Mother of four locked out of emergency accommodation due to paperwork issue


The head of South Australia’s Housing Authority has apologised to a mother of four who has been locked out of her emergency accommodation five times in the past fortnight because the agency failed to complete the necessary paperwork.

Kirsty told ABC Radio Adelaide this morning that her family would not have anywhere to go if the SA Housing Authority did not get the paperwork through today to extend her stay.

“My key was disabled again this morning because Housing SA hasn’t done the appropriate paperwork,” she said.

Last September, Kirsty was told she had to leave her home of five years.

Since then, she has applied for about 200 rental properties without success.

After couch surfing for three months, housing services placed her in a motel room.

“If Housing SA don’t get the paperwork promptly to them this morning, then they are probably going to ask me to pack all my stuff up and get out and I won’t have anywhere to go,” Kirsty said.

After hearing Kirsty’s story, SA Housing Authority Chief Executive Michael Buchan issued an apology.

Mr Buchan said there was an increasing number of families looking for public housing.

“Kirsty is not alone at the moment, there are lots of people in very similar circumstances,” he said.

“It goes to show the challenges we have at the moment and, in particular, when the private rental market isn’t able to provide housing for people who would otherwise be in it.”

Labor MP Nat Cook called for more to be done to help Kirsty and other families in similar circumstances.(

ABC News

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Opposition’s Nat Cook says ‘go back to your office and do the work’

Opposition human services spokesperson Nat Cook said she was furious at Mr Buchan’s response to Kirsty’s situation.

“I’m absolutely gasping at this, seriously Michael Buchan, you need to look at the policies and take charge of this and change them,” she said.

“People in the sector knew months ago that families were going to be homeless — like Kirsty — suffering this indignity and this embarrassment.

Ms Cook said she had received three more calls over the weekend from women in similar circumstances to Kirsty.

“I just cannot believe that someone can sit there in that position and wring their hands and say sorry,” she said.

“You’ve got no answers, you’ve got nothing for Kirsty and nothing to say about the 1,700 homes that are empty that we have found with kitchens that are brand new available for someone like Kirsty to live in.”

Mr Buchan said there were currently 600 properties available and awaiting allocation and another 1,400 homes that were vacant but needed upgrading or repairs.

“We would have properties that match Kirsty’s needs, but they are probably not in the area that she wants to live,” he said.

He said policy making had been “very agile” in recent times.

“We were able to find a huge amount of accommodation [for people] who were really needy during the COVID period and we continue to do that essentially every day,” Mr Buchan said.

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Man placed in psychiatric facility James Nash House following violent attack on mother



A man who attacked his mother “with an extraordinary level of violence” believing she was an alien in disguise will spend more than a decade in a secure psychiatric facility.

The man — who cannot be identified for legal reasons — was found not guilty of attempted murder by reason of mental incompetence in the South Australian Supreme Court last year.

He was suffering a psychotic relapse and had delusions that his mother had been taken by alien forces when he attacked her in her home in Adelaide’s south in October 2018.

The Supreme Court heard the woman was getting a loaf of bread out from the freezer when her son grabbed her from behind and started attacking her saying, “what did you do with my mum, where’s my mum?”

In sentencing on Tuesday, Justice David Peek said the woman was attacked “with great ferocity”.

“You left your mother with life-threatening injuries which required immediate and multiple surgeries followed by close to two months in an intensive care ward,” he said.

The court previously heard the man had told his mother the night before the incident that there was “something wrong with his head” and he was not “thinking straight”.

The man had a “long history of mental health problems”, but had a good relationship with his mother.

Psychiatric report found man needed long-term support

Justice Peek said a psychiatric report prepared for him by forensic psychologist Dr Loraine Lim concluded the man was still psychotic and was likely to require long-term intensive support and supervision.

The report also found he was likely to abscond interstate if released from treatment prematurely.

“Although medication has reduced his inclination to act on his delusions, his mental state is easily destabilised by stress,” Justice Peek read.

“Given the extraordinary level of violence involved, his treatment resistance and poor prognosis he will require a substantial period of inpatient rehabilitation followed by a very lengthy period of close supervision on licence in the community.

“Any future discharge from the forensic hospital should be done very cautiously and gradually.”

Justice Peek ordered the man be detained at secure psychiatric facility James Nash House for a limiting term of 11 years and six months.

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RSL President apologises to mother hoping for an inquiry into veteran suicides




The national president of the RSL has apologised after accusing a woman campaigning for a royal commission of looking to “assuage” her own guilt. Andrew Greene reports.

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‘Can’t take this pain’: Rohingya mother searches for son after refugee camp blaze



Noor Banu, 32, points at a picture of her eleven-year-old son Mohammed Karim who went missing after a fire broke out earlier this week and destroyed thousands of shelters at the Balukhali refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, March 25, 2021. “I can’t take this pain any more,” Banu said. “I believe Karim is dead, and I may not even be able to identify his body.” REUTERS/Mohammad Ponir Hossain

March 26, 2021

By Ruma Paul

BALUKHALI REFUGEE CAMP, Bangladesh (Reuters) – After losing her husband, two young sons and her home, Noor Banu thought she had seen the worst of life.

She made the perilous journey from her village in Myanmar’s Rakhine State to the refugee camps in Bangladesh in 2017, with nothing except her four surviving boys.

Now she fears she has lost another son to the massive blaze that ripped through the Cox’s Bazar camps, reducing tarpaulin and bamboo shelters to ash. More than 300 refugees are missing. Eleven-year-old Mohammed Karim is among them.

“I can’t take this pain any more,” Banu said, breaking into sobs as she spoke to Reuters inside a temporary shelter on Friday.

“I believe Karim is dead, and I may not even be able to identify his body.”

The 32-year-old Rohingya Muslim has already seen two sons die by fire.

In 2016, as the Myanmar army poured into Rohingya villages in response to coordinated insurgent attacks on security posts, Banu said her home was set ablaze in Pawet Chaung, killing the two boys – one barely a year old, and another seven.

“My home was torched in front of my eyes,” she said. “I could do nothing to save my children from the blaze.”

Her sons still bear burn marks from the fire.

Banu was among hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims who fled Myanmar in 2017 following army operations that the United Nations called a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.

Myanmar denies the charge and says it was waging legitimate counterinsurgency operations against Rohingya insurgents.

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Banu is one of around a million Rohingya refugees living at the camps. Myanmar denies most Rohingya citizenship and considers them interlopers from Bangladesh even though they have lived in Myanmar for decades.

She – like many others – arrived with the trauma of the violence back home. Her husband went missing in 2015, and she said she later learned he had been arrested and was in jail – she does not know on what charges. She has not heard from him since.

The family stayed at a shelter close to those of her relatives and survived on food aid.

The boys began to attend the religious school at the camps. Slowly, they were learning to build a life out of ruins.

On Monday, Banu said she had just finished with lunch when she heard people screaming and rushed out of her hut. Her four boys, who had been at the madrassa, were running toward her, and behind them, flames were rising from shelters.

“My sons were hurrying home to take me away,” she said.

She grabbed her youngest and ran, but as people scurried from the fire, Banu said she was separated from her other sons.

That evening, two of the boys managed to reach her by making calls through the phones of other refugees. Four days on, there has been no word from Karim.

The ruins of scores of charred huts can be seen at the hilly camps. Some 45,000 refugees have been displaced, according to the United Nations. Some refugees are working to rebuild their tent homes, others search for their relatives. Eleven people have so far been confirmed dead.

Banu has approached aid agencies at the camps to seek help in finding Karim, but her hope is fading.

“My son knows the camps very well,” she said. “If he was alive, he would have returned to me by now.”

For the photo essay, click on https://reut.rs/3fgwtAh

(Reporting by Ruma Paul; Additional reporting by Mohammad Hossain; Writing by Zeba Siddiqui; Editing by Alison Williams)



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Accused killer mother said she ‘wanted to put something’ in son’s drink, court told


A Gold Coast mother accused of killing two of her children for financial gain described her son as “a potato” with “no life” and said she “wanted to put something in his drink”, a committal hearing has heard.

Maree Crabtree is charged with the murders of her son Jonathan Crabtree, 26, in 2017, and her daughter Erin, 18, in 2012.

Both deaths were initially considered suicides.

Ms Crabtree is also charged with torturing and attempting to murder another woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, over a seven-year period, as well as charges of fraud and obtaining a financial benefit by deception.

Police have alleged Ms Crabtree forced all three to take prescription pain medication over a prolonged period, which caused them to suffer from health and developmental problems.

It has also been alleged Ms Crabtree used their disabilities, and her children’s deaths, to claim close to $1 million in insurance payouts.

Former neighbour Gemma Buchholz was cross-examined at the committal hearing in the Brisbane Magistrates Court over statements she had made to detectives investigating the deaths.

The court heard Ms Buchholz told police Ms Crabtree said to her: “Jonathan’s like a potato. He has no life. I just want to put something in his drink so he will just not be here.”

Jonathan Crabtree had been in a coma in 2015, following a serious car crash.

Defence barrister Angus Edwards told the court the alleged comment would have been made while Jonathan was in hospital, but suggested Ms Buchholz changed her statement to claim it was made closer to the time of Jonathan’s death.

“You said it closer to the time he died to make it seem like she had killed him,” Mr Edwards said.

Ms Buchholz replied: “I’ve made mistakes but I’m true to what she said to me.”

The court heard Ms Buchholz had also told police about a conversation at her child’s birthday party that Maree Crabtree attended.

Ms Buchholz told detectives Ms Crabtree insisted on being called “Nanna Marie”.

“Just her saying that and stating that, my hairs on the back of my neck raised up,” Ms Buchholz said.

But Mr Edwards again cast doubt on the witness’s recollection.

“You’re twisting my words,” Ms Buchholz said.

The defence barrister replied: “Your words change because you can’t keep your story straight”.

On Tuesday, the woman allegedly tortured by Ms Crabtree was ordered to hand over her phone, which was alleged to contain crucial evidence.

The charge of torture against Ms Crabtree related to allegations she forced the woman to take prescription medication for years.

The woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, originally told police Jonathan Crabtree had committed suicide because he had received “bad news”, but two years later she wrote a letter claiming Ms Crabtree had killed him.

The woman told the court at the time of Jonathan’s death she was under a lot of stress and “couldn’t think straight” and decided to write down what had happened.

“I wanted to remember everything more clearly,” she said.

Under cross-examination, Mr Edwards suggested to the court that the woman had not remembered anything, and had instead made up the details.

“I did remember, but I decided not to talk to anyone until that time,” she said.

“I remembered, but not much, just like the small details … I didn’t remember them until I wrote all of them down.”

The court heard that in the letter the woman said she saw Ms Crabtree give her son a drink laced with an opioid drug called Oxynorm on the night he died.

“I remembered seeing her do it,” she said.

The court heard she told a friend what she had recalled and then spoke about it with her over social media, and also called another woman and told her over the phone.

The court was also told the woman was refusing to show police and prosecutors the social media messages between her and her friend.

“Everything was deleted before,” she said.

“I just don’t want anyone going through my phone — I own it.

“It’s private … it’s only for my eyes.”

Mr Edwards said the woman had “told lies”, and threatened to subpoena her phone.

“It’s a bit hard to accept what you say just on the basis that you say it — someone has to check it,” Mr Edwards said.

The woman is expected to continue giving evidence when the hearing resumes on Thursday.

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Mother says paramedic son Damian Crump should not have been left alone with stolen medication


The grieving mother of a paramedic who took his own life has told an inquest she hopes “to see changes in the ambulance services” so her son’s death is “not in vain”.

Damian Michael Crump died on or about December 23, 2016, after he took his own life using drugs he had stolen from Ambulance Tasmania (AT).

Evidence provided to the coronial investigation suggested the 36-year-old had drug abuse and mental health issues, “including suicidal plans”.

The three-week inquest before Coroner Olivia McTaggart will examine AT’s mental health systems and drug security.

Speaking on the first day of the inquest, his mother, Alanah Crump, said Mr Crump had long struggled with his mental health, but he lived for his work.

“When he was off on leave he used to get real [sic] bored. He didn’t like to have time off,” she said.

“He liked to be working. He lived for his job.

In her ruling on the scope of the inquest, Ms McTaggart wrote there was evidence that Mr Crump had abused prescription medication before his death and that AT medication had been reported as going missing in September 2016, with Mr Crump suspected as being responsible.

In December 2016, he was caught by a colleague with an amount of unauthorised medication.

Ms Crump told the inquest she believes it was a mistake that person asked him to wait while they fetched assistance.

Mr Crump instead stole more drugs and later used them to end his life.

“He raced back into medical room and got exactly what he needed because I’m sure the first thing going through his mind was ‘I’m going to lose my job’ and that would’ve been devastating to him,” she said.

“If that had happened Damien would still be with us.”

A former paramedic told the inquest random drug testing would help reduce drug theft.(

ABC News: Scott Ross

)

Two paramedics, who cannot be named for legal reasons, also gave evidence that they had also stolen drugs from AT.

One paramedic said they “started looting drugs whenever their backs were turned” and would just “make up names” for the sign-in book.

“I was putting in five to 10 times what everyone else was using and nobody picked that up,” he said.

He told the inquest random drug testing would likely decrease the issue.

“There are probably still people diverting today,” he said.

Ambos mental health systems ‘inadequate’, says police officer

Sergeant Terry McCullough, who led the investigation into Mr Crump’s death, said he had been surprised to find AT’s mental health systems were “slightly inadequate”.

“Some of the issues observed during the investigation were quite surprising, [including] a lack of mental health structures in an agency involved with handling trauma,” he said.

“As a police officer I attend some of the trauma and to me it appears that ambulance officers attend all trauma matters.

Tasmanian paramedic Damian Crump
Tasmanian paramedic Damian Crump ‘lived for his job’.(

Supplied

)

“The mental health and welfare provisions that they seemed to operate at the time of this matter seemed slightly inadequate compared to other agencies.”

He said the management structures appeared “ad hoc” and it was quite apparent many AT staff relied on private mental health assistance.

Sergeant McCullough also said while there was medication management, the “systems were perhaps flawed in many ways”.

“[There were] two other incidents, both ambulance officers who were found to be diverting medications.

“The disturbing thing is it was almost identical modus operandi, and to the best of my knowledge, I don’t think anything was done to remedy the situation.

“Hence Damien was able to do exactly the same things as what happened twice before.”

Sergeant McCullough said from what he knew of Mr Crump, he was someone who loved his job and was passionate about improving his and other paramedics’ work — he even ran a Facebook page called ‘Crump Academy’ dedicated to this.

“My understanding is his job was everything. He put a lot of effort into this work [and was] dedicated to improving his standards and standards of others,” he said.

“It’s my belief that Damian Crump’s desire to … see positive change within Ambulance Tasmania has considered by way of this investigation.”

Ms Crump told the inquest she hopes some good comes out of it.

“Hopefully his death is not in vain,” she said.

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Grieving mother calls for inquest as State Coroner investigates bashing death of Courtney Herron’s in Royal Park


“Justice for Courtney is not over,” she said. “This is what we want, for her voice to be heard, how she got to be there and the systemic failures.”

Ms Antoniou has previously spoken of her daughters struggles with mental health issues and a serious drug addiction as a young adult.

Courtney Herron with her mother Maxie.

Ms Herron had struggled with depression and anxiety since she was a teenager and had been in and out of hospital for several years prior to her death. When she was killed, she had been returning to her partner’s house after spending time couch-surfing.

Her mother said she hoped an inquest could examine how flaws within the mental health and bail system had failed her daughter.

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“It could make fundamental changes to the whole system and people and the processes will be held to account,” she said.

“That’s the most important thing out of the whole process.”

Ms Antoniou, who worked in welfare services for a decade, said she believed the system was broken.

“All we have now is a Band-Aid system. It’s overcrowded, people go for acute care, there aren’t enough beds, then there is a whole circle of not enough beds, and they are pushed out into society and there is nowhere to live, no proper housing.”

It is mandatory for a coroner to hold an inquest if a person dies in custody or care, if a person’s identity is unknown or if the coroner suspects homicide and no one has been charged in relation to the death. A coroner can also hold an inquest if they determine there is public interest in doing so.

Hammond had been released from jail just weeks before Ms Herron’s murder.

Court documents show that he successfully appealed a 10½-month jail sentence he had received for threatening to kill his ex-partner by waving a knife in her face, choking and punching her, fracturing her eye socket.

His lawyer argued his sentence had been “manifestly excessive” and Hammond’s parents, from NSW, told the court they would help pay for some temporary accommodation if he were released.

He was assessed as suitable for a 12-month community corrections order on the condition he received drug, alcohol and mental health treatment, supervision and judicial monitoring. Seven weeks later he was back in jail, charged with murder.

On Wednesday, Victorian Supreme Court judge Phillip Priest ordered Hammond spend 25 years in a mental health facility. The court had been unable to do that during previous hearings due to a lack of beds at the hospital.

Henry Hammond.

Henry Hammond.

Hammond appeared via video link with thick facial hair. He did not speak except to confirm he could hear proceedings.

His lawyer asked for a review period for the order to be set, arguing that Hammond didn’t have the “resources or the understanding” to request one himself.

However, Justice Priest said he did not believe a review date needed to be set.

“I can’t see things changing before I retire,” he said.

The family of Courtney Herron, who was killed in Parkville at a memorial to mark one year since her death.

The family of Courtney Herron, who was killed in Parkville at a memorial to mark one year since her death.Credit:Jason South

The order was backdated to the date of Hammond’s arrest on in May 2019.

The pair met after Ms Herron gave Hammond a cigarette after he approached her in the CBD on May 24, 2019.

They travelled to Fitzroy where they smoked cannabis and methamphetamine, before having dinner together at Vegie Bar on Brunswick Street in Fitzroy. She paid for Hammond’s meal, and they returned to the friend’s apartment.

At 3.30am, the pair left the apartment and entered the grounds of Royal Park from Elliott Avenue about 4.30am.

Courtney Herron was buried beside her grandfather.

Courtney Herron was buried beside her grandfather. Credit:Jason South

While walking through the park, Hammond picked up a branch. Courtney was scared and asked him, ‘Are you going to kill me?’ before he struck her on the head with the branch.

A man sleeping in the park heard screams and estimated Hammond bludgeoned the body with the branch for 50 minutes.

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Hammond then tied her feet together with black material and dragged the body to a clearing near a tree and some logs. He covered her with leaves, a tree branch and put a piece of concrete on her face.

Hammond was arrested the next day. He initially made no comment during an interview and denied knowing Ms Herron, but in a second interview, he said he had been walking through Royal Park and had recognised “her treachery towards him and her family” and said the “trees had dropped sticks for a reason”.

He told police he recognised Ms Herron from a past life when he was happily married and “had everything”, and admitted to hitting her with a stick and punching her.

Ms Antoniou said the details of her daughter’s death haunt her. She doesn’t want it to happen to anyone else.

“Courtney is the embodiment of all that is wrong in Australia. A failed mental health system, to her being a victim of violence against females, and the myriad of systems that are supposedly in place to protect her and others.”

If you or anyone you know needs support call the national sexual assault, domestic and family violence hotline on 1800 737 732

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Gold Coast mother Maree Crabtree faces court accused of killing children by drugging them for financial gain


Maree Crabtree was charged in 2018 over the murders of her son Jonathan Crabtree, 26, in 2017, and her daughter Erin, 18, in 2012.

Both deaths were initially considered suicides.

Ms Crabtree was also charged with torturing and attempting to murder another woman known to her over a seven-year period.

Police alleged she forced all three to take prescription pain medication over a prolonged period, which caused them to suffer from health and developmental problems.

It was also alleged Ms Crabtree used their disabilities, and her children’s deaths, to claim close to $1 million dollars in insurance payouts.

In a committal hearing being held in Brisbane, Jonathan’s ex-girlfriend Katelyn Lofts told the court he had feared his mother.

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Mother says paramedic son Damian Crump should not have been left alone with Ambulance Tasmania stolen medication, which he used to overdose


The grieving mother of a paramedic who took his own life has told an inquest she hopes “to see changes in the ambulance services” so her son’s death “is not in vain”.

Damian Michael Crump died on or about December 23, 2016, after he took his own life using drugs he had stolen from Ambulance Tasmania (AT).

Evidence provided to the coronial investigation suggested the 36-year-old had drug abuse and mental health issues, “including suicidal plans”.

The three-week inquest before Coroner Olivia McTaggart will examine AT’s mental health systems and drug security.

Speaking on the first day of the inquest, his mother, Alanah Crump, said Mr Crump had long struggled with his mental health, but he lived for his work.

“When he was off on leave he used to get real [sic] bored. He didn’t like to have time off,” she said.

“He liked to be working. He lived for his job.

In her ruling on the scope of the inquest, Ms McTaggart wrote there was evidence that Mr Crump had abused prescription medication before his death and that AT medication had been reported as going missing in September 2016, with Mr Crump suspected as being responsible.

In December 2016, he was caught by a colleague with an amount of unauthorised medication.

Ms Crump told the inquest she believes it was a mistake that person asked him to wait while they fetched assistance.

Mr Crump instead stole more drugs and later used them to end his life.

“He raced back into medical room and got exactly what he needed because I’m sure the first thing going through his mind was ‘I’m going to lose my job’ and that would’ve been devastating to him,” she said.

“In my eyes that was preventable. That never should’ve happened. You don’t leave them, you take them with you.

“If that had happened Damien would still be with us.”

A former paramedic told the inquest random drug testing would help reduce drug theft.(

ABC News: Scott Ross

)

Two paramedics, who cannot be named for legal reasons, also gave evidence that they had also stolen drugs from AT.

One paramedic said they “started looting drugs whenever their backs were turned” and would just “make up names” for the sign-in book.

“I was putting in five to 10 times what everyone else was using and nobody picked that up,” he said.

He told the inquest random drug testing would likely decrease the issue.

“There are probably still people diverting today,” he said.

Ambos mental health systems ‘inadequate’, says police officer

Sergeant Terry McCullough, who led the investigation into Mr Crump’s death, said he had been surprised to find AT’s mental health systems were “slightly inadequate”.

“Some of the issues observed during the investigation were quite surprising, [including] a lack of mental health structures in an agency involved with handling trauma,” he said.

“As a police officer I attend some of the trauma and to me it appears that ambulance officers attend all trauma matters.

Tasmanian paramedic Damian Crump
Tasmanian paramedic Damian Crump ‘lived for his job’.(

Supplied

)

“The mental health and welfare provisions that they seemed to operate at the time of this matter seemed slightly inadequate compared to other agencies.”

He said the management structures appeared “ad hoc” and it was quite apparent many AT staff relied on private mental health assistance.

Sergeant McCullough also said while there was medication management, the “systems were perhaps flawed in many ways”.

“[There were] two other incidents, both ambulance officers who were found to be diverting medications.

“The disturbing thing is it was almost identical modus operandi, and to the best of my knowledge, I don’t think anything was done to remedy the situation.

“Hence Damien was able to do exactly the same things as what happened twice before.”

Sergeant McCullough said from what he knew of Mr Crump, he was someone who loved his job and was passionate about improving his and other paramedics’ work — he even ran a Facebook page called ‘Crump Academy’ dedicated to this.

“My understanding is his job was everything. He put a lot of effort into this work [and was] dedicated to improving his standards and standards of others,” he said.

“It’s my belief that Damian Crump’s desire to … see positive change within Ambulance Tasmania has considered by way of this investigation.”

Ms Crump told the inquest she hopes some good comes out of it.

“Hopefully his death is not in vain,” she said.

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Breonna Taylor’s mother says daughter ‘deserves justice’ – a year after police killing | US News


Breonna Taylor’s mother has said her daughter “deserves justice” – a year after she was shot dead in a botched police raid.

Ms Taylor, 26, was killed when officers in Louisville, Kentucky, carried out a “no-knock” warrant and broke down her apartment door.

Her boyfriend thought it was someone breaking in and fired a single shot in self-defence, hitting one officer in the leg.

Image:
Tamika Palmer says the protesters’ actions have given her courage

Ms Taylor was shot multiple times when police fired dozens of shots in return.

Police were actually searching for an ex-partner of Ms Taylor who did not live at the address and no drugs were found in the property.

More from Black Lives Matter

“Breonna was just full of life, she just didn’t deserve it,” her mother Tamika Palmer told NBC News.

Alongside George Floyd’s killing, her daughter’s death is one of several cases taken up by Black Lives Matter campaigners in their push for equality.

People march for the third day since the release of the grand jury report on the death of Breonna Taylor on September 26, 2020 in Louisville, Kentucky.
Image:
People protested in September when it was revealed officers would not face charges

Ms Palmer said the protesters’ push for justice has helped keep her going.

“There’s been plenty of times I don’t want to get up. But you roll over and look at your phone or the TV and they’re there before you. So how do you not show up?”

“She definitely deserves justice – but there’s so many people that deserve justice,” added Ms Palmer – who reached a $12m (£8.6m) settlement with the city of Louisville over the killing.

In December, she published an open letter in The Washington Post to President Joe Biden, who had considerable support among black voters in the US election.

She told him “actions speak louder than words” and “we fought for you, now it’s your turn to fight for us”.

“Breonna’s law” – banning “no-knock” warrants has been introduced in the city of Louisville and three states, but so far not in Kentucky.

FRANKFORT, KY - SEPTEMBER 23: Kentucky Attorney General, Daniel Cameron, speaks to the media during a press conference on September 23, 2020 in Frankfort, Kentucky. Cameron announced partial charges being filed against Brett Hankison, a former Louisville Metro Police Officer for his role in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor during the execution of a no-knock raid on her apartment on March 13, 2020.  (Photo by Jon Cherry/Getty Images)
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Kentucky attorney general Daniel Cameron said officers were justified in shooting as the boyfriend fired first

Kentucky’s attorney general Daniel Cameron said officers were justified in shooting as her boyfriend had fired first during the raid on 13 March 2020.

The officers said they had announced their presence before forcing their way in – a claim disputed by some witnesses.

None of the police were charged over the killing – a decision that sparked protests across the US in September.

The officer shot in the leg is still on the force and the other two were dismissed.

The only indictment was against one officer for endangerment, after he accidentally shot into a neighbour’s property.

The case against Ms Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth L Walker, was permanently dropped this week.

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