Mum of Malik Nicholas Floyd Namok-Malamoo voices grief over court decision


The mother of three-year-old Malik Nicholas Floyd Namok-Malamoo, who was found dead on a child care bus in Cairns.

The mother of a young boy found dead on a child care bus in Cairns has expressed her grief at a court’s decision to drop a charge of manslaughter against one of the centre’s workers.

The body of Malik Nicholas Floyd Namok-Malamoo, 3, was found on a Goodstart Early Learning centre bus at Edmonton, south of Cairns, in February last year.

The Goodstart Early Learning Centre in Edmonton, near Cairns.
The Goodstart Early Learning Centre in Edmonton, near Cairns.

Police allege the young boy was left on the bus for hours before being discovered by staff.

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Former centre director and bus driver Michael Glenn Lewis and former child care worker Dionne Batrice Grill were both charged with manslaughter.

His mother Muriel Namok spoke to media on Friday expressing her family’s “grief and loathe” at a magistrate’s decision to drop the manslaughter charge against Ms Grill.

Ms Namok described her son’s death as her family’s “worst nightmare”.

Dionne Batrice Grills was charged with the manslaughter but a magistrate dismissed her charge following a committal hearing earlier this year.
Dionne Batrice Grills was charged with the manslaughter but a magistrate dismissed her charge following a committal hearing earlier this year.

“It grieves me and my family that my son cannot return to me and the freedom he was blessed with,” an emotional Ms Namok said.

At a committal hearing earlier this year, Ms Grill’s defence barrister Tony Kimmins said his client should not face a charge of manslaughter because responsibility lay “solely with the driver”.

Mr Lewis has been committed to stand trial charged with manslaughter, but a date is yet to be set.

Former Centre director and bus driver Michael Glenn Lewis (centre) will stand trial for the manslaughter of Ms Namok’s son.
Former Centre director and bus driver Michael Glenn Lewis (centre) will stand trial for the manslaughter of Ms Namok’s son.

Ms Namok said adjusting to life without her son – affectionately known as ‘Meeky’ – had been extremely difficult and the family had been “totally devastated”.

She teared up when speaking about how her son had missed out on experiences like enrolling in prep, graduation, first love and learning to drive.

“First Christmas and his birthday were a painful time without my baby boy and it does not get any easier,” she said.

“My boy brought so much joy and laughter with his cheeky smiles and little boy mischief.

“We pray this tragedy must not happen to any Australian child and family ever again.”

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Son of Only Fools and Horses actor Nicholas Lyndhurst dies of a rare brain condition


The mother of teenage actor Archie Lyndhurst has said the CBBC star died from a brain haemorrhage while he slept at his family home in west London.

An inquest into the 19-year-old’s ‘unexplained’ death on September 22 had been abandoned months after the star passed away following a ‘short illness’. 

The teenager, who had been acting since the age of 11 and was son of Only Fools and Horses star Nicholas Lyndhurst, starred in the hit CBBC show So Awkward as Ollie Coulton and was dating co-star Nethra Tilakumara.

His devastated mother Lucy Lyndhurst has now revealed that Archie had died in his sleep after an intracerebral haemorrhage caused by acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukaemia – an incredibly rare condition which kills just 800 people a year. 

Lucy and her husband Nicholas Lyndhurst, 59, found out the ‘harrowing’ details from his second post mortem just four days before Christmas. 

Actor Nicholas Lyndhurst’s son Archie, 19, was pronounced dead at home in Fulham, West London on September 22 after a ‘short illness’ (Pictured: Lucy, Archie and Nicholas Lyndhurst)

'Darling, magical boy': Sharing nine photos of Archie with his parents, Lucy said the family were still awaiting answers as to why he died (Nicholas Lyndhurst with Archie)

‘Darling, magical boy’: Sharing nine photos of Archie with his parents, Lucy said the family were still awaiting answers as to why he died (Nicholas Lyndhurst with Archie)

Lucy told her followers that 'the pain of our loss is beyond anything we have ever felt before, and wouldn’t wish upon anyone'

Lucy told her followers that ‘the pain of our loss is beyond anything we have ever felt before, and wouldn’t wish upon anyone’

Archie, who was the beloved son of Only Fools and Horses star Nicholas Lyndhurst and his wife Lucy Smith, starred in the hit CBBC show So Awkward as Ollie Coulton

Archie, who was the beloved son of Only Fools and Horses star Nicholas Lyndhurst and his wife Lucy Smith, starred in the hit CBBC show So Awkward as Ollie Coulton

His devastated mother Lucy Lyndhurst has now revealed that Archie had died in his sleep after an intracerebral haemorrhage caused by acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukaemia - an incredibly rare condition which kills just 800 people a year

His devastated mother Lucy Lyndhurst has now revealed that Archie had died in his sleep after an intracerebral haemorrhage caused by acute lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukaemia – an incredibly rare condition which kills just 800 people a year

Posting on Instagram, she wrote: ‘He died from an Intracerebral Haemorrhage caused by Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma/Leukaemia. 

‘This is not Leukaemia as we know it, the word Acute in medical terms means rapid. He assured us that there wasn’t anything anyone could have done as Archie showed no signs of illness.

‘Archie had numerous bleeds on the brain and the Dr went to great lengths to reassure us that he wouldn’t have been in any pain as it happened in his sleep.’

Lucy also shared pictures of Archie as a young child and pictures of him with Nethra, who she called ‘the love of his life’.

Paying tribute to her only son, she said: ‘The world is a very different place without him. One of my last conversations with him was about all that was going on in the world, the chaos, anger about all different subjects.

‘He looked at me with his huge blue soulful eyes, shook his head and said ‘All the world need is love Mama, it’s so easy to love’.

‘He loved life, he valued everyone in it and every moment he was given. He was always singing, and had such energy and passion in everything he did.

‘To be part of his life has been the biggest joy mad honour. We miss him everyday and always will.’ 

The teenager starred in So Awkward as Ollie Coulton and also appeared as a young Jack Whitehall in the BBC’s Bad Education in 2014.  

Heartbreak: Sharing a photo of actor Nicholas kissing Archie as a young boy, Lucy said: 'We will love you forever and ever'

Heartbreak: Sharing a photo of actor Nicholas kissing Archie as a young boy, Lucy said: ‘We will love you forever and ever’

Lucy Lyndhurst said her son 'was and remains our absolute world' in the heartbreaking social media post. She added the couple would miss their son 'every day'

Lucy Lyndhurst said her son ‘was and remains our absolute world’ in the heartbreaking social media post. She added the couple would miss their son ‘every day’

Actor Luke Milligan also paid tribute, saying: 'Tonight my brother travelled to heaven on the Pussy Wagon, to join his fellow angels and start his new journey!'

Actor Luke Milligan also paid tribute, saying: ‘Tonight my brother travelled to heaven on the Pussy Wagon, to join his fellow angels and start his new journey!’

Police were called ‘to a report of a concern for welfare’ on September 22 and the young actor was declared dead at the scene. His death is being treated as ‘unexplained but not suspicious’. 

Sharing nine images of her late son on social media, Lucy told her followers: ‘The pain of our loss is beyond anything we have ever felt before, and wouldn’t wish upon anyone.’ 

Inquests: What are they and why are they held?

An inquest is an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding a death where the cause is still unknown, or if the person died a violent or unnatural death, or in prison or police custody.

The purpose of the hearing is to find out who the deceased person was and how, when and where they died.  

Coroners can reach one of a set list of conclusions, or return a ‘narrative conclusion’ if none of the categories are appropriate. Among the mots common conclusions are:

Accidental death

Misadventure

Suicide 

Natural causes

Unlawful killing

The coroner can also make recommendations designed to prevent similar deaths occurring in future.

Some inquests require a jury, for instance after an unnatural death in custody or in relation to health and safety at work.   

Deaths due to natural causes and most illnesses do not require an inquest to be held.

She added: ‘We’ve never known anyone live like Archie. He cherished and absorbed every moment he had. 

‘Until we meet again our darling magical boy. We will love you forever and ever and will be forever grateful for choosing us to be your parents. We were beyond lucky.’  

Fellow actor and Archie’s close friend, Luke Milligan, also paid tribute, writing: ‘Tonight my brother travelled to heaven on the P**** Wagon, to join his fellow angels and start his new journey! 

‘Will miss you forever buddy! Until we meet again, go flyyyy high my man! Goodnight and Goodbye for now!’

Archie’s girlfriend, actress Nethra Tilakumara, who starred alongside Archie in the CBBC show So Awkward, hasn’t yet commented on his funeral but described the teenager as a ‘beautiful soul’ at the time of his death, writing: ‘Every day with you was the best day ever.’  

She shared the poignant tribute to her Instagram, alongside a photograph of her late boyfriend taking pictures with a Polaroid camera.

Ms Tilakumara wrote: ‘There was once a boy named Archie Lyndhurst and he made me the happiest girl in the whole wide world. 

‘A boy in a white beanie with his skateboard, swaggered through two wooden doors with an unimaginable lust for life down the hallway of Sylvia Young Theatre School. 

‘He sat across from me while my head was buried in a script, trying to book a job. 

‘He was there for his friend who was really nervous and auditioning too, he was always there for his friends.

‘Blissfully unaware, I had no idea my future was sitting right in front of me.’ 

She added: ‘Boyfriend doesn’t do it justice. Archie you were my Person and Best friend all in one. 

‘To spend the rest of my life laughing and going on adventures with you, was just it for me. 

‘Everything made sense with you. You made me laugh like no one else and you loved me in such a way that I will forever just be grateful for. 

‘Being loved by you was a bonus, but I can proudly say you are the most incredible person that I have ever met and had the pleasure of being in love with.’ 

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Melbourne Stars skipper Glenn Maxwell impressed with teammate Nicholas Pooran


“If you take away his momentum by letting him spend time at the non-striker’s end it can sort of be to the detriment of the team. To let him face as many balls as possible when he was in that rhythm was key for us.”

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It was 25-year-old Pooran’s first knock with the Stars since signing ahead of the Big Bash League season. Maxwell said the innings had no peer from what he’d seen in BBL history.

“That’s probably as clean hitting as I’ve ever seen in the Big Bash,” Maxwell said.

“To be at the other end, not wanting him to hit a single and just watch him go about his work was pretty cool. I’ve seen him do it I suppose a little bit in the IPL but not as consistently and as clean as that. That was extraordinary hitting. And hopefully that’s just the beginning, because I know how good he is and hopefully the rest of the Big Bash fans can see him go off and keep hitting those massive sixes.

“I don’t think there’s too many wickets that don’t suit him around the world, when you’ve got the pure swing that he has.”

Glenn Maxwell, right, and Nicholas Pooran, left, in action on Saturday. Credit:Chris Hyde

The Stars were ultimately undone by Daniel Hughes’ heroics for the Sixers but have flown to Canberra ahead of Tuesday night’s date with Sydney Thunder at Manuka Oval.

The Stars are set to regain experienced top order pair Marcus Stoinis and Nic Maddinson for the match against the Thunder.

But paceman Nathan Coulter-Nile has headed home to Perth after hurting his left calf in the game against Thunder. The Stars remain optimistic, however, that he will be back by the pointy end of the campaign.

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“He’s still a little bit sore. He’s done a similar injury before. He’s still in good spirits, he thinks it won’t take too long to get back,” Maxwell said.

“Obviously with the loss of Nathan, to have a bit more experience coming back into the side will be handy for us.”

The struggling Melbourne Renegades are also in action on Tuesday night, taking on the Sixers at Metricon Stadium. The Renegades have just one win from four matches and were thrashed by the Sixers earlier in the season, losing by 145 runs in Hobart.

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Sydney Sixers vs Melbourne Stars, Glenn Maxwell, Nicholas Pooran, Daniel Hughes, cricket news


Glenn Maxwell celebrates 50 runs with team mate Nicholas Pooran.

Sydney Sixers captain Daniel Hughes has steered his side towards a thrilling victory against the Melbourne Stars at Metricon Stadium on Saturday evening.

Hughes struck 96 off 51 balls to secure the unlikely win on the Gold Coast, which finished after midnight local time with a final over that couldn’t be scripted.

An explosive partnership between Australian powerhouse Glenn Maxwell and West Indies import Nicholas Pooran wasn’t enough for the Stars, who were eventually toppled by one wicket.

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The Sixers chose to bowl first after winning the toss, and all-rounder Jason Holder immediately removed West Indies teammate Andrew Fletcher in the opening over, caught at mid-on for four.

Hilton Cartwright followed suit soon after, skying a short ball from paceman Ben Dwarshuis on 14.

Veteran tweaker Steve O’Keefe then trapped Nick Larkin in front for two, before dismissing Ben Dunk caught in the outfield or 24.

But Maxwell (71* off 47) and Pooran (65 off 26) combined for a remarkable 125-run partnership, guiding the Stars towards a formidable total of 5/193.

The winning moment.
The winning moment.

The run chase started horrifically, with Sixers opener Jack Edwards and English international James Vince both removed for a duck.

Hughes steadied the ship through the middle overs to ensure their side won the Bash Boost bonus point at the 10-over mark. He combined with Josh Philippe for a 50-run stand before Stars leg-spinner Adam Zampa struck with his first delivery of the match.

Brief cameos from Holder (18 off 11 balls) and West Indies all-rounder Carlos Brathwaite (21 off 12 balls) set up a thrilling conclusion, in which the Sixers required 23 runs from the final two overs.

Pace bowler Liam Hatcher (3/33 off four overs) snared two crucial scalps in the penultimate over to put the Stars back in the favourable position.

But Hughes struck three consecutive boundaries off Maxwell’s next over to make the equation four runs required off three balls.

Hughes was then caught on the boundary rope at mid-wicket in yet another twist, meaning the Sixers tailenders needed to muster the last four runs from two balls.

And to everybody’s surprise, the winnings runs came from leg byes, with the ball ricocheting off O’Keefe’s thigh guard towards the third man boundary.

It was the first time these two clubs had met since last year’s BBL Final, and the Sixers couldn’t resist rubbing salt into their opponent’s wounds one more time.

TRINIDADIAN’S STUNNING BBL INCEPTION

The Stars were 4/49 when Trinidadian batsman Nicholas Pooran waltzed to the crease in the ninth over, and he could only manage four runs from his first six deliveries.

But Pooran then slapped 42 runs off his next eight balls to completely rattle the defending champions.

He cracked eight sixes and brought up his half-century in just 17 deliveries, making it the fastest fifty by a Stars player in BBL history.

On Channel 7’s coverage, former Australian batsman Brad Hodge called it “one of the best BBL innings you will ever see”.

Nicholas Pooran of the Stars.
Nicholas Pooran of the Stars.

UMPIRE’S NASTY BLOW

On Boxing Day, umpire Phillip Gillespie showed why several officials have opted to wear helmets and arm guards in the T20 format.

During the 12th over of the run chase, Daniel Christian smashed a delivery from Stars spinner Zahir Khan straight back past the bowler.

Before he even had time to react, the ball struck Gillespie firmly on the hip, and he immediately hit the deck.

Thankfully he was able to continue officiating the match following a two-minute breather.

ANOTHER X-FACTOR BLUNDER

Fans are still unconvinced by the newly-introduced X-Factor innovation, and the Sixers proved why on Saturday.

After spin bowler Ben Manenti conceded five runs off his maiden over, he was subbed out for former Australian seam bowler Gurinder Sandhu.

Unfortunately, Sandhu was pummelled for 28 runs in his only two overs of the match, and the paceman joined a growing list of X-Factor flops.

Sports Reporter

Sydney

Nic is a passionate sports reporter and cricket addict. He completed a Bachelor of Media at the University of New South Wales in 2018, and has since worked as a digital content creator at Fox Sports before join…

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The Rise and Fall of Hungarian Admiral Nicholas Horthy


The career of Admiral Nicholas Horthy spanned not only two world wars, but also stretched across the decades from the age of sail to atomic-powered submarines. He witnessed the fall of Europe’s oldest dynasties during 1917-1919, the rise of dictatorships to replace them, and the advent and then collapse of fascism as well.

His own country, Hungary, twice fell victim to Soviet revolution and foreign occupation, and he lived long enough to witness the aborted Hungarian Revolt of 1956. Although he did not survive to see her free once more, this salty sailor predicted that Hungary would emerge again in his post-World War II memoirs.

He was one of only two of Adolf Hitler’s former Axis partners in Europe to survive World War II. Both Benito Mussolini of Italy and Marshal Ion Antonescu of Romania were executed by the communists, while King Boris of Bulgaria died of a mysterious heart attack in 1943. Croatian strongman Dr. Ante Pavelic, like Admiral Horthy, escaped.

Nicholas Horthy outlived them all as the deposed regent of Hungary, a former Imperial Austro-Hungarian Navy commander in chief who was head of state in a landlocked nation virtually without a fleet. A reluctant politician who had been first a career sailor all his life, Horthy had served as aide-de-camp to the Dual Monarchy’s Kaiser Franz Joseph for the five years preceding the outbreak of World War I in 1914.

In that capacity, he rubbed shoulders with kings, sultans, and the emperor of Germany, and later would hobnob with Victor Emmanuel III of the House of Savoy, Pope Pius XII, and the Führer of the Third Reich, Adolf Hitler. It was Hitler who dominated the last years of Horthy’s 25-year regency, and Horthy thus has come down to history as a mere vassal to Hitler, but he was much more than that.

From Naval Cadet to Elected Dictator

Horthy rose from being an unknown naval cadet at Pola on the Adriatic Sea in the 1880s to command the Austro-Hungarian fleet in 1918. He was appointed to that post by Austria’s last Emperor, Kaiser Karl I, a man whose return to power he would thwart in 1921. Forced to surrender his proud, undefeated vessels to newly formed Yugoslavia on October 31, 1918, Horthy saw his naval career give way to one in a field he had always avoided, politics.

Within just a few months, the victor of the Battle of Otranto would be acclaimed as the national hero of his native land for the liberation of Budapest from the communist takeover led by Bela Kun. And as the elected regent of Hungary, he would reside in the former royal palace in the formidable Burgberg. Offered the crown himself, Admiral Horthy refused it, preferring to rule instead as an elected dictator. He was one of the few admirals in history who came to office at the head of an army rather than a fleet.

Caught between two powerful neighbors, Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia, Horthy’s Hungary threw in her lot with the Nazis against the Bolsheviks when Hitler invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, but was seeking a way out of the conflict as early as the following year, convinced that the Third Reich would lose the war. Reportedly, Horthy was one of the few foreign leaders whom Hitler respected, and why not? By the time Hitler was born, Horthy was already an Imperial Navy officer.

While Hitler was an unknown corporal in the trenches on the Western Front in 1917, the admiral was the naval hero of Austria-Hungary, and when the demobilized future Führer was a struggling politician in Bavaria, Nicholas Horthy was elected regent by a landslide vote of 131 out of 141 ballots cast in the parliament at Budapest.

Moreover, Hitler only traveled to countries he occupied, while mariner Horthy had long since sailed the oceans of the world. Thus, both before and during World War II the crusty sailor stood up to Hitler in a way that few Axis Pact partners dared. In return, the Führer may have murdered the regent’s first son. He did send SS Colonel Otto Skorzeny to kidnap the second son, occupied Hungary with nine German divisions late in 1944, and imprisoned the deposed regent, his former ally, in a Bavarian castle.

It was there that the 78-year-old admiral narrowly escaped execution by SS bullets in the spring of 1945 when the U.S. Army liberated the Horthy family outside Munich. Protected from extradition on Josip Broz Tito’s demand to stand trial in Yugoslavia for alleged war crimes, the regent instead was saved by the American government to testify as a witness in both 1945 and 1948 at the war crimes trials conducted in Nuremberg by the International Military Tribunal.

Over the course of his rich and varied life, Horthy had married the best dancer he ever met, hunted tigers in Borneo, seen the Himalayas, gotten drunk in Spanish ports, and survived a 70-foot fall from the mast of an Austrian training ship. His life was truly an epic.

“Above Life Stands Duty”

It was an unusual saga, beginning with his birth in Hungary in 1868 to a family of landed gentry tracing its lineage back several centuries.  Young Horthy’s dream was almost instantly to go to sea as a career sailor, but it almost was not realized because an older brother had died at the Imperial Navy’s Academy at Pola. In 1882, his parents reluctantly granted him permission to seek entrance.

Years later, Horthy recalled that of 612 applicants to the academy only 42 were admitted as officer candidates, and of those only 27 were later commissioned. The future admiral adopted as his own lifelong slogan the motto of the naval academy: “Above Life Stands Duty.”

As a graduated midshipman, young Horthy was assigned to the Winter Squadron flagship Radetzky, a frigate named after a famous Austrian Army field marshal. The ships were still powered by sails, with steam boilers hardly ever stoked, including the armor-clad vessels. Skippers who still felt more comfortable sailing thus preferred going into harbors under sail, rather than employing the newer steam power of a more modern era.

The future regent graduated from sailing vessels to torpedo boats and would later command both armored cruisers and battleships as well. Overall, his many voyages over the course of 36 years would take him to England, France, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Malta, Gibraltar, Tunisia, Greece, Egypt, Somalia, Thailand, Indonesia, Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Italy, and the Solomon Islands, to name but a few places.

Horthy joined the torpedo service of the Imperial Navy, preferring it, he said, to the other three possibilities: the desk-bound naval staff, minelaying, and heavy surface units. Staying ever longer on sea exercises, it meant faster and more promotions, Horthy later asserted.

A Swift Rise Through the Ranks

Following his command of both a training ship and the school that prepared young boys as future naval petty officers, Horthy found himself serving as a government translator in Vienna. He translated the naval budget from German into Hungarian for the joint parliamentary review in Budapest, as provided for in the 1867 constitution between Hungary and Austria.

Shortly afterward, he met his future wife, Magda Purgly, at a dance, and they were married on July 21, 1901. The happy union would endure war, revolution, overthrow, arrest, and exile, as well as having their homes looted by Romanians, Hungarians, and Russians.

Horthy’s rise in the Navy was swift. From skippering a torpedo boat, he next commanded a destroyer flotilla, and then the battleship Habsburg, flagship of the fleet’s Mediterranean Squadron, before World War I. One of his colleagues in the Navy was another admiral, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, who insisted on promoting the offensive capabilities of the Imperial Navy, not only its role as a coastal defense force. It was he whose assassination at Sarajevo on June 28, 1914, touched off the Balkan powder keg, which soon spread to a general European conflict.

Aide-de-Camp to Franz Joseph

Horthy was twice stationed at Constantinople in Turkey, where he witnessed the famous Young Turk rising that overthrew the old sultan. When Austria took advantage of the crisis and annexed Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Turks responded by boycotting and seizing imported Austrian commercial goods as well as refusing to allow cargo to be unloaded. Since Turkey was Austria’s main customer for exports, Horthy decided to act to break the impasse.

When the nervous Austrian ambassador asked what Horthy would do if fired upon, he coolly replied that he would return the fire, even if it meant war. All went well, however, Horthy recalled in the 1950s, as the Kurds declined to fight. The sailor had learned that bold, decisive action provided results, a lesson he remembered during World War I.

This action as well as his reports to Vienna on the Young Turks brought him to the attention of the aged Emperor Franz Joseph, and in 1909 Horthy was named the monarch’s naval aide-de-camp, a high point in his celebrated career.

Decades later, Admiral Horthy still recalled with awe his first meeting with the Austrian Kaiser. As a boy, Horthy heard the king-emperor mentioned only as a near godlike figure, but now meeting him in person in an Austrian Army general’s uniform, he witnessed a man of grace and dignity stepping forward quietly to meet his new aide.



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