Foxtel, Australian newspapers financial millstones in News Corp accounts


Despite some growth, and a strong start this financial year, Foxtel and the Australian newspapers aren’t looking all that flash for News Corp.

(Image: AAP/Dean Lewins)

Books: good. Digital real estate: better. Wall Street: yummy.

But the rest of News Corp’s assets (Australian and UK newspapers and the floundering Foxtel) were financial millstones in the September quarter as the Murdoch family’s media group reported a much stronger start to the new 2020-21 financial year than it started 2019-20.

Foxtel and the Australian newspapers’ revenues fell. The Australian papers saw a 20% slump in revenues for the quarter, according to the News Corp report.

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Schumpeter – Should big tech save newspapers? | Business


IN THE EARLY 17th century the best place to gather news in London was the old cathedral of St Paul’s, a place that buzzed with gossip on politics and was described—unusually for a house of worship—as “the ear’s brothel”. Some of the informants were entrepreneurs; they had recently started writing “letters of news” which they sold to subscribers at a hefty price. Some 400 years later, the original newspaper business model is finally making a comeback.

The reason it has taken so long to resurface is that, for almost two centuries, newspapers have been on a journey into the mass market which gave them scale, prestige and profit but which has now reached its end. They mostly abandoned dependence on subscriptions and instead sold below what they cost to produce as a way to attract legions of readers to sell to advertisers. The aphorism today applied to users of technology platforms—“If you are not paying, you are the product”—rang almost as true of newspaper readers in the heyday of print advertising.

No longer. Since the internet took off, the print media’s advertising-supported business model has floundered. In the past 20 years newspapers’ ad revenues in America have fallen by about 80% (to Depression-era levels), while circulation has roughly fallen by half. Though online traffic has surged, revenue from digital advertising has failed to offset the profit draining out of print. Platforms such as Google and Facebook have become the new moguls of the media landscape. In Britain, for instance, Google accounts for more than 90% of search-advertising revenues and Facebook for half the value of all display ads, says the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), a regulator. In the past two years they have between them disgorged 40% of online traffic going to national papers. The CMA warned in July that ad-fuelled online platforms could hasten the decline of reliable news media.

This power shift has led newspapers in many countries to plead with politicians that they need help in the face of big tech. Partly because they have, by their very nature, a loud voice, they have generated sympathy. How much they deserve it is another matter.

The world is strewn with businesses, from books and music to travel and taxis, that have been torn apart by the digital revolution without anyone rushing to the rescue. Why are newspapers different? One argument is that a thriving press supports grass-roots journalism which, though often loss-making, supports democracy. That is reasonable. Yet it is muddled up with other motivations, such as the desire to throttle the tech giants. The result is an array of government interventions in recent months aimed at putting the squeeze on Google and Facebook. In Australia and France trustbusters are striving to force the duo to pay for news they link to on their platforms. In America a congressional subcommittee this month recommended a “safe harbour” for newspapers to negotiate collectively with online platforms.

Mindful of the hue and cry, Google is offering a handout. This month it pledged $1bn over three years to newspapers to curate news content for its site. Some publishers saw it as a precedent—and a tacit admission that Google should pay for news. Even News Corp, a media behemoth controlled by Rupert Murdoch, which has led the crusade against the tech giants, welcomed the move. Last year Facebook agreed to pay News Corp a licensing fee for displaying some articles in its news tab.

If anything, the gratitude for big tech’s largesse shows how desperate newspapers are for payment of any kind. Yet set against revenues of $162bn last year at Google’s parent, Alphabet, $1bn is a pittance. More to the point, it will not change the underlying economics of the global newspaper industry, which had about $140bn of revenues last year. That is because the ad-funded business model was living on fumes even before the internet ate the world this century. Data from Benedict Evans, who writes a technology newsletter, show that newspapers in America have been losing share of ad dollars to TV since the 1950s—long before the web. Circulation has also fallen relative to population, suggesting that profits were bolstered by economic and demographic growth, not because the industry was producing a more popular product.

Claims that the tech giants are plundering newspapers for profit sound far-fetched, too. The real failure is that papers have lost control of distribution to Google and Facebook, making it harder to monetise the traffic. This is a mistake some content industries, such as video-streaming and music, have avoided. Moreover, some of the advertising dollars made by big tech came from bringing new firms, particularly microbusinesses, into the market, rather than poaching online advertisers from newspapers.

The (slightly) better news

So ignore the moaning of old-media moguls in distress and look instead at how some newspapers have already adapted to the digital onslaught. Revenues at the New York Times, for instance, are still far short of their ad-funded halcyon days. Yet the number of subscriptions exceeded 6.5m this year, a number that should give the paper enough clout to bypass the tech giants. Tabloids find it harder to turn readers into subscribers, especially with so much clickbait around. But some digital publications with a newsworthy focus such as Axios, which produces sponsored newsletters, are thriving. Axios even plans to enter local markets, where newspapers are in particular trouble.

The question of who pays for public-interest journalism remains unanswered. But few think it ought to be Google and Facebook. That would “undermine the principles of an independent press”, says Alice Pickthall of Enders Analysis, a research company. Curbing the power of big tech is a matter for the world’s trustbusters, which must not be conflated with bailing out press barons. The survival of newspapers should depend on business, not regulation. Like the gossip merchants of St Paul’s, they need to produce a product that readers are happy to pay a fair price for.

This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “Bad news”

Reuse this contentThe Trust Project



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Editor’s accidental text sparks Ballarat council candidate complaint over newspaper’s alleged bias


A former mayor and council election candidate is accusing a regional Victorian newspaper of attempting to sway a local government election.

Samantha McIntosh is one of eight candidates vying for three vacancies in the Central Ward of the upcoming Ballarat City Council election.

Ms McIntosh, who served as mayor between 2016-2019, has accused weekly newspaper The Ballarat Times of running a campaign aimed at discrediting her and disrupting this month’s local government elections.

The Times News Group, which publishes the newspaper, has rejected any assertation of improper reporting and says it has never run a campaign against Ms McIntosh.

How it all unfolded

Ms McIntosh’s claims were sparked by a text message she inadvertently received from the Ballarat Times’ newspaper editor, Alistair Finlay.

The Ballarat Times has run extensive coverage of the Ballarat City Council election.(Supplied: The Ballarat Times)

The message was about her, not for her, and included a directive that she believes revealed the newspaper’s bias.

“To the point where she’s under so much pressure she literally ran away from my reporter yesterday.”

The message, which was leaked to the ABC, also included explicit language the ABC has chosen not to publish.

It was unclear who the message was intended for, but names Ms McIntosh.

Mr Finlay was contacted but declined to comment.

‘It took my breath away’

Ms McIntosh said she was floored by the text, which arrived in the midst of her council re-election campaign.

She said it took a few days to comprehend the text.

“I felt like I couldn’t breathe,” Ms McIntosh said.

“There’s a desire by a few to determine the outcome of a local council election and to use local media bodies to help direct the outcome.

“I believe these local council elections should be about our community’s right to voice their decisions, and little do they know there’s this influence.”

A picture of a woman in a garden
Samantha McIntosh trained as a disability nurse before spending 12 years with Ballarat City Council, including a stint as mayor.(Supplied: Samantha McIntosh)

Ms McIntosh has written to the Victorian Ombudsman, the local government inspectorate, the Victorian Electoral Commission and the Australian Press Council, asking for the newspaper’s actions to be investigated.

‘Unequivocally no’

The Times News Group has rejected any claims of bias against Ms McIntosh, or any other candidate.

Managing director of Ballarat Times News Group Warick Brown said he had received a complaint about one of the company’s journalists.

Mr Brown defended the work of the newspaper and how it had covered the upcoming election.

“I think the way that we report in the Ballarat Times is very evenly spread, it’s all about mainly the facts,” Mr Brown said.

Ms McIntosh said the text messages from the newspaper’s editor were concerning.

“I’m sick of the behaviour,” she said.

“This has gone on for a long time and it’s not OK for our council elections to be played with.”

But the newspaper’s managing director Warick Brown said there was no bias to be seen in his team’s coverage.

“We’re here to report on all the candidates that are vying for certain ward positions,” Mr Brown said.

“We completed a really equal platform for all candidates to talk about themselves and to pitch for themselves.”

A full-page advertisement in a newspaper that says 'Vote 1 Samantha McIntosh'.
Samantha McIntosh has taken out significant advertising space in local newspapers, including The Ballarat Times.(Supplied: Samantha McIntosh Facebook)

‘If we don’t call it out, it won’t stop’

The former mayor said she and her husband have since met with Mr Finlay who apologised profusely.

Ms McIntosh said she wanted to call out the actions and take a stand against media interference.

“I believe if we do not call it out publicly, it will not stop,” she said.

“But if this starts to impact the outcome of a local council election, it needs to be called out. Not in a year’s time, but now.”



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Extinction Rebellion defends disrupting national newspapers to protest against ‘failure to report’ on climate crisis – Channel 4 News


If the aims of the latest Extinction Rebellion protests overnight were to get publicity and provoke a backlash, they worked.

Information is power – but parked cars and pieces of Bamboo were sufficient to disrupt the mighty UK printing press.

For a short while anyway.

Blockades like these at sites across the country delayed the distribution of several major newspapers nationwide this morning.

Their target – Rupert Murdoch’s newspaper empire

Their message – if you won’t report the climate crisis, you won’t report at all.

I am joined now by the editor of the Sunday Times Emma Tucker and D. And the writer Donnachadh McCarthy from Extinction Rebellion.



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Britain’s treasury officials pushing for tax hikes -newspapers


Article content

Treasury officials in Britain are pushing for tax hikes to plug holes blown in public finances by the coronavirus pandemic, two leading British newspapers said.

Such hikes will enable the exchequer to raise at least 20 billion pounds ($26.70 billion) a year, and some could be introduced in the November budget, the Sunday Telegraph said https://bit.ly/2YKTjar.

The Sunday Times newspaper said officials were drawing up plans for a 30-billion-pound “tax raid” on the wealthy, businesses, pensions and foreign aid.

In its budget, the government also plans to raise both capital gains tax and corporation tax, the Sunday Times https://bit.ly/32CQlWn added.

Finance Minister Rishi Sunak is considering a proposal to boost corporation tax to 24% from 19%, a move that would raise 12 billion pounds next year, rising to 17 billion in 2023-24, the paper said.

The Treasury did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday.

Britain’s economic recovery from the shock of the pandemic has gathered pace, data showed this month, but government borrowing has exceeded 2 trillion pounds and fears of future job losses are mounting.

The economy still faces a long recovery after shrinking by a record 20% in the second quarter, the largest decline of any big country.

Britain entered lockdown in late March and shops in England only reopened fully on June 15, followed by bars and restaurants on July 4.

Sunak has indicated that some taxes will need to rise over the medium term. ($1=0.7491 pounds) (Reporting by Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru)



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Dozens of regional newspapers to return in print after COVID-19 hibernation | Goulburn Post


news, local-news, ACM, newspapers, regional media

Media company ACM has urged audiences and advertisers to support local newspapers as dozens of regional papers resume printing this week after production was temporarily suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic. Key ACM titles will be back in circulation in towns in NSW, Victoria, South Australia and Queensland as part of a phased return to print publishing. The resumption comes as ACM, the owner of this website, was notified that it is eligible for a grant under the federal government’s $50 million Public Interest News Gathering program. ACM chief executive Allen Williams urged communities to support local papers by buying a printed copy, signing up as a digital subscriber or booking an advertisement. “We are showing our commitment to regional media and the important role our local newspapers play in keeping their areas informed, however as we’ve seen with recent closures by other publishers these titles need support to prosper,” Mr Williams said. “We’re certainly grateful for the many supportive messages ACM’s trusted mastheads have received from loyal readers, customers and community leaders who say they have missed the local newspaper. “Now we need those communities to rally around the local paper and our dedicated journalists and advertising sales staff so these titles can return to sustainably serving regional readers and advertisers.” Due to the economic impact of government COVID-19 control measures, ACM announced in mid-April that it was facing stoppages in work beyond its control, and as a result the production of a number of non-daily newspapers would be suspended and employees associated with print sites and products stood down. Many other non-daily titles continued to publish and ACM’s 14 daily papers, such as The Canberra Times and Newcastle Herald, and agricultural journals, such as The Land and Queensland Country Life, were not affected. Non-daily mastheads such as the Goulburn Post, Wimmera Mail-Times, Maitland Mercury, Southern Highland News, North West Star, The Area News, Armidale Express and Port Macquarie News continued to cover local news online and attract new digital subscribers while printed editions halted. They are among the dozens of titles resuming newspaper production in coming days. Back in print today, the Goulburn Post, Southern Highland News, The Area News, Wimmera Mail Times and Port Macquarie News use their front pages to thank their community and urge audiences and advertisers to support local news by buying a copy of the paper, subscribing online or booking an advertisement. READ MORE: ACM Chief Marketing Officer Paul Tyrrell said the publications returning in print would ensure the important messages of national as well as local advertisers could once again reach ACM’s highly engaged audiences in major regional population centres. “As local, regional and national businesses get back to business and continue their recovery, key ACM publications will be there alongside them, ready to help connect them with our audiences across print and digital platforms,” Mr Tyrrell said. According to the latest EMMA (Enhanced Media Metrics Australia) readership figures, ACM recorded a combined network audience of 8.4 million readers across digital and print for the month of March, up 35 per cent year on year. Mr Williams said ACM would “continue to review our ability to return other suspended titles subject to advertising recovery”. He welcomed federal government relief measures such as JobKeeper. “We will continue to work constructively with the government and its agencies, ” Mr Williams said. “We’re particularly grateful to the Judith Neilson Institute for its initiatives to support journalism, including journalism projects to serve ACM’s audiences in regional areas.”

https://nnimgt-a.akamaihd.net/transform/v1/crop/frm/vuJmMAkyxKfBpiJqjiHTXS/b5457db9-5bbd-4c57-aabf-8acae6eae174.jpg/r290_284_2428_1492_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg





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News Corp’s closing of newspapers a blow to Australian communities


News Corp’s closing of its community and regional papers, with few remaining and others online-only, cancels centuries of beliefs about media in the community, which were already dying.

Gone overnight are the “local papers” familiar to dozens of towns and with them assumptions about what the media are supposed to do.

Since the 19th Century advent of machine printing presses and mass-circulation dailies, the idea set in that the news would be business, professionally produced, selling a service not promoting causes. That would mean benefits to all.

The coverage would be popular, like sports, crime, cartoons, crosswords, market information, the weather, horoscopes, astonishing world events and so on.

The real estate and classified advertisements were vital to the economic life of the community. Politics and all other sensitive matters would be done according to an ethic of fairness and balance, generally respecting all views; best practice with the vital commercial imperative of not offending customers by confronting them with too much they did not want to read.

It was the birth of the dictum of objectification for journalists when doing the news and it did a lot for civility, tolerance and keeping the peace.

It worked for democracy.

Journalism or something else?

That has been thrown out during the last decade by News Corp, taking up instead the approach worked-up by the parent organisation in America, with its Fox News – essentially blatant propaganda backing conservative political interests.

The former Prime Ministers, Malcolm Turnbull and Kevin Rudd, have been saying that News Corp has gone further, wanting to take part in political decision-making, for example, by campaigning within the Liberal Party and in its publications, for Turnbull’s removal from office.

Several devoted journalists have been noticed leaving the company. Others have soldiered on providing conventional and marketable news of the town, but operating in poor company.

These have been increasingly displaced by campaigning editorials, notably supporting the News Corp fixation against recognising climate change; sneering commentators, syndicated across the chain; other devices, like the closing off of the letters columns to all but the political right.

Money talks

Suddenly, the Corporation has responded to its other keen interest – making money – and brought forward some inevitable decisions about keeping the print runs going. The dramatic drying up of revenue in the coronavirus crisis just kicked it over the edge.

As is well-known, its trouble is firstly the product of new information and communication technology, generating a complex of factors working against newspapers: very effective alternative advertising formats, both classified and through social media; other forms of communication, like social media, busting the media’s hold on huge audiences; broader cultural and economic changes working against consensus and sharing, like neoliberalism or new racialist movements on the right.

The squeeze on media means that media businesses become smaller. In the classic case of Channel Nine, always a subject of great interest to its proprietorial family, The Packers moved on from Channel Nine when free-to-air television began to falter, instead investing in casinos.

News Corp’s many changes

In 2013, Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers were put in the News Corp Australia stable and separated from the rest of the media empire, which was working on new media solutions of its own, such as buying into online classified businesses and pay television.

Why did they keep going with daily print operations this long?

  • Hopes of building upon the residual good market position of newspapers, down but not out, with new solutions, like multi-media ventures with television and online; and
  • Keeping them for political purposes. Before the closures announced this week, stories were rife that at last, they would close The Australian. But The Australian is a conservative organ for the business community; it is a favourite child of Murdoch who founded it in 1964. The Australian, which always runs at a loss, can be useful for pleasing or pressuring political leaders and promoting causes, like, of all things, denying climate change.

The hit-list

In the outcome this week:

After the suspension of 60 News Corp papers in April, News Corp has now pronounced the full list:

  • 112 newspapers will end print publishing;
  • 36 of those will close altogether; and 
  • 76 will continue only as online publications.

Three newspapers in Sydney, the Wentworth Courier, Mosman Daily and the North Shore Times, will come out of temporary closure to resume print operations. The News Corp metropolitan mastheads will stay in print, along with some of the regional or community papers, such as the Townsville Bulletin.

In 2016, News Corp bought the suite of regional newspapers operated by the APN company, which saw better prospects elsewhere, like operating its billboards the length and breadth of the country.

Several of those acquisitions are now on the death list announced by News Corp or set for conversion to online-only: in Queensland, the Sunshine Coast Daily, the Mackay Daily Mercury and the Queensland Times in Ipswich, and in New South Wales, the Northern Star and Daily Examiner,  have all been listed to go over to digital-only.

Over time, the Corporation has absorbed dozens of household-name publications, going back well over a century; like the long-time family-owned Bowen Independent, a go-to office for information, announcements and help. It’s now closed. 

Why did News Corp take over so many publications?

Why the drive for monopoly control of the regions in print? If it is thinking about copy sharing and economies of scale, there is a plain flaw: the product is a cultural product, communication among communities, extremely difficult to fake or manufacture on a soulless footing.  

What is to come out of this destructiveness towards community across the land?

The surviving newspapers and the “online-only” ones using their old mastheads may survive as smaller media enterprises.

There are gaps now being left open in the market for small operators, especially with online publications,  with a talent for diverse funding, running beyond scratching-up local advertisements or a small slice of national campaigns.

Another kind of product, “micro media” in very small communities, might fulfil many of the historical functions of newspapers: people contribute – births, deaths, marriages, performances, local campaigns. It must be a labour of love; Pulitzer prizes come rarely in this category.

Journalists, last but not least

Certainly, there are many journalists. The journalists union, the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA), has been beset by redundancies and mass sackings for more than the last two decades. This time, it heard the news through leaks coming out of News Corp. After 12 hours, individual journalists had received no word about their position.

MEAA’s Chief Executive, Paul Murphy, called the company’s move a massive blow to communities“, with hundreds of staff likely to be lost.

He said:

We are still waiting for clarity from the company on how many editorial staff will be affected by these changes across the News Corp network.

 

We are determined to see proper consultation and fair treatment for any affected staff. The closure of so many mastheads … coming off the back of hundreds of previous regional closures during this period, underlines the seriousness of the crisis facing regional and local journalism.

Media editor Dr Lee Duffield is a former ABC foreign correspondent, political journalist and academic.

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Centuries of belief lost as News Corp newspapers close


News Corp’s closing of its community and regional papers, with few remaining and others online-only, cancels centuries of beliefs about media in the community, which were already dying.

Gone overnight are the “local papers” familiar to dozens of towns and with them assumptions about what the media are supposed to do.

Since the 19th Century advent of machine printing presses and mass-circulation dailies, the idea set in that the news would be business, professionally produced, selling a service not promoting causes. That would mean benefits to all.

The coverage would be popular, like sports, crime, cartoons, crosswords, market information, the weather, horoscopes, astonishing world events and so on.

The real estate and classified advertisements were vital to the economic life of the community. Politics and all other sensitive matters would be done according to an ethic of fairness and balance, generally respecting all views; best practice with the vital commercial imperative of not offending customers by confronting them with too much they did not want to read.

It was the birth of the dictum of objectification for journalists when doing the news and it did a lot for civility, tolerance and keeping the peace.

It worked for democracy.

Journalism or something else?

That has been thrown out during the last decade by News Corp, taking up instead the approach worked-up by the parent organisation in America, with its Fox News – essentially blatant propaganda backing conservative political interests.

The former Prime Ministers, Malcolm Turnbull and Kevin Rudd, have been saying that News Corp has gone further, wanting to take part in political decision-making, for example, by campaigning within the Australian Liberal Party and in its publications, for Turnbull’s removal from office.

Several devoted journalists have been noticed leaving the company. Others have soldiered on providing conventional and marketable news of the town, but operating in poor company.

These have been increasingly displaced by campaigning editorials, notably supporting the News Corp fixation against recognising climate change; sneering commentators, syndicated across the chain; other devices, like the closing off of the letters columns to all but the political right.

Money talks

Suddenly, the Corporation has responded to its other keen interest – making money – and brought forward some inevitable decisions about keeping the print runs going. The dramatic drying up of revenue in the coronavirus crisis just kicked it over the edge.

As is well-known, its trouble is firstly the product of new information and communication technology, generating a complex of factors working against newspapers: very effective alternative advertising formats, both classified and through social media; other forms of communication, like social media, busting the media’s hold on huge audiences; broader cultural and economic changes working against consensus and sharing, like neoliberalism or new racialist movements on the right.

The squeeze on media means that media businesses become smaller. In the classic case of Channel Nine, always a subject of great interest to its proprietorial family, The Packers moved on from Channel Nine when free-to-air television began to falter, instead investing in casinos.

News Corp’s many changes

In 2013, Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers were put in the News Corp Australia stable and separated from the rest of the media empire, which was working on new media solutions of its own, such as buying into online classified businesses and pay television.

Why did they keep going with daily print operations this long?

Hopes of building upon the residual good market position of newspapers, down but not out, with new solutions, like multi-media ventures with television and online; and keeping them for political purposes. Before the closures announced last week, stories were rife that at last, they would close The Australian. But The Australian is a conservative organ for the business community; it is a favourite child of Murdoch who founded it in 1964. The Australian, which always runs at a loss, can be useful for pleasing or pressuring political leaders and promoting causes, like, of all things, denying climate change.

In the outcome this week:

After the suspension of 60 News Corp papers in April, News Corp has now pronounced the full list:

112 newspapers will end print publishing; 36 of those will close altogether; and 76 will continue only as online publications.

Three newspapers in Sydney, the Wentworth Courier, Mosman Daily and the North Shore Times, will come out of temporary closure to resume print operations. The News Corp metropolitan mastheads will stay in print, along with some of the regional or community papers, such as the Townsville Bulletin.

In 2016, News Corp bought the suite of regional newspapers operated by the APN company, which saw better prospects elsewhere, like operating its billboards across the length and breadth of the country.

Several of those acquisitions are now on the death list announced by News Corp or set for conversion to online-only: in Queensland, the Sunshine Coast Daily, the Mackay Daily Mercury and the Queensland Times in Ipswich, and in New South Wales, the Northern Star and Daily Examiner, have all been listed to go over to digital-only.

Over time, the Corporation has absorbed dozens of household-name publications, going back well over a century; like the long-time family-owned Bowen Independent, a go-to office for information, announcements and help. It’s now closed.

Why did News Corp take over so many publications?

Why the drive for monopoly control of the regions in print? If it’s the thinking of copy sharing and economies of scale, there is a plain flaw: the product is a cultural product, communication among communities, extremely difficult to fake or manufacture on a soulless footing.

What is to come out of this destructiveness towards community across the land?

The surviving newspapers and the “online-only” ones using their old mastheads may survive as smaller media enterprises.

There are gaps now being left open in the market for small operators, especially with online publications, with a talent for diverse funding, running beyond scratching-up local advertisements or a small slice of national campaigns.

Another kind of product, “micro media” in very small communities, might fulfil many of the historical functions of newspapers: people contribute – births, deaths, marriages, performances, local campaigns. It must be a labour of love; Pulitzer prizes come rarely in this category.

Journalists, last but not least

Certainly, there are many journalists. The journalists union, the Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA), has been beset by redundancies and mass sackings for more than the last two decades. This time, it heard the news through leaks coming out of News Corp. After 12 hours, individual journalists had received no word about their position.

MEAA’s Chief Executive, Paul Murphy, called the company’s move a “massive blow to communities“, with hundreds of staff likely to be lost.

Media editor Dr Lee Duffield is a former ABC foreign correspondent, political journalist and academic.

Source: Independent Australia



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Suspended newspapers will fight to return and serve the country


A true picture is emerging of the state of regional media, and it’s not pretty. Will legacy papers be able to rally in a post-pandemic world?

(Image: Unsplash/Bank Phrom)

When the Covid-19 crisis ends, it’s likely that hundreds of communities across Australia will wake up without a newspaper. 





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