The Notebook: Is Notepad ++ Available for Mac?


Did you recently jump ship from Windows PC to Mac? Are you still adjusting to the changes in terms of the settings, features, and usability of a Mac computer?

Though you can find online tips and suggestions for a smoother transition to Mac, there will be some tools and features of your Windows PC that you will likely miss. And one of these is the Notepad ++.

Hence, you may be asking “is Notepad ++ available for Mac?”

The Notepad ++ is a text and source code editor that runs in the MS Windows environment. It trumps the traditional Notepad in terms of performance.

And best of all, it is free!

But now that you’re using a Mac, can you still use the Notepad ++ on your new computer? Continue reading below as we answer this pressing question and more.

Is Notepad ++ Available for Mac Users? The Straight-Up Answer

Is Notepad ++ available for Mac computers and Macbooks? Unfortunately, the straight-up answer is “no.” This is because the Notepad ++ is an open-source project that originally caters to the Windows operating system.

Moreover, Notepad ++ is a non-commercial project. It also had one developer behind it (Don Ho), who intended it to work exclusively on Windows computers back in 2003.

It may come with limited features but because it is free, it makes it appealing for users. Moreover, allows you to build extensions and plugins depending on your requirements.

Hence, it is no surprise for users who moved from Windows to macOS to ask if there’s a Notepad++ for Mac devices. Though there may be no exact native Notepad ++ for your Mac, it doesn’t mean all hope is gone.

Some alternatives and workarounds will help you enjoy the benefits of the Notepad ++.

Using a Virtual Machine

The first workaround worth considering is installing a virtual machine. This a good option especially if you’re after stability with minimal bugs. What a virtual machine does is it allows you to run a Windows environment on your Mac computer or Macbook.

Since the environment is full-scale, it means you can install and use any software that you want. And this includes software that you can only use on Windows PC like Notepad ++.

Thankfully, there are many virtual machines to choose from. However, there are a few that stand out in terms of reliability. One of which is VMware Fusion.

To install this virtual machine, you must first have an official copy of the Windows version you wish to use. Make sure it includes all the license keys.

Thereafter, download VMware Fusion and install it on your Mac computer. Drag and drop the ISO onto the “Installation Method” window.

Also, you want to tick the “Use Easy Install” option in the window. Next, you need to fill out the Windows license credentials. As soon as you input your credentials, you can save your virtual machine and use the Windows environment on your Mac.

The only thing that’s left is to download and run the Notepad ++ using the Windows environment window.

Via an Emulator

If downloading the VMware Fusion does not suit you, you can still run the Notepad ++ using an emulator program. An emulator works by creating a compatibility layer between your Mac and the Windows OS. In turn, you can load any type of Windows software on your Mac.

As for the type of emulator, Wine is one of the most stable options out there. Visit Wine’s official website and download the Wine package. Unzip the archive and open “Terminal.”

From there, type “winecfg”. This allows you to create a C drive where you will place your Notepad ++ later on. Next, go to the GitHub repository and download Notepad ++.

Move the program in the C drive you created. Go back to “Terminal” and open the C drive directory. There, type “wine” then the file name to install the .exe file.

After installation, you can launch the Notepad ++ by typing “wine [file name]” in the Terminal.

Alternatives to the Notepad ++

Interestingly, you don’t need to emulate a copy of the Notepad ++ to enjoy its features on your Mac. There are many alternatives to the program that are worthy substitutes.

If you want something simple and straightforward, the Atom Text Editor is one of your best bets. It comes with a combination of colorful interface and syntax themes that add to its appeal.

And like the Notepad ++, the Atom software is free to download.

Are you creating or managing a website? Do you work heavily on texts and shell scripts? Do you often need to extract data?

Then the BBEdit is the software for you. It comes with features that will help you develop sites, manipulate textual data, and handle different kinds of files.

But if you’re more into graphics and advanced coding, you need to download SlickEdit. This award-winning software is perfect for developers who want a plethora of tools and editing features that are more advanced than others.

However, you need to pay a one-time fee to enjoy all of its features.

If security is what you’re after, UltraEdit is a good option to consider. This source code editor offers security credentials on top of its unique themes and editing modes.

Downloading the free version gives you access to standard web development, file comparison, system administration, and text editing features.

Last but not least is Sublime Text, which is one of the most trusted text editors for Mac users. It comes with features that are head and shoulders above what other Notepad ++ alternatives offer.

Some of these features include a powerful API; multiple selections; remarkable customizability, and syntax highlighting and folding.

Additionally, Sublime Text is cross-platform. This means you can use it on your Mac, Windows PC, or Linux computers.

Unleash the Potential of Your Mac

Now that you know the answer to the question “Is Notepad ++ available for Mac?” You can emulate the Notepad ++ or download any of its worthy alternatives. But if you want to maximize the power of your Mac computer, there are many other things to learn.

Check out our other articles where we discuss Macbooks and Mac computers. We also discuss topics that will help unleash your Mac’s full potential.



Thank you for stopping by and checking out this post on cooking and food news published as “The Notebook: Is Notepad ++ Available for Mac?”. This news article is presented by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our Australian news services.

#Notebook #Notepad #Mac



Source link

Trump administration likely to keep Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in conservatorship, Mnuchin suggests


WASHINGTON — Joe Biden’s election victory has likely ended the Trump administration’s efforts to return Fannie Mae
FNMA,
-16.42%
  and Freddie Mac
FMCC,
-15.24%
  to private hands.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin suggested in an interview with The Wall Street Journal that he is unlikely to support a legal move — called a consent order — to end the government conservatorships of the mortgage-finance companies before President Trump leaves office. His signoff would be required for any change in their legal status.



Source link

Apple Mac Mini Review (2020): Brawn on a Budget


A lot of this success has to do with the fact that Apple has strongly nudged its ecosystem into embracing the M1, and it came out of the gate with a huge number of applications that have been upgraded to run as “universal” apps, programs which can run natively on the M1 and take advantage of its architecture in full. Naturally, all of Apple’s own applications are fully M1-ready, but so is a significant portion of the rest of the market. The good news is that a new version of Apple’s Rosetta emulator is always on standby to fill in any gaps, so you can still run Intel-designed applications on the Mac Mini, just a lot slower than native code. But at least it runs.

Adobe’s Creative Cloud—just as it was with Microsoft’s SQ1 chip—is the big holdout here, but a beta version of Photoshop for M1 is already out (it shipped at the same time as the version for Microsoft’s ARM chip), with a final version slated for next year. An M1-native Lightroom will also be released by the end of 2020, per Adobe. Given the importance of the Mac market to Adobe, it’s hard to imagine these apps won’t be hustled out as quickly as possible, but note that there are currently no official release dates for native versions of any of Adobe’s other apps.

Rosetta can’t run everything—any kind of Intel-era system extension won’t work on the new Mac Mini—but it didn’t choke on anything I threw at it, including games, few of which have been updated for the new hardware. I never encountered a crash during my testing and invariably found the system peppy and responsive in daily use.

All Mac Mini models include the 3.2-GHz M1. The base Mac Mini gives you 8 GB of RAM and a 256-GB solid-state drive for $699. The other base model is the same, except it ups the SSD to 512 GB, for $899. Both RAM and SSD can be further upgraded, but only at purchase—the Mac Mini is not user-upgradeable, nor even upgradeable at the Apple Store—all the way up to the model which was sent to me for testing, featuring 16 GB of RAM and a 2-terabyte SSD for $1,699.

That’s getting pretty heady in price for a system that’s no bigger than a hearty sandwich, though I honestly can’t imagine many shoppers will have a need for multiple terabytes of internal storage and can readily pare down the specs (and price). Better to plug in an external drive here, as the connectivity options are decent enough, including two Thunderbolt/USB 4/USB-C ports, Ethernet, HDMI, and two USB 3.1 ports. It’s worth noting that the 2018 Mac Mini had four USB-C ports, the halving of which is perhaps the only real negative to be found on this device.

Otherwise, it’s tough to raise complaints. Apps run fast, stability is rock solid, and the price (at least for more entry-level configurations) is decidedly tame. It’s even got Wi-Fi 6 in the mix.

If you need a half-dozen monitors, quadrophonic sound, and bleeding-edge performance, this isn’t the system for you, of course. For those teeming masses who want a solid Mac (one that doesn’t need to be mobile) without breaking the bank, you really won’t go wrong here.



Source link

Apple preps next Mac chips with aim to outclass top-end PCs


While Intel gets less than 10 per cent of its revenue from furnishing Apple with Mac chips, the rest of its PC business is liable to face turbulence if the iPhone maker is able to deliver demonstrably better-performing computers. It could accelerate a shakeup in an industry that has long been dependent on Intel’s pace of innovation. For Apple, the move sheds that dependency, deepens its distinction from the rest of the PC market and gives it a chance to add to its small but growing share in PCs.

An Apple spokesman declined to comment. Chip development and production is complex with changes being common throughout the development process. Apple could still choose to hold back these chips in favor of lesser versions for next year’s Macs, the people said, but the plans nonetheless indicate Apple’s vast ambitions.

Apple’s Mac chips, like those in its iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch, use technology licensed from Arm, the chip design firm whose blueprints underpin much of the mobile industry and which Nvidia is in the process of acquiring. Apple designs the chips and outsources their production to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, which has taken the lead from Intel in chip manufacturing.

The current M1 chip inherits a mobile-centric design built around four high-performance processing cores to accelerate tasks like video editing and four power-saving cores that can handle less intensive jobs like web browsing. For its next generation chip targeting MacBook Pro and iMac models, Apple is working on designs with as many as 16 power cores and four efficiency cores, the people said.

While that component is in development, Apple could choose to first release variations with only eight or 12 of the high-performance cores enabled depending on production, they said. Chipmakers are often forced to offer some models with lower specifications than they originally intended because of problems that emerge during fabrication.

Loading

For higher-end desktop computers, planned for later in 2021, and a new half-sized Mac Pro planned to launch by 2022, Apple is testing a chip design with as many as 32 high-performance cores.

With today’s Intel systems Apple’s highest-end laptops offer a maximum of eight cores, a high-end iMac Pro is available with as many as 18 and the priciest Mac Pro desktop features as much as a 28-core system. Though architecturally different, Apple and Intel’s chips rely on the segmentation of workloads into smaller, serialized tasks that several processing cores can work on at once.

AMD, which has been gaining market share at Intel’s expense, offers standard desktop parts with as many as 16 cores, with some of its high-end chips for gaming PCs going as high as 64 cores.

While the M1 silicon has been well received, the Macs using it are Apple’s lower-end systems with less memory and fewer ports. The company still sells higher-end, Intel-based versions of some of the lines that received M1 updates. The M1 chip is a variation of a new iPad processor destined to be included in a new iPad Pro arriving next year.

Apple engineers are also developing more ambitious graphics processors. Today’s M1 processors are offered with a custom Apple graphics engine that comes in either 7- or 8-core variations. For its future high-end laptops and mid-range desktops, Apple is testing 16-core and 32-core graphics parts.

For later in 2021 or potentially 2022, Apple is working on pricier graphics upgrades with 64 and 128 dedicated cores aimed at its highest-end machines, the people said. Those graphics chips would be several times faster than the current graphics modules Apple uses from Nvidia and AMD in its Intel-powered hardware.

Bloomberg

Technology newsletter

The top technology stories, gadget releases and gaming reviews delivered every Friday. Sign up here.



Source link

Apple preps next Mac chips with aim to outclass top-end PCs


While Intel gets less than 10 per cent of its revenue from furnishing Apple with Mac chips, the rest of its PC business is liable to face turbulence if the iPhone maker is able to deliver demonstrably better-performing computers. It could accelerate a shakeup in an industry that has long been dependent on Intel’s pace of innovation. For Apple, the move sheds that dependency, deepens its distinction from the rest of the PC market and gives it a chance to add to its small but growing share in PCs.

An Apple spokesman declined to comment. Chip development and production is complex with changes being common throughout the development process. Apple could still choose to hold back these chips in favor of lesser versions for next year’s Macs, the people said, but the plans nonetheless indicate Apple’s vast ambitions.

Apple’s Mac chips, like those in its iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch, use technology licensed from Arm, the chip design firm whose blueprints underpin much of the mobile industry and which Nvidia is in the process of acquiring. Apple designs the chips and outsources their production to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing, which has taken the lead from Intel in chip manufacturing.

The current M1 chip inherits a mobile-centric design built around four high-performance processing cores to accelerate tasks like video editing and four power-saving cores that can handle less intensive jobs like web browsing. For its next generation chip targeting MacBook Pro and iMac models, Apple is working on designs with as many as 16 power cores and four efficiency cores, the people said.

While that component is in development, Apple could choose to first release variations with only eight or 12 of the high-performance cores enabled depending on production, they said. Chipmakers are often forced to offer some models with lower specifications than they originally intended because of problems that emerge during fabrication.

Loading

For higher-end desktop computers, planned for later in 2021, and a new half-sized Mac Pro planned to launch by 2022, Apple is testing a chip design with as many as 32 high-performance cores.

With today’s Intel systems Apple’s highest-end laptops offer a maximum of eight cores, a high-end iMac Pro is available with as many as 18 and the priciest Mac Pro desktop features as much as a 28-core system. Though architecturally different, Apple and Intel’s chips rely on the segmentation of workloads into smaller, serialized tasks that several processing cores can work on at once.

AMD, which has been gaining market share at Intel’s expense, offers standard desktop parts with as many as 16 cores, with some of its high-end chips for gaming PCs going as high as 64 cores.

While the M1 silicon has been well received, the Macs using it are Apple’s lower-end systems with less memory and fewer ports. The company still sells higher-end, Intel-based versions of some of the lines that received M1 updates. The M1 chip is a variation of a new iPad processor destined to be included in a new iPad Pro arriving next year.

Apple engineers are also developing more ambitious graphics processors. Today’s M1 processors are offered with a custom Apple graphics engine that comes in either 7- or 8-core variations. For its future high-end laptops and mid-range desktops, Apple is testing 16-core and 32-core graphics parts.

For later in 2021 or potentially 2022, Apple is working on pricier graphics upgrades with 64 and 128 dedicated cores aimed at its highest-end machines, the people said. Those graphics chips would be several times faster than the current graphics modules Apple uses from Nvidia and AMD in its Intel-powered hardware.

Bloomberg

Technology newsletter

The top technology stories, gadget releases and gaming reviews delivered every Friday. Sign up here.



Source link

Wallabies vs Argentina Tri Nations Rugby 2020: Taniela Tupou vs Nicolas Sanchez fight video, Big Mac


Wallabies prop Taniela Tupou was left far from impressed with Argentine Nicolas Sanchez after the latter’s push to the face sparked a mini scuffle.

Tempers between Australia and Argentina threatened to boil over just before half-time of Saturday night’s Tri-Nations clash after Tupou and Sanchez clashed.

After Tupou picked a loose ball up, Sanchez swatted it out of Tupou’s hands, leading to a few pushes between the two players.

Watch every match of the 2020 Tri Nations Live & Ad-Break Free During Play on Kayo. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly



Source link

A Q&A with Freddie Mac Single-Family Leader Donna Corley on How and Why Organizations Need More Women in Leadership Roles


Most industries, housing and finance included, are in the midst of profound cultural transformation. At the center of that transformation is how successful organizations make embracing inclusion and diversity a core value. As the sponsor of Freddie Mac’s new research report, Female Leaders on Reaching Financial Services Upper Ranks, and as executive vice president and head of Freddie Mac’s Single-Family business, Donna Corley is passionate about inclusion and diversity, specifically relating to women in leadership roles.

Numbers indicating the relative lack of women in leadership roles in the housing and finance industries have been disappointing, but not surprising. They’ve just confirmed what many of us already knew. But they have also pointed to a real opportunity for us to make positive change.

Donna believes research matters with this topic, and the stories of the real people behind that research matter even more. They help us understand what’s really happening in our organizations and worlds so that we can look at the facts and make smart business decisions to set new courses of action when needed.

Read Julie Devoll, HBR’s editor of special projects interview with Donna below:

Julie Devoll, HBR: Hi Donna and welcome. Can you share with readers a little bit about your background? You’ve had a long, impressive career at Freddie Mac. What’s moved you to sponsor this new research?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: I have been with Freddie Mac for over 25 years. In fact, I literally started the day after I graduated from college. Over the years, I’ve held about a dozen different roles and in each one, I grew and learned more about the business. I don’t take the great culture I work in for granted and Freddie Mac doesn’t take its culture for granted, either. We want to do everything we can to benefit women and make sure that a fair and equal environment exists, and I want to see more of that kind of environment across the industry. That is one of the main reasons why we funded this research.

Julie Devoll, HBR: It’s clear from the research that having a diverse workforce across all levels of the mortgage industry benefits everyone. What are some of the reasons for this?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: There are several reasons. When you think of it from a big picture perspective, companies with inclusive and diverse teams and cultures are better-managed companies. They’re more open to new ideas and different perspectives. You’re not narrowing down the choices in front of you as you look for promising business opportunities. Studies also have shown that diverse companies have a better bottom line as well.

I’ve seen firsthand how powerful a team you create when every single person on the team feels free to work to their strengths and full capabilities. That brings out the best in everyone and raises the bar for the entire organization.

Julie Devoll, HBR: What do you see as the biggest challenge we face as we seek gender equality in the workplace, especially in the housing and financial services industry?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: There are definitely some big challenges. When I look at all the specific challenges I faced over my career, and try to trace back why that issue was so hard to solve, I think it comes back to one of two fundamental issues. Either it’s unclear who’s accountable for solving the problem or you have an old, entrenched mindset and culture that needs to change. When it comes to workplace equality, I think that, unfortunately, these two elements are the root causes.

Julie Devoll, HBR: How important is it then to include men in the fight for gender equality? And assuming you’re going to say it is important, what are some of the ways companies can do that?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: We absolutely need men as part of the fight. When you think of it, we need more than just women supporting other women. We need men supporting women, too. Just look at the statistics. Given that there are so many more men in leadership roles, we’ll never get true equality if it’s only the women who help other women, right? So we need men.

One thing we need to do is help educate men on what women’s issues are, what men can do to support women rise in the workplace, and how all of us can have conversations about this.

Some of us may be afraid of bringing up issues and having what we think might be ‘challenging’ conversations, thinking to ourselves, hey, what if I cross the line? But there are smart ways to approach these conversations and ways to avoid conversational pitfalls. The first step involves getting everyone comfortable with the facts and focusing on opening up opportunities.

Julie Devoll, HBR: What are some of the ways that Freddie Mac supports women in advancing to leadership positions?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac:  It’s a multi-pronged effort that starts first and foremost with our culture and core values. Having an inclusive diverse workforce is a top priority. Without that, nothing else really matters. There’s also our women’s network, which offers mentoring and coaching.

We also have specific policies in place that help make sure everything that we do drives home our core values. For example, when we interview candidates, we make sure we have a diverse slate of candidates. We go beyond that to make sure the people on the interview panel are diverse, too. Because if there’s a mindset that you’re hiring someone who’s like you, a diverse interview panel will help decrease the odds of bias.

In addition, we focus on programs to encourage greater equality in the workforce, such as our maternity and paternity leave and flexible work arrangements. I’ve been teleworking one day a week for the last 14 years. I remember when I first started, people said, “well isn’t that going to stunt your career growth?” I’m happy to report that I was still promoted to VP, SVP and EVP over the last 14 years. That didn’t end up being the case at all.

But you need a culture that supports and encourages flexibility.

Having a woman who’s chair of our board and another woman who runs our Multifamily business is more evidence that, clearly, we’re doing something right when it comes to empowering women to lead. We want to get that empowering message out there as broadly as we can throughout the industry.

Julie Devoll, HBR: As organizations take a hard look at their diversity efforts, do you think it’s important to look both at what systematic changes the organization can make as well as what changes individuals can make as well?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: Absolutely. You need both – a focus on systems and individuals. We’re a data-driven company, so we look long and hard at statistics. We analyze our employee engagement surveys, including different cuts to make sure there aren’t very different views between male and female respondents. We also look at who’s getting promoted, who’s getting rated above plan on their performance measures, and who’s not. We search for any type of anomalies that could be signs of not giving everyone a fair shot at moving forward.

I’d like to mention that our continual focus on making sure our policies are fair applies to people of color as well. With our heightened awareness of racial injustice, we’re exploring not only gender inequality but also racial inequality, focusing on how we can drive meaningful outcomes not only internally with hiring and promotions but also externally with ensuring that our partners also embrace diversity and inclusion in their businesses. For example, to help change the unacceptable gap between white and black homeownership rates, we’re looking into ways we can help break through barriers around important areas such as loan qualification, access to housing supply and expansion of financial literacy programs.

From an individual standpoint, we push for people to be accountable for their own careers. One of the most common mistakes I see are people not willing to be transparent about what they want and what their aspirations are, maybe because they’re risk averse or unwilling to seize new opportunities. A good opportunity isn’t always a promotion. Some of the best growth opportunities I’ve had in my life occurred when I took horizontal rather than vertical moves. You have to be willing to change and put yourself out there if you want to advance. You have to really look at what you personally can do to help change things for the future.

Julie Devoll, HBR: Freddie Mac has a campaign called #LeadingTheWay, which is focused on advancing women in the housing industry. It explores ways to do that from raising awareness and building networks within the industry to spotlighting role models to exploring new equality focused approaches to leading. What motivated Freddie Mac to start that campaign?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: Gender inequality is a big issue in the workplace overall, and especially in the financial industry. Since we’re proud of the way we’ve pushed for gender equality within Freddie Mac, we want to share what we’ve learned to help raise awareness and educate others through success stories and techniques we have used.

I have the opportunity to speak on various business-related panels and I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve come off a stage to greet a line of people waiting to talk to me. The message I hear most often is wow, it was great to see a woman up on stage talking about such hard-hitting subjects. I’ve seen up close the power of how one woman speaking from a position of influence can directly inspire other women and give them the sense that, hey, they can do that, too. That’s why I feel it’s our duty for me and other women in leadership roles to get out there and be those role models who inspire women to keep aiming high with their goals. That’s the only way we’re ever going to turn these statistics around and create positive change.

Julie Devoll, HBR: Circling back to the research, what led Freddie Mac to sponsor this report, which encourages all of us to pay attention and get involved?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: Yes, the report does encourage all of us to pay attention and get involved and it is an integral piece of our #LeadingTheWay campaign. I encourage everyone to read this research and pass it on to both male and female colleagues. And while there are many research points and statistics, I believe that readers will be engrossed in the personal stories of women addressing challenges and making their ways up the ladder. I know I was. I also think there’s great value in the trends the report explores and the spotlight on common themes that have helped other women be successful. Through the report, we learn more about what women need in their work environments to thrive and what organizations can do to create these empowering environments.

Julie Devoll, HBR: Can you share a little bit about what empowerment means to you? And do you have any advice for younger women starting out in this industry?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: Empowerment is such an important word. It means so many different things to different people. To me, first and foremost, empowerment starts within yourself. You have to stop waiting for others to give you permission to say that you’re good enough or that you can try something. It’s up to each and every one of us to own our journeys and decisions and to act.

Despite that individual aspect, it’s also incredibly empowering to have a trusted network. Knowing that you have a support group or a cheering squad goes such a long way. I strongly encourage young women and men alike to build a great support system, find mentors, and enlist coaches. If someone can be an advocate for your work, ask for their help as you move along your career path.

I used to think of networking as a bad word. As an introvert, I associated networking with cocktail parties and hundreds of people – gosh, just the thought of it would give me a rash. Then I realized, hey wait a minute…I can change the format to be truer to myself, form smaller groups and find close-knit ways of getting to know people better. It was still a way to expand my network but it felt much more authentic for me, and that made all the difference. Now there are teams that I call upon on a regular basis and know that they’re always there for me and vice versa. My approach to networking has come a long way.

Julie Devoll, HBR: We look forward to sharing the new research report with everyone shortly. In the meantime, is there a website where readers can learn more about the #LeadingTheWay campaign?

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac: There is indeed. The campaign has its own website, which features executive profiles, facts and figures that support the need for action, and more about upcoming events and ways to connect and get involved. I highly encourage folks to visit https://sf.freddiemac.com/about/single-family/leading-the-way/overview.

Julie Devoll, HBR: Donna, thank you so much for talking with us. This has been great.

Donna Corley, Freddie Mac:  I appreciate the time. Thank you so much. If there’s one final thought I’d like to leave your readers with, it’s this. While there have been great strides, all of us need to do more to make our workplaces as equal a playing field and as full of opportunities for women leaders as possible. There’s still lots of work to do. After hearing about and eventually reading this report, I hope your readers will feel as inspired and motivated as we are to make a positive difference.

Learn how you can help level the playing field.



Source link

Apple ‘M1’ Silicon-based Macbook Air, Macbook Pro, and Mac Mini launched


Apple launched three Apple Silicon-based Mac at the ‘One More Thing’ event on Tuesday.

The Apple Silicon ‘M1’ System-on-Chip (SoC) featured on the Apple Silicon-based Macbook Air, Mac Mini, and 13-inch Macbook Pro.

The first Mac with ‘M1’ SoC is the Macbook Air and is said to have 15 hours of battery life, with pricing starts the same as before at $999.

The Macbook Air will become an all-out Apple Silicon based lineup with this transition despite the Macbook Air getting 10th Generation Intel processor upgrade back in March 2020.

The India pricing for the Macbook Air on the M1 chip starts at Rs 92,900 for the base varient and can go upto Rs 1,17,900 with the option to upgrade RAM, Memory and purchase additional software on Apple’s online store.

 

The second device to feature the ‘M1’ Apple Silicon was the Mac mini which sees more features being packed into the same chassis as before with prices starting at $699(India Pricing:Rs 64,900 onwards). There will also be an Intel processor variant for the MacMini.

The third device to feature the ‘M1’ Apple Silicon is the 13-inch Macbook Pro, features 2 USB-C ports, and is said to have a battery life of 17 hours of web browsing, 20 hours of video watching. The device is priced at $1299.

This will be replacing the base 13-Inch Macbook pro with the 8th Generation Intel processor variant and is priced at 1,22,990 for the starting 13-inch Macbook pro with M1 in India.

The higher end 10th generation Intel processor variant of the 13-inch Macbook pro will continue to retail as before.

The ‘M1’ chip models based Macbook Air, Mac Mini and Macbook Pro will be available from November 17 and will replace the similar products in Macbook Pro and Mac Mini, while there will continue to be Intel processor based variants of the same.

The Apple Silicon ‘M1’ SoC features an 8 Core CPU, 8 Core GPU, and a 16-core neural Engine, and more transistors than ever. A lot of Machine Learning capabilities of the SoC using the 16-core neural engine on the M1 was showcased during the event.

A look at the 16 billion transistors on the M1 chip   –  Via Apple Newsroom

 

macOS 11 Big Sur will be launched on Thursday, November 12, with these devices being available from November 17.

Earlier at WWDC, Apple said that the transition away from Intel chips will take two years. After updating its laptop line, Apple will still have until 2022 to transition the iMac, iMac Pro, Mac Pro, and Mac mini to Apple Silicon.

Reuters adds

Takeaway from the Apple event

Apple Silicon dubbed M1

Apple’s chip, called the M1, is built using a 5-nanometer processor technology and is packed with 16 billion transistors, the most the company has ever put into a chip. It will be used in three of its devices.

Mac mini

The entry-level desktop computer, Mac mini, will come with the latest M1 chip that has an 8-core CPU in its familiar 7.7-inch silver aluminum square design. Its price starts at $699.

Macbook Air

Apple also launched a 13-inch MacBook Air with the new chip, starting at $999 and with a battery life of up to 18 hours, the longest ever for the sleek wedge-shaped notebook that has not radically changed its form-factor since founder Steve Jobs removed it from a manila envelope in the 2008 launch event.

Macbook Pro

Its new 13-inch MacBook Pro will have a starting price of $1,299 and will have a battery life of 20 hours in a single charge, promising to deliver up to twice the battery life of the previous generation using the latest chip.

The three new computers will be available for pre-order from Tuesday and will begin arriving to customers starting next week.

macOS Big Sur

The new Macs will come with Big Sur, the latest version of its desktop operating system. It will let iPhone and iPad apps to run directly on the Mac. The update will be available to eligible device owners beginning Thursday.



Source link

Apple launches Mac computers with M1 processor


Apple on Tuesday (US time) introduced a MacBook Air notebook and other computers with the first Apple-designed microprocessor, called the M1, a move that will tie its Macs and iPhones closer together technologically.

The new chip marks a shift away from Intel Corp technology that has driven the electronic brains of Mac computers for nearly 15 years.

The new chip marks a shift away from Intel Corp technology that has driven the electronic brains of Mac computers for nearly 15 years.Credit:Bloomberg

It is a boon for Apple computers, which are overshadowed by the company’s iPhone but still rack up tens of billions of dollars in sales per year. Apple hopes developers now will create families of apps that work on both computers and phones.

In Australia, the MacBook Air will start at $1599 and have up to twice the battery life, Apple said. The M1 will also power the MacBook Pro notebook, which starts at $1999, and its $1099 Mac Mini computer, which comes without a monitor. The computers will be available from November 17.



Source link

Apple launches Mac computers with M1 processor


Apple on Tuesday (US time) introduced a MacBook Air notebook and other computers with the first Apple-designed microprocessor, called the M1, a move that will tie its Macs and iPhones closer together technologically.

The new chip marks a shift away from Intel Corp technology that has driven the electronic brains of Mac computers for nearly 15 years.

The new chip marks a shift away from Intel Corp technology that has driven the electronic brains of Mac computers for nearly 15 years.Credit:Bloomberg

It is a boon for Apple computers, which are overshadowed by the company’s iPhone but still rack up tens of billions of dollars in sales per year. Apple hopes developers now will create families of apps that work on both computers and phones.

In Australia, the MacBook Air will start at $1599 and have up to twice the battery life, Apple said. The M1 will also power the MacBook Pro notebook, which starts at $1999, and its $1099 Mac Mini computer, which comes without a monitor. The computers will be available from November 17.



Source link