UK football club responds to fans who booed players for BLM kneeling by banning some and ordering RE-EDUCATION for others — RT Sport News



Cambridge United Football Club is punishing fans who booed when players kneeled in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, banning some from Abbey Stadium for the season and requiring others to be re-educated before they can return.

The club launched an investigation after hearing a smattering of boos when players kneeled before Cambridge United’s December 15 home game against Colchester. Based on the findings of that probe, the team on Wednesday said it banned an undisclosed number of fans and issued refunds to those who had season tickets. Other politically incorrect fans were told they could get back into the stadium only after receiving discrimination and equality education.



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“Diversity and inclusion will continue to be at the heart of what we stand for as a football club, and we will be making no further comment about the incident,” Cambridge United said in a statement.

Several club board members oversaw the investigation, including Godric Smith, formerly spokesman for then-Prime Minister Tony Blair. Individual fans were given the opportunity to “explain their actions.”

But some observers found it absurd that a football club’s supporters would even need to explain why they chose to boo. “Cambridge deserves to go under for this,” one commenter said. “Who on earth do these football clubs think they are?”

Other fans said the booing was driven by disgust over BLM’s offensive political agenda, not racism, and they will continue to voice their displeasure. One said, “2020, and booing communism is punishable,” while another quipped, “Just leave footy to the woke, and watch it go broke. Good riddance.”

A similar controversy was stirred on December 5, after fans at a Millwall FC match hosting Derby County booed when players kneeled in support of BLM, leading media outlets to brand them as racist. A fan group for Millwall, the Millwall Supporters Club, said those who booed were responding to BLM’s extreme political views and actions, such as damaging war memorials and Winston Churchill statues.



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Millwall FC responded by saying that players from both teams at its next match, against Queens Park Rangers, would stand together before the game and hold a pro-equality banner. Fans responded by cheering heartily when players held the banner on December 8.

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Wallabies considers kneeling during anthem, Australia vs New Zealand


The Wallabies could become the first Australian national team to take a knee during the national anthem in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Senior Wallaby Dane Haylett-Petty revealed the squad will consider the silent protest statement before the third Bledisloe Cup Test against the All Blacks on October 31 at Sydney’s ANZ Stadium, when they will wear their new Indigenous-designed jersey.

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While several sporting clubs and organisations around the world have taken a knee before games or openly supported BLM – including the NBA, European soccer and English Super League – the Wallabies would be the only Australian side to do so.

“It’s great that sport has an amazing opportunity to have a say and join conversations, a lot of sports have done that and it would be a great thing for us to do,” Haylett-Petty said.

“I obviously can’t speak for everyone but definitely I think it’d be a great show of support.

I think that’s probably a discussion to have as a group, and we’d definitely consider it.”

Under new coach Dave Rennie, a Kiwi of Cook Islands heritage, the Wallabies have embraced learning about different cultures and learned how to sing Fijian and Tongan songs during camp before the Bledisloe opener a fortnight ago.

He‘s obviously big on bringing the different cultures together, you’ve probably seen some of the songs we’ve been singing, learning about different cultures,” Haylett-Petty said.

“We‘ve got a very diverse group and we see that as a big strength of ours. And this only adds to it as well, being able to represent all Australians, especially First Nations people, by wearing this jersey.”

While the Wallabies will don the new first nations strip for the first time in Sydney, no player of Indigenous heritage has been picked in the squad, an alarming concern for how rugby is developing talent from within those communities.

Rugby Australia chairman Hamish McLennan said: I think it shows that we’ve got to open more player pathways for indigenous rugby players, but what it also says is that we’re very committed to an inclusive culture.

“We’re very proud of our Aboriginal and indigenous heritage, and we’re going to promote it proudly.”

Indigenous Wallabies legend Gary Ella said league took the early advantage over union to lure talent because they were paying players from the beginning – whereas rugby only turned professional in 1996.

“In the beginning, league was really dominant, and if you have a look at the states outside of NSW and Queensland, AFL had a real strong base for a very long time,” Ella said.

“We’re gradually introducing the game to more Aboriginal communities around Australia [with the] Big Time (development program) getting players to be associated with sevens teams, but it’s also now we’re having a lot more players playing club rugby.

“We’ve had good success recently and having a lot more people going into Super, and there are now Aboriginal communities seeing that opportunity where they can play professional. And they’re looking for that opportunity.

I think that the league has always been professional and so it had an early footing, so people could make a living playing that particular sport. But now they’re saying that rugby’s offers just as much.”



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BLM: Australian rugby team considers kneeling during anthem


The Wallabies could become the first Australian national team to take a knee during the national anthem in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Senior Wallaby Dane Haylett-Petty revealed the squad will consider the silent protest statement before the third Bledisloe Cup Test against the All Blacks on October 31 at Sydney’s ANZ Stadium, when they will wear their new Indigenous-designed jersey.

While several sporting clubs and organisations around the world have taken a knee before games or openly supported BLM – including the NBA, European soccer and English Super League – the Wallabies would be the only Australian side to do so.

Watch every match of the 2020 Bledisloe Cup Live & On-Demand on Kayo. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly

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Australian rugby team considers kneeling during anthem


The Wallabies could become the first Aussie national team to take a knee during the national anthem in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Senior Wallaby Dane Haylett-Petty revealed the squad will consider the silent protest statement before the third Bledisloe Cup Test against the All Blacks on October 31 at Sydney’s ANZ Stadium, when they will wear their new Indigenous-designed jersey.

While several sporting clubs and organisations around the world have taken a knee before games or openly supported BLM – including the NBA, European soccer and English Super League – the Wallabies would be the only Australian side to do so.

Watch every match of the 2020 Bledisloe Cup Live & On-Demand on Kayo. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly

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“It’s great that sport has an amazing opportunity to have a say and join conversations, a lot of sports have done that and it would be a great thing for us to do,” Haylett-Petty said.

“I obviously can’t speak for everyone but definitely I think it’d be a great show of support.

I think that’s probably a discussion to have as a group, and we’d definitely consider it.”

Under new coach Dave Rennie, a Kiwi of Cook Islands heritage, the Wallabies have embraced learning about different cultures and learned how to sing Fijian and Tongan songs during camp before the Bledisloe opener a fortnight ago.

He‘s obviously big on bringing the different cultures together, you’ve probably seen some of the songs we’ve been singing, learning about different cultures,” Haylett-Petty said.

“We‘ve got a very diverse group and we see that as a big strength of ours. And this only adds to it as well, being able to represent all Australians, especially First Nations people, by wearing this jersey.”

While the Wallabies will don the new first nations strip for the first time in Sydney, no player of Indigenous heritage has been picked in the squad, an alarming concern for how rugby is developing talent from within those communities.

Rugby Australia chairman Hamish McLennan said: I think it shows that we’ve got to open more player pathways for indigenous rugby players, but what it also says is that we’re very committed to an inclusive culture.

“We’re very proud of our Aboriginal and Indigenous heritage, and we’re going to promote it proudly.”

Indigenous Wallabies legend Gary Ella said league took the early advantage over union to lure talent because they were paying players from the beginning – whereas rugby only turned professional in 1996.

“In the beginning, league was really dominant, and if you have a look at the states outside of NSW and Queensland, AFL had a real strong base for a very long time,” Ella said.

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“We’re gradually introducing the game to more Aboriginal communities around Australia (with the) Big Time (development program) getting players to be associated with sevens teams, but it’s also now we’re having a lot more players playing club rugby.

“We’ve had good success recently and having a lot more people going into Super, and there are now Aboriginal communities seeing that opportunity where they can play professional. And they’re looking for that opportunity.

I think that the league has always been professional and so it had an early footing, so people could make a living playing that particular sport. But now they’re saying that rugby’s offers just as much.”

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F1 kneeling stance questioned at Styrian Grand Prix


The historic Styrian Grand Prix has seen drivers once again taken a knee before the national anthem of Austria.

Led by Lewis Hamilton wearing a “Black Lives Matter” T-shirt while the other drivers wore “End Racism” shirts, the grid once again saw several drivers remaining standing while a majority of the grid took a knee.

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Hamilton, who also went from pole position to the top of the podium also made a stand when collecting his winner’s trophy.

After the national anthem, the six-time world champion raised his fist in an allusion to Tommie Smith and John Carlos at the 1968 Olympics.

Sky Sports’ F1 host Simon Lazenby took a strong stance at the lack of unity in kneeling, which was a big story after last week’s race as several drivers ended up having to explain why they did or didn’t kneel.

It came after the furore after the first race with some believing it was a “bad look” during the Austrian Grand Prix last week.

“Lewis Hamilton leading the conversation on this and taking a knee again,” Lazenby said on Sky Sports. “He said he had no problem with any of the drivers and team members who decided against taking a knee but he did stress he doesn’t want to see this campaign for change die a silent death and the sport can do more.

“It’s a shame that they’ve gone off those pictures after people questioned the apparent lack of unity last week with some kneeling and some not, you’ve got to ask the question would it have been in the best interests in the image of this sport to get it together this week. That’s not a judgment, it’s for you to decide at home.

“The images still don’t seem to fit the message in this the most global of sports. If NASCAR, football and cricket can get it right, why can’t Formula One. That’s the question. From where I’m standing here, we have seen some taking an knee and some not, it’s just a mixed message.”

Lazenby also asked fellow commentator and former world champion Jenson Button about his thoughts on the kneeling issue.

“I think as an image, yes, I agree, it doesn’t look so good with some standing and some kneeling but the important thing to me is what they have to say about ending racism, they all agree,” he said. “I think we as Formula One have to be proactive in pushing forward and ending racism and we race as one. It can’t go quiet, we need to mention it every race, we need to not only be mentioning it, we need to be proactive in making change. I still don’t know how we go about that to help diversity in our sport as well. It’s something we all need to sit down and discuss and make change.

Haas’ Kevin Magnussen reportedly left during the national anthem as well as he appeared to forget his T-shirt with F1 journalist Chris Medland explaining he could get fined for “I assume not to seem unsupportive”.

Mercedes team principal Toto Wolff said he and the team knelt but when asked after the race if they were sending mixed messages, he said we need to be “non-judgemental”.

“None of the drivers, even the ones who are standing, are racist, we need to respect everybody’s view,” he said. “I think where we come from is that being not a racist but staying silent is not enough but I don’t want to judge what people do because he might not know, he might not kneel but he might do some good stuff in the background.

“It’s not a one weekend PR stunt we haven’t painted the car black for one weekend. Some guys said ‘we kneeled last week’ but this is not over. This is just the beginning and it’s against racism it’s for more equality, more gender diversification and just continuing the momentum of that and that doesn’t stop with one weekend.”

Hamilton said he didn’t ask for the team to take a knee but it meant a lot.

“I think it’s a beautiful thing, it doesn’t take a lot to do, it’s not changing the world but perhaps shifting perceptions and shifting of ideals and we’ll just keep going,” he said post-race.

Former Indian F1 driver and Sky Sports analyst said he would have taken the knee but it’s every individal’s choice.

“I remember when I left India to come to the UK to race in Formula 3, my mum said to me being a racing driver shouldn’t just be about driving around and around in circles,” he said. “You need to use that profile you’re building to do something big in the world. We started a charity back in India to educate young children because that was a cause that needed big support in India and I think Lewis has taken this up as a cause that he wants to use his voice to support and I think the other 20 drivers and 10 team bosses and various other people with high profile in the paddock have the ability to drive change. Lewis is calling out for people that it’s not enough to be non-racist, he’s asking everyone to be actively anti-racist and actively pro-diversity and inclusion in the paddock.”

F1 champion and Sky Sports presenter Damon Hill praised the call of his colleagues’ strong stance on the lack of kneeling together.

“Very impressed that @SkySportsF1 was strong on the BLM driver support being disunified with regard to kneeling. Can a driver show full support for BLM / Anti Racism and not knee?” he tweeted.

But the world coverage of the race was also slammed as the coverage cut from protest to a pretaped skydiving demonstration.

ITV2 presenter Melissa Nathoo took aim at the coverage cutting away from the kneeling.

“I do think the sport should show a united front, but kneeling or not is the decision of the drivers. However, cutting away at that moment was poor form and completely negates the message of the movement,” she wrote.





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F1 fans react to drivers kneeling before 2020 Austrian Grand Prix


The F1 has paused before the start of the season in Austria to recognise the Black Lives Matter movement with drivers wearing black shirts with the “End Racism” and “Black Lives Matter” messages.

While the start of the Formula One season has been pushed back from March when it was cancelled in Australia to July due to the coronavirus pandemic with a condensed season including three week runs and back-to-back races in Austria and Great Britain, a first for the sport.

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But in the meantime, the world was shocked by the death of George Floyd and six-time F1 champion Lewis Hamilton has been an outspoken advocate of the Black Lives Matter movement, including attending protests in recent weeks and hitting out at comments from former CEO Bernie Ecclestone.

Mercedes have backed Hamilton by changing the cars and race suits from silver to black, with signage around the Red Bull Ring for the season opening race with the “End Racism” message as well as FIA donating $A1.6m (1 million euros) to the new foundation set up by Formula One aiming to improve diversity in the sport.

But before the weekend, the Grand Prix Drivers’ Association held decided the drivers would “stand united with their teams against racism and prejudice, at the same time embracing the principles of diversity, equality and inclusion and supporting Formula 1‘s commitment to these.”

It came as all the drivers came together on the starting line all wearing black T-shirts before the race.

Before the race had started, F1 next generation stars Max Verstappen from Red Bull and Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc confirmed they wouldn’t kneel during the national anthem.

The act has been performed by sports people around the world after coming to prominence in recent memory through NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Sky Sports commentators agreed that it would be a “monumental moment” with all drivers united and it was appreciated by fans although some said that it “wasn’t united” with just six drivers staying standing.

Two of the drivers were Red Bull’s Max Verstappen and Ferrari’s Charles Leclerc, two drivers many in the Formula One world believe are the future of the sport.

Before the first race of the season, Leclerc tweeted: “All 20 drivers stand united with their teams against racism and prejudice, at the same time embracing the principles of diversity, equality and inclusion, supporting Formula 1’s and FIA’s commitment.

“I believe that what matters are facts and behaviours in our daily life rather than formal gestures that could be seen as controversial in some countries. I will not take the knee but this does not mean at all that I am less committed than others in the fight against racism.”

Similarly, Max Verstappen tweeted: “I am very committed to equality and the fight against racism. But I believe everyone has the right to express themself at a time and in a way that suits them. I will not take the knee today but respect and support the personal choices every driver makes”.

But while it was a powerful moment, something Sky Sports commentators agreed was “monumental” for the sport, some pointed out that it was an odd message for six of the 20 drivers to remain standing when 14 were still kneeling.

CBS Sports editor Igor Melo said that all drivers not kneeling was a “bad look”.

Before the race, Sky Sports played an interview with Hamilton who said he hadn’t decided whether he would kneel when the interview was held.

But whatever the drivers decided, he said the drivers would be “paying their respects in their own ways.“

The six-time champion also told his fellow drivers in a meeting last week why “silence is generally really complicit”.

“Well, just in the meeting I just acknowledged a lot of the drivers that … obviously there was an interpretation of a message that I had posted, asking for people to speak out and their silence and just saying thank you to those who have said something on their social media platforms,” said Hamilton

“They‘ve got a great voice, a great platform and then encouraging the others that haven’t to say something and I just described the scenario that silence is generally really complicit so there still is some silence in some cases but I think it’s also part of a dialogue of people trying to understand, because there are still people that don’t fully understand exactly what is happening and what are the reasons for these protests. So I continue to try and be that guide, try to influence.”

Drivers’ Association director and Haas driver Romain Grosjean said as a global sport, F1 “have a lot of audience and we can send some very strong messages”.



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Sam Newman refuses to apologise for George Floyd and kneeling criticism after Channel 9 exit


Fresh after parting ways with Channel 9, outspoken commentator Sam Newman has admitted he has no regrets and no apologies to give after a string of controversies.

Newman was vocally against the kneeling in first round of the AFL season following the coronavirus suspension, calling on players to “stop the preening”.

He later labelled George Floyd, who’s death sparked Black Lives Matter protests across the world, “a piece of s***” on his podcast You Cannot Be Serious.

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Newman’s comments about George Floyd sparked plenty of controversy as he hit out at protesters.

“George Floyd … is piece of s***,” he said. “He has been in jail five times, he held up a pregnant black woman with a knife, he’s a drug addict, he’s a crackhead and he’s a pornstar.

“He’s dead because of the police brutality and it never should have happened. But I am telling you who George Floyd is, now they’ve made a monument about him and he’s a piece of s***”.

While he also reignited a feud with the Herald Sun’s Caroline Wilson, it appeared enough was enough as Newman and Channel 9 reportedly mutually decided to part ways, “in the station’s best interests” after 35 years.

But speaking on 3AW’s Mornings with Neil Mitchell, Newman said that he may be more controversial in the future.

“I only used to be reticent about some of the things I did because I didn’t want to actually bring the station into too much disrepute,” Newman said on Monday.

“But now I’m not on air any more I feel I can say exactly what I want to say.”

Newman told Mitchell that “was taking a risk speaking to me, you might be cancelled for having me on” and said he hadn’t been on TV in two years, rather doing remote pieces.

However, he said he was unrepentant over his comments, particularly around the kneeling players in round two of the AFL and the George Floyd issues.

“There’s a communal strain of syphillus infecting the grievance brigade and the activists who will not be bothered to listen to what I say, not that I’m whinging, but I’m 100 per cent right on what I said about those two matters that caused controversy,” he said.

“One was about the kneeling – the players before the game. I said ‘I don’t believe they know why they were kneeling’ and this was confirmed by an unlikely ally in a bloke called Joel Wilkinson (former Gold Coast player), who said the AFL was ‘hypocritical’ on the racism stance and the kneeling was borne from George Floyd accusing them of police brutality and inspired by Colin Kaepernick – that’s what I said.

“I make no apology for saying George Floyd is a piece of what I said and I did say it was a disgrace what happened to him — no one mentions that — and the police should be in receipt of the full force of the law for what they did to him. Having said that, why we would eulogise and make a martyr out of him and that’s what I said, I don’t recede from that one iota.”

After a long career of controversies during his time on The Footy Show, Newman added that he was not ashamed by anything he had done in his career, even taking aim at Wilson once again after Mitchell brought up an infamous moment in 2009 involving a picture of Wilson and a mannequin.

He added that if the AFL or any sporting body was serious about dealing with racism, they would have a sign on every jumper that said “say no to racism”.

Mitchell said it’s the type of thing that the 74-year-old would send up, a comment to which Newman took exception to.

“It was my suggestion that if you had a designated size, colour and position on the AFL jumper, you wouldn’t need to have the kneejerk piecemeal reaction to people kneeling before games because it would be on all the jumpers, every time a player went for the ball, it was on television, or they were dressed at the press conference, ‘say no to racism’ and then you don’t need to carry on with all the virtue signalling and nonsense that goes on,” he said.

“Where do you draw the line at people kneeling? What other precedent will be set for any other activist position that you want to take on anything that’s going on in the community?”

Newman said he doesn’t care what people say about him on social media. But as for what’s next, Newman said he was “probably the first to experience the cancel culture in Australia and I’ll probably be unemployable”. But he said he was relaxed about who he is and having an opinion because “we’re being taken for a ride”.

Speaking to the Herald Sun over the weekend, Newman said he received a call at 3pm on Friday afternoon and he said he suggested standing down and said he had a “very amicable and pleasant conversation with them” and that it wasn’t unexpected, having only appeared once in 2020 and his contract expiring at the end of the year.



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Caroline Wilson slams Sam Newman over ‘bitter’ kneeling stance


Veteran footy journalist Caroline Wilson has taken aim at Sam Newman after the Footy Show star’s criticism of AFL players kneeling in support of Black Lives Matters.

Newman posted several times on Twitter over the weekend condemning the move and also compared AFL CEO Gillon McLachlan to NFL supremo Roger Goodell, who recently apologised for a former stand against kneeling in his league.

“Apparently the players and umpires will ‘take a knee’ before game tonight. IF that is true, how long before we stop being intimidated into nodding in agreement and question the REAL motives. The game maybe incidental,” he wrote.

“Before the AFL morph themselves completely into a political body, research some FACTS. McLachlan has turned himself into the Goodell of the NFL. IF you’re going to kneel, know WHY you’re kneeling. Stop the preening. It’s bullshit.”

Wilson hit back on Monday night’s episode of Footy Classified.

“Sam Newman said that AFL footballers taking a knee to say that black lives matter were preening and divisive,” she said.

“He said most players didn’t understand why they were kneeling and had been intimidated into it.

“For what it’s worth, I didn’t think it was political, I thought it was social and a united move and it was one that united all the players, black and white, and represented a brotherhood that Newman did not understand and therefore tried to belittle.

“Sam, you’ve got a terrible history in the area of race relations, and you’ve done it again, unleashing a series of bitter and divisive rants.

“What an unfortunate piece of timing that the Sunday Footy Show decided to bring you back this week and portray you as the venerable football bead after you had unleashed so much bitterness.”

Wilson played audio of AFL Players Association president Patrick Dangerfield talking about the obligation he felt to make a stand.

“We have such a wonderful platform as athletes and we have to use it for more than just kicking a footy,” Dangerfield told 3AW.

“I’d challenge anyone that has an opinion that players should shut up and dribble or just focus on kicking a footy.

“We owe it to our indigenous peoples that we do better than we currently do.”



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National women’s team calls on US Soccer Federation to end anthem policy brought in to stop kneeling protests


The US women’s national team wants the US Soccer Federation to repeal the anthem policy it instituted after Megan Rapinoe started kneeling during the “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

The women’s team also wants the federation to state publicly that the policy was wrong and issue an apology to the team’s black players and supporters.

“Further, we believe the Federation should lay out its plans on how it will now support the message and movement that it tried to silence four years ago,” the US women’s team said in a statement posted on the Twitter feed of its players association Monday night.

Rapinoe took a knee during the anthem at a pair of national team matches in 2016.

She said she wanted to express solidarity with San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who silently took a knee during the national anthem before NFL games to raise awareness of police brutality and racial injustice.

Colin Kaepernick popularised the kneeling protest as a quarterback for San Francisco in the NFL.(AP: Jose Sanchez)

The US Soccer Federation then approved a policy in February 2017 that stated players “shall stand respectfully” during national anthems.

The policy remains in place, though the unions for the men’s and women’s teams believe it doesn’t apply to their players because of their collective bargaining agreements.

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Kaepernick and Rapinoe each faced sharp criticism for the protest for years.

But public sentiment has changed since George Floyd’s death last month.

Mr Floyd, a black man, died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Mr Floyd’s neck while he was handcuffed and saying that he couldn’t breathe.

His death sparked protests in Minneapolis and around the country, some of which became violent.

A lawyer for the men’s team union also called for the repeal of the policy and an apology in a statement provided to BuzzFeed News, which was the first to report on the US women’s statement.

AP



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Drew Brees apologises for kneeling comments



FILE PHOTO: Jan 5, 2020; New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) looks on before a NFC Wild Card playoff football game against the Minnesota Vikings at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Mandatory Credit: Chuck Cook -USA TODAY Sports

June 4, 2020

(Reuters) – New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees issued a lengthy apology on Thursday for comments he made about kneeling protests being disrespectful to the American flag that drew criticism on social media.

Brees was asked during an appearance on Yahoo Finance’s On the Move on Wednesday about the possibility of players protesting against racial injustice by kneeling during the anthem when the NFL’s 2020 season kicks off in September.

The 41-year-old, widely regarded as one of the best passers in NFL history, said: “I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country.”

Colin Kaepernick popularized the gesture of kneeling during pre-game renditions of “The Star-Spangled Banner” in 2016 while a member of the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers.

Kneeling has become a symbol of the fight against police brutality used by protesters who have flooded the streets of U.S. cities in the wake of the death last week of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

“I would like to apologize to my friends, team mates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday,” said Brees in an Instagram post alongside a picture of white and black hands shaking.

“In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused.

“In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country.

“They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy.”

Moments after the original comments became public the backlash was swift with team mates and other sport greats slamming Brees for his insensitivity.

“WOW MAN!! Is it still surprising at this point. Sure isn’t! You literally still don’t understand why Kap was kneeling on one knee??” Los Angeles Lakers player and NBA great LeBron James posted on Twitter.

Brees said he took full responsibility for his remarks and felt “sick” over how they were perceived.

“I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening… and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen,” he added.

(Reporting by Steve Keating in Toronto. Editing by Christian Radnedge)





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