Crows star Wayne Milera opens up about racial bias after bank loan incident


Bobby Hill art for ISM
Bobby Hill art for ISM

As NewsCorp celebrates Indigenous Sport Month, our reporters headed out to speak to some of the game’s biggest Indigenous stars to talk about their careers and their lives outside of the game.

Speaking about everything from racism to their sporting heroes, the players opened up about everything that makes them tick.

For non-Victorian club profiles can be found below, while the Victorian clubs can be found here.

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Wayne Milera has revealed he faced racial bias while trying to get a home loan.
Wayne Milera has revealed he faced racial bias while trying to get a home loan.

WAYNE MILERA — NARANGGA, WOTJOBALUK, GUNDITJMARA

What Indigenous Nation/s are you connected with?

On my dad’s side, I’m a Narangga man, which is on the Yorke Peninsula, and on my mum’s side her two nations are Wotjobaluk and Gunditjmara, in western Victoria.

What does your heritage/culture mean to you?

It’s really hard to put into words, but it’s good to have something that you can always come back to and something you can represent through your family. I sometimes sit back and think about how it was back in the day and how the old mob used to live, and live off the land. It’s good to have something you can always come back to. As an example, I remember going to Tasmania for the first time and sitting in the team bus and looking out at how green and hilly it was. And I was just thinking about when there were no roads here, no nothing and how my ancestors wold get around and they’d walk through dense bush. I always think about that, when I’m driving … sometimes you wish you could go back and just see how it was.

My favourite custom from my heritage is …

On my dad’s side down on the Yorke Peninsula, every year we have a fishing competition. Back in the day, they used to spear fish, so they carried this on, where on the Australia Day weekend, instead of celebrating Australia Day, they go and do this festival, called the Gynburra Festival, near Port Victoria. Every time you go, you end up sitting down and chatting to your Uncles and your Elders and you always hear stories about the fish they used to catch back in the day and how big they were. It’s always good to go there and reconnect with your country and get in the water and have some fun with your family.

Wayne Milera after a match for Central Districts in 2015. Picture: Dylan Coker
Wayne Milera after a match for Central Districts in 2015. Picture: Dylan Coker

Something not many people know about me is …

One thing some people might not know is that growing up, I lived in two places beside from Adelaide, I’ve lived in Ballarat, which is where my mum was born, and then we spent maybe six months living in Darwin.

My earliest memory is …

I’d have to take it back to when we lived in Ballarat, when I was maybe about three or four, and I don’t have a specific memory, but I recall getting around and visiting family there.

One piece of advice I would give my teenage self …

Continue to work hard and strive for what you want to achieve in life. If you work hard, it will pay off at some stage. You may have some setbacks along the way, but if you work hard enough, you’ll achieve it.

The best advice I was ever given …

To be yourself and enjoy what you do.

Milera on draft day in 2015 with dad Wayne, Mum Kveta Smith and Grandma Lillian Milera. Picture: Sarah Reed
Milera on draft day in 2015 with dad Wayne, Mum Kveta Smith and Grandma Lillian Milera. Picture: Sarah Reed

If I wasn’t in sport I would be …

I’d probably be doing some study at uni and I would have been trying to study something along the lines of PE teaching, or working with young Indigenous kids.

A common misconception made about me is …

Not sure on this one. I think I’m a bit of an open book, so I don’t know if there are many misconceptions about me. Maybe, it’s that I’m just a footballer.

When I cop abuse I …

I generally ignore it. On the footy field, I haven’t copped too much targeted abuse.

When people see me I hope they think …

That I’m a loving, respectful young man, who loves his family.

Family means …

Everything. I became a father in April, to my son, Carter and it’s been an incredible experience.

Milera with teammates Tariek Newchurch, Ben Davis and Shane McAdam in this year’s Indigenous guernsey. Picture: Sarah Reed
Milera with teammates Tariek Newchurch, Ben Davis and Shane McAdam in this year’s Indigenous guernsey. Picture: Sarah Reed

A word or phrase I use too much …

I reckon it’s probably er or um.

My weird sporting superstition is …

There’s one that I don’t do any more, but before I got drafted, when I’d do to my footy games, I used to stop at a servo and buy myself a yellow Gatorade and a packet of red frogs and I used to drink half of my Gatorade – I don’t know why I used to do this – and then eat maybe half a packet of the lollies. I don’t do that anymore because they’ve got lollies at the club. That was a weird one. But what I do now, is that my dad taught me to put my footy socks on by starting with them being inside-out, so you start from your foot and roll them up. So that’s how I put my footy socks on and I put my right one on, before my left foot.

My sporting hero is …

I’ve got two: Andrew McLeod and Adam Goodes. I loved the way they played and particularly with Adam Goodes, how he stood up for Aboriginal people and that impact he’s had on me, as a young, Indigenous athlete coming up, he started a movement and copped a lot of abuse for it.

Which sporting moment carried the most significance for you?

I have two games that stick out in my mind: before I was drafted, I played at Central Districts, and we made a semi-final and we played against the Port Magpies. It was a pretty close game and I think we ended up winning by four points, and it was one of the best wins I’d been a part of and I was playing with some blokes who I’d grown up with and playing in a SANFL final with them was pretty cool. Then, the win in the Showdown in 2018 when Josh Jenkins kicked a goal to put us in front with two minutes left on the clock. It was definitely a goal. That win was definitely one of my favourites in the AFL games I’ve played. They’re such good memories.

Milera takes on Steven Motlop and Robbie Gray in the 2018 Showdown. Picture: Sarah Reed
Milera takes on Steven Motlop and Robbie Gray in the 2018 Showdown. Picture: Sarah Reed

What’s it’s like being an Indigenous athlete today?

It’s no different to any other athlete, I imagine, that I find it pretty humbling to just know that I’m a role model, not only for young Indigenous people, but for anyone. I remember watching AFL footy and I looked up to a lot of the players, so it’s humbling knowing that people look up to you and I have younger cousins and my little nephews who idolise and I just hope it gives them encouragement and a drive that they can do that as well.

Have you encountered racism or unconscious bias against you?

Not really on the footy field. But there have been a couple of instances off it. It was only two years ago, and I went into a bank trying to discuss how to get a home loan and I needed to print out a statement and the lady in the bank, I asked her for it and she said to me: “Do you need this for your benefits, or something?” But I was organising a home loan to buy my first house. I remember going back into the car and my partner, Nina, was there and it was a weird feeling, because I was hurt and angry and I couldn’t believe she’d just said that. Even before that, she took quite a while to serve me, and then in the middle of serving me, someone else jumped in and she served them.

Milera greets the fans after a Showdown win. Picture: Sarah Reed
Milera greets the fans after a Showdown win. Picture: Sarah Reed

How do we improve support networks for Indigenous athletes coming through the ranks of professional sport?

We’ve got Jeremy Johncock as our Aboriginal liaison officer at the club and he does an awesome job. When I first came to the club, and I probably still am a bit, you’re very shy, you connect with Aboriginal people a lot better, and if there’s something bothering you and stuff, it’s easy to go and chat to Jeremy, which also takes a bit off the senior players as well. Having someone in the organisation to fight for you, or who has a voice for you, is so helpful. I think every sporting organisation should have one.

Reflections of your career highlights so far …

Draft night and AFL debut are probably my two so far. On draft night, I was in Adelaide and had a heap of my family with me and obviously it was something you dream of growing up, that was a pretty cool moment to have all my family with me on draft night (in 2015).

With my debut (in 2016), it’s the same: you always dream to play AFL footy and then to finally get your first game and it’s real. I played in Melbourne (against North Melbourne) and I had a lot of family drive over and it was cool because some of mum’s family from Victoria came as well.

The SANFL’s Indigenous footballers in 1993. (Front) Vivian O'Brien, Eddie Hocking, Michael O’Loughlin, Troy Bond, David Cockatoo-Collins. (Middle) Joe Wyatt, Justin Lampard, Ian Taylor, Dudley Ah Chee, Shane Tongerie, Wayne Milera. (Back) Shane Bond, Neville Abdullah-Highfold, Barry Buckskin, Che Cockatoo-Collins, Eugene Warrior. Picture: Ray Titus
The SANFL’s Indigenous footballers in 1993. (Front) Vivian O’Brien, Eddie Hocking, Michael O’Loughlin, Troy Bond, David Cockatoo-Collins. (Middle) Joe Wyatt, Justin Lampard, Ian Taylor, Dudley Ah Chee, Shane Tongerie, Wayne Milera. (Back) Shane Bond, Neville Abdullah-Highfold, Barry Buckskin, Che Cockatoo-Collins, Eugene Warrior. Picture: Ray Titus

Who put you on your pathway …

My dad, Wayne Snr. I just remember going to his local footy games and every Saturday I remember sitting in the car and heading to wherever he was playing and carpooling with his mates and watching him play. He played reserves for Central Districts, but he never went on to play league or anything. I guess growing up, my first hope was to play AFL, but he drove me to play SANFL footy and then go on and play AFL.

Who is your inspiration …

My family in general is my inspiration to play footy and make them proud.

What is the key priority to improve player and leadership opportunities for the next generation of Indigenous athletes …

For me and a fair few people I went to school with, I found it hard talking up. I know for some people that just comes naturally, but maybe there needs to be more education around the fact that there are more than one way to be a leader, there are many different ways to be a leader.

Lions superstar Charlie Cameron.
Lions superstar Charlie Cameron.

CHARLIE CAMERON — LARDIL-WAANYL

What Indigenous Nation/s are you connected with?

I’m from Mount Isa and Mornington Island. Mornington Island is the Lardil people and Mount Isa is the Waanyi people.

What does your heritage/culture mean to you?

It obviously means a lot and you obviously want to stay connected to your culture and your people. For me, it keeps me grounded and it’s always good to know where you’re from and who your people are. It means a lot to me playing in the AFL because you sort of become a role model for your people and younger kids in your community. My community, especially, has a lot of Indigenous kids and for them to see me here, I want to be a role model for them.

My favourite custom from my heritage is …

My culture and my people always have dancing and cultural dancing. I love it. It keeps me connected to who you are and educates you about your culture.

Something not many people know about me is …

I grew up on a small island, called Mornington Island. That’s where all of my family are right now. There’s not much there and probably only about 1000 people, mainly Indigenous people. I grew up there for much of my life.

My earliest memory is …

Probably going fishing and camping with my family. It was something I loved to do as a kid and it’s something I always want to do when I go back. I haven’t been back for a while so I want to go up and go camping, fishing and hunting.

One piece of advice I would give my teenage self …

Just have fun and enjoy yourself. There’s going to be challenges but just have fun.

Charlie Cameron snaps a goal for the Lions. Picture: Bradley Kanaris/Getty
Charlie Cameron snaps a goal for the Lions. Picture: Bradley Kanaris/Getty

The best advice I was ever given …

Respect my elders.

If I wasn’t in sport I would be …

I was an apprentice mechanic before I was drafted so I’d still be a mechanic I think. I ended up doing two years of my apprenticeship before getting into footy.

A common misconception made about me is …

Not sure really. Maybe carry on too much?

When I cop abuse I …

I just laugh and move on. It doesn’t really faze me, unless it’s racial. If it’s just people having a go at you on Instagram or something, I just say I’m enjoying my life and can’t complain.

When people see me I hope they think …

I want to try and give back by just smiling and waving to people. So hopefully they think I’m happy and enjoying my life.

Family means …

It means a lot. They’ve helped me to get to where I am at the moment. It’s a big thing for me.

A word or phrase I use too much …

“Obviously”

My weird sporting superstition is …

I don’t really have any superstition. That stuff doesn’t really bother me.

My sporting hero is …

(Rugby league legend) Greg Inglis. A few other NRL players like Cameron Munster and Latrell Mitchell, I look up to as well.

Which sporting moment carried the most significance for you?

Playing in an AFL Grand Final (for Adelaide). I haven’t had that opportunity in the last five years so hopefully I can get there again.

What’s it’s like being an Indigenous athlete today?

It means a lot actually. Young Indigenous kids sometimes don’t have the belief that they can get to where I am today. Seeing Indigenous role models, you want to be like them. I’m trying to set a good example and that’s what it means to me to be an Indigenous athlete today.

Have you encountered racism or unconscious bias against you in your career? Share an example if you are comfortable.

I don’t think so, no.

Greg Inglis and Latrell Mitchell. Picture: Brett Costello
Greg Inglis and Latrell Mitchell. Picture: Brett Costello
Maroons star Cameron Munster. Picture: Scott Davis/NRL Photos
Maroons star Cameron Munster. Picture: Scott Davis/NRL Photos

How do we improve support networks for Indigenous athletes coming through the ranks of professional sport?

Probably exposing them to real life teachings and that kind of stuff. It’s a lot to do with education as well.

Reflections of your career highlights …

Playing in a Grand Final was definitely up there. It was probably the highlight of my life so far. The recent success here at the Lions is also pretty exciting.

Who put you on your pathway …

My parents definitely. There’s been a few other people as well when I was living in Newman, WA which is 12 hours from Perth. I was working in the mines there. I got the opportunity to play in the WAFL and there’s a few people over there that helped me out.

Who is your inspiration …

My mum and dad. My nanna as well. They’ve really taught me those family values.

What is the key priority to improve player and leadership opportunities for the next generation of Indigenous athletes …

Just by having good role models and education for them. Just leading them on the right path, not necessarily to success but just a good pathway to a positive and good life. Obviously, where I’m from you can go down the path I was fortunate to go down and have people that helped me on that path but it can go the other way as well.

Bobby Hill.
Bobby Hill.

BOBBY HILL — WHADJUK-BALLARDONG NOONGAR

What Indigenous Nation/s are you connected with?

I’m a Whadjuk-Ballardong Noongar from Northam, which is 90km east of Perth, so I’m a WA boy.

What does your heritage/culture mean to you?

It means a lot, especially being an Aboriginal Indigenous man.

My favourite custom from my heritage is …

Family, and how close we are. We always go out hunting and there’s a fair bit that goes on when we’re out there. Us boys go out all day and bring the food back to have my aunties, my mum and nan finish off the day by cooking it. We hunt kangaroo and emus sometimes, but mainly kangaroo.

Something not a lot of people don’t know about me is …

I’ve got the nickname ‘Bobby’, but my real name is Ian. I got called Bob the Builder from my grandfather, who passed away last year, from when I was young watching Bob the Builder too many times. Only if I’m in trouble from mum (is when I’m called Ian).

Bobby Hill celebrates his first win with the Giants. Picture: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images
Bobby Hill celebrates his first win with the Giants. Picture: Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

My earliest memory is …

Going to watch dad play (country) footy when I was younger, with my uncles and cousins around playing or on the sidelines watching.

One piece of advice I would give my teenage self is …

Listen in school (laughing). I always thought sport was the best thing, but if I went back – luckily I graduated – I’d hand my assignments in on time.

The best advice I was ever given was …

Probably just from my dad: “Always listen to your mother.”

If I wasn’t in sport I would be …

I maybe would have done a certificate in metal work or art.

A common misconception made about me is …

Nothing comes to mind.

Hill signs autographs for supporters following a training session. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts
Hill signs autographs for supporters following a training session. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Himbrechts

When I cop abuse I …

It just depends what abuse it is. If it’s a spray from the coach, you take it on board, but if it’s from someone else, I would speak my word. I had one (guy) after a game, and he keeps messaging, but I find it pretty funny – how much time they have to just keep going at you. It’s nothing too abusive, just stuff I can laugh about. Other than that, I just block them and laugh at them.

When people see me, I hope they think …

I’m a role model for non-Indigenous and Indigenous young kids and someone to look up to and idolise and who’s a good guy.

What does family mean to you?

Family means a lot to me, especially being from a family with a lot of cousins and everyone’s so close. At a young age, we did a lot with all my uncles and aunties, on both sides – mum and dad. I’ve got a heap of relatives in the AFL. Josh Hill, who played for Western Bulldogs and West Coast, Brad and Stephen (Hill) – one’s at the Saints, one at Freo – I had Gerald Ugle here at Giants and Sydney Stack at Richmond. Also, my uncle Leon Davis, who played at Collingwood.

Hill flies for the screamer over Andrew McPherson. Picture: James Elsby/AFL Photos
Hill flies for the screamer over Andrew McPherson. Picture: James Elsby/AFL Photos

A word or phrase I use too much …

Probably ‘and’. (No full stops) I just get straight to it.

My weird sporting superstition is …

I always have to have my left side done before my right, so my left sock and foot, then my right sock and boot in every game. Since I was in Wesley College, I always wore the same red Speedos. They have to be red. I think I run fast in red, and if I don’t have them I probably won’t play.

My sporting hero is …

That’s a hard one, because there’s a lot. If it has to be a well-known sportsman then Adam Goodes, but if it’s someone I really looked up to, my dad. Sporting-wise, Adam Goodes and Cyril Rioli. I wear the No.37 here at the Giants because of Goodesy. They had great careers, and me being a young Indigenous kid myself, I always watched them on the TV and saw them dominate.

Which sporting moment carried the most significance for you?

Probably my first game. To get drafted was an achievement but to play my first game in my first year and to have my family there to support me, and all the boys here and everyone at the Giants, is something I’ll never forget and cherish for the rest of my life.

What’s it like being an Indigenous athlete today?

It’s a lot to take in. You have a lot of young Indigenous kids who look up to you, and also non-Indigenous as well, so to be an Indigenous player in 2020 is a big achievement and something I love.

Hill shows off the Giants Indigenous jumper for the AFL Sir Doug Nicholls round. Picture: Phil Hillyard/AFL Photos
Hill shows off the Giants Indigenous jumper for the AFL Sir Doug Nicholls round. Picture: Phil Hillyard/AFL Photos

Have you encountered racism or unconscious bias against you in your career?

I haven’t but I know Eddie Betts and all the older boys (in the AFL) who went through it. It doesn’t only hurt them but it hurts the rest of us Indigenous boys, just knowing what they’re going through and thinking what they think of us. I haven’t had that experience but I don’t wish it upon anyone to go through that, so hopefully I don’t go through it either.

How do we improve support networks for Indigenous athletes coming through the ranks of professional sport?

I think teaching more about our culture. It doesn’t hurt to sit down and listen and know where we’re coming from and learning what we’re teaching you.

What are your reflections on your career highlights?

B.H: Probably the one where I should have got mark of the year (in 2020). The one where I got robbed for mark of the year. (wide grin) That’s the big one.

Who put you on your pathway?

Mum and dad. Dad worked his backside off to pay for a lot of fees and a pair of boots every week. I (also) had other family there to drive me down to trainings in Perth.

Who is your inspiration?

Just family. I wouldn’t be the man I am today and wouldn’t be where I am if it wasn’t for them.

What is the key priority to improve player and leadership opportunities for the next generation of Indigenous athletes?

Just pathways, like we’re doing now with the academies bringing more Indigenous kids in. Back home in WA, we’ve got the Kickstart Academy, Nicky Winmar carnivals. So just going around the right pathways and doing more stuff around Indigenous footy for young Indigenous kids.

Sports reporter

Adelaide

Liz Walsh has been a journalist for almost 20 years, joining The Advertiser in 2005 following reporting stints in Port Lincoln and Canberra. After covering music, movies and entertainment as the Sunday Mail’s f…

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Thank you for dropping in and checking this article about “News, Sports & What’s On in Mornington Peninsula” titled “Crows star Wayne Milera opens up about racial bias after bank loan incident”. This post was posted by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our Mornington Peninsula news and what’s on in Mornington Peninsula updates and services.

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COVID incident emerging at Kwinana port in WA as crew member taken off ship



A crew member has been removed from a ship at Kwinana Bulk Terminal in Western Australia as part of a COVID-19 incident.

The person, believed to be the ship’s cook, was taken away by ambulance under police escort at 8:00pm last night from the terminal in Perth’s south.

It is believed there was a ship crew change in Mauritius 12 days ago.

The ship was due to leave port at 10:00pm last night but did not depart.

WA Health said it was preparing a statement on the issue.

More to come.

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Two men in hospital after stabbing incident at Ottoway in Adelaide’s north-western suburbs



One man has been charged with assault and two men are in hospital after a stabbing incident in Adelaide’s north-western suburbs early this morning.

Police were called to May Terrace at Ottoway about 1:30am, responding to reports a man had been stabbed.

A police spokesperson said a 35-year-old man was found with stab wounds at the scene.

Police allege that a 37-year-old man, whom they suspect of the stabbing, was assaulted by a third, 36-year-old man.

The first two men were taken to the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

Police said they were both in a serious but stable condition.

The third man was arrested and charged with assault causing serious harm.

He was granted bail and will appear in the Port Adelaide Magistrate’s Court on March 30.

Police said all three men are known to each other, and they would speak to the two injured men when it is medically appropriate.

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Investigation find Richmond Football Club star Shai Bolton ‘exacerbated’ nightclub incident with teammate Daniel Rioli


Bolton, Rioli and their girlfriends had sought to avoid mixing too much with others in the nightclub by getting a booth.

Bolton, who is one of the biggest names in the AFL out of contract at the end of this season, said he had thought about “what could have happened as a result of my actions”.

“When I saw what happened to Daniel, I acted on instinct. I now know that my instincts were wrong and that my actions could have led to a far more serious outcome,” he said.

“I want to say publicly that I made the wrong choice, and I am sorry for getting involved in the manner that I did.

“The right choice is to walk away from trouble or for me to do whatever I could to stop what was happening and not do something that could make it worse.

“Violence is never OK no matter the circumstances, and I want to share that message with everyone. The right choice is to walk away.”

Richmond’s chief executive Brendon Gale said the club did not condone any form of violence. Richmond coach Damien Hardwick, and the club had spoken strongly in defence of the two players after the incident surfaced – a stance that initially differed somewhat from the AFL’s view that Bolton did not need to intervene as forcefully.

“We encourage our players to do everything possible to de-escalate these situations and to walk away, regardless of the circumstances,” Gale said.

“Getting involved in any altercation is not OK and that is a message we will reiterate to our players.

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“These can be highly volatile situations and Shai has acknowledged his mistake. We all need to learn from it.”

Richmond and Bolton will donate $20,000 to Tomorrow Man, which according to the club “works with boys and men to develop healthy masculinity”.

The AFL said Rioli had been cleared of misconduct but Bolton had acknowledged he should have “de-escalated” the situation, rather than get involved.

AFL general counsel Andrew Dillon said, “The investigation concluded that Shai’s actions on the night had the potential to cause a much worse situation for all involved.

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“Shai understands the choice he made was the wrong one, he has acknowledged his mistake and is now accountable for his actions.

“This is a message that is bigger than our playing group, it is a message to everyone in the community, regardless of age, profession or circumstances – walk away, violence is never the answer.”

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Major incident declared after gas explosion destroys homes in Lancashire


child has died and four people have been injured, two seriously, after a suspected gas explosion in Heysham, Lancashire Police said.

A major incident has been declared after a gas explosion which reportedly destroyed up to three terraced houses on on Mallowdale Avenue.

Lancashire Fire said on Twitter that 10 units were called to a row of homes around 2.30am on Sunday and that firefighters were searching a collapsed property.

“A major incident has been declared after we (were) called to terraced houses on Mallowdale Avenue. It has been reported that there has been an explosion at a property and firefighters are searching the collapsed property,” Lancashire Fire said.

No information on any casualties was immediate available, but several residents of the area tweeted that up to three houses had collapsed, and that emergency services sirens had been heard near the scene for a prolonged time.

Lancashire Police said a safety cordon had been put in place and nearby residents had been evacuated in the town some 25 miles north-east of Blackpool.

“We are asking people to please avoid the entire area while we deal with this ongoing incident,” the force said.

https://twitter.com/LancsPolice/status/1393768704371003400

The North West Ambulance Service tweeted that it had also sent units to the scene, with a priority to “ensure people receive the medical help they need as quickly as possible”.

The Service tweeted: “Following reports of an explosion on Mallowdale Avenue, #Heysham, we have resources at the scene and we are working with @LancashireFRS and @LancsPolice”.

Electricity North West tweeted that it had paused electricity supplies to the area for safety reasons while the blast was being investigated.



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Major incident declared after ‘gas explosion’ destroys terraced houses in Heysham, Lancashire



A major incident has been declared after a reported gas explosion destroyed up to three terraced houses in Heysham, Lancashire.

Lancashire Fire said on Twitter that 10 units were called to a row of houses on Mallowdale Avenue around 2.30am on Sunday. Firefighters were searching a collapsed property.

Nearby residents said they heard a blast that sounded and felt like a “minor earthquake” or a bomb.

“A major incident has been declared after we (were) called to terraced houses on Mallowdale Avenue. It has been reported that there has been an explosion at a property and firefighters are searching the collapsed property,” Lancashire Fire said.

No information on any casualties was immediately available, but several residents of the area tweeted that up to three houses had collapsed, and that emergency services sirens were heard near the scene.

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13-year-old boy dies in incident involving garbage truck in South Australia




A boy who was asleep in an industrial bin has died, after the bin was collected by a garbage truck at Port Lincoln on South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula.

Thank you for stopping by to visit My Local Pages and seeing this article on current SA news called “13-year-old boy dies in incident involving garbage truck in South Australia”. This story was shared by My Local Pages as part of our Australian news services.

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Woman charged after flipping car during alleged drink driving incident

A woman has been charged with high-range drink driving after flipping her car on a residential street in Sydney’s west.

The woman was driving through South Granville in the early hours of this morning when she crashed into a parked car at the intersection of Clyde and Byrnes streets, flipping her Mazda6 onto its roof.

The driver, a 22-year-old woman from Auburn, was driving with a passenger in the car at the time.

A woman has been charged with drink driving offences after flipping her car in South Granville. (9News)

She was arrested and taken to Granville Police Station where she returned an alleged breath analysis reading of 0.173 – more than triple the legal limit.

The Auburn woman has since had her licence suspended and has been issued with a future court attendance notice for high-range PCA (drink driving) and negligent driving.

CCTV caught the car driving down the road and hitting a parked vehicle before rolling. (9News)

A passenger in the vehicle escaped without any serious injuries.

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South Sydney forward Tom Burgess is cleared of neck damage after incident in NRL season opener against Melbourne Storm



Tom Burgess has been released from hospital to return home with South Sydney after being cleared of serious injury in the NRL season-opener against Melbourne.

Burgess had to be stretchered from the field in the Rabbitohs’ 26-18 loss at AAMI Park and was taken to hospital for precautionary x-rays after Benji Marshall landed on him in a tackle.

The 28-year-old Englishman looked in pain as he lay on the turf after falling awkwardly, holding his shoulder and neck area.

He was attended to for several minutes as several Souths teammates looked on, before Burgess was lifted onto a stretcher and carried off and the last four minutes 40 seconds of the game were played.

But he took to Instagram early on Friday morning to confirm there were no major concerns, with the Rabbitohs also confident the issue was just a burner.

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“Hey guys, thanks for the messages of concern, I’m all good, CT scans have come back clear but have to keep this lovely thing [neck brace] on till the morning to rule out any serious nerve damage which can only be seen from an MRI scan,” he said.

“Could be a long night in Melbourne here but would rather be safe than sorry! How good the footy is back, eh.”

Working in Burgess’s favour is that the Rabbitohs have a nine-day turnaround until they face Manly at Brookvale Oval next Saturday.

Burgess’s injury soured an already tough night for the Rabbitohs, who were left chasing a 22-0 lead after just 29 minutes.

And while they fought back to get within six, Bennett described their first half as “awful” and said his team did not give themselves a chance, completing at 62 per cent and with 15 errors.

“I was pleased for 30 minutes and then we self-destructed again,” Bennett said.

“We played for 30 minutes, and the other 50 we were just wasting our time.”

He said they needed to be able to go 80 minutes with the competition heavyweights if they had hopes of going further than last season’s preliminary-final defeat.

While Souths had not won at AAMI Park in nine previous attempts, they came to Melbourne with high hopes after being a stand-out in the preseason.

“I know what the team is capable of, I’ve seen enough but we’ve got to get to these big games and do better than we do and that’s the challenge for us,” Bennett said.

Bennett said if there was any hype around his team, he was glad it was now gone.

“There could have been a bit of hype but there will be no hype around them now or for the next week or so which will be good,” he said.

AAP/ABC

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Emergency services respond to Risdon Prison incident


Emergency services respond to Risdon Prison incident.

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