Supercar driver Luke Youlden says ‘driver input’ was likely involved in fatal Lamborghini crash


A former Supercar driver called to give expert evidence about a Lamborghini involved in a fatal crash has told an Adelaide court the car would not just turn sideways and leave the road “without significant driver input”.

Alexander Campbell has been charged over the death of 15-year-old Sophia Naismith who, along with her friend Jordyn Callea, was hit in front of the House of Tien restaurant at Glengowrie in June 2019.

Mr Campbell, who was driving a Lamborghini Huracan when he struck the pair, has been charged with causing death by dangerous driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving.

The prosecution is alleging the tyre type and mode that the sports car was being driven in played a role in the crash.

Former Supercar driver and Bathurst winner Luke Youlden was called on as a witness during today’s committal court hearing to provide expert evidence.

Mr Youlden said while he had only seen photos of the crash, he had experience driving the Huracan model.

Appearing via video link, Mr Youlden told the court the car could be driven in three modes; Strada or street mode, Sport mode, and Corsa, which is meant for the racetrack.

He said he believed the car may have been driven in a mode other than Street.

“You can’t be just cruising down the road at 60 or 80 kilometres and all of a sudden the car just turns left or right.

“It has to have some sort of input.”

Fellow supercar driver Dean Canto also gave evidence about the sports car.

The Lamborghini involved in the crash.(Carsales)

Mr Campbell’s lawyer, Craig Caldicott, has sought to have the death by dangerous driving charge thrown out before trial.

Mr Caldicott previously told the court that the car’s crash data chip had the potential to “tell us everything”, including the speed of the vehicle.

“It’s a complex matter involving a Lamborghini,” Mr Caldicott said in August.

“There’s a computer chip inside that Lamborghini which we’re seeking access to, to be able to read, which is a crash data chip.”

Accused driver Alexander Campbell holds hands with partner outside court.
Alexander Campbell (right) outside court after his first appearance in 2019.(ABC News)

SA Police crash expert Mark Fulcher, who was tasked with investigating the collision, also gave evidence today.

Sergeant Fulcher told the court it had not been possible to determine the speed of the car Mr Campbell was driving at the time of the incident.

“We do have a key that we can access the data with,” he told the court.

But he said the data chip inside the car, which could have revealed details about what happened in the moments leading up to the collision, was not on.

Sergeant Fulcher said the chip had been “switched off” in Huracan models “everywhere but the United States”.

He said that, as a result, investigators had also been unable to determine if the vehicle was in sports or street mode.

“When you switch the ignition off and turn it back off it goes back to Strada (street mode),” he said.

Sophie Naismith leans on a ledge with her arm in front of her face
Sophia Naismith’s family shared this portrait photo.(Supplied)



Source link

Data chip from Lamborghini that killed teenager Sophia Naismith was ‘switched off’, court told


A police crash investigator has told the Adelaide Magistrates Court that it is not possible to access data from a car that hit and killed a teenage pedestrian last year.

Alexander Campbell has been charged over the death of 15-year-old Sophia Naismith, who was hit along with her friend Jordyn Callea in front of the House of Tien restaurant at Glengowrie in June 2019.

Mr Campbell, who was driving a Lamborghini Huracan when he struck the pair, has been charged with causing death by dangerous driving and causing serious injury by dangerous driving.

His lawyer, Craig Caldicott, has sought to have the death by dangerous driving charge thrown out before trial.

Mr Caldicott previously told the court that the car’s crash data chip had the potential to “tell us everything”, including the speed of the vehicle.

“It’s a complex matter involving a Lamborghini,” Mr Caldicott said in August.

“There’s a computer chip inside that Lamborghini which we’re seeking access to, to be able to read, which is a crash data chip.”

Alexander Campbell (right) outside court after his first appearance in 2019.(ABC News)

SA Police crash expert Mark Fulcher, who was tasked with investigating the collision, today gave evidence in a committal court hearing.

Sergeant Fulcher told the court it had not been possible to determine the speed of the car Mr Campbell was driving at the time of the incident.

“We do have a key that we can access the data with,” he told the court.

But he said the data chip inside the car, which could have revealed details about what happened in the moments leading up to the collision, was not on.

Sergeant Fuller said the chip had been “switched off” in Huracan models “everywhere but the United States”.

He said that, as a result, investigators had also been unable to determine if the vehicle was in sports or street mode.

A supercar
The Lamborghini involved in the crash.(Carsales)

“When you switch the ignition off and turn it back off it goes back to Strada (street mode),” he said.

Former Supercar driver Luke Youlden was also called on as a witness to provide expert evidence.

Mr Youlden said while he had only seen photos of the crash, he had experience driving the Huracan model.

When asked by Mr Caldicott if he could identify what setting Mr Campbell’s car had been in, he replied: “No, I can’t”.

Sophie Naismith leans on a ledge with her arm in front of her face
Sophia Naismith’s family shared this portrait photo.(Supplied)



Source link

NSW Police plea to find blue Lamborghini driver for alleged speeding


An alleged Lamborghini hoon seen speeding through a Sydney suburb is being hunted by police.

Footage shows a blue Lamborghini allegedly speeding down Roberts Road in Telopea in Sydney’s north west about 8.45am on Saturday.

The force is seeking public help to identify the driver after the incident was reported to the Cumberland Police Area Command.

The vehicle has dark tinted windows and bears black and white registration plates.

Investigations are continuing and anyone with information should contact Cumberland Police on (02) 98974199 or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.



Source link