Elton John and Michael Caine Star in NHS Advert Promoting COVID Vaccine


Sir Elton John and Sir Michael Caine have joined forces in a new video by the UK’s National Health Service to encourage people to get vaccinated against COVID-19. The film shows Elton ‘auditioning’ for a promotional advert where he pretends to get the jab before bursting in to his 1983 hit I’m Still Standing. An unimpressed director tells him “we will let you know,” to which John replies, “Well, at this short notice you won’t find anyone bigger.” The film then cuts to Caine who says that the vaccine doesn’t hurt. “Not many people know that,” says Caine. The pair are both over 70 years old have been vaccinated by the NHS, an NHS statement said. More than 10 million people in England have already been vaccinated, and the advert is part of a drive to ask anyone aged 70 or over who has not yet been vaccinated to come forward to receive the jab. Credit: NHS England via Storyful

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NHS ‘failing’ people from ethnic minority backgrounds, study shows


T

he NHS is “failing” people from ethnic minority backgrounds, according to England’s most extensive study of the issue.

The University of Manchester study found the average health of 60-year-olds from Gypsy or Irish Traveller, Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Arab groups to be similar to a white British 80-year-old.

The study found unfairness in NHS services is exacerbating health inequalities, with people from some ethnic minority groups more likely to report insufficient support from local services to manage health conditions.

Lead author Dr Ruth Watkinson from the University of Manchester said: “This suggests the NHS as an institution is failing people from some ethnic groups.

“Policy action is needed to transform healthcare and wider support services to make sure they meet the needs of all individuals in England’s multi-ethnic population fairly.

“But policymakers also need to address the structural racism that makes it harder for people belonging to ethnic minority groups to access socio-economic opportunities because poverty is a major cause of poor health.”

Approximately 12 per cent of the British adult population is from an ethnic minority background, but these communities have experienced higher rates of infection and mortality during the Covid-19 pandemic.

The study, published in Lancet Public Health, used the England-wide GP Patient Survey to analyse responses from almost 1.4 million adults aged over 55, surveyed between 2015 and 2017.

The sample included 152,710 people who self-identified as belonging to an ethnic minority group — the largest-ever sample.

In 15 out of 17 ethnic minority groups, health-related quality of life was worse on average than for white British people, with inequalities generally wider for women.

Mattey Mitchell who is Romany and a health campaigns officer at Friends, Families and Travellers said: “For the Romany people, these findings reflect a stark and familiar reality.

“We’ve learned to accept this reality as the norm, but this study reminds us it is not. In turn, I hope it will remind others that the sharp edge of inequality has a very real and dangerous impact on peoples’ lives.”

The two ethnic groups who were healthier than white British people were Chinese men and women, and black African men.

The study found large differences between ethnicities often grouped together in broad categories. For example, Bangladeshi, Pakistani and Chinese ethnicities are often categorised as “Asian”. But the study found people of Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnicity often had the worst disadvantage in health whereas people of Chinese ethnicity had a “relative advantage”.

Co-author Dr Alex Turner said there was a need for “more nuanced research”.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said: “This Government is committed to ensuring everyone has access to high quality healthcare, regardless of where they live or who they are.

“That’s why we are levelling up across this country – so that everyone can have the opportunity to enjoy a long and healthy life.

“Our NHS Long Term Plan, which is backed by an extra £33.9 billion for the NHS by 2023/24, puts tackling health inequalities at its heart and we have established a new NHS Race and Health Observatory to tackle the specific health challenges facing people from ethnic minority backgrounds.”

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‘Children have been very seriously damaged’ by NHS gender clinic, says former Tavistock staff governor – Channel 4 News


Consultant psychiatrist Dr David Bell, who served as a staff governor at the Tavistock Trust, wrote an internal report in 2018, raising the concerns brought to him by colleagues about the way the Gender Identity Development Service was treating patients.

He faced disciplinary action.

But after 24 years working with the Tavistock, Dr Bell, a former President of the British Psychoanalytic Society, has recently retired, and in his first television interview since then, he began by outlining his worries about the service.

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NHS urged to recognise ‘Covid tongue’ as official sign of the disease


Professor Tim Spector, from King’s College London, said he’s seeing an increasing number of infected patients with sores on their tongue and unusual mouth ulcers

The NHS is being urged to recognise ‘Covid tongue’ as an official symptom of coronavirus amid fears it is becoming more widespread. 

Professor Tim Spector, from King’s College London, said he’s seeing an increasing number of infected patients with sores on their tongue, unusual mouth ulcers and swollen tongues.

The epidemiologist, who is monitoring the UK crisis through his Covid symptom tracker app used by millions of Brits, warned one in five sufferers show symptoms the NHS doesn’t recognise.

Professor Spector warned 20 per cent of infectious people may be slipping through the cracks and continuing to spread the disease because of it. 

The NHS currently only lists three signs of the infection — a fever, continuous cough and loss of smell or taste. It suggests only people with these three symptoms may have Covid-19 and therefore should self-isolate and get tested. 

This means Britons suffering from the virus’ less common symptoms are not getting access to swabs and may be continuing to pass the virus to others. 

The UK has repeatedly been accused of playing catch up with the rest of the world when it comes to spotting Covid-19 throughout the crisis.

In the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns of 11 primary symptoms, including fatigue, body aches, headache, sore throat and shortness of breath — but admits the virus can cause an array of other side effects.

He is urging the NHS to recognise 'Covid tongue' as an official symptom of coronavirus amid fears it is becoming more widespread.

He is urging the NHS to recognise ‘Covid tongue’ as an official symptom of coronavirus amid fears it is becoming more widespread.

The UK has been accused of missing 'the majority' of Covid-19 cases because it still only recognises three tell-tale signs of the infection (the NHS website, shown)

The UK has been accused of missing ‘the majority’ of Covid-19 cases because it still only recognises three tell-tale signs of the infection (the NHS website, shown)

The medical name for acute swelling of the tongue as the result of a viral infection is ‘glossitis’. Professor Spector tweeted about the symptom last week.

He said: ‘One in five people with Covid still present with less common symptoms that dont get on the official PHE list – such as skin rashes. 

‘Seeing increasing numbers of Covid tongues and strange mouth ulcers. If you have a strange symptom or even just headache and fatigue stay at home!’

He added today: ‘Keep those Covid tongue pics coming – important to draw attention to these, skin rashes, Covid toes and the 20 plus other symptoms of Covid that go ignored.

‘Thirty-five per cent of people have non-classic symptoms in the first three days when most infective.’

Professor Spector has repeatedly called for the NHS to expand its list – which he described as the ‘briefest in the world’ – to ensure Covid-19 infections are spotted in the early stages – reducing the risk of it being spread as Britons self-isolate earlier.

Professor Spector is drawing attention to the Covid tongue symptom of the virus

Professor Spector is drawing attention to the Covid tongue symptom of the virus

‘We’re still missing 35 per cent of cases that have symptoms that aren’t in the NHS 111 list which is the briefest list in the world,’ he told MailOnline.

He added that anyone using the Covid-19 symptom app can get a test for the virus if they’re suffering any symptom, rather than just the NHS-identified ones. 

Analysis of NHS hospital records show a cough, fever and shortness of breath are the three most common symptoms, with seven out of 10 patients suffering at least one of the three.  

But up to a third of patients also experience respiratory problems, stomach pains and musculoskeletal symptoms — including muscle and joint pain, and fatigue.  

Professor Spector told MailOnline today: ‘We are collecting many anecdotal reports of COVID tongue via the ZOE app and it is associated with Long COVID patients. 

‘We need more analyses before we can put some numbers on how common it is and how predictive it is of COVID. 

‘Until then, unusual tongue symptoms are likely to suggest COVID while the virus is still common.’ 

However, red and white patches can also be caused by other infections, including thrush, according to British Dental Association spokesman Professor Damien Walmsley. 

‘The white patches usually rub off, leaving a sore red patch underneath,’ he said.

But sore patches are often only an indication that a person is run down and their immune system is not firing on all cylinders, he added.

‘It could also occur in those who have been taking antibiotics, or using asthma inhalers.’ 

Single white patches on the tongue ‘can be a bit more worrying,’ according to Professor Walmsley.

It could simply be down to the fact the tongue is rubbing against a tooth or filling and being irritated, but there’s a small chance it could indicate oral cancer.  

A localised white patch or red patch which has been there for more than three weeks should be checked out by your dentist or GP, the expert said.

COVID-19 HAS AT LEAST 19 SYMPTOMS, EXPERT BEHIND UK SYMPTOM TRACKER APP SAYS 

Professor Spector and researchers from King’s College London have developed a symptom-tracking app which has seen millions of Britons sign up and report their symptoms. 

The full list of symptoms, in order of how predictive they are of the disease, include:

1. Loss of smell/taste

2. Persistent cough

3. Fatigue

4. Loss of appetite

5. Skin rash

6. Hives

7. Fever

8. Severe muscle pain

9. Shortness of breath

10. Diarrhoea

11. Delirium

12. Abdominal pain

13. Chest pain

14. Hoarse voice

15. Eye soreness

16. Sore or painful throat

17. Nausea or vomiting

18. Headache

19. Dizziness or light headedness

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Man accused of posing as NHS worker and charging elderly woman for fake COVID-19 vaccine



Police are searching for a suspected conman who administered a fake COVID-19 vaccine to an elderly woman in her London home.

Detective Inspector Kevin Ives, from City of London Police, said police were appealing for help to identify the man because he “may endanger people’s lives”.

Police said the victim, 92, allowed the man into her Surbiton home on December 30 after being told he was from the National Health Service (NHS) and there to administer the vaccine.

The woman reported she was jabbed in the arm with a “dart-like implement” before being asked for £160 (AU$280).

The man was paid and left the home but later returned on January 4 asking for a further £100.

“It is not yet known what substance, if any, was administered to the victim, but she was checked over at her local hospital and has suffered no ill effects following this encounter,” police said in a statement.

Inspector Ives said it was crucial the man was found.

“This is a disgusting and totally unacceptable assault on a member of the public which won’t be tolerated,” he said.

The man is described as having a London accent, aged in his early 30s, of medium build with light brown hair.

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NHS may have to start using beds in CARE HOMES if pressure continues to worsen


NHS hospitals may have to start transferring patients to care homes if coronavirus keeps piling pressure on their wards, a senior health official warned today.

Chris Hopson, chief of healthcare union NHS Providers, warned that some hospitals are almost full already and looking for beds elsewhere for their patients.

‘They know there is some spare capacity in the care and nursing sector,’ he said. ‘They’re in the middle of conversations with care and nursing home colleagues to see if they can access that capacity.

‘It’s literally leaving no stone unturned to maximise every single piece of capacity that we’ve got, in those areas under pressure.’ 

If care homes are turned into overflow wards for hospitals it is likely only non-Covid patients would be sent to them, following uproar over a Government policy in the first wave which saw people recovering from coronavirus sent into care homes where they were feared to have triggered killer outbreaks.   

Shocking figures last night revealed the number of Covid patients in British hospitals surged past 30,000 on January 4 — the most recent data. This was up 27 per cent in a week and towers above the worst figure of 21,700 seen in April 2020.

And hospitalisations are only expected to surge further after health chiefs announced more than 50,000 new infections for the ninth day in a row yesterday.

It comes as an intensive care professor in London warned the situation in hospitals is ‘definitely worse than the first wave’ as the capital grapples with mounting cases.

And the capital’s medical director Vin Diwakar said that they could be overwhelmed within less than two weeks even in a ‘best’ case scenario. Even if coronavirus patients grew at the lowest likely rate and capacity is increased — including opening the Nightingale — the NHS would still be short 2,000 general, acute and ICU beds by January 19, it was reported.

Hospitals across England are seeing more coronavirus patients than they did in the first wave in 2020 (Pictured: Staff in an intensive care ward in St George’s Hospital in London)

Some hospitals are approaching breaking point, and preparing to turn to care homes for help, the chief executive of NHS Providers has said. The number of Covid-19 patients in hospital had surged past 30,000 by January 4, NHS data reveals

On BBC Radio 4 this morning Mr Hopson said the situation is ‘really escalating very quickly’.

‘We’ve seen 5,000 new patients in hospital beds with Covid-19 over the last week – that’s 10 full hospitals worth of new Covid patients in just seven days so there’s a really big challenge.’

LONDON’S HOSPITALS ‘TO BE OVERWHELMED IN TWO WEEKS’

London’s hospitals will be overwhelmed by Covid-19 in less than two weeks even in a ‘best’ case scenario, an official briefing reportedly warns.

Medical director at NHS London Vin Diwakar provided the worrying analysis to medical directors of the capital’s hospital trusts over a Zoom call this afternoon.

Even if coronavirus patients grew at the lowest likely rate and capacity is increased – including opening the Nightingale – the NHS would still be short 2,000 general, acute and ICU beds by January 19, the HSJ reports.

Three scenarios are laid out in the report – ‘best’, ‘average’ and ‘worse’. These account for the impact of four per cent daily growth, five per cent growth and six per cent growth respectively.

Growth for beds on January 5 was 3.5 per cent, with the rate at 4.8 per cent for ICU beds, the report claimed. 

He said the Nightingales hadn’t been utilised – except in Manchester and Exeter – because they required staffing, snatching vital doctors and nurses away from overstretched wards and emergency units.

‘It’s better if we can access any spare capacity in the nursing home sector because its got staff there,’ he said.

‘We all recognise that if we’re going to do that then we really need to help care and nursing home.

‘So, for example, if we’re going to discharge patients who need consistent access to high quality therapy we’re going to need to ensure that our community services can provide that support.

‘We also know if we’re going to discharge patients that are perhaps slightly more higher levels of acuity than normal we’re going to have to provide extra nursing support.

‘The issue is we’re now at a point where unless we can access this capacity, we’re not going to be able to treat the patients that we need to treat in the NHS.’

Professor Rupert Pearse, a consultant in the capital, also told the programme how staff are already being stretched to the limit in London. 

‘It is definitely worse than the first wave and proving much harder to deal with now as the resources we had in the first wave aren’t available to us,’ he warned.

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, warned of spiralling admissions

Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, warned of spiralling admissions

‘So we’re really struggling to provide the quality of patient care that we think patients deserve. And the impact of the pandemic is taking care away from other illnesses such as cancer and heart disease.’

MailOnline has contacted NHS England to ask how care homes may be utilised to help take the pressure off central hospitals.

Intensive care patients are already being moved from the hardest hit regions to those where there is spare capacity.

Some doctors are currently considering moving the most critically ill from London and the South East to as far afield as Yorkshire and the South West.

The President of the Intensive Care Society, Dr Stephen Webb, said yesterday around 10 intensive care patients were already being shifted every day. 

Most of these are moved from and to hospitals within the same regions, he said, but a small number may be moved between regions. 

A nurse works on a patient in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) in St George's Hospital in Tooting, south-west London

A nurse works on a patient in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) in St George’s Hospital in Tooting, south-west London

At St George's a surge in coronavirus patients has meant the number of intensive care beds had to be doubled from 60 to 120

At St George’s a surge in coronavirus patients has meant the number of intensive care beds had to be doubled from 60 to 120

Staff sickness due to coronavirus and self-isolation means doctors, nurses and healthcare assistances face demanding shift patterns and exhausting work looking after critically ill Covid-19 patients (Pictured: Staff in St George's Hospital)

Staff sickness due to coronavirus and self-isolation means doctors, nurses and healthcare assistances face demanding shift patterns and exhausting work looking after critically ill Covid-19 patients (Pictured: Staff in St George’s Hospital)

There were 30,451 people in hospital with Covid-19 as of January 4, with 2,645 on ventilators in intensive care

There were 30,451 people in hospital with Covid-19 as of January 4, with 2,645 on ventilators in intensive care

NHS statistics show that it is rare for people under the age of 40 to die of Covid-19, with 100 of the 17,572 fatalities in November and December in that age group

NHS statistics show that it is rare for people under the age of 40 to die of Covid-19, with 100 of the 17,572 fatalities in November and December in that age group

Nurses and doctors work on wards at University College Hospital, London, pictured above

Nurses and doctors work on wards at University College Hospital, London, pictured above

Normally, it is rare for intensive care patients to be moved between hospitals. 

Dr Webb, who also works in the East of England, said: ‘The problem with sending patients to the North is that those units were really badly affected earlier in this wave, and they could be hit with the new variant. It’s a very tricky situation.

‘If the virus continues as it is, I’m much more fearful we may get to saturation point for ICUs, but we have still got a bit of time. We do have capacity in other parts of the country, but not a lot.

‘Currently, in the East of England, South East and London, many intensive care units are already saturated. This is where we’re seeing daily export of patients. but at the moment this is mainly locally.

‘So it may be a few miles down the road between London hospitals. We try to avoid moving patients and we always try to move the least sick of our ICU patients. They are transferred using all the equipment needed to keep them alive, accompanied by an ICU doctor and a nurse.’

It comes after it was revealed last night that London’s hospitals may be overwhelmed by Covid-19 in less than two weeks even in a ‘best’ case scenario.

Medical director at NHS London Vin Diwakar provided the worrying analysis to bosses of the capital’s hospital trusts over a Zoom call yesterday afternoon.

Even if coronavirus patients grew at the lowest likely rate and capacity is increased – including opening the Nightingale – the NHS would still be short 2,000 general, acute and ICU beds by January 19, the HSJ reported.

Three scenarios are laid out in the report – ‘best’, ‘average’ and ‘worse’. These account for the impact of four per cent daily growth, five per cent growth and six per cent growth respectively.

Growth for beds on January 5 was 3.5 per cent, with the rate at 4.8 per cent for ICU beds, the report claimed. 

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Britain will allow mixing of COVID-19 vaccines on rare occasions, as fears grow NHS could be overwhelmed


The United Kingdom will allow people to be given shots of different COVID-19 vaccines on rare occasions, despite a lack of evidence about the extent of immunity offered by mixing doses.

In a departure from other strategies globally, the Government said people could be given a mix-and-match of two COVID-19 shots, for example if the same vaccine dose was out of stock, according to guidelines published on New Year’s Eve.

“[If] the same vaccine is not available, or if the first product received is unknown, it is reasonable to offer one dose of the locally available product to complete the schedule,” according to the guidelines.

Mary Ramsay, head of immunisations at Public Health England, said this would only happen on extremely rare occasions, and that the Government was not recommending the mixing of vaccines, which require at least two doses given several weeks apart.

COVID-19 has killed more 74,000 people in the United Kingdom — the second-highest death toll in Europe — and health officials are racing to deliver doses to help end the pandemic as fears grow that the National Health Service could be overwhelmed.

Earlier this week, the Government reactivated emergency hospitals built at the start of the outbreak as wards fill up with COVID-19 patients.

The UK has been at the forefront of approving the new coronavirus vaccines, becoming the first country to give emergency authorisation to the Pfizer-BioNTech and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines last month.

Both vaccines are meant to be administered as two shots, given several weeks apart, but they were not designed to be mixed together.

The Government’s new guidelines said there was “no evidence on the interchangeability of the COVID-19 vaccines although studies are underway”.

However, the advice said that while every effort should be made to complete the dosing regimen with the same vaccine, if the patient is at “immediate high risk” or is considered “unlikely to attend again” they can be given different vaccines.

Britain sparked controversy earlier this week by announcing plans to delay giving the coronavirus vaccine booster shot in an attempt to ensure more people could be given the more limited protection conferred by a single dose.

The top US infectious diseases expert, Anthony Fauci, said on Friday he did not agree with the approach of delaying the second dose up to 12 weeks.

“I would not be in favour of that,” he told CNN.

“We’re going to keep doing what we’re doing.”

Reuters



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Covid-19: Health workers ‘back in eye of storm’, says NHS chief


With coronavirus infections at what public health officials called an “unprecedented level” and a new variant spreading, hospitals in England have now

surpassed the April peak of Covid-19 patients.



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Vaccine rollout could be in jeopardy as hospitalisations soar, NHS boss warns


Clogged hospitals are putting the rollout of life-saving Covid vaccines in jeopardy, the chief executive of the NHS Confederation has warned.

In the South East of England, it is said that half of all its beds are now occupied by coronavirus patients.

That, it has been suggested, could potentially slow down efforts to get vaccines to people who needed them in the weeks ahead.

Worryingly, also at risk is cancer treatment.

Over 2,000 Covid patients were admitted to UK hospitals on Sunday – and that figure is expected to increase in the build up to Christmas.

Last weekend there were 16,526 patients in England’s hospitals, compared with the peak of 18,974 back in April.

Have you been affected by coronavirus? Email webnews@mirror.co.uk.



Hundreds of thousands have already had the vaccine – but busy hospitals may slow the process down

Danny Mortimer, boss of NHS Confederation, warned of massive disruption to non-Covid treatment, the MailOnline report.

That means a potential slowing of the vaccine rollout if help isn’t forthcoming.

He told the publication: “Members are expecting mass cancellations over the next weeks as an inevitable consequence of the rise in infections.

“Particularly in Tier 4 areas, as we enter the New Year there will be massive disruption to non-Covid care.



Over 2,000 Covid patients were admitted to UK hospitals on Sunday

“In Wales there have been widespread cancellations, and there has been the prioritisation of Covid and cancer work in Kent, Essex and some hospitals in London.

“The volume of Covid patients is back at the levels of April, but the number of non-Covid patients is also much higher.

“Hospital trusts and GPs will need decisive action [from Government] to help control the virus and roll out the vaccination programme.”



England’s worrying Covid map as of December 20

Downing Street chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance says the UK are powerless ‘to stop this getting into other places’.

Telling a Downing Street briefing, he warned: “The evidence on this virus is it spreads easily, it’s more transmissible.

“We absolutely need to make sure we have the right level of restrictions in place.

“I think it is likely that this will grow in numbers of the variant across the country and I think it’s likely, therefore, that measures will need to be increased in some places, in due course, not reduced. I think it is the case that this will spread more.”





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Britain’s N.H.S. Takes on a Mass Vaccination Challenge


LONDON — In Bristol, a sports stadium is being converted into a temporary clinic to provide inoculations, as is a racecourse outside London. Village halls, libraries and parking lots across the country are also being quickly turned into makeshift vaccination centers, with the government enlisting military planners for advice.

As it prepares to begin rolling out a coronavirus vaccine on Tuesday, Britain is taking on the biggest logistical challenge ever faced by the country’s health service, the vaccination of tens of millions of people against coronavirus in a matter of months. At the same time, law enforcement authorities are contending with an array of potential security threats to the vaccination campaign.

Inoculations are expected to begin Tuesday at selected hospitals throughout Britain that have received the first batches of vaccine made by Pfizer and BioNTech, which need to be stored at very low temperatures. But the temporary clinics that are being hurriedly put together are expected to play critical roles as the mass vaccination program expands.

Retired health workers are being asked to help, while the National Health Service is also recruiting tens of thousands of first aid workers and others to help administer the shot, as the vaccine becomes available to progressively more people.

“I think all people who can help should put their hands up,” said Sarah Wollaston, who worked as a doctor before serving in Parliament until recently. She has just completed part of an online refresher course, to qualify to help in the vaccine rollout.

“Physically, giving someone a vaccine is very straightforward,” she said. “The challenge is the logistics.”

While industry experts and health officials grapple with that, law enforcement officers and cyber-sleuths face an equally pressing challenge in the potential security threats surrounding a product in such high demand.

“It is the most valuable asset on earth right now,” said Lisa Forte, a former British counterintelligence employee and a partner at Red Goat, a cybersecurity firm. “Naturally, this will attract highly skilled cybercriminals, criminal groups and state actors.”

Europol has warned that organized crime groups might target trucks containing vaccines for theft and hijacking, and last week Interpol warned against an “onslaught of all types of criminal activity linked to the COVID-19 vaccine,” which it has described as “liquid gold.”

From the factory to hospitals and other sites, the Pfizer vaccine — because it has to be stored at around minus 70 degrees Celsius, or minus 94 Fahrenheit — is acutely vulnerable to sabotage, in addition to theft.

“With the vaccine, the two biggest risks are maintaining the cold chain and interception by public or private actors,” said Sarah Rathke, a lawyer at Squire Patton Boggs who specializes in supply chain litigation.

“It may be the most difficult supply chain challenge posed in recent history, with not a lot of time to prepare for it,” Ms. Rathke added.

Cyberattacks can reveal a wealth of information about the vaccines that can be exploited by state actors and criminal gangs, experts say.

Last week, IBM said it had detected a series of cyberattacks in September against companies involved in the distribution of coronavirus vaccines across the world. IBM said the attackers, whose identity could not be determined, had tried to learn how the vaccines would be stored and delivered.

“We’ve seen petrochemical companies targeted, because they’re essential in producing dry ice used to store the vaccine,” said Claire Zaboeva, a senior cyber-threat analyst at IBM’s Security X-Force.

As nations compete to be among the first to administer the vaccine, Ms. Zaboeva added, state actors or even terrorist groups might try to disrupt deliveries. “Making loads of vaccine doses spoiled and useless, that would be a pretty destructive attack,” she said.

While security agencies look after those concerns, Britain’s health service will have the daunting problem of managing a mass vaccination program that will reach further and faster into the population than any other public health outreach in living memory.

One charity, St. John Ambulance, aims to help train up to 30,000 vaccinators and others to help at inoculation centers.

“Rolling out a vaccine to tens of millions of people will be a monumental task as we look to save lives and hopefully bring about an eventual return to our normal way of life,” said Ian Hudspeth, Chairman of the Community Wellbeing Board for the Local Government Association, which represents local municipalities.

Success is hardly guaranteed, given Britain’s spotty record on logistics during the Covid-19 crisis. In the early stages of the pandemic hospitals were left chronically short of basic protective equipment like masks and gloves, putting some workers at risk of infection.

Since then, the government has struggled to establish a test and trace system, despite budgeting around $16 billion for the much-criticized project.

Already, Pfizer’s problems sourcing raw materials may force it to cut the number of vaccine doses promised for delivery this year to Britain possibly by around half, to five million. And there is a potential bottleneck in the production of dry ice needed for packing and shipping the vaccine.

Yet experts are cautiously optimistic that the vaccine rollout will go better than the government’s earlier, fumbling efforts to address the pandemic because it will be handled under the umbrella of the National Health Service, which has extensive experience with organizing mass immunizations, like annual flu shots.

“It is not going to be without problems because of its scale and the logistics — I would be amazed if, in six months something, somewhere, didn’t go wrong,” said Helen Buckingham, director of strategy and operations at the Nuffield Trust, a research institute specializing in health.

But the concept of mass vaccination is a familiar one, she added, “and overall people are putting a lot of effort into making this work.”

Vaccines will be offered at three different types of locations: hospitals; doctors’ offices and clinics; and temporary vaccination centers still being prepared, including drive-through sites, sports stadiums and public buildings. Family doctors, who will carry much of the burden, can call on their experience of giving at least 15 million flu shots each year.

Coronavirus vaccination will be different for several reasons, however. In addition to the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine, Britain is likely to authorize at least two others, one produced by Moderna and another by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford. But when and where each one will be available is unclear.

Martin Marshall, chair of the council of the Royal College of General Practitioners, notes that refrigeration requirements particularly for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines introduce a complication doctors do not have to manage with flu shots. Both require a second injection after several weeks, which can be an administrative nightmare.

“We are pretty used to delivering big vaccination programs, but of course no one has ever had to deliver one in a situation where the vaccinations don’t come through in pre-filled syringes,” said Mr. Marshall.

Doctors’ offices and other temporary clinics might come more into play, experts say, if the AstraZeneca vaccine gains approval. In addition to costing far less, it can be stored at normal refrigeration levels.

Then there are worries that average Britons, not to speak of anti-vaccination campaigners, will be reluctant to take the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, which rely on a relatively untested technology.

Priority will go to those at highest risk and the oldest Britons, so a system will also be needed to call the right people in for appointments at specified times, then to do so again three weeks later for the second shot.

Early plans to vaccinate nursing home residents have been shelved because of the deceptively vexing issue of how to break down the 975-dose batches that Pfizer ships and safely take them into those facilities. And it is unclear when — and in what quantity — other vaccines will become available.

All this has to be done at a time when the health care sector is under acute strain, its staff stretched after months of relentless pressure and during a winter season when people are generally more susceptible to illness.

Nonetheless, Mr., Marshall is confident that the vaccine rollout can succeed.

“I think we can make this work if we work across the N.H.S. and show some flexibility,” he said. “It plays to the strength of the N.H.S., which is a centralized, organized and managed system — and it plays to our values as well.”



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