Lawmakers are ‘inching toward’ Cuomo impeachment probe


A Democratic New York state lawmaker who accused Gov. Andrew Cuomo of threatening him over his criticism of the handling of COVID-19-related nursing home deaths said Friday that support is building within the state legislature to begin an impeachment investigation.

“It will take a little time to build that consensus, but every day we are inching toward the impeachment process,” Assemblyman Ronald Kim, a Democrat from Queens, said in an interview with the Yahoo News podcast “Skullduggery.” He estimated that, along with “virtually all” Republicans, between 25 and 30 Democratic legislators currently support an impeachment inquiry into Cuomo — a number he suggested is growing steadily.

Kim, who considers himself a progressive socialist, made the comments after recounting how Cuomo called him up at home and “berated” him, threatening to destroy his career if the lawmaker didn’t immediately retract his comments accusing Cuomo’s administration of withholding evidence about nursing home deaths. Kim said Cuomo’s comments “traumatized” his wife and prompted him to hire a lawyer.

Cuomo has adamantly denied Kim’s account, and during a news conference in Albany on Friday he pushed back on the accusations against him, charging that his critics are spreading “lies” and “misinformation” about nursing home deaths.

“I’m not going to let you hurt New Yorkers by lying about what happened. Surrounding the death of a loved one,” he said. “So I’m going to take on the lies and the unscrupulous actors, especially when they cause pain and damage to New York.” He added: “I should have done it before. And I should have done it more aggressively.”

The controversy over Cuomo’s phone call to Kim, along with an apparent confession from a top aide that data about nursing home deaths had been concealed from the Justice Department, has provoked an outcry within the legislature, with lawmakers vowing to strip the governor of his emergency powers to deal with the COVID-19 crisis.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo speaks during a daily briefing following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Manhattan in New York City, New York on July 13, 2020. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a daily briefing on July 13, 2020. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

The allegations have also prompted the FBI and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn to launch a criminal investigation into the Cuomo administration’s handling of the nursing home issue.

Kim said in the “Skullduggery” interview that he has been told the investigation is focused in part on “obstruction of justice” and that as part of that he is fully prepared to recount his phone call to federal authorities.

“Of course, I’m prepared to comply and spend as much time handing over as much evidence as they want,” he said. “I expect many of us to be contacted very soon.”

Kim, whose uncle died in a nursing home from COVID, has been a thorn in Cuomo’s side on the issue ever since last spring, when the governor’s administration directed that COVID-positive patients at state hospitals be returned to nursing homes, leading to the spread of the disease among elderly patients. Cuomo’s aides have defended the move, saying that at the time the state was facing a serious shortage of intensive-care-unit beds at hospitals to treat patients during the pandemic.

But the governor’s political problems over the issue have mounted in recent weeks by a series of revelations, starting with New York Attorney General Letitia James’s release of a report concluding that the state had undercounted by as much as 50 percent the number of New Yorkers who had died in nursing homes.

Then a top aide to Cuomo admitted in a private conversation with lawmakers that the state had withheld data about nursing home deaths from the Justice Department because officials feared it “was going to be used against us.”

Assemblyman Ron Kim, D-Queens, speaks during a press briefing at the state Capitol in Albany, N.Y. (Hans Pennink, File/AP)

New York Assemblyman Ron Kim during a press briefing at the state Capitol in Albany. (Hans Pennink, File/AP)

Kim said the concealing of the data needs to be investigated along with another issue he sees as closely related: Cuomo’s decision to back and sign legislation last spring giving nursing homes and their top executives immunity from lawsuits stemming from the coronavirus pandemic — a move that Kim claimed was the result of political influence exerted by the nursing home industry.

“If we had the real-time data — which they were holding onto — we would have had the argument to repeal that immunity,” he said. “Instead, because we didn’t see the whole picture, we were only able to repeal” the immunity partially last July.

“So this is one clear example of what we could have done differently in terms of policy if they had shared the data in real time,” Kim said. “But they made a choice not to do it. All of those decisions need to be investigated. Who gave him the language of the immunity? [The] industry came in and even said and bragged in a press release that we got this done for nursing homes and hospitals.”

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‘Mission creep?’ Police ‘recommend’ keeping razor-wired fencing around Capitol until September, cite ‘threats against lawmakers’



Washington, DC, police are calling for razor-wire-topped fencing around the US Capitol to be kept in place until at least September because they continue to hear of threats against lawmakers in the aftermath of the January 6 riot.

US Capitol Police have notified congressional leaders of their fencing recommendation, the Associated Press reported on Thursday, citing anonymous officials with the department. The threats include “online chatter” about extremist groups possibly coming to Washington in the weeks ahead. Police said the physical barrier is needed as a physical barrier to prevent a repeat of the Capitol riot.

There has been no clear indication of the basis for suggesting that massive crowds of protesters intend to return to Washington and threaten physical harm to politicians or anyone else. The fence was erected the day after the riot, and more than 25,000 National Guard troops were summoned to Washington from across the US to help seal off the city’s government district for President Joe Biden’s January 20 inauguration.



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So NOW walls work? Capitol police chief calls for PERMANENT security fencing to protect Congress


Although the violent protests that were predicted for Inauguration Day didn’t occur, the National Guard has kept about 7,000 troops in Washington and plans to still have 5,600 in mid-March to continue bolstering security. Acting Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman called last month for installing permanent fencing and implementing other security measures, raising concerns over the aesthetic and symbolic appearance of indefinitely walling off a government from its people.

“Right on schedule, police officials anonymously say the ridiculous barbed-wire fence surrounding the Capitol must stay in place till at least September..,” journalist Michael Tracey said. “Are you familiar with the concept of mission creep?”

Many observers noted the irony that Democrats in Congress now endorse a barrier for their protection, after arguing for years that a wall on America’s southern border was a waste of money that diverts attention from ‘genuine threats’ to US homeland security. Others predicted that the threat will continue to be resuscitated, likely meaning the fence will stay up well beyond September.

But some Democrats, such as Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser, have spoken out against long-term fencing around the Capitol. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a non-voting member of Congress who represents the District of Columbia, introduced a bill this week seeking to prohibit Capitol fencing from being made permanent. She said the Capitol needs to be secured without walling it off “like a fortress that needs to be protected from the people we represent.”



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When 25,000 troops aren’t enough: Democrats ‘WORE BODY ARMOR’ to Biden’s inauguration in sealed-off Capitol, reports claim


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President Trump thanks defense team, GOP lawmakers following acquittal in impeachment trial


Trump lawyers Michael van der Veen (C) and William J. Brennan (2nd R) talk after the second impeachment trial of former US President Donald Trump, on February 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)

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UPDATED 1:00 PM PT – Sunday, February 14, 2021

President Trump praised his supporters for standing by his side during what he said was “the greatest witch hunt in our nation’s history.” In a statement Thursday, the President thanked his defense team and GOP lawmakers for helping to preserve the rule of law and America’s constitutional rights.

The 45th President said it’s sad to see a political party excuse itself from civility and attempt to cancel those with opposing views.

Conservative voices also threw their support behind Trump following the verdict. On Saturday, Eric Trump tweeted “two-to-zero” in reference to the Democrat Party’s second failed attempt to convict President Trump of wrongdoing.

Donald Trump Jr. also took to social media and said he hoped Democrats could finally start working for the American people.

“Now, maybe that they’ve gotten all of the nonsense hopefully out their system, the Democrats can actually go back to doing some work in the Senate,” the 45th President’s eldest son said. “All of the Senate was pushed through this nonsense.”

In the meantime, some citizens voiced their opinions against the partisan efforts.

“I feel like that was a huge waste of tax dollars and American people who are suffering,” Michigan resident Jessica Kurlyowich stated. “They wasted millions and billions of dollars on something that they…ultimately knew that they were going to fail.”

Trump supporters across the country also spoke out and said President Trump had no role in the January 6 events on Capitol Hill.

“I think it’s great because the President did not incite a riot at the Capitol, he told the American people to come peacefully and patriotically,” Michigan resident Vance Sellers said. “They chose to break the law.”

In light of the outpour of support, President Trump said the MAGA movement has just begun and added he looks forward to revealing what his next endeavors are in the coming months.

RELATED: Senate Votes To Acquit 45th President Donald J. Trump



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Lawmakers weigh new child tax credit expansion


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A Democratic proposal to expand the child tax credit for one year could give qualifying families up to $300 per child per month.

But like all direct payments made by the government as part of Covid relief, some are questioning whether the aid will be too much or too little.

One of the strongest objections to the Democrats’ proposal came from Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who wrote in an op-ed this week that it is “not a pro-family policy, no matter how much Democrats will claim it to be.”

The child tax credit expansion is aimed at reducing child poverty. Research has indicated President Joe Biden’s plan could help cut today’s rate in half, particularly for minority families.

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Still, others like Rubio are skeptical.

“If pulling families out of poverty were as simple as handing moms and dads a check, we would have solved poverty a long time ago,” Rubio wrote.

As with other direct payments, such as stimulus checks, the debate on how the child tax credit is structured has focused on whether those who are hurting the most financially will truly benefit.

Some experts say the Democratic plan could also enrich those at the top of the qualifying income thresholds.

How Democrats’ child tax credit would work

The child tax credit helps parents under certain income thresholds financially provide for their children.

Today, it amounts to $2,000 per child for those who earn up to $400,000 if they are married and $200,000 if single.

Because it’s a tax credit, it lets parents reduce their federal tax liability. (This is not to be confused with a deduction, which lowers adjusted gross income.)

House Democrats’ proposal, which was released this week, calls for raising the credit to $3,600 per child under age 6, and $3,000 per child for those up to and including age 17.

The bill would make it so families can opt to receive payments monthly, instead of having to wait for one lump sum at the end of the year. Families could receive up to $300 per month per child under 6 and $250 per month per child ages 6 to 17.

Eligibility for fuller payments would be based on income. So single parents with adjusted gross income up to $75,000, heads of household with up to $112,500 and married couples filing jointly with up to $150,000 would qualify.

The credit would phase out for those making above those levels, where it would be reduced and then plateau at $2,000 per child. It would be capped for individuals with $200,000 in income and couples with $400,000, the same thresholds in place for the credit today.

“The idea is the current $2,000 that people get per kid still phases out the same way,” said Steve Wamhoff, director of federal tax policy at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy.

Protecting the credit for those making up to $400,000 is also in line with Biden’s campaign promise not to raise taxes for people making under that level of income.

Why lower income households would benefit

The legislation also takes aim at changing existing rules to make it so that lower-income families can access the credit.

To do that, it eliminates the $2,500 minimum income requirement and makes the credit fully refundable. That would give access to families who currently receive no credit or a reduced credit.

“That represents a pretty big shift, I think, in the goal of what the credit was trying to do,” which is help working families, said Garrett Watson, senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation.

Estimates have found such a change could lift 9.9 million children nearly or completely above the poverty level. Many of the children who would benefit would be Latino, African-American or Asian-American.

Yet some conservatives have spoken out against the proposals.

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, (left) and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., at a March 4, 2015 Capitol Hill news conference to introduce their proposal for an overhaul of the tax code.

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Rubio and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, released a joint statement this month calling for Congress to expand the child tax credit without “undercutting the responsibility of parents to work to provide for their families.”

“We do not support turning the Child Tax Credit into what has been called a ‘child allowance,’ paid out as a universal basic income to all parents,” Rubio and Lee said. “That is not tax relief for working parents; it is welfare assistance.”

Together, the senators have put forward an alternative proposal for raising the credit to $4,500 per child under 6, and $3,500 for older children. Work, however, would be a key requirement under the plan.

Yet other experts argue that the key point of the Democrats’ plan is making the money more accessible to families to help fight poverty. Therefore, tying the benefit to income would be counterproductive.

“Is the goal to reduce child poverty or not?” Wamhoff said. “And if that is the goal, then you give assistance to families with children. It’s pretty straight forward.”

But as parents under the same $150,000 income threshold for married couples also stand to get full $1,400 stimulus payments for both them and their children, many families could be in for a big pay day if the current coronavirus relief package goes through.

Altogether, some families could qualify for as much as $10,000 in direct payments, estimates Bill Hoagland, senior vice president at the Bipartisan Policy Center.

“I think we need to do something,” Hoagland said. “But I think there needs to be a better targeting and coordination here between the direct payments and the child tax credit.”

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State lawmakers are pushing to curb governors’ virus powers


Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns.

The push is underway in such states as Arizona, Michigan, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, Indiana and Pennsylvania, where legislators are seeking a constitutional amendment to strip the governor of many of his emergency powers.

Pennsylvania Republican Sen. Wayne Langerholc said the amendment would “make it unequivocally clear that our General Assembly is a co-equal branch … that we are not a monarchy and that our voices matter.”

FILE – In this Jan. 27, 2021, file photo provided by the Michigan Office of the Governor, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer delivers her virtual State of the State address the state in Lansing, Mich. Irked by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (Michigan Office of the Governor via AP)

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and some of his counterparts around the country have argued that they need authority to act quickly and decisively against the fast-changing threat.

The coronavirus has killed an estimated 430,000 Americans and is going through its most lethal phase yet, despite the rollout of vaccines, with new and more contagious variants from abroad turning up in the U.S.

CORONAVIRUS IN THE US: STATE-BY-STATE BREAKDOWN

State legislatures generally took on lesser roles after the pandemic hit, with many suspending work or adjourning. It has been governors or their top health officials who have set many of the policies — imposing mask mandates, limiting public gatherings and shutting down dine-in restaurants, gyms, hair salons and other businesses.

Lawmakers in more than half the states have filed bills this year to limit gubernatorial powers during the pandemic and other emergencies, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Most legislatures began their sessions this month.

FILE - In this July 23, 2020, file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks during an interview with The Associated Press to talk about his response to the coronavirus outbreak in Annapolis, Md. Irked by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. Democrats who control the Maryland General Assembly are pressing for more transparency from Hogan’s administration. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

FILE – In this July 23, 2020, file photo, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan speaks during an interview with The Associated Press to talk about his response to the coronavirus outbreak in Annapolis, Md. Irked by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. Democrats who control the Maryland General Assembly are pressing for more transparency from Hogan’s administration. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Kentucky’s Republican-led Legislature could consider as soon as next week whether to override Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear’s vetoes of several bills that would rein in his emergency powers.

Wisconsin’s GOP-controlled Senate voted earlier this week to repeal Democratic Gov. Tony Evers’ emergency health order, which would end the state’s mask mandate. The Republican-controlled Assembly called off a similar vote Thursday in the face of criticism from health, school and business leaders and concern that it could jeopardize more than $49 million in federal aid.

NEW YORK AG FINDS STATE UNDERCOUNTED NURSING HOME DEATHS

Wisconsin Republicans have argued that Evers exceeded his authority by issuing multiple emergency declarations during the pandemic, which enabled him to extend the mask mandate beyond the 60 days allowed under the law without getting the Legislature’s approval.

Evers contends that the changing nature of the pandemic warranted new emergency declarations.

FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2021, file photo, Republican Gov. Doug Ducey delivers a remote state of the state address during the opening of the Arizona Legislature at the state Capitol in Phoenix. Irked by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. Republicans in the Arizona Senate want to end the broad emergency powers that Ducey has used to limit large gatherings and business capacities. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool, File)

FILE – In this Jan. 11, 2021, file photo, Republican Gov. Doug Ducey delivers a remote state of the state address during the opening of the Arizona Legislature at the state Capitol in Phoenix. Irked by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. Republicans in the Arizona Senate want to end the broad emergency powers that Ducey has used to limit large gatherings and business capacities. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool, File)

The amendment Pennsylvania Republicans are seeking to place on the May ballot also would put a cap on the governor’s disaster declarations — 21 days, unless lawmakers vote to extend them. The Legislature also could halt them at any time with a two-thirds vote.

Wolf has said that prematurely ending his disaster declaration would itself be “disastrous” for the state and that requiring repeated legislative approval “could slow down or halt emergency response when aid is most needed.”

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In Michigan, House Republicans have threatened to withhold billions of dollars for schools unless Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer cedes her administration’s power to prohibit in-person instruction and sports to local health departments. Whitmer called the move “cruel and reckless.”

Whitmer was the target of an alleged kidnapping plot last fall by anti-government extremists upset over her coronavirus restrictions.

A sign requiring patrons to wear a mask is on the door to Whitey's General Store in Zelienople, Pa., Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

A sign requiring patrons to wear a mask is on the door to Whitey’s General Store in Zelienople, Pa., Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Though legislative resistance to executive coronavirus orders has fallen largely along partisan lines in some states, lawmakers elsewhere are pushing back against governors of their own parties.

Republicans in the Arizona Senate want to end the broad emergency powers that GOP Gov. Doug Ducey has used to limit large gatherings and business capacities.

MICHIGAN GOV. WHITMER CALLS STATE REPUBLICANS ‘CRUEL AND RECKLESS’ OVER THREAT TO WITHHOLD EDUCATION RELIEF

Ohio Sen. Rob McColley introduced a bill this week that could rescind emergency health orders issued by Gov. Mike DeWine, a fellow Republican. It would create a committee to retroactively review them. DeWine vetoed a similar bill last year.

McColley said the Legislature needs to take action “when the relatively unfettered power of the executive branch during a time of emergency has lasted as long as it has.”

A Starbucks in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh is open for takeout only on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

A Starbucks in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh is open for takeout only on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

In Indiana, Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb’s executive orders have also stirred opposition from his own party. GOP-sponsored legislation would require lawmakers to be called into session to extend a governor’s emergency order beyond 60 days.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster is supporting legislation that would give lawmakers greater opportunity to pass judgment on his emergency declarations.

INGRAHAM: LOCKED-DOWN ‘BLUE STATE BLUES’ PRESENT DIRE CONTRAST TO GOP-RUN FLORIDA, TEXAS

Under current law, McMaster can issue a declaration for just 15 days before the General Assembly has to weigh in. The Republican governor has skirted that by issuing 22 different declarations, with incremental changes, every two weeks or so.

McMaster has said his goal wasn’t to avoid legislative oversight; he said he couldn’t wait for lawmakers to meet when they were trying to stay apart during the pandemic.

A sign hangs on the door of the Union Grill, temporarily closed due to COVID-19, in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

A sign hangs on the door of the Union Grill, temporarily closed due to COVID-19, in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2021. Irritated by the sweeping use of executive orders during the COVID-19 crisis, state lawmakers around the U.S. are moving to curb the authority of governors and top health officials to impose emergency restrictions such as mask rules and business shutdowns. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Democrats who control the Maryland General Assembly are pressing for more transparency from Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s administration. One idea would require him to go through a state board or alert a legislative panel before making emergency coronavirus purchases.

Hogan spent millions of dollars last year on a confidential deal to acquire COVID-19 testing supplies from South Korea that didn’t initially meet federal requirements.

FIRST WUHAN EVACUEES ARRIVING IN CALIFORNIA WERE MET BY ILL-PREPARED US STAFF: REPORT

A separate GOP-sponsored bill seeks to limit Hogan’s power by capping the number of times he could extend a state of emergency without legislative input. Hogan has denounced it as “about probably the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard in my life.”

Lawmakers are also seeking to rein in the emergency powers of local officials, especially in states such as Missouri, where the Republican governor has deferred most decisions on shutdowns and masks to cities and counties.

St. Louis County, the state’s biggest jurisdiction, has imposed a variety of restrictions, including periodic prohibitions and capacity limits on indoor dining at restaurants.

Jeff Fitter, the owner of Super Smokers BBQ, said his profits were cut in half last year. He is supporting a bill that would limit local emergency health orders to 14 days unless authorized for longer by the Legislature. It also would give tax breaks to businesses affected by occupancy limits imposed by cities and counties.

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“One person, one pen, shouldn’t be the difference between my business surviving or its demise,” Fitter said. “That should be something that is ran through a legislative body.”

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Republican lawmakers continue to push back on impeachment efforts


WASHINGTON, DC – DECEMBER 08: US President Donald Trump. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:45 PM  PT – Sunday, January 10, 2021

Members of the GOP are warning against efforts to impeach President Trump ahead of Inauguration Day on January 20.

Democrats continue to push forward with their effort to impeach the President for the second time, in a bid to remove him from office when he has fewer than 10 days left. However, they face the likelihood there won’t be enough Republican support to make it happen.

On Friday, reports detailed a letter sent to Joe Biden by GOP Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.), which was signed by seven lawmakers. The letter urged him to block House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s impeachment efforts.

In a tweet, Buck said, “in the spirit of healing and fidelity to our Constitution, I’m asking Biden to request Pelosi discontinue her efforts.”

The letter itself said the Constitution does not envision impeaching a president without an adequate investigation and congressional hearings. It said impeachment should not occur in the heat of the moment, but after “great deliberation.”

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy also spoke out against the effort. He said impeaching a president with less than two weeks left in the term will only divide the country more.

McCarthy called on leaders to refocus their efforts on working directly for the American people. These calls are not only coming from the lower chamber, but upper chamber as well.

In an interview Sunday, Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) said he’s not interested in spending time on things that can’t happen, including impeachment.

“Is there any likelihood that he could possibly be removed between now and January 20?” Blunt questioned. “If there’s no additional ensuing event, my belief is there is no possibility of that.”

In a recent interview, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said Democrat leaders need to stand down on impeachment. He also added impeachment will only l destroy the country even further.

In a recent memo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Republican colleagues Congress will not reconvene for business until January 19. In order to conduct impeachment efforts sooner, all 100 senators would have to vote unanimously on the issue, which is unlikely given the chamber’s current Republican majority.

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OAN Call to Action: How to Donate to Lawmakers Who Stayed True to President Trump



Sen. Josh Hawley:

https://secure.winred.com/josh-hawley-for-senate/support-today

 

Sen. Ted Cruz:

https://secure.anedot.com/tedcruz/pg-tedcruzorg?_ga=2.30887231.1432881635.1610142625-1642638184.1610142625

 

Sen. Matt Gaetz:

https://gaetzforcongress.revv.co/donate

 

Rep. Louie Gohmert:

 

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene:

https://secure.winred.com/marjorie-greene-for-congress/donate

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Making life difficult. Russian lawmakers rush to tighten legislation ahead of the 2021 State Duma elections




In the lead up to the close of the State Duma’s fall 2020 session on December 24, Russian lawmakers were working in “turbo mode.” In a matter of days, they submitted and successfully adopted — although sometimes only in the first reading — an array of bills that will seriously tighten the country’s legislation concerning “foreign agents,” public demonstrations, election campaigning, and “educational activities.” Generally speaking, lawmakers from the ruling party, United Russia, introduced these initiatives, though they were sometimes joined by their colleagues from nominal opposition parties. Politicians and experts alike told Meduza that the new legislation will make it much more difficult for opposition parties to nominate candidates, run campaigns, organize public rallies, and monitor the integrity of elections in Russia. All of which will affect the State Duma elections set to take place in 2021.

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In pictures: Guns drawn as lawmakers scramble amid US Capitol breach


Pictures from inside the US Capitol revealed unprecedented scenes of guns drawn in the House of Representatives and hand-to-hand combat with police after protesters stormed the building.

The nation”s elected representatives scrambled to crouch under desks and donned gas marks, while police tried to barricade the building in one of the most jarring scenes ever to unfold in a seat of American political power.

Here is a summary of what happened on Wednesday evening, in pictures.

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Lawmakers and officials condemn attack on U.S. Capitol


Riot police prepare to move demonstrators away from the US Capitol in Washington DC on January 6, 2021. – (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 4:00 PM PT – Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Vice President Mike Pence condemned the attack on the Capitol building, calling on the violence and destruction caused by protesters to stop.

On Wednesday, thousands of demonstrators broke through police lines to storm the Capitol Building while lawmakers debated the Electoral College votes. During the breach, the vice president took to Twitter to say anyone involved in storming the Capitol Building must respect law enforcement and leave.

Pence affirmed peaceful protests are the right of every American, but added this attack on our Capitol will not be tolerated. The vice president also asserted those involved in the attack will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

President Trump’s attorney, Rudy Giuliani, also called for peace as protesters stormed the U.S. Capitol. In a tweet, he said the President wants them to express their opinions peacefully.

The former New York City mayor urged President Trump’s supporters to act with respect for all, reminding demonstrators they are part of the “law and order party.”

Additionally, former White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway called for demonstrators breaching the Capitol to end the violence. In an interview on Wednesday, Conway said protesters in front of the Capitol should heed President Trump’s advice to go home.

She added that anyone who condemned the far-left riots last summer should also condemn the protesters who stormed the Capitol Building.

Meanwhile, protests are erupting in a number of other cities across the nation. According to reports on Wednesday, thousands of demonstrators in Georgia, Michigan and California stormed their state Capitol buildings.

Demonstrators pray during a pro-Trump rally outside of City Hall Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

A number of protesters rallied at the Golden State’s Capitol building. They called for election integrity and to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom (D-Calif.). The Kansas Statehouse was also breached by hundreds of demonstrators.

MORE NEWS: U.S. Capitol On Lockdown Amid Protests



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