Legendary broadcaster Larry King has died in hospital, aged 87


Larry King, the suspenders-sporting everyman whose broadcast interviews with world leaders, movie stars and ordinary Joes helped define American conversation for a half-century, died Saturday. He was 87.

King died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, Ora Media, the studio and network he co-founded, tweeted. No cause of death was given, although he had been hospitalised with COVID-19 earlier this month.

A longtime nationally syndicated radio host, from 1985 through 2010 he was a nightly fixture on CNN, where he won many honors, including two Peabody awards.

With his celebrity interviews, political debates and topical discussions, King wasn’t just an enduring on-air personality. He also set himself apart with the curiosity be brought to every interview, whether questioning the assault victim known as the “Central Park Jogger” or billionaire industrialist Ross Perot, who in 1992 rocked the presidential contest by announcing his candidacy on King’s show.

In its early years, “Larry King Live” was based in Washington, D.C., which gave the show an air of gravitas. Likewise King. He was the plainspoken go-between through whom Beltway bigwigs could reach their public, and they did, earning the show prestige as a place where things happened, where news was made.

King conducted an estimated 50,000 on-air interviews. In 1995 he presided over a Middle East peace summit with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, King Hussein of Jordan and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. He welcomed everyone from the Dalai Lama to Elizabeth Taylor, from Mikhail Gorbachev to Barack Obama, Bill Gates to Lady Gaga.

Especially after he relocated to Los Angeles, his shows were frequently in the thick of breaking celebrity news, including Paris Hilton talking about her stint in jail in 2007 and Michael Jackson’s friends and family members talking about his death in 2009.

King boasted of never over-preparing for an interview. His non-confrontational style relaxed his guests and made him readily relatable to his audience.

“I don’t pretend to know it all,” he said in a 1995 Associated Press interview. “Not, ’What about Geneva or Cuba?’ I ask, ’Mr. President, what don’t you like about this job?’ Or ’What’s the biggest mistake you made?’ That’s fascinating.”

Melania Trump, Donald Trump, Larry King and Shawn Southwick King.
Camera IconMelania Trump, Donald Trump, Larry King and Shawn Southwick King. Credit: Jemal Countess/WireImage

At a time when CNN, as the lone player in cable news, was deemed politically neutral, and King was the essence of its middle-of-the-road stance, political figures and people at the center of controversies would seek out his show.

And he was known for getting guests who were notoriously elusive. Frank Sinatra, who rarely gave interviews and often lashed out at reporters, spoke to King in 1988 in what would be the singer’s last major TV appearance. Sinatra was an old friend of King’s and acted accordingly.

“Why are you here?” King asks. Sinatra responds, “Because you asked me to come and I hadn’t seen you in a long time to begin with, I thought we ought to get together and chat, just talk about a lot of things.”

King had never met Marlon Brando, who was even tougher to get and tougher to interview, when the acting giant asked to appear on King’s show in 1994. The two hit it off so famously they ended their 90-minute talk with a song and an on- the-mouth kiss, an image that was all over media in subsequent weeks.

After a gala week marking his 25th anniversary in June 2010, King abruptly announced he was retiring from his show, telling viewers, “It’s time to hang up my nightly suspenders.” Named as his successor in the time slot: British journalist and TV personality Piers Morgan.

Larry King and his ex-wife Shaun.
Camera IconLarry King and his ex-wife Shaun. Credit: Stuart Ramson/AP

By King’s departure that December, suspicion had grown that he had waited a little too long to hang up those suspenders. Once the leader in cable TV news, he ranked third in his time slot with less than half the nightly audience his peak year, 1998, when “Larry King Live” drew 1.64 million viewers.

His wide-eyed, regular-guy approach to interviewing by then felt dated in an era of edgy, pushy or loaded questioning by other hosts.

Meanwhile, occasional flubs had made him seem out of touch, or worse. A prime example from 2007 found King asking Jerry Seinfeld if he had voluntarily left his sitcom or been canceled by his network, NBC.

“I was the No. 1 show in television, Larry,” replied Seinfeld with a flabbergasted look. “Do you know who I am?“

Always a workaholic, King would be back doing specials for CNN within a few months of performing his nightly duties.

He found a new sort of celebrity as a plain-spoken natural on Twitter when the platform emerged, winning over more than 2 million followers who simultaneously mocked and loved him for his esoteric style.

“I’ve never been in a canoe. #Itsmy2cents,” he said in a typical tweet in 2015.

Larry King.
Camera IconLarry King. Credit: BRIAN K. DIGGS/AP

His Twitter account was essentially a revival of a USA Today column he wrote for two decades full of one-off, disjointed thoughts. Norm Macdonald delivered a parody version of the column when he played King on “Saturday Night Live,” with deadpan lines like, “The more I think about it, the more I appreciate the equator.”

King was constantly parodied, often through old-age jokes on late-night talk shows from hosts including David Letterman and Conan O’Brien, often appearing with the latter to get in on the roasting himself.

King came by his voracious but no-frills manner honestly.

He was born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger in 1933, a son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who ran a bar and grill in Brooklyn. But after his father’s death when Larry was a boy, he faced a troubled, sometimes destitute youth.

A fan of such radio stars as Arthur Godfrey and comedians Bob & Ray, King on reaching adulthood set his sights on a broadcasting career. With word that Miami was a good place to break in, he headed south in 1957 and landed a job sweeping floors at a tiny AM station. When a deejay abruptly quit, King was put on the air – and was handed his new surname by the station manager, who thought Zeiger “too Jewish.”

A year later he moved to a larger station, where his duties were expanded from the usual patter to serving as host of a daily interview show that aired from a local restaurant. He quickly proved equally adept at talking to the waitresses, and the celebrities who began dropping by.

Legendary broadcaster Larry King has died in hospital, aged 87.
Camera IconLegendary broadcaster Larry King has died in hospital, aged 87. Credit: Chris Pizzello/AP

By the early 1960s King had gone to yet a larger Miami station, scored a newspaper column and become a local celebrity himself.

At the same time, he fell victim to living large.

“It was important to me to come across as a ‘big man’,” he wrote in his autobiography, which meant “I made a lot of money and spread it around lavishly.”

He accumulated debts and his first broken marriages (he was married eight times to seven women). He gambled, borrowed wildly and failed to pay his taxes. He also became involved with a shady financier in a scheme to bankroll an investigation of President Kennedy’s assassination. But when King skimmed some of the cash to pay his overdue taxes, his partner sued him for grand larceny in 1971. The charges were dropped, but King’s reputation appeared ruined.

King lost his radio show and, for several years, struggled to find work. But by 1975 the scandal had largely blown over and a Miami station gave him another chance. Regaining his local popularity, King was signed in 1978 to host radio’s first nationwide call-in show.

Originating from Washington on the Mutual network, “The Larry King Show” was eventually heard on more than 300 stations and made King a national phenomenon.

I made a lot of money and spread it around lavishly.

A few years later, CNN founder Ted Turner offered King a slot on his young network. “Larry King Live” debuted on June 1, 1985, and became CNN’s highest- rated program. King’s beginning salary of $100,000 a year eventually grew to more than $7 million.

A three-packs-a-day cigarette habit led to a heart attack in 1987, but King’s quintuple-bypass surgery didn’t slow him down.

Meanwhile, he continued to prove that, in his words, “I’m not good at marriage, but I’m a great boyfriend.”

He was just 18 when he married high school girlfriend Freda Miller, in 1952. The marriage lasted less than a year. In subsequent decades he would marry Annette Kay, Alene Akins (twice), Mickey Sutfin, Sharon Lepore and Julie Alexander.

In 1997, he wed Shawn Southwick, a country singer and actress 26 years his junior. They would file for divorce in 2010, rescind the filing, then file for divorce again in 2019.

The couple had two sons, King’s fourth and fifth kids, Chance Armstrong, born in 1999, and Cannon Edward, born in 2000. In 2020, King lost his two eldest children, Andy King and Chaia King, who died of unrelated health problems within weeks of each other.

He had many other medical issues in recent decades, including more heart attacks and diagnoses of type 2 diabetes and lung cancer.

Early in 2021, CNN reported that King was hospitalized for more than a week with COVID-19.

Through his setbacks he continued to work into his late 80s, taking on online talk shows and infomercials as his appearances on CNN grew fewer.

“Work,” King once said. “It’s the easiest thing I do.”



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Larry King has died, aged 87


Larry King, the legendary American television and radio host, has died at the age of 87.

He passed away on Saturday morning (local time) at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, after receiving treatment for coronavirus, The Sun reports.

The tragic news was announced on Larry’s official Twitter page.

King was hospitalised shortly before Christmas after testing positive for coronavirus.

His iconic career spanned more than six decades – but the host suffered with Type 2 diabetes and from lung cancer, angina and heart attacks in recent years.

A statement from his representatives said: “With profound sadness Ora Media announces the death of our co-founder, host and friend Larry King, who passed away this morning at age 87 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

“For 63 years and across the platforms of radio, television and digital media, Larry’s many thousands of interviews, awards and global acclaim stand as a testament to his unique and lasting talent as a broadcaster.

“Additionally while it was his name appearing in the shows’ titles, Larry always viewed his interview subjects as the true stars of his programs, and himself as merely an unbiased conduit between the guest and audience.”

Piers Morgan was among the star names leading tributes to the iconic broadcaster after his death was announced this afternoon.

He wrote: “Larry King was a hero of mine until we fell out after I replaced him at CNN & he said my show was ‘like watching your mother-in-law go over a cliff in your new Bentley.’ (He married 8 times so a mother-in-law expert.

“But he was a brilliant broadcaster & masterful TV interviewer.”

CNN anchor Jim Acosta wrote: “Broadcasting legend and longtime CNN host Larry King has passed away.

“He will be missed by so many CNN employees past and present. #RIPLarryKing.”

Sports journalist Keith Olbermann wrote: “My friend Larry King has died. It is literally true that thousands of us can make that sad statement this morning.

“While he was easily caricatured, I’ve never known anybody who made a bigger deal out of the slightest kindness afforded him.”

Boy George called King a “media legend” while others shared their favourite interviews from the broadcaster’s illustrious career.

HEARTBREAKING TRIBUTES

King was married eight times and had five children.

He was last pictured last month at home with two of his sons during Thanksgiving last November.

The broadcaster was admitted to hospital with Covid-19 shortly before Christmas but passed away after four weeks of treatment.

King was born in New York and started his career as a local journalist in Florida in the 1950s.

He gained global prominence after the launch of The Larry King Show in 1978 and went on to host Larry King Live on CNN from 1985 to 2010.

King interviewed a staggering number of celebrities, political leaders and public figures, including every US president from Richard Nixon to Donald Trump.

Among the celebrities he interviewed over the years were Marlon Brando, Snoop Dogg, Liza Minnelli, Jerry Seinfeld, Elizabeth Taylor, Frank Sinatra and Sir Paul McCartney.

The statement announcing his death concluded: “Whether he was interviewing a US president, foreign leader, celebrity, scandal-ridden personage, or an everyman, Larry liked to ask short, direct, and uncomplicated questions.

“Larry’s interviews from his 25-year run on CNN’s ‘Larry King Live,’ and his Ora Media programs ‘Larry King Now,’ and ‘Politicking with Larry King’ are consistently referenced by media outlets around the world and remain part of the historical record of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.”

Funeral arrangements for King and a memorial service will be announced at a later date.

His family has requested privacy at this time.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission

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US broadcast legend Larry King dies at 87


Larry King, the suspenders-wearing US broadcaster whose interviews with world leaders, movie stars and ordinary people helped define American conversation for decades, has died ages 87.

King died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, his social media accounts said in a statement on Saturday.

No cause of death was given King had been hospitalised earlier in January after contracting COVID-19.

With his celebrity interviews, political debates and topical discussions, King wasn’t just an enduring on-air personality.

He also set himself apart with the curiosity he brought to every interview on radio and on his Larry King Live nightly TV show.

King conducted an estimated 50,000 on-air interviews with presidents, world leaders, Hollywood celebrities and sports stars during his radio and TV career that spanned more than 60 years.

He welcomed everyone from the Dalai Lama to Elizabeth Taylor, from Mikhail Gorbachev to Barack Obama, and Bill Gates to Lady Gaga.

His shows were frequently in the thick of breaking celebrity news, including Paris Hilton talking about her stint in jail in 2007 and Michael Jackson’s friends and family members talking about his death in 2009.

King boasted of never over-preparing for an interview, and his relaxed style helped his guests feel at east and made him relatable to his audience.

“I don’t pretend to know it all,” he said in a 1995 Associated Press interview.

Funeral arrangements and a memorial service will be announced later in coordination with the King family, according to the tweet on Saturday from Ora Media, the studio and network he co-founded.

King was born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger in 1933, a son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who ran a bar and grill in Brooklyn.

But after his father’s death when Larry was a boy, he faced a troubled, sometimes destitute youth.

King set his sights on a broadcasting career and in Miami in 1957 he landed a job sweeping floors at a tiny AM station.

When a deejay abruptly quit, King was put on the air – and was handed his new surname by the station manager, who thought Zeiger “too Jewish”.

By the early 1960s King had gone to a larger Miami station, scored a newspaper column and become a local celebrity himself.

At the same time, he fell victim to living large.

“It was important to me to come across as a ‘big man’,” he wrote in his autobiography.

He was married eight times to seven women. He accumulated debts. He gambled, borrowed wildly and failed to pay his taxes.

A three-packs-a-day cigarette habit led to a heart attack in 1987, but King’s quintuple-bypass surgery didn’t slow him down.

Through his setbacks he continued to work into his late 80s, taking on online talk shows and infomercials as his appearances on CNN grew fewer.

“Work,” King once said. “It’s the easiest thing I do.”

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Legendary American talk show host Larry King dead at 87


Former CNN talk show host Larry King has died following a recent battle with COVID-19.

His company, Ora Media, made the announcement on his Twitter account.

The 87-year-old King had undergone treatment at Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles. Earlier this month, the Associated Press reported King had moved out of the intensive care unit.

The legendary broadcaster was among America’s most well-known interviewers of celebrities, presidents and other public figures. He hosted Larry King Live from 1985 to 2010.

More to come

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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan tweets photo after skin cancer removal: ‘No pain, no gain’


Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan isn’t letting his latest battle with cancer get him down.

“No pain, no gain. Play like a Raven,” Hogan tweeted Saturday following a procedure to remove cancerous cells from his face.

The tweet included a photo of himself with a bandage on one side of his face, giving a thumbs up while donning Baltimore Ravens gear ahead of the NFL team’s playoff game against the Buffalo Bills (which Buffalo won 17-3).

Hogan, who celebrated five years of being cancer-free last summer following a battle with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2015, was recently diagnosed with early-stage skin cancer known as basal and squamos cell carcinoma, FOX 5 in Washington, D.C., reported.

MARYLAND GOP GOVERNOR, LIEUTENANT WANT TRUMP TO RESIGN AFTER CAPITOL RIOT 

On Wednesday, the Republican governor called the outpatient procedure “minor” and said he likely wouldn’t need any more treatment, the Baltimore Sun reported.

‘DANCING WITH THE STARS’ JUDGE LEN GOODMAN REVEALS SKIN CANCER REMOVAL FROM FACE

Hogan had some skin removed a few weeks ago and in 2018. He said his most recent procedures were “another pop-up of that stuff. But it’s nothing serious,” the Sun reported.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is seen in Annapolis, Md., Jan. 7, 2021. (Associated Press)

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Hogan has managed to take care of his duties as governor despite the medical procedure. On Friday he declared a state of emergency in Maryland, which borders D.C., amid heightened security measures ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration Wednesday, according to FOX 5.

He previously called on President Trump to resign after the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. 

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Larry King, hospitalized with COVID, moved out of ICU


Veteran talk show host Larry King, suffering from COVID-19, has been moved out of the intensive care unit at a Los Angeles hospital and is breathing on his own, a spokesman said on Monday.

King was moved to the ICU on New Year’s Eve and was receiving oxygen but is now breathing on his own, said David Theall, a spokesman for Ora Media, a production company formed by King.

The 87-year-old broadcasting legend shared a video phone call with his three sons, Theall said.

King, who spent many years as an overnight radio DJ, is best known as host of the Larry King Live interview show that ran in prime time on CNN from 1985 to 2010.



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Larry King hospitalized with COVID-19 for more than a week


Legendary talk show host and former CNN interviewer Larry King has COVID-19, according to a source close to the family.

King, 87, has been hospitalized at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles for more than a week, the source said. Due to protocols at the hospital, King’s three sons have been unable to visit him, according to the source.

King, who has Type 2 diabetes, has confronted a series of medical issues over the years, including several heart attacks and quintuple bypass surgery in 1987. In 2017, King revealed he had been diagnosed with lung cancer and successfully underwent surgery to treat it. He also underwent a procedure in 2019 to address angina.

His own medical issues inspired him to start the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, a non-profit aimed at helping those without health insurance afford medical care.

King hosted CNN’s “Larry King Live” for 25 years, interviewing presidential candidates, celebrities, athletes, movie stars and everyday people. He retired in 2010 after taping more than 6,000 episodes of the show.

But he couldn’t stay off the airwaves for long.

In 2012, he became the host of “Larry King Now,” a thrice-weekly show on Ora TV, an on-demand digital network he co-founded with Mexican telecommunications mogul Carlos Slim, according to Forbes.

Last year, two of King’s adult children died within weeks of each other. His son, 65-year-old Andy King, passed away of a heart attack in late July, followed by King’s 52-year-old daughter Chaia King, who died in August shortly after being diagnosed with lung cancer.

King’s Twitter feed, @kingsthings, has 2.4 million followers. His most recent tweet was on November 26, when he wished his followers a happy Thanksgiving.





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Larry Ellison’s last stand – Can TikTok help Oracle stay relevant in the cloud-computing age? | Business


LARRY WHO? A few weeks ago asking a young tech worker in Silicon Valley about Larry Ellison, co-founder, former boss and now chief technology officer of Oracle, might have elicited blank stares. More surprising, given that his company is still the world’s second-largest software-maker, a follow-up question might have been: “Remind me what Oracle sells?”

Being treated like a has-been must have irked the 76-year-old Mr Ellison. In Oracle’s heyday 20 years ago he was Silicon Valley’s best-known rogue billionaire—yesteryear’s Elon Musk. “The Difference Between God and Larry Ellison”, one of the many books written about the firm and its colourful founder, was subtitled “God Doesn’t Think He Is Larry Ellison”.

Now he and his firm are back in the headlines, thanks to something that, in software terms, is about as far from Oracle’s bread and butter of corporate databases as jelly beans are from white toast. Its deal to team up with TikTok has made its brand recognisable even to many teenagers—the main clientele of the Chinese-owned video-sharing platform. Whether the notoriety lasts more than 15 seconds, the length of a typical TikTok video, is another matter.

Attempts at reinvention are nothing new in Silicon Valley. It can be made harder by lucrative legacy businesses; just ask IBM, another once-great information-technology (IT) giant that has been sliding into irrelevance. Oracle would rather emulate Microsoft, which has ridden the cloud revolution to a market capitalisation of $1.6trn and stellar returns (see chart). The TikTok arrangement, which would see Oracle host the app’s data in its cloud, confirms that is Mr Ellison’s plan. Like the transaction—which could yet be blocked by President Donald Trump (see next article)—Oracle’s metamorphosis is not, however, a done deal just yet.

Since its founding in 1977 Oracle has been the odd one out in Silicon Valley—less focused on inventing the next new thing and more on signing the next big contract. By the mid-1990s it dominated the market for “relational” databases, which underlie corporate applications from book-keeping to supply-chain management. After the dotcom crash in the early 2000s it used its pile of cash and high share price to consolidate swathes of the IT industry. Within a few years it acquired several software rivals, including BEA Systems and PeopleSoft, as well as Sun Microsystems, a maker of powerful computers. It is still hard to find a sizeable firm that does not send a cheque to Oracle’s snazzy headquarters in Redwood City. With customers locked in by the sheer tedium of switching databases, Oracle could extract huge profits. In its last financial year the company earned a net income of more than $10bn on revenue of nearly $40bn.

Success in old IT was a big reason why Oracle was late to the new sort: cloud computing. Mr Ellison long dismissed it as a faddish label for existing technology. By the time he realised it was an epochal shift in IT, Oracle had fallen behind. Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), as it calls its offering, is said to have sales of less than $2bn annually, compared with more than $40bn for Amazon Web Services (AWS). The e-commerce titan’s market-leading cloud unit is valued at several times Oracle’s market capitalisation of $178bn. Cloud-based rivals of the sort that Mr Ellison once dismissed, such as Adobe and Salesforce, are worth around a quarter more than his firm.

Even in databases, Oracle’s core business, the world has moved on. For many new applications, such as customer-facing websites, its tools are too expensive and inflexible. Recent years have seen the rise of more specialised digital repositories, many of them in the cloud and based on malleable “open source” software. According to Gartner, a research firm, Oracle’s share of the database market fell from nearly 44% in 2013 to 28% last year. And it has yet to shake off a reputation for antagonising clients with things like audits to verify their use of software by workers—and hefty charges for firms that exceed licence limits. Brent Thill of Jefferies, a bank, echoes other Oracle bears when he says that the company has been stuck for years even as “we are living in the data age, the biggest tech-boom ever.”

Seers of a brighter future

Oracle optimists counter that the firm has a few things going for it. One is management. The death last October of a co-CEO, Mark Hurd, left Safra Catz as the woman in charge. She is widely considered an effective operator. Mr Ellison, who stepped down as chief executive in 2014, has in recent years taken a more active role in product development—considered his forte—without treading on Ms Catz’s toes. The upshot, says Ted Friedman of Gartner, is better technology such as the “autonomous database”, which uses artificial intelligence to automate work once reserved for human IT administrators. For example, it allows software updates to be installed without shutting systems down, a dreaded procedure which can go badly wrong.

OCI enjoys the latecomer advantage in the cloud, says Clay Magouyrk, one of its leaders. “We did not have to take the circuitous path others had to take to get it right,” he says. Mr Magouyrk points to Oracle’s next-generation cloud platform, which will, among other things, offer hundreds of local sub-clouds that let customers keep their data close to home, as privacy regulations may require them to. In April Zoom, a videoconferencing service, opted for OCI to help it manage pandemic-fuelled growth (mostly because Oracle charges less for the use of its networks). Landing the TikTok contract would be another boost: the video app spends an estimated $1bn annually on cloud-computing services.

A bigger opportunity for Oracle lies in cloud-based applications. It has begun converting some of its existing customers to these programs, which are more sophisticated than the basic computing and storage offered by AWS and OCI, observes Mark Moerdler of Bernstein, a broker. The company’s bundle of cloud-based services already accounts for 8% of its software revenue; sales have been growing by more than 30% a year.

The wild card is Oracle’s political bets. The firm has positioned itself close to Mr Trump. In 2016 Ms Catz served on the president’s transition team and this year Mr Ellison hosted a fund-raiser for him. This did not help them win a lucrative cloud contract with the Department of Defence; OCI was not technically up to snuff. But being in the White House’s good graces may have helped Oracle beat Microsoft (which won the Pentagon contract) to the TikTok deal. If the deal succeeds—a big “if”—Oracle’s cloud may emerge as a digital haven for companies seeking to reassure Washington that their data are safe from prying Communist eyes in Beijing amid the Sino-American tech cold war.

It is, then, too early to write Oracle off. When a group of youngish cloud-services CEOs recently met reporters on a Zoom call, they were unanimous in their assessment. Jennifer Tejada of PagerDuty, which helps firms manage IT incidents, summed it up: “You have to respect Oracle for finding ways to keep itself relevant.” Relevance is not the same as fast growth, which may prove elusive given competition from AWS and others. But it is better than the digital dustbin of obscurity.

This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “Larry’s last stand”

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New South East Melbourne Phoenix NBA import Ben Moore arrives with big wraps from Jeff Van Gundy, Larry Brown


Van Gundy made the case for Moore to have a bigger role in the NBA while he was stuck on the bench with Indiana in 2018.

“[He’s a] straight winner. He could be on any team in the NBA,” Van Gundy said.

“[He brings] energy, passion, enthusiasm, defence, tenacity, rebounding. [He’s] tough, hard-nosed, nasty competitive. I love Ben Moore … he plays so hard, so athletic.”

Naismith Hall of Fame coach Larry Brown mentored Moore at Southern Methodist University and honed his work ethic, the pair still speak regularly.

Players that match Van Gundy’s praise are what any NBL side is looking for and the Phoenix are excited about how they can pair Moore with Mitch Creek and Dane Pineau in their front court next season.

Moore is also fired up to show what he can do to springboard his way back into the big league.

“Defensively, I’m going [to] bring a lot to the team and I’m going to try to embody the [team] culture,” Moore said.

“I’m going to bring it every day to practice. I’m just going to have a great work ethic and doing what I can for the team.

“I’m a blue-collar kind of player, that’s what they [the fans] can expect.”

Phoenix coach Simon Mitchell said he was excited to see what Moore would bring to the side when he arrives for pre-season training in December.

“He came extremely recommended,” Mitchell said.

“Larry Brown coached him in college and rated him the best team player he’s ever coached. When you get a Hall of Famer talking up a kid like that, then you take notice.

“I think he’s a bit of a Swiss Army Knife in that he can perform multiple roles; he can play the five [centre] spot, certainly plays the four [power forward] spot and can play the three [small forward] as well. He’s inside, outside and brings constant energy.

“We just felt like he ticks so many boxes for us. We love his length, we love his athletic ability, we love his versatility, and we think he’s going to be the guy for us.”

The Phoenix roster so far: Mitch Creek, Cam Gliddon, Ben Moore (import), Kyle Adnam, Yanni Wetzell, Dane Pineau, Adam Gibson, Kendall Stephens, Reuben Te Rangi and Izayah Mauriohooho-Le’afa (development player).

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Horse racing: Luke Tarrant headbutts Larry Cassidy, six month ban, latest news


Queensland jockey Luke Tarrant has been disqualified for six months after admitting to headbutting fellow rider Larry Cassidy at the weighing scales at Doomben.

As well as the seriousness of the physical incident, stewards took into account the breach of the COVID-19 social protocols and the potential for Tarrant’s actions to have an adverse effect on the racing industry.

It is the latest disqualification or suspension for Tarrant who had been making a success of a comeback after facing criminal drugs charges. Tarrant and Cassidy had been involved in a scrimmage during the ninth race on Wednesday.

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Veteran jockey Larry Cassidy.Source: AAP



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