India Lays The Foundations For Green Energy Megapark



AsianScientist (Dec. 28, 2020) – India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi laid the foundation stone for what will soon be the world’s largest renewable energy park on December 15, 2020. Built in the Kutch region of Western Gujarat, the project will cover 180,000 acres—an area just over the size of Singapore.

Since the Industrial Revolution, fossil fuels like coal and oil have powered everything from trains to factories and household lights. Our centuries-long habit of burning fossil fuels, however, comes at a cost: global warming. Greenhouse gases released by these fuels trap heat in the atmosphere, with 2020 likely to end up as one of the hottest years on record.

To avert consequences of global warming like extreme weather events and rising sea levels, countries like India are increasingly turning to renewable energy. Unlike fossil fuels, renewable energy sources like solar and wind power can be replenished and do not release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

According to Modi, the vast plot of solar panels, solar energy storage units and windmills will generate 30 gigawatts of power—a substantial increase from the 2.245 gigawatt capacity of India’s Bhadla solar park, currently the largest of its kind in the world.

The sprawling energy park will hold a dedicated hybrid zone for wind and solar energy generation and storage as well as an exclusive wind park zone. Once completed, the new ‘megapark’ is expected to help India reduce its carbon dioxide emissions by up to 50 million tons per year.

This development is a part of India’s march towards a target of 175 gigawatts of renewable energy capacity by 2022, with 100 gigawatts generated from solar, 60 gigawatts from wind, ten gigawatts from bioenergy and five gigawatts from small-scale hydropower dams.

The green energy megapark is a huge step towards this goal, accomplishing almost 20 percent of the targeted 175 gigawatts. Moving forward, India aims to accomplish an even more ambitious goal of 450 gigawatts by 2030.

Despite the seemingly apparent environmental benefits of such a project, grassroots organizations have raised concerns over the megapark’s long-term effects on the region’s biodiversity. Though described as a wasteland, the vast expanse allocated for the megapark’s construction is actually a unique desert ecosystem home to hundreds of birds that might not survive the new power lines and structures.

Part of a bigger movement of several development projects in the Kutch district, the megapark will be built next to a desalination plant that can process 100 million tons of water a day for the 800,000 people living within the region.

“Energy and water security are vital in the 21st century,” said Modi to Agence France-Presse. “The two major projects of the renewable energy park and the desalination plant inaugurated today in Kutch are steps towards achieving the two.”

———

Copyright: Asian Scientist Magazine; Photo: Pexels.
Disclaimer: This article does not necessarily reflect the views of AsianScientist or its staff.


[ad_2]
Source link

Macquarie CEO lays out plan for boosting diversity in workforce


“My main message to girls out there is – is why let boys have all this fun?” she said.

“Working to ensure diversity of thought and capability is critical. We’ve seen many times a diverse team delivers stronger results than any individual or homogenous team.”

For a chief executive who speaks sparingly about her personal life, Ms Wikramanayake shared the story of her upbringing to demonstrate how she used adversity to her advantage.

Today I don’t see myself as a female CEO with brown skin.

Macquarie CEO Shemara Wikramanayake

Ms Wikramanayake was born in England and at at three months old was sent to Sri Lanka as an unaccompanied minor to live with her grandparents. At eight, she moved back to England to live with her parents where the family experienced financial hardship.

“This could have been unsettling as a child but I looked at it as an opportunity,” she said. “Possibly from natural resilience, I was able to quickly accept that I could do nothing about our circumstances. But I appreciated I still have choices and things I could control, including my attitude.”

Loading

“Being curious and social, I resolved to embrace the frequent change the opportunity to learn from different cultures and perspectives,” she said. “I saw the adventure in my nomadic childhood.”

This resilience prepared her for discrimination she would face in the workplace. Ms Wikramanayake has been at Macquarie for three decades and said as a young adviser, she was asked to lead a complex transaction in Melbourne.

“I encountered a senior client who didn’t have confidence that a very young looking, brown skinned female would be able to get the job done in what was an important moment in the company’s journey.

“I could have been demotivated or lost confidence from this,” she said. “I was instead focused on my responsibility to help deliver the necessary outcome for this client.”

“After the deal concluded successfully, he took me aside and thanked me for teaching him about irrational prejudice and was happy to have me lead further transactions for his company.”

Ms Wikramanayake, who became Macquarie CEO almost two years ago, said she has focused her energy on “things I can impact” and implored others to do the same.

“Today I don’t see myself as a female CEO with brown skin,” she said. “I see myself as a CEO who is one of today’s custodians of a business built over 50 years plus by 75,000 people, cumulatively delivering innovative solutions and strong outcomes.”

Around 60 per cent of Macquarie’s global workforce has now returned to work from the office on a voluntary basis, she said, and flexible work conditions will be now be a permanent feature, for Ms Wikramanayake personally as well.

“I spent a whole part of my career missing dinner with family on weeknights because I got home after 8pm,” she said. “I’ve [now] been able to have dinner at home and still do my late night calls.”

Market Recap

A concise wrap of the day on the markets, breaking business news and expert opinion delivered to your inbox each afternoon. Sign up for the Herald‘s here and The Age‘s here.

Most Viewed in Business

Loading



Source link

Macquarie CEO lays out plan for boosting diversity in workforce


“My main message to girls out there is – is why let boys have all this fun?” she said.

“Working to ensure diversity of thought and capability is critical. We’ve seen many times a diverse team delivers stronger results than any individual or homogenous team.”

For a chief executive ordinarily guarded about her personal life, Ms Wikramanayake shared the story of her upbringing to demonstrate how she used adversity to her advantage.

Today I don’t see myself as a female CEO with brown skin.

Macquarie CEO Shemara Wikramanayake

Ms Wikramanayake was born in England and at at three months old was sent to Sri Lanka as an unaccompanied minor to live with her grandparents. At eight, she moved back to England to live with her parents where the family experienced financial hardship.

“This could have been unsettling as a child but I looked at it as an opportunity,” she said. “Possibly from natural resilience, I was able to quickly accept that I could do nothing about our circumstances. But I appreciated I still have choices and things I could control, including my attitude.”

Loading

“Being curious and social, I resolved to embrace the frequent change the opportunity to learn from different cultures and perspectives,” she said. “I saw the adventure in my nomadic childhood.”

This resilience prepared her for discrimination she would face in the workplace. Ms Wikramanayake has been at Macquarie for three decades and said as a young adviser, she was asked to lead a complex transaction in Melbourne.

“I encountered a senior client who didn’t have confidence that a very young looking, brown skinned female would be able to get the job done in what was an important moment in the company’s journey.

“I could have been demotivated or lost confidence from this,” she said. “I was instead focused on my responsibility to help deliver the necessary outcome for this client.”

“After the deal concluded successfully, he took me aside and thanked me for teaching him about irrational prejudice and was happy to have me lead further transactions for his company.”

Ms Wikramanayake, who became Macquarie CEO almost two years ago, said she has focused her energy on “things I can impact” and implored others to do the same.

“Today I don’t see myself as a female CEO with brown skin,” she said. “I see myself as a CEO who is one of today’s custodians of a business built over 50 years plus by 75,000 people, cumulatively delivering innovative solutions and strong outcomes.”

Around 60 per cent of Macquarie’s global workforce has now returned to work from the office on a voluntary basis, she said, and flexible work conditions will be now be a permanent feature, for Ms Wikramanayake personally as well.

“I spent a whole part of my career missing dinner with family on weeknights because I got home after 8pm,” she said. “I’ve [now] been able to have dinner at home and still do my late night calls.”

Market Recap

A concise wrap of the day on the markets, breaking business news and expert opinion delivered to your inbox each afternoon. Sign up for the Herald‘s here and The Age‘s here.

Most Viewed in Business

Loading



Source link

Corruption watchdog raids two law firms, lays money laundering charges


Four people connected to two law firms raided by the state’s corruption watchdog are together facing hundreds of money fraud and money laundering charges.

The Crime and Corruption Commission has laid more than 300 charges following the raid on two Brisbane-based law offices, as well as business premises and private dwellings in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast, under Operation Mercury.

Three men and a woman are facing dozens of charges each and the raids follow the arrest of another two people earlier this year on drug charges.

The CCC said more charges are pending.

“The major crime investigation, codenamed Operation Mercury, involved a number of search warrants executed at two Brisbane-based law firms and a number of business premises and private dwellings in Brisbane and the Gold Coast throughout the 18-month investigation,” the CCC said in a statement.

“It will be alleged the four people charged on Tuesday were involved in serious fraud offences against a number of financial institutions.

“It will also be alleged those charged laundered the proceeds of serious criminal offences.”

CCC Chair Alan MacSporran QC said the scale of the alleged offending demonstrates why the crime watchdog has a continued focus on the enablers of major and organised crime.

“The CCC has an investigative focus on not just those who directly engage in major crime, but those individuals and groups of people who facilitate and enable it,” he said.

“It is disappointing and concerning, some of the allegations relate to the legal profession,” Mr MacSporran said.

The CCC has laid more than 300 charges, with a 45-year-old Helensvale man facing more than 100 charges alone.

He has been charged with multiple aggravated fraud charges, 89 counts of fraud, seven counts of fraudulent falsification of records and six counts of money laundering.

The CCC said the man is currently before the courts on a separate count of money laundering relating to the seizure of $97,000 in cash in February.

A 37-year-old Helensvale woman is facing one count of aggravated fraud, 76 counts of fraud, three counts of fraudulent falsification of records and three counts of money laundering.

A 36-year-old Helensvale man will have to answer to 12 counts of fraud, two counts of fraudulent falsification of records, one count of money laundering and one count of perjury.

A 42-year-old Ascot man has been charged with six counts of aggravated fraud, 77 counts of fraud, seven counts of fraudulent falsification of records and seven counts of money laundering.

The Ascot man was also accused of money laundering relating to the seizure of $97,000 in cash in February and in September was charged with supplying drugs, the CCC said.

All four people charged yesterday are expected to appear before the Brisbane Magistrates Court on January 11.



Source link

$4m for youth mental health services in Tasmania after report ‘lays bare many gaps’


The Tasmanian Government has accepted all seven recommendations from an independent review into the state’s Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), after it found the services were overburdened and in need of significant systemic and cultural change.

Mental Health Minister Jeremy Rockliff detailed the review’s findings in state Parliament on Tuesday, after a draft copy of the 100-page report was obtained by the ABC in September.

The Government has confirmed the final version does not differ from the draft, which detailed issues such as children and teenagers with severe and complex needs “generally not being accepted” by CAMHS.

It found funding did not approach the amount required and that two of CAMHS’ three sites were not fit for purpose and should be replaced.

It also found that acute services were effectively unavailable outside business hours.

Mr Rockliff said the “warts and all” review found child and adolescent mental health services were inaccessible to those needing specialist care, were inconsistent around the state and were unable to adequately respond to young Tasmanians with complex mental health needs.

‘We could do a lot better’

He said the Government acknowledged the longstanding gaps in the system.

“I was only interested in a report that truly reflects the current nature of adolescent mental health services in Tasmania, so then we could respond appropriately to exactly the needs of our young people across Tasmania,” Mr Rockliff said.

“The report is critical of past practices and it needs to be for there to be serious intervention, serious investment.

“We could do a lot better, and we will. As Minister for Mental Health and Wellbeing I will be held accountable to these reforms,” he said.

Mr Rockliff said the issues were not a reflection on the hard work of staff, who had instead been hampered by an out-of-date system.

The Government has accepted all seven recommendations, including establishing a statewide service, and has allocated $4 million over two years in the state Budget, to be handed down on Thursday, to begin the implementation.

The money includes:

  • $500,000 for a new tiered senior management team to unify services
  • $1.8m for a dedicated service for children in out-of-home-care
  • $1m for a youth early intervention service
  • $500,000 to increase the capacity of the perinatal and infant mental health service to cover the north and north-west

“What I’ve announced today is a fundamental shift in the delivery of child and adolescent mental health services in Tasmania, with a focus on integration, and changing models of care to enable CAMHS to respond to demand, particularly in relation to severe and complex cases,” Mr Rockliff said.

“Addressing service gaps by developing new programs, and building better links and partnerships with other services and government agencies under a new organisational structure to drive and maintain meaningful change.

“We are committed to getting this right.”

Connie Digolis says the Government will be held accountable to ensure the system is improved.(Supplied)

Mental Health Council of Tasmania chief executive Connie Digolis welcomed the review and its recommendations.

“This provides us an opportunity to be able to hold the Government accountable in actually achieving this, but it also provides us with a clear idea of where the opportunities are for us as a community sector to also be able to integrate and come up with a more comprehensive and contemporary child and adolescent mental health service,” she said.

Labor health spokeswoman Sarah Lovell said the system had been left underfunded and completely under-resourced.

“That’s resulted in a delivery of services that is extremely flawed,” she said.

“What we will really be looking for is adequate resourcing, funding, and real action from the government to ensure that these recommendations are implemented.”



Source link

North Korea’s Kim lays out 80-day campaign to attain goals this year


October 5, 2020

By Sangmi Cha

SEOUL (Reuters) – North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has called on his country to embark on an 80-day campaign to attain its goals in every sector before a congress in January to decide a new five-year plan, state news agency KCNA said on Tuesday.

Kim made the announcement in a politburo meeting of the ruling Workers’ Party on Monday. The meeting comes during a difficult year for North Korea as the coronavirus pandemic puts more pressure on a economy hurt by recent storms and flooding.

“We have performed historical feats with our costly efforts, boldly overcoming unprecedentedly grave trials and difficulties this year, but we should not rest on our laurels,” KCNA said.

“We still face the challenges that cannot be overlooked and there are many goals we have to attain within this year.”

In August, Kim had announced that the ruling party will hold a congress in January to decide a new five-year plan, with a party meeting noting serious delays in improving the national economy.

Last year, Kim vowed to make a “frontal breakthrough” in the country’s campaign to build a self-reliant economy in the face of tightening sanctions aimed at curbing its nuclear and missile programmes.

Security officials were watching for signs that North Korea may use an upcoming holiday to unveil new weapons or test fire a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) on Oct. 10, the 75th anniversary of the ruling workers party.

(Reporting by Sangmi Cha; editing by Richard Pullin)





Source link

Nvidia lays out plan to create new kind of data center chip


Nvidia Corp on Monday laid out a multi-year plan to create a new kind of chip for data centers, aimed at siphoning off more functions from its chief rival Intel Corp .

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Nvidia Corporation is seen during the annual Computex computer exhibition in Taipei, Taiwan May 30, 2017. REUTERS/Tyrone Siu

REUTERS: Nvidia Corp on Monday laid out a multi-year plan to create a new kind of chip for data centers, aimed at siphoning off more functions from its chief rival Intel Corp .

Models with limited features will debut in months, while full-fledged versions are planned within two years, Nvidia said in a press briefing. Server companies such as Dell Technologies and Lenovo Group Ltd plan to integrate them into their machines, it added.

Nvidia chips have long been used to improve video game graphics, but in recent years they have helped to speed up artificial intelligence tasks such as image recognition. The chips typically sit alongside an Intel central processor, offloading some of the computing work.

Nvidia is now seeking to grab more tasks with its proposed series of “data processing unit” chips. They will combine networking technology acquired with Nvidia’s US$6.9 billion purchase of Mellanox Technologies Ltd, with artificial intelligence and computing power from Arm Ltd. Nvidia last month agreed to buy Arm from SoftBank Group Corp for US$40 billion.

Using artificial intelligence, the chips could detect hackers trying to break into a data center, said Manuvir Das, Nvidia’s head of enterprise computing, in the briefing. The chips would review network traffic for unusual patterns and seek to block it proactively.

Previously such functions would have required a combination of chips.

(Reporting by Stephen Nellis in San Francisco; Editing by Richard Chang)



Source link

US election 2020: Joe Biden formally nominated as Bill Clinton lays into Trump | US News


Joe Biden has been formally nominated as the Democratic Party’s candidate for the US presidency.

His election candidacy was confirmed in a virtual ‘roll-call’ of 57 states and voting territories.

As the camera cut to the former vice president, in the company of his wife and grandchildren, he said: “Thank you all from the bottom of my heart, from my family.”

He later tweeted: “It is the honour of my life to accept the Democratic Party’s nomination for president of the United States of America.”







Clinton: Trump will blame, bully and belittle

On the second day of the Democratic National Convention, a number of prominent political figures endorsed Joe Biden as the Democratic choice and derided Donald Trump’s presidency.

Former president Bill Clinton said in a video segment: “You know what Donald Trump will do with four more years.



Jill Biden



Dr Jill Biden spoke about how her husband, Joe Biden, went to work four days after his son’s death, because ‘that’s who he is’.

“Blame, bully and belittle. And you know what Joe Biden will do. Build back better. It’s Trump’s ‘us versus them’ America, against Joe Biden’s America. Where we all live and work together.

More from Democratic Party

“It’s a clear choice. The future of our country is riding on it.”

General Colin Powell, who served as Secretary of State in George W. Bush’s Republican administration, offered his backing to the Democrat ticket.

He said: “Today, we are a country divided, and we have a president doing everything in his power to make it stays that way and keep us that way.

“What a difference it will make to have a president who unites us, who restores our strength and our soul.”

:: Listen to Divided States on Apple podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and Spreaker

The theme of the convention’s second night was “Leadership Matters”. While the programme on the first night had been devoted largely to attacking Donald Trump, day two focused on telling Joe Biden’s story, in life and in politics.

The keynote address was given by his wife Dr Jill Biden. Delivering a speech inside Brandywine High School, where she once taught, she told their story of life, love and loss.

MILWAUKEE, WI - AUGUST 18: In this screenshot from the DNCC’s livestream of the 2020 Democratic National Convention, actress and activist Tracee Ellis Ross speaks in front of photo of Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee former Vice President Joe Biden and Presumptive Democratic vice presidential nominee, U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris during the virtual convention on August 18, 2020.  The convention, which was once expected to draw 50,000 people to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is now taking place virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic.  (Photo by DNCC via Getty Images)  (Photo by Handout/DNCC via Getty Images)
Image:
Actress and activist Tracee Ellis Ross hosted the second evening of the convention

Dr Biden told of meeting her future husband after he had lost his wife and daughter in a car crash and she drew a parallel between their past experience and the present state of the nation.

She said: “I never imagined, at the age of 26, I would be asking myself: how do you make a broken family whole?

“We have shown that the heart of this nation still beats with kindness and courage. That’s the soul of America Joe Biden is fighting for now.”

It was the second day of the Democratic Party adapting their convention output to the restrictions of the coronavirus pandemic.

The format meant his nomination was crystallised with a Eurovision-style round-the-country video roll call of the 50 states and 7 voting territories.

This was the elevation of “Ordinary Joe”, man of the people. Capitol Hill colleagues chosen to deliver short nomination speeches were joined by Jacqueline Brittany, a security guard at the New York Times, who said: “I take powerful people up in my elevator all the time.

Balloons come down on Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and running mate Tim Kaine at the end of the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center on July 28, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.   / AFP / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
Image:
The DNC is usually a glitzy affair with balloon drops and live music

“When they get off, they go to their important meetings. But in the short time I spent with Joe Biden, I could tell he really saw me, that he actually cared, that my life meant something to him.

“I knew, even when he went into his important meeting, he’d take my story in there with him.”

For all the talk about how convention coverage would be impacted by the lack of a live stage, crowd and balloon drop, it fits easily into the digital format.

Indeed, the marketing gurus of both parties may ponder how much they can retain of their convention coverage as a small screen production.



Donald Trump says Barack Obama is the reason he is in the White House



Michelle Obama’s speech was ‘divisive’

It gives them a control over content they don’t necessarily have of a less predictable live event.

Sure, there are technical challenges but a hefty element of pre-recording has ensured a viewing experience smooth enough for a Zoom-literate audience.

Contributions on camera, many personal and poignant stories from members of the public, are afforded the space, silence and intimacy they wouldn’t enjoy on the big stage.

Tales are told without distractions and with pictures to illustrate. It aids lasting impression.



Bernie Sanders endorses Trump



Sanders: Biden will end ‘racist dog whistling’

Content from the evening can also be sliced and shared across social media before and after the event.

According to the Biden campaign, nearly 30 million people watched the first night of the Democratic convention across television and digital platforms.

A campaign spokesman said the number of digital viewers, 10.2 million, set a record for convention streaming.

Fewer watched the event on television than four years ago, according to Nielsen data. In 2016 around 26 million watched the first night of the convention, compared to 19.7 million this time.



Source link

U.S. Fed’s ‘long road’ lays bare challenge to new Bank of Canada governor



FILE PHOTO: Bank of Canada governor designate Tiff Macklem attends a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada May 1, 2020. REUTERS/Blair Gable

June 11, 2020

By Julie Gordon

OTTAWA (Reuters) – New Bank of Canada Governor Tiff Macklem, already facing the double whammy of the coronavirus pandemic and slumping oil prices, must now also contend with the Federal Reserve forecast that the United States expects years of slow growth.

Some 75% of the goods that Canada exports go to the United States, which like Canada is grappling with historic losses in output and jobs caused by COVID-19 shutdowns. Fed Chair Jerome Powell said on Wednesday the United States faced “a long road” to recovery and the Fed forecast interest rates languishing near zero through 2022.

Macklem will take the lead on the bank’s July 15 rate decision, officially his first, when it could also give new economic forecasts. The Bank of Canada said this month second quarter GDP would decline a further 10%-20% from the fourth quarter of 2019, but noted growth could pick up again in the third quarter of 2020. It slashed rates three times to a record low 0.25% in March.

“Something we have to keep in mind is the coronavirus shock for Canada is coming along with an oil price shock,” said Josh Nye, senior economist at RBC Economics.

“That’s perhaps a reason to expect that the Bank of Canada might need to keep policy stimulative for at least as long or longer than the Fed is going to.”

Before being named governor in May, Macklem told Reuters the oil price decline may hammer Canada long after the coronavirus slump has passed.

With Macklem firmly in his new role, all eyes are on whether the bank will reintroduce tables and forecasts on July 15, after suspending forecasts in April amid the uncertainty.

“The Fed’s projections probably put a bit more pressure on the bank to revert to publishing these elements … sooner rather than later,” said Royce Mendes, senior economist at CIBC Capital Markets.

(Reporting by Julie Gordon in Ottawa; additional reporting by Kelsey Johnson in Ottawa and Fergal Smith in Toronto; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)





Source link

COVID-19 lays the foundation for future ‘chicken Olympics’ National Poultry Show champions


A perfect balance of power, athleticism, and beauty is a lot to ask of a chicken, but champion breeders Chris White and Alan Bailey have come closer than most to producing flawless fowl.

For four years they have prepared for the National Poultry Show, also known as the “chicken Olympics”, and were left “shattered” when the four-yearly event was cancelled due to COVID-19.

But the veteran breeders hope the surge in popularity of pet chickens will lay the foundation for a new generation of competitors.

‘Born with feathers’

For more than 20 years, the National Poultry Show has been the place where fanciers can lay claim to being Australia’s best breeder.

About 5,000 birds are brought in from across the country to compete.

Veteran competitor Chris White works all year round to prepare.

Chicken breeder Chris White stands with one of his old english game fowls.
Veteran competitor Chris White is happy to pass on his knowledge to the younger generation of fanciers.(ABC Radio Sydney: Matt Bamford)

Raising chickens has been his lifelong passion.

“Everyone reckons I was born with feathers, and I haven’t changed,” he said.

He was deep into his final preparations for the 2020 show when it was cancelled due to COVID-19.

“It was extremely disappointing for many people. Nothing matches the national show,” he said.

But Mr White said he was heartened to see more people using their time at home to start raising chickens.

“It’s a giant network and the more people who join — that is good for everyone.”

Alan Bailey holds one of his prized black fowls.
Fanciers spend years preparing for the ‘chicken olympics’.(ABC Radio Sydney: Matt Bamford)

He said the hobby is a perfect relief from the pace of modern life.

“I can come home from the hardest of days and the stress of the day is gone. It’s fantastic,” he said.

Cessnock farmer Alan Bailey was hoping to win back-to-back honours with his grand champion from the 2019 Sydney Royal Easter Show.

“I was shattered when I found out it was cancelled,” he said.

Alan Bailey stands with one of his prized game fowls.
Alan Bailey was hoping to win back-to-back honours with his prized game fowls.(ABC Radio Sydney: Matt Bamford)

The decorated fancier learned his craft from a coal miner who would record every piece of meat and vegetable fed to his chooks.

He said there are endless opportunities to get involved.

“When you can, head along to your local agricultural show and have a look. There’s plenty of people who are keen to share their knowledge,” he said.

“It’s also one of the only hobbies where you can eat your mistakes.”

Next generation

Boy holding hen inside chicken run
Raising chickens has been a reprieve from COVID-19 for many families.(ABC Radio Canberra: Penny Travers)

The Royal Agricultural Society of NSW has been watching the uptick in chicken enthusiasts with interest.

RAS president Glen Best said it was a silver lining in an otherwise gloomy year.

A poultry judge examines a silkie chicken at the Royal Canberra National Poultry Show.
Thousands of birds of all shapes and sizes compete in the National Poultry Show.(ABC News: Kathleen Dyett)

“Most people start with just a few laying hens and then they get bitten by the bug.

“It’s a hobby that has great physical and mental benefits, and can be a break from the busy society that we all live in these days.”

He said he would not be surprised if coronavirus was the catalyst for a new wave of top tier competitors.

“We certainly need youngsters to come through and replace the older generations,” Mr Best said.

A dog rounds up a chicken.
Raising chickens is fun for the whole family, according to the Royal Agricultural Society.(ABC Radio Sydney: Matt Bamford)



Source link