Aerial Footage Captures Foundering at Kilauea Volcano’s Lava Lake



Footage captured by the US Geological Survey (USGS) on December 31 shows crustal foundering at the Kilauea volcano lava lake, a process that turns over the lake crust and renews its surface. Footage shows foundering at the Halemaʻumaʻu crater. A segment of the cool lava crust sinks into the lava lake, causing a gush of hot, “more fluid” lava to well up around it, the USGS said. The volcano erupted on December 20. As of December 31, scientists said the lava lake was 181 meters (608 ft) deep. Credit: USGS Volcanoes via Storyful



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Lava Flows From Kilauea Volcano Into ‘Lava Lake’



Official footage from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island shows continuous lava flow into a “lava lake” in the early morning hours on Saturday, December 26. According to the US Geological Survey (USGS), this video shows the western and northern fissure vents of the Halema‘uma‘u crater gushing lava into the lake between 2 and 5 am on Saturday morning. By December 25, scientists said the lake was 577 feet deep. Officials issued a warning about the “deadly consequences” of entering closed areas at the site after the eruption sparked an increase in visitor numbers. “Dozens” of citations were issued by park authorities to those disregarding safety rules, reports said. The volcano erupted on December 20. Credit: USGS Volcanoes via Storyful



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Lava Spews Out of Kilauea Overnight as Eruptions Continue



Kilauea Volcano continued to spew lava on a third day of eruptions, as video taken by the US Geological Survey showed lava “fountaining” in the early hours of December 22. The new volcanic activity, which began on December 20, has drawn visitors to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The National Parks Service reported that at least one lookout was full on Tuesday. This footage shows lava pouring out into crater at Kilauea, as well as “a wind vortex on the lava lake, strong enough to rip up pieces of the lake’s crust,” according to USGS Volcanoes. Credit: USGS Volcanoes via Storyful



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Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano erupts | SBS News


Authorities in Hawaii are warning of a possible “significant emission” of volcanic ash into the atmosphere, after the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island erupted.

“An eruption has commenced within Kilauea’s summit caldera,” shortly after 9:30 pm local time, said the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

“The situation is rapidly evolving and HVO (Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) will issue another statement when more information is available.”

The Kilauea volcano is located within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

United States Geological Survey

Images posted by the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park showed billows of red smoke rising into the night sky.

The USGS warned of a “significant emission of volcanic ash into the atmosphere” and upgraded its aviation color code to red, advising pilots to avoid the area around Kilauea.

The National Weather Service reported prevailing winds could push the ashfall towards communities on the southwest of Big Island and said people with respiratory problems should take “extra precaution”.

The USGS reported a shallow, 4.4-magnitude earthquake near the volcano shortly after the eruption.

Ken Boyer says the eruption is the biggest he has ever seen.

Ken Boyer says the eruption is the biggest he has ever seen.

Facebook/Ken Boyer

Kilauea, a popular tourist attraction, is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and has been erupting regularly since the 1950s.

In 2014 Big Island declared a state of emergency after red-hot lava from Kilauea ignited a house and threatened the entire town of Pahoa on the eastern tip of the island.

Hawaii Island, or the Big Island, is the largest of the eight main islands which make up the Pacific US state – an archipelago that includes hundreds of smaller volcanic islands.



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Lava Flows From Erupting Kilauea Volcano


The Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island erupted late on Sunday, December 20, the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park said. According to the US Geological Survey (USGS), the volcano erupted following a 4.4-magnitude earthquake. Footage shows lava flowing from the volcano just before midnight. The USGS said the “lake” of lava rose by approximately 10 meters by 1:30 am. The Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency warned residents in several areas to stay inside to avoid fallout. Credit: USGS Volcanoes via Storyful



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