Fever,” as well as “Look Who’s Talking,” “Pulp Fiction,” and “Get Shorty.”

The Academy Presents

Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta attend the “Grease” 40th anniversary screening at Samuel Goldwyn Theatre on August 15, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)


John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

One of the homes seven bathrooms. Picture: Realtor


Preston had roles in “Jerry Maguire,” “The Experts,” and “Gotti.”

Travolta announced the death of his wife on Instagram, writing, “Kelly’s love and life will always be remembered. I will be taking some time to be there for my children who have lost their mother, so forgive me in advance if you don’t hear from us for a while.”

Travolta recently was seen with his daughter Ella, for an appearance in a sweet and very buzzy Super Bowl ad showing off some “Grease” dance moves.

John Travolta Selling Massive Waterfront Mansion in Maine for $5M. Picture: Realtor

You’ll have your own private deepwater dock. Picture: Realtor




We hope you enjoyed checking out this news release on local and Australian news called “John Travolta is selling his huge 30-room oceanfront mansion for $6.3 million”. This news release is presented by MyLocalPages as part of our local and national news services.

#John #Travolta #selling #huge #30room #oceanfront #mansion #million



Source link

‘March Mammal Madness’ Brings Simulated Animal Fights to Huge Audiences



Ever idly wondered if a capybara could somehow take down an elephant in a beachfront brawl? That’s the kind of thinking behind March Mammal Madness (MMM), an annual social media event based on the March Madness NCAA Men’s College Basketball Tournament. Like its namesake, this educational project encourages viewers to fill out brackets predicting which teams would triumph in a hypothetical head-to-head showdown—with the “teams” in this version being specific mammals. The virtual fights, each set in a randomly chosen arena, unfold as Twitter threads posted by participating scientists—with each move backed up by very real research, planning and pedagogy. As an approach to science education, the project is paying off: A new paper put together by the nearly 40 co-organizers suggests that hundreds of thousands of students, in addition to younger and older participants, have participated in MMM since its creation.

March Mammal Madness combines biological facts with a running narrative of fictional action that encourages those following along at home to hit “reload” as the Twitter thread updates. “All of that drama, those emotions—this is what makes MMM a shared experience that facilitates long-term retention of information,” says the paper’s lead author Katie Hinde, the event’s creator and an associate professor at Arizona State University’s Center for Evolution and Medicine. “For example, in 2019 moose was battling tiger in the Elite Trait [the round featuring the final eight competitors], and we waited until that battle to remind everyone that moose drop their antlers in the fall. Moose fans were shook,” she explains, as they realized that their chosen fighter would lose one of its key advantages against its feline foe. Then her team reminded them of the fact that a moose would never have used antlers against a tiger in the first place, because it employs its headgear in competition against other males, not as a defense against predators. “This is part of the roller-coaster ride of a battle narration,” Hinde says. Other past confrontations have involved pygmy hippo versus coyote, manatee against tapir, and one epic bout between short-faced bear and honey badger.

The project’s efforts at engaging narratives are based on educational theory. “Humans are psychologically and cognitively adapted for fireside storytelling, shared experiences, artistic imagery and jokey-joke-joke-jokes,” Hinde says. She believes that adding drama to science communication helps lessons stick. “Too many scientists ignore the evidence and continue to talk facts and probabilities in a vacuum,” she says. “Folks remember the science that ended their pick’s hunt for the MMM championship. There are people who can now tell you that platypus venom is seasonal, who would never pick up Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B to read ‘Grant & Temple–Smith 1998.’”

Though MMM players might not read the scientific literature, the co-organizers do—and they take in a lot of it, citing over 1,000 scholarly works that justify the behavior and biology on display in their virtual fights. “It’s evident that the folks writing the battles put their heart and soul into this project,” says Sarah McAnulty, the executive director of a virtual science education nonprofit called Skype a Scientist, who is not involved with MMM but follows the event. “I’ve learned about all kinds of animals and adaptations, and the process of researching the animals to pick who you think will win is a great and fun way for kids to dig into the science. It’s a super engaging way to learn animal facts.”

Many teachers agree, and have encouraged their students to join in. The new paper estimates that about 1 percent of all high school students in the U.S. participate—a relatively large audience for a science communication initiative. “Even though it’s simulated, I love that it takes all of these biology concepts we’re learning and makes them real and cohesive and applicable,” says Linda Correll, the science supervisor for Fauquier County, Va., public schools. “All of a sudden understanding biomes, symbiotic relationships, and adaptations gives you an edge in trying to answer the question of who is going to win.” In addition to creating the contest, the MMM team provides free educational resources to help students with their research. “The narratives are exciting and educational, and I love when my students get upset that [an] unstoppable apex predator loses to something they find helpless or weak,” Correll says. “These are great teachable moments.”

March Mammal Madness has formal partnerships with science teachers around the country—and also reaches adults who have outgrown traditional science classes. “To see so much engagement with the content we create is really exciting,” says Eduardo Amorim of the University of Lausanne, a co-organizer and co-author. “Families play together at home. Adults, teenagers and kids, scientists and nonscientists—I never imagined this would be something that reached so many people.”

Hinde is thrilled by how much March Mammal Madness has grown since she started it on her own in 2013. (Although the event is not directly affiliated with Arizona State University, and the current co-organizers come from a variety of institutions, ASU’s digital library still hosts MMM’s educational resources.) “I love this community brought together by our shared delight in the natural world,” she says. “Also, I love the trash talk. But really, the community, even in pandemic times, has been a refuge from despair.”

[Editor’s Note: The writer works part-time at a remote ASU-administered research center that has no relationship with the MMM program.]

The March Mammal Madness bracket will be released on February 26. Anyone wishing to participate can predict a winner for each listed match, then wait for the action to unfold on Twitter at preannounced times.



Thank you for dropping in and reading this news article about Science & Tech and related news updates titled “‘March Mammal Madness’ Brings Simulated Animal Fights to Huge Audiences”. This story was posted by My Local Pages as part of our news aggregator services.

#March #Mammal #Madness #Brings #Simulated #Animal #Fights #Huge #Audiences



Source link

Brisbane Lions thump West Coast Eagles to move to the top of the AFLW ladder, thanks to a huge percentage


The Lions led by one point at half-time, despite the Eagles dominating inside 50s and incredibly winning the game’s first 13 clearances.

But they made the visitors pay for their missed opportunities in front of goal, putting the foot down with a five-goal third term to prevail 10.5 (65) to 2.8 (20) at Hickey Park in Monday’s rescheduled fixture.

It kept the Eagles winless in their second AFLW season and set up a tasty clash with unbeaten Melbourne next Sunday after the Lions’ comprehensive defeats of Richmond and Gold Coast to begin their campaign kept their percentage above 500.

Lauren Arnell collected a game-high 18 disposals and a clever grubbered goal in a stand-out performance.

The competition’s leading goal kicker, Dakota Davidson, managed two majors, including a set shot from the tightest of angles in the pocket to ignite the Lions’ second half.

That goal followed some stern half-time words from the Lions’ coaching staff and sparked them into action as their midfield turned the tables and Alexandra Anderson, Jesse Wardlaw, Taylor Smith and Arnell all kicked third-term majors.

Thank you for dropping by My Local Pages and checking this article regarding “What’s On in the City of Brisbane” named “Brisbane Lions thump West Coast Eagles to move to the top of the AFLW ladder, thanks to a huge percentage”. This post was presented by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local and national events & what’s on news services.

#Brisbane #Lions #thump #West #Coast #Eagles #move #top #AFLW #ladder #huge #percentage



Source link

Brisbane Lions thump West Coast Eagles to move to the top of the AFLW ladder, thanks to a huge percentage



Brisbane have absorbed an early West Coast surge to thump the Eagles by 45 points and stay unbeaten in the AFLW.

The Lions led by one point at half-time, despite the Eagles dominating inside 50s and incredibly winning the game’s first 13 clearances.

But they made the visitors pay for their missed opportunities in front of goal, putting the foot down with a five-goal third term to prevail 10.5 (65) to 2.8 (20) at Hickey Park in Monday’s rescheduled fixture.

Loading

It kept the Eagles winless in their second AFLW season and set up a tasty clash with unbeaten Melbourne next Sunday after the Lions’ comprehensive defeats of Richmond and Gold Coast to begin their campaign kept their percentage above 500.

Lauren Arnell collected a game-high 18 disposals and a clever grubbered goal in a stand-out performance.

The competition’s leading goal kicker, Dakota Davidson, managed two majors, including a set shot from the tightest of angles in the pocket to ignite the Lions’ second half.

Loading

That goal followed some stern half-time words from the Lions’ coaching staff and sparked them into action as their midfield turned the tables and Alexandra Anderson, Jesse Wardlaw, Taylor Smith and Arnell all kicked third-term majors.

“You have to expect good teams to come at you and we were a little bit flat early,” Lions coach Craig Starcevich said.

“[We needed] to embrace the fact that we were in a contest. Last week [against Gold Coast] we were comfortable all the way through but it was a different kettle of fish.

“We were right in a contest and it was valuable for later on in the year to get some composure and try to find a solution to this.”

Loading

Their ability to bring the ball to ground and convert whenever entering their forward 50 was a clear difference, with the Eagles unable to transfer their early field position dominance into genuine scoring chances.

“I’ve been really proud of their effort for periods of the game … but against good teams you need to play for four quarters,” Eagles coach Daniel Pratt said.

“Brisbane are at the top of the table for a reason and they made us pay … it could have been a completely different game [if West Coast kicked straight in the first term].”

Aisling McCarthy had 17 touches and a goal for the Eagles while Andrea Gilmore kicked her first AFLW goal before a head knock ended her night prematurely.

The Eagles immediately flew home to Perth on Monday night. They will head east again to face the Giants in Sydney on Sunday.

AAP

Thank you for checking out this story regarding current Australian Sports news named “Brisbane Lions thump West Coast Eagles to move to the top of the AFLW ladder, thanks to a huge percentage”. This article was presented by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local and national news services.

#Brisbane #Lions #thump #West #Coast #Eagles #move #top #AFLW #ladder #huge #percentage



Source link

Huge fines won’t deter NRL players from behaving badly, union boss says


But Newton believes increasing fines will do little to stop players behaving badly off the field, and could instead financially destroy players on more modest salaries.

“We’ve got huge portions of our players are on $150,000 or less,” Newton said. “It’s certainly not as simple as just increasing sanctions to get a better outcome or generate behavioural change.

“We have one of the toughest sanction regimes in Australian sport and these sanctions need to be fair and proportionate to the behaviour.”

As well as increasing fines, the NRL said they would also be working with the RLPA to reviewing how education is delivered to players.

Last year, the NRL moved their two-day face-to-face rookie education camp to a four-hour session online, in an effort to put the responsibility back onto clubs.

Newton said the NRL needed to look at encouraging more players to engage in either work or study while in first-grade.

Payne Haas was fined $50,000 by the NRL this week.Credit:NRL Photos

In 2019, 481 players were engaged in work or study. Just 2.5 per cent were referred to the NRL’s integrity unit for indiscretions.

Meanwhile, 28 per cent of the 78 players not engaged had been referred to the integrity unit at some point during the year.

“I’m yet to see any evidence at the moment that would support that just having mandated bigger fines creates behavioural change,” he said.

Loading

“The changes that we make, we can’t be just throwing a dart in the night and hoping it lands on triple 20 or the bullseye.”

In 2019, the NRL mandated that all young NRL players would be ineligible for first-grade selection if they did not partake in at least one day of work or study a week.

But due to COVID-19, the rule was not strictly enforced last year with the game fearing players would have been unable to find employment or study during the pandemic.

The RLPA boss said “industry experts” needed to be invited to discussions around the sanctions review to find the best way forward.

“We have our views and the NRL have theirs, but it’s critical that the right people are in the room for these discussions,” Newton said.

Sport newsletter

Sports news, results and expert commentary delivered straight to your inbox each weekday. Sign up here.

Most Viewed in Sport

Loading

We hope you enjoyed reading this news update about League called “Huge fines won’t deter NRL players from behaving badly, union boss says”. This news article was shared by My Local Pages as part of our Australian news services.

#Huge #fines #wont #deter #NRL #players #behaving #badly #union #boss



Source link

Why 2001 Was a Huge Year for Black Women in Music – E! Online


In 2001, a grand total of 15 songs spent time at the top of the Billboard Hot 100.

For the unfamiliar, the music publication’s weekly chart compiles data collected by Nielsen SoundScan relating to the sales performance and radio play, ranking the 100 most successful. The list is industry standard. Reaching the top of it is a big freaking deal. And 20 years ago, only 15 songs did it. 

Of those 15 songs, six of them—or 40 percent—belonged to Black women.

To put that into some context, Black women were only responsible for 22 percent of the No. 1 hits in 2020. In 2019, just 12 percent. 

Quite simply, 2001 was a major year for Black women in music. 

While their contributions continue to be felt year in and year out, regardless of their performance on the charts, a look at the totality of their impact two decades ago is enough to have the least sentimental among us longing for a trip back in time. After all, this was the year that gave us landmark albums from Destiny’s Child, Janet Jackson and Missy Elliott, introduced us to Alicia Keys, forced us to say goodbye to Aaliyah and saw Whitney Houston earn exactly what her estimable talent was worth.



Source link

‘Huge shoes to fill’: Top Cat to step aside at end of 2021



One of the game’s longest-serving and most respected administrators, Brian Cook will step aside at the end of 2021 after a marathon stint at Geelong.

Thank you for dropping in to My Local Pages and seeing this story regarding sports news called “‘Huge shoes to fill’: Top Cat to step aside at end of 2021”. This story was presented by My Local Pages Australia as part of our local news services.

#Huge #shoes #fill #Top #Cat #step



Source link

4 Ways to Be Healthy and Huge in 2021


“There was a point in my life where I thought, ‘I don’t care if I die young. I just want to be in the biggest pine box possible,'” recalls Kaleb Redden. Back in those days, he was a football player and diehard lifter with plenty of gains—and plenty of injuries—to show for his efforts. He was huge, yes, but healthy? Definitely not.

Fifteen or so years down the line, everything has changed—except his passion for lifting. Redden is a father, husband, orthopedic doctor, and the team doctor for Kaged Muscle supplements and their sponsored athletes. In other words, he has a lot of reasons to function at a very high level long after his grueling workouts end.

As detailed in “Lessons from a Jacked Medical Doctor,” Redden is as big and strong as he’s ever been, and absolutely throws down in the weight room. And now he does it without the downsides that plagued him as a younger lifter. But it didn’t happen by accident.

Here’s how the man who goes by “Doc Thor” changed his ways for the better—and recommends you do the same.

1. Chase Intensity More Than Numbers

Max-effort strength is the eternal siren’s call of the weight room. Big stacks of plates are asking if you could possibly lift them, and if you’re willing to give up what is necessary to do so. Redden knows this all too well.

“I had this idea for a long time that ‘I’m going to be the strongest dad on the block and my kids are going to think that’s so cool,'” he recalls. “But I realized numbers don’t matter to them. My kids don’t give a shit how much I can deadlift. They care about whether I can play soccer with them and ride my bike to school with them—things like that.”

With time, he says, he’s had to be more targeted in his training, but also more open-minded in what he’s training for. Hitting a solid low-rep PR or a heavy single is important on occasion, but prioritize it too highly, and it will almost always take more than it gives.

“I still push myself to extremes, but it’s with intensity; it’s not just about hitting numbers,” he says. “And it’s a lot more calculated than it was maybe 15 or 20 years ago.”

You can see what this intensity looks like in Redden’s video workout with Kris Gethin, the appropriately named “Get Wide or Die Trying.” Today, one gym, one scoop of Pre-Kaged, and one training partner are the only numbers Redden needs.

Lesson for you: Don’t let a single number or achievement define you for better or worse. How you dedicate the majority of your training is what really shows where your priorities lie.

2. Train, and Rest, Without Exception

Even when he found his calling in medicine, Redden knew he was a lifter at heart. That meant that even during medical school, missing workouts wasn’t an option. He knew he had to find a way.

“Class would go from 8 a.m. to noon,” he recalls. “They’d let you out for an hour. I would leave 15 minutes early from the last class and then I would come 15 minutes late to the next class. So I would jog to the gym, work out, listen to lectures during my workouts—which I hated.”

However, there was an exception: “I never really worked out on Sunday, just because I wanted to spend time with my family instead of going to the gym.”

No, it wasn’t always easy, and yes, some sleep was lost along the way. But the deeper Redden got into his medical training, the more he saw that important, lasting changes in the body only happened in response to consistent, repeated stimulus. What he was learning in med school only reinforced that conclusion.

However, that couldn’t come at the expense of his job, life, or family. Finding the balance took plenty of practice, but embracing that practice is the work of a lifetime.

The lesson for you: Your body needs constant encouragement if you want lasting change. But your private life is what makes the privilege of training possible. Give both what they need to get the results you want, and then repeat the process more times than you can count.

3. Love Lifting, Not Just What Lifting Gives You

Redden hears it all the time: “You should compete!” And he says the prospect of doing a bodybuilding or powerlifting competition crosses his mind every May or June, like clockwork.

So, what keeps him from doing it? He remembers what keeps bringing him back to the gym in the first place.

“I’m a body builder, not a bodybuilder. I just want to build my body,” he says. “I’ve learned to basically feel successful with the process, and the things I’ve learned feel more valuable to me than any medal.”

And what he’s learned most of all is simply this: He loves training.

“That’s my favorite thing to do; I love lifting weights,” he says. “If you’re going to hypothetically ask me: ‘It’s Friday night, you’ve got 4 hours off, nothing to do, and all the money in the world, what do you want to do?’ Man, let’s go to the gym. Let’s clang and bang.”

The lesson for you: Competing is a major decision and big commitment, and while many people treat it as a natural progression in training or use it for motivation, it doesnt have to be either of those things.

The lesson for you: Competing is a major decision and big commitment, and while many people treat it as a natural progression in training or use it for motivation, it doesn’t have to be either of those things. There’s no shame in simply training for life, and for the love of each rep along the way.

4. Use Doctors to Help You—Not Limit You

You’re training hard, but you’re in pain—and you’re starting to believe that it’s the kind of pain caused by an injury. What’s the next step? You could continue suffering through it. You could spend untold, unguided hours on foam rollers and trigger point devices. You could go to the chiropractor, a soft-tissue specialist, or any number of other medical specialists.

You could do a lot of things—but according to Redden, the place to start is the office of your primary care doctor.

“Get a diagnosis,” Redden says. “Find out what’s wrong. Then your treatment plan afterward can include soft tissue work, mobility work, stretching, acupuncture, chiropractic—whatever.”

And if you’re a lifter, he also recommends that your doctor lift. No, he doesn’t have to be as jacked as Redden, but simply someone who “understands your activity” and doesn’t roll their eyes or tell you to stop. He says this applies to anyone training hard for any physical activity.

“As a physician, I want you to live your life the way you want to, on your terms,” he says. “But I also want you to understand the risks. Once you understand the risks, you can make the informed decision and whatever modifications are necessary. My job is to educate—that’s what the term doctor means.”

Lesson for you: Don’t shy away from treatment that you know, or just suspect, you might need. Being an informed lifter will only make you a better one, as long as you’re willing to always keep moving forward.

Thanks for dropping by and seeing this story regarding Mental Health and related news items published as “4 Ways to Be Healthy and Huge in 2021”. This news release was brought to you by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local and national news services.

#Ways #Healthy #Huge



Source link

Tim Pain’s huge target a mark of respect for India on day when they deserved more


Tim Paine looks on as officials investigate a report of crowd abuse at the SCG on Sunday.Credit:Getty

Before Paine’s declaration, Australia’s innings was no easy procession towards setting a target. For much of the day, they were forced to eke out their runs against an Indian attack missing the injured Ravindra Jadeja.

Loading

Marnus Labuschagne completed twin half-centuries for the match, while Steve Smith was ropable at missing out on twin centuries. Such are the differences between a mini-me and a me. Smith’s return to his run-making ways has been so complete that he has moved from anxiety to irritation.

If he had made the century he wanted, it would have been one of his slowest and hardest-earned. If Smith’s revival has filled in a gap in the slide puzzle of Australia’s batting, Matthew Wade has opened up another. We are all permitted our favourites, and Wade is one of mine. It’s a matter of personal taste, and I admire his team-first approach to cricket. Is he a genuine Test No.5? Probably not quite, but he was not a genuine Test opener either, and he still stepped into that role knowing he was putting his career at risk, just as he has done whenever his captain has asked him to sacrifice his average to lift the run rate.

Paine congratulates Cameron Green on his half-century.

Paine congratulates Cameron Green on his half-century.Credit:AP

In Sydney, Wade has had to press against a tide that, at the age of 33, seemed to have finally turned against him. He played with a run-hungry attitude in both innings but got himself out. In the field, catches constantly eluded him. What he would have given for a couple of Cameron Green’s inches. If Wade should lose his spot after this match, the Australians will be sorry to lose a true team player.

Loading

It was Green’s innings that provided the most stimulating subplot. The 21-year-old battled to score, as had everyone else, and was lucky to survive some early scares when he closed his bat face dangerously on the slow pitch. Once Paine joined him and made noises about the declaration, however, Green found his freedom and hit some towering blows over the on-side to complement his more classical cover-driving. We can only hope that the Twenty20 recruiters were not watching.

Green even did the right thing by his captain at the end, getting out for 84 before he could prompt uncomfortable questions about whether a declaration should be delayed even further to give him time to make a hundred.

India’s progress, in a long final session, gave Paine enough to worry about but not enough for nightmares. Shubman Gill and Rohit Sharma were critical to India’s hopes. Both threatened, producing the most attractive batting of the game, but both were ultimately cut short. Josh Hazlewood, who had created enough scares for a haunted house, eventually secured Gill’s wicket.

Loading

Late in the day, Patrick Cummins had Rohit caught on the boundary, a mode not previously seen in this Roundhead battle.

The rope where Rohit holed out was in front of the Brewongle Stand, from which six spectators had earlier been ejected after Indian players accused them of abuse.

As long as the matter remained under investigation, the exact nature of the alleged abuse was being debated. But from all accounts, the kindest interpretation of the taunts was that they were witless and stupid. If the Brewongle Six were Australian patriots, they would have done well to follow their captain’s example and treat our guests with respect.

Most Viewed in Sport

Loading

Thank you for stopping by and checking out this news article involving local sport titled “Tim Pain’s huge target a mark of respect for India on day when they deserved more”. This article was shared by My Local Pages as part of our local and national news services.

#Tim #Pains #huge #target #mark #respect #India #day #deserved



Source link

‘Absolutely vital’: Huge lines as testing goes 24/7



Long lines have formed at testing centres across southeast Queensland amid a looming lockdown of Greater Brisbane.

Thank you for visiting My Local Pages. We hope you enjoyed reading this news update on National and TAS news and updates called “‘Absolutely vital’: Huge lines as testing goes 24/7”. This news update was shared by MyLocalPages as part of our national news services.

#Absolutely #vital #Huge #lines #testing



Source link