St George Illawarra sponsor Norm Black slams NRL’s stand-down policy


Black, the owner of TripADeal, pours about $500,000 a year into the Dragons and a similar amount into the Sea Eagles. ‘‘The [stand-down] rule is so flawed it’s beyond words,’’ he said.

The NRL brought in the rule to appease fans and sponsors, but Black – a sponsor – does not share the NRL’s view. Of all the clubs, the Dragons have been hit hardest by the edict, which was championed by former ARL Commission chairman Peter Beattie, and rushed through as the NRL dealt with a range of off-field incidents at the end of 2018. The Dragons have paid de Belin more than $1 million just to train during the past two seasons. De Belin watched on as each season crumbled and former coach Paul McGregor was sacked.

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‘‘Of course I’ve got an interest in this as I’m a Dragons supporter and we put money into the club, but my view is not based on that at all,’’ Black said. ‘‘I believe that by being stood down from the game you are immediately cast as being guilty. You tell me what the message sends when a person is not allowed to work when they have a court case pending? It says one thing: you are presumed guilty.

‘‘Walk down the street and see what people say when a bloke is stood down. It creates a feeling of guilt. It’s a one-size-fits-all rule and I think that’s wrong.

‘‘I want to make it very clear that I am not defending Jack de Belin – I don’t know the full details of the case – but what I do know is he has been presumed guilty [by the NRL].

‘‘The same goes for Tristan Sailor [who has been charged with aggravated sexual assault]. Everything I know of Tristan is he is a good kid, but his career is stalled, as is his life. I think he should be allowed to play football until he has his day in court. If he is guilty, then the punishment should start. It’s innocent until proven guilty, not the other way about. I’ve got no doubt the police like big scalps like NRL players and my view is they [players] get a hard time.’’

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Sailor has not entered a formal plea, but his lawyer has indicated he will fight the charge.

Black is aware not everyone will agree with his views

‘‘I know that people will say that I am on a soapbox, but the reason that the NRL wanted to bring this in was to get two days of bad press instead of months of it,’’ he said. ‘‘But it has not worked and it becomes like OJ Simpson with everyone bringing it up all the time.’’

The B-word rears its ugly head again

While on de Belin, the police’s phone intercept of his conversation with another NRL player highlights an issue that has existed in league for as long as I can remember: lack of respect for women.

The recording was played during de Belin’s sexual assault trial in Wollongong. When asked who had accused him of sexual assault, de Belin said: ‘‘Some little chick who was hanging around. So me, my mate went back to my cousin’s house. Just had a like f—ing bun, just like a typical f—ing standard bun. And then she’s never once said no, she’s changed position up. It baffles me she’s gone to police.’’

Many will remember Canterbury’s Coffs Harbour scandal in 2004. I fell out with Bulldogs management at the time, and more particularly the late Steve Folkes, when I quoted a Canterbury player saying: ‘‘Some of the boys love a bun. Gang bangs are nothing new to this club or the rugby league.’’

It appears not much has changed.

Shark scare at training

The dangers of off-season training were highlighted by the tragic death of Manly’s Keith Titmuss on November 22. In the same week that happened the Sharks had their own scare. An ambulance had to be called for half Braydon Trindall, who was unwell after a tough fitness session. Thankfully he was OK, but the Titmuss tragedy has clubs on high alert.

Promising Cronulla halfback Braydon Trindall.Credit:Getty

The Titmuss family want their son to be remembered and if clubs are now increasing their testing of players and exercising even greater caution, that’s a good thing. The Titmuss family has been amazed by the support they have received from Manly chief executive Stephen Humphreys and Sea Eagles owners the Penn family, who have done everything they can for them in the most difficult time.

Time will tell

Timing is the key to Brent Naden’s immediate playing future. The timing of when he used cocaine. If it was the night before the grand final he will get a minimal ban.

Naden, 24, has been stood down after being notified on Tuesday of a positive sample to metabolites of cocaine from a test taken after Penrith’s 26-20 loss to Melbourne.

Timing is also important for the Panthers. When they knew what Naden did is key. If they found out post-Mad Monday, they are without blame or concern. Any time before that and they will be facing serious questions.

My last interaction with Naden was at a Panthers media day in the lead-up to the grand final, where he spoke about the impact of the racial abuse he copped during the year and the incredible support he then received from people such as Adam Goodes and top NRL players.

There are other theories being put forward about why he went off the rails, outside of the racial abuse. COVID lockdown is one. The isolation from family led to more drinking and then drug use. I’ve been told he was with two people on the night when he used the drug.

Whatever the reason for his drug use, it’s unacceptable and hard to fathom he would do so before a grand final. That’s a worrying indication of his mental state. Let’s hope he gets the help he needs.

Filmmakers want to show the real Nick

He may not have played a match since February, but Nick Kyrgios remains a man in demand.

The 25-year-old has received a number of offers from major international filmmakers to follow his career for a fly-on-the-wall-style documentary in 2021.

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Kyrgios is one of the most watched tennis players on the circuit and he is not afraid to tell people what he thinks.

What makes this even more intriguing is the filmmakers want to release the film immediately and not when he has retired, as is the case with so many other athletes, including Michael Jordan with The Last Dance.

Kyrgios has long been a TV ratings hit. His fourth-round match against Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open earlier this year was one of the most watched sporting events of the year. Film executives are confident this appeal will be box office gold.

Ace in the pack

Lleyton Hewitt is now the TV star in his family, and his role is only growing. Hewitt’s wife, Bec, was a big deal on the small screen – starring on Home and Away, among other TV shows – but now Lleyton is taking over. He is on the verge of signing a deal that will see him have an increased role in Channel Nine’s tennis coverage next year, including coverage of Wimbledon and the French Open, which have been secured by Nine.

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Sounds of silence

The silence has been deafening from the Gold Coast Titans about the culture issues we highlighted last week. No official has stuck their head up to counter or dispute what we said – that the club was warned that Michael Gordon needed to be pulled into line by former coach Garth Brennan.

Gal starts blue

Paul Gallen is starting to make his mark as a commentator. The former Blues captain has put noses out of joint in the Blues hierarchy, though. He agreed with the claim that the Queensland side was the worst in 40 years. The opinion didn’t bother the Blues when he first said it, but they felt the comment from Gallen helped galvanise the Queensland side. Gallen is paid to give his views these days, so he won’t care. The Blues certainly didn’t lose because Gallen had his say. They lost because they didn’t fire when it mattered the most.

Lock and key

The old firm is very much back together at Manly. The lockers of skipper Daly Cherry-Evans and returning star Kieran Foran are next to each other. Youngster Josh Schuster has been told he is going to be the team’s No.6, so you have to think the locker placements are related to the pair being mates. At least that’s what Schuster would hope. His parents have already met with Manly to get assurances about his status at the club.

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AFL Grand Final 2020: Norm Smith Medal voting, Leigh Matthews error, Nathan Broad, Jayden Short, Dustin Martin, Geelong vs Richmond stats


AFL legend Leigh Matthews has admitted he bungled part of his voting submission as Norm Smith Medal panel Chairperson.

Richmond superstar Dustin Martin took home his third Norm Smith Medal as the best player on the ground in Saturday night’s grand final win over Geelong, but there was confusion as Matthews gave defender Nathan Broad two votes under the 3,2,1 voting system – the only votes he received from the five-strong panel to do so.

Speaking on Channel 9’s Sunday Footy Show, Matthews was asked why he gave Broad two votes and Jayden Short (the clear runner up to Martin) none, with the premiership player and coach visibly taken aback.

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AFL Grand Final 2020, Richmond vs Geelong, Dustin Martin, Jack Riewoldt, Norm Smith Medal, best player in AFL


BRISBANE – For years Jack Riewoldt has considered Alex Rance the best teammate he’s played with.

Not anymore.

Following Saturday’s premiership, Riewoldt – beer in hand – elevated Dustin Martin to the top of his personal perch.

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Norm Smith Medal winner Dustin Martin reflects on Richmond Tigers’ premiership, says Gary Ablett is the GOAT


Martin said of his achievement of becoming the first player to win three Norm Smith Medals: “I don’t know what it means to me at the moment. There’s no way I would be able to do it without my teammates, we’re an unbelievable team, it’s not a one-man job, we all do our part and I’m just incredibly grateful to be a member of the team.”

Martin, who was the unanimous choice of the Norm Smith Medal judges as best afield, said becoming a three-time premiership player was “the cool one” rather than the Norm Smith Medals.

“Yeah, that’s the cool one right there. As Dimma just said, the adversity we faced this year, yeah I still can’t believe it – it’s very special and a very special club.”

Martin said the Tigers had started to look like themselves again late in the second quarter, after the Cats had been in control.

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“They got off to a good start, but as Dimma said that last five minutes to go in the second quarter, it started to look like Richmond again – credit to the boys we took that into the second half and stuck to the process, couldn’t be prouder.”

Martin acknowledged there had been peaks and troughs in Richmond’s time in the Gold Coast hub this season: “It’s had its ups and downs but we’re an incredible club and we love being around each other and we got through really well and yeah, it’s something we’ll look back at the rest of our lives and say ‘wow it’s really cool.'”

Hardwick observed that Martin’s goals had been really important, with his first coming when the Tigers “couldn’t buy one” in the second quarter.

“Yeah, it was an important goal … we just needed a goal – couldn’t buy one.

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“That’s what great players do – they take their opportunies and get the job done. That’s why he sits here with his third Norm Smith really.”

Martin was jocular when asked if he had imminent tattoo plans. “I haven’t got any yet, but George [Jason Castagna] brought his tattoo gun up so I daresay he’ll be getting that out tomorrow.”

Otherwise, the triple Norm Smith medallist suggested he would celebrate with teammates at the hub venue before remaining in Queensland for a time.

“Enjoy it together as a club back at the resort we’re at tonight, tomorrow. And then might stick around here for a little bit and see what happens.” Would he catch Serena Williams again? “Not this year.”

Martin, 29, who joined the Tigers at the same post-season when Hardwick was appointed, 2009, described his coach as like a second father to him.

“The care that he’s got for his players, ever since we started together 10 years ago, you know he’s almost like a second father to a lot of us – he’s a friend first, and then a coach second. I couldn’t be more grateful, you know, he’s helped me become a better person and along with all the other boys as well.”

Martin also had generous words for retired champion Gary Ablett.

Retiring star Gary Ablett is the GOAT, according to Martin.Credit:Getty Images

“He’s the GOAT, isn’t he. He’s had an incredible career, yeah, he’s an amazing player, an amazing person. It was a pleasure to play against him tonight and I wish him all the best.”

Sitting alongside his coach, Martin jested that he would return for pre-season training in February. “That’s just who we are as a group, we’re humble and we’re hungry. Success is awesome and enjoy this one and we’ll be looking to forward to pre-season again – in February.”

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AFL Grand Final 2020: Dustin Martin, Damien Hardwick embrace, hug, video | Norm Smith Medal voting


It must feel like there’s a thousand people to hug when the siren blows on a grand final victory – and when you’ve had more to do with that win than anyone else the line of people looking to acknowledge you is longer than the wait for a night grand final to start.

That person was Dustin Martin on Saturday night after the Richmond champion was a unanimous choice for the Norm Smith Medal after kicking four magical goals.

Martin claimed all five three-point votes as the unanimous winner of the best on ground award as Richmond beat Geelong by 31 points in Brisbane.

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The Tigers have now claimed three titles in four years, coming from 22 points down just before halftime to topple the Cats.

But in the decider of a season unlike any other, it appeared the 12.9 (81) to 7.8 (50) win meant more than most.

While there have been plenty of questions over whether the 2020 season would be tarred with an asterisk in the history books, one final eye-catching moment from Martin said it all.

After first hugging Jack Riewoldt and joining a group of teammates in a pack embrace, Martin spotted his coach Damien Hardwick entering the field.

He made a beeline for his mentor, almost brushing off a couple of others who had charged from the sidelines to reach the man who has led him to the highest of heights.

The look on the face of Martin when he embraced Hardwick must have touched the hardest of hearts before he lovingly rested his head on his coach’s shoulder.

After being quarantined in the AFL bubble for nearly 110 days, the emotion was palpable.

media_cameraDustin Martin looked near tears when embracing his coach.

After the medal presentation, Martin still didn’t know what to say.

“It still doesn’t feel real,” he said on Channel 7. “I don’t know what to say. I’m just so grateful to be a part of such an unbelievable group. I’m lost for words to be honest.

“It’s been a tough road. I couldn’t be prouder of the way we faced a bit of adversity this year and the way we stuck at it. That’s why we’re a great club.”

Martin became just the second player behind Barry Cable to have 20 disposals and multiple goals in three Grand Finals, as he booted four majors to go with 21 touches.

The result sees Martin become the first three-time winner of the Norm Smith Medal after a virtuoso performance.

He kicked his first major to get the Tigers back into the game after dropping 22 points behind in the second quarter.

Martin also landed a massive goal to snatch the lead in the third term, before wrapping it up with two late goals in the fourth, kicking from beyond the 50m arc into an empty goalsquare with just under eight minutes left before snapping around the corner to make it a 30-point game with a minute remaining.

Social media went insane for the biggest of big game players as he came up huge again.

2011 Brownlow Medallist Dane Swan said: “There is now clearly no doubt about it now that Dustin is the greatest big game player ever. Him and Jordan sit at the same table.”

Newcastle Herald deputy editor Xavier Mardling tweeted: “Clearly the best of Dusty’s three grand finals, I reckon. Hope (Jordan) De Goey is watching. That’s how you earn big money.”

AAP journalist Michael Ramsey added: “Dusty stamps himself as the player of his generation. Incredible and pretty much the difference between these two teams”.

Dustin Martin — take a bow.
media_cameraDustin Martin — take a bow.

NORM SMITH VOTING

15 – Dustin Martin (Richmond) – 33333

6 – Jayden Short (Richmond) – 222

4 – Shane Edwards (Richmond) – 1111

3 – Mitch Duncan (Geelong) – 21

2 – Nathan Broad (Richmond) – 2

Originally published as Dusty lets guard down, wins hearts





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Dustin Martin’s Norm Smith Medal hattrick takes him into the stratosphere after Richmond’s grand final win


How do you know when you are watching history?

How can you tell when something has gone beyond good, moved past great, even superseded exceptional, and moved into a category all of its own?

What is it that can make you certain that what is unfolding in front of you will be recounted for decades to come, a story so incredible that future generations may well consider it a myth?

Whatever your metric, Dustin Martin meets it. Unequivocally.

If you were in any doubt prior to Saturday night, his 2020 grand final performance put paid to that emphatically. In a game of fine margins for the most part, Martin made himself the difference.

He didn’t wait for the decisive moments but instead created them and seized them himself before anyone else had even realised they’d arrived.

Dustin Martin kicked four goals, each of them spectacular and crucial.(AAP: Dave Hunt)

If stats are your go, then you will naturally be drawn to the fact that Martin has now won three Norm Smith Medals — the first player in VFL/AFL history to do so.

You’ll look at his four goals in the 2020 grand final to go with four in 2019 and two in 2017, numbers reserved for hulking key forwards, not hybrid midfielders who are expected to win clearances and set up attacks too.

Some will get sucked to Martin’s highlights, the most startling of which came with the game already sealed when he intercepted a handpass deep in the pocket, shrugged and evaded his rival talisman Patrick Dangerfield and snapped from a near impossible angle.

It was Dusty in a microcosm, doing the impossible just for the sake of it, to prove he could. That it was Dangerfield that fell away helplessly from Martin’s swerving hips was almost on the nose in its poetry — two players often fairly considered equals, but polar opposites on this most important of nights.

Martin remains the most watchable player in the league. There are flashier players — the smoking hot feet of Shai Bolton were just mesmeric on this night — and there are players more regularly involved in the game — Jayden Short seemed to be the fulcrum for everything off half-back for Richmond — but none catch the eye like Martin.

And it’s that which lifts him above his contemporaries and places him among the true champions of the sport. Whenever he is withing five metres of the football, the humidity in the ground rises.

Spectators feel it and move to their feet, Martin’s Richmond teammates feel it and get out of the damn way. But most of all his opponents feel it, and no matter how despairing the lunge or coordinated the defensive effort is, they simply can’t do anything to stop him.

At times the whole Richmond team feels like that though. After a first half in which Geelong managed to bring the game onto its own terms, and its standing as the game’s most crafty and skilful ball user was confirmed, Richmond’s second-half onslaught was frightening both in its ruthless ferocity and in its inevitability.

Jack Riewoldt celebrates with Richmond teammates after kicking a goal in the AFL grand final against Geelong
The Tigers overwhelmed Geelong in the second half.(AAP: Dave Hunt)

As impressive as Geelong’s control and method was in the first half, it was no match for Richmond once it engaged its top level. They swarmed from midfield after the long break, carrying the ball forward as part of its collective whole — where Geelong looked to master the footy, Richmond just made it an extension of its yellow and black wave.

The Cats held on gamely in the third quarter, and even missed some chances of their own to take a lead into the last change, but even if they had its hard to confidently predict they could have stopped what was coming.

First Dion Prestia, the Tom Lynch after Bolton lit up the Gabba, then the Dusty and Jack Riewoldt show. Each with a gasp and a shrug and the solemn recognition that this is just the way things are now — Richmond decides it wants to win, and then Richmond wins.

The team’s place in history will now be debated ad nauseum, but at the very least it belongs alongside the great Brisbane, Geelong and Hawthorn sides of this century.

Beyond that, who knows. It’s all there for the taking for these Tigers, four or five or six or seemingly as many as they feel like winning. Eras end and dominance fades, but sitting at the Gabba on Saturday night, it is just impossible to imagine them losing.

Dustin Martin kicks a goal under pressure for Richmond against Geelong during the AFL grand final at the Gabba
What else could Dusty achieve in the rest of his career?(AAP: Dave Hunt)

Which brings us back to Dustin Martin.

It is not entirely unreasonable to suggest he could finish his career as the best footballer of all time. What’s stopping him? Who is slowing him down? What else is this marvel of a man capable of in the remaining years of his career?

I guess it all comes down to what it is you are looking for. If it’s stats, you could always find some of those to make an argument for someone else, and there are players too who have highlight reels that rival Dusty’s.

But with Martin, it’s more about the feeling. Because he plays purely on instinct, he taps into ours. It makes him harder to judge but easier to enjoy.

So maybe that’s the secret for now. Just enjoy Dustin Martin, for everything that he is.

The final decision as to his place in history will, as always, be made by the man himself.



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Dustin Martin wins third Norm Smith medal, putting him among all-time greats


In this grand final, Dustin Martin – and Richmond – had faced it, looked it dead in the eye, and stared it down.

With that play, Martin had just become the first player to collect three Norm Smith medals on the way to the Tigers’ third premiership in four years, a dynasty that he has defined.

It’s no longer enough to bracket him simply among the modern greats. Exceptional is the grand final with two all but certain future AFL legends playing. This was one.

The other, of course, was Gary Ablett, the greatest player of his generation, diminished only by age and the agony of a shoulder badly damaged in the opening minutes. Martin hasn’t been as dominant for as long as Ablett, not yet, but on Saturday night he surely joined him in stature for his wrecking-ball impact on the game’s biggest stage.

And in the final moments, as if there was anything more to be done to underline his brilliance, there was a denouement. Poaching the ball from the feet of Mark Blicavs on the boundary line, Martin turned, shrugged off a lunging Patrick Dangerfield, spun and hooked through his fourth.

Martin didn’t take his first kick until the 22nd minute of the first quarter.Credit:Glenn Hunt

The crowd erupted. Geelong heads sagged.

What more – as Dennis Cometti once put it – can you say? In the Richmond box, Damien Hardwick stood and applauded Martin’s virtuoso performance, before making his way down to the ground.

It had actually taken Martin time to work into the game, as the Cats took control of the first half. It wasn’t until the 22nd minute of the first quarter that he took his first kick, a dinky chip at half-forward that found Liam Baker. But it was the right option: Baker was in space, where there was little to be found, and he found a running Kamdyn McIntosh for the Tigers’ second.

Playing in a forward pocket, Martin now started to worry the life out of Jake Kolodjashnij, wheeling for an impossible snap that didn’t quite have the journey. He ended the quarter in the centre square, stationed briefly on Cameron Guthrie, who had five clearances to that point.

Deep into the second quarter, Richmond were on the ropes, trailing by 22 points.

Martin wrote himself into football immortality a long time ago. But in this game, he ascended to something else again.

Martin wrote himself into football immortality a long time ago. But in this game, he ascended to something else again.Credit:Getty Images

With a bit over a minute left in the half, Martin dragged Richmond back into the match, sharking a hit-out, throwing the ball onto his boot, then immediately gathering his forwards into a huddle, looking for a moment like the captain he will never be, but the giant of the game he had become.

Midway through the third quarter, it was Martin who put the Tigers in front for the first time, dribbling through a checkside from 40 metres. Every one of his four goals, then, was utterly decisive to the outcome: rescuer; leveller; finisher; stone-cold killer.

It would be impossible to imagine a more complete performance.

Martin wrote himself into football immortality a long time ago. But in this game, he ascended to something else again, a player to rank with the very greatest Australian rules football has ever seen: Ablett – indeed both of them – but also Matthews.

The game will eventually return to the MCG. One day, Martin’s statue may well be outside it, fending off all comers forever.

HOW THEY VOTED

15 – Dustin Martin, Richmond – 33333
6 – Jayden Short – 222
4 – Shane Edwards – 1111
3 – Mitch Duncan – 21
2 – Nathan Broad – 2

Judges voting – 3 2 1.

Leigh Matthews (Chair) – D Martin, N Broad, S Edwards

Lauren Arnell – D Martin, J Short, M Duncan

Malcolm Blight – D Martin, M Duncan, S Edwards

Damian Barrett – D Martin, J Short, S Edwards

Peter Ryan – D Martin, J Short, S Edwards

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Dustin Martin Norm Smith voting, Damien Hardwick image, history, Richmond vs Geelong


It’s quickly becoming the Richmond Tigers dynasty that Dustin Martin built as the superstar claimed his third Norm Smith Medal by putting on a masterclass in Saturday night’s AFL Grand Final.

Martin claimed all five three-point votes as the unanimous winner of the best on ground award as Richmond beat Geelong by 31 points in Brisbane.

The Tigers have now claimed three titles in four years, coming from 22 points down just before halftime to topple the Cats.

But in the decider of a season unlike any before, it appeared the 12.9 (81) to 7.8 (50) win meant more than most.

While there has been plenty of questions over whether the 2020 season would be tarred with an asterisk in the history books, the look on the face of Martin when he embraced Richmond coach Damien Hardwick said it all.

After being quarantined in the AFL bubble for nearly 110 days, the relief was clear on Martin’s face as he rested his head on his coach’s shoulder.

Social media was quick to react to the image and the Tigers’ incredible achievement.

After the presentation, Martin still didn’t know what to say.

“It still doesn’t feel real,” he said on Channel 7. “I don’t know what to say. I’m just so grateful to be a part of such an unbelievable group. I’m lost for words to be honest.

“It’s been a tough road. I couldn’t be prouder of the way we faced a bit of adversity this year and the way we stuck at it. That’s why we’re a great club.”

Martin became just the second player behind Barry Cable to have 20 disposals and multiple goals in three Grand Finals, as he booted four majors to go with 21 touches.

The result sees Martin become the first three-time winner of the Norm Smith Medal after a virtuoso performance.

He kicked his first major to get the Tigers back into the game after dropping 22 points behind in the second quarter.

Martin also landed a massive goal to snatch the lead in the third term, before wrapping it up with two late goals in the fourth, kicking from beyond the 50m arc into an empty goalsquare with just under eight minutes left before snapping around the corner to make it a 30-point game with a minute remaining.

SEN’s Gerard Whateley said it best: “Dusty in a Grand Final, it’s just the vibe.”

Social media went insane for the biggest of big game players as he came up huge again.

2011 Brownlow Medallist Dane Swan said “There is now clearly no doubt about it now that Dustin is the greatest big game player ever. Him and Jordan sit at the same table”.

Newcastle Herald deputy editor Xavier Mardling tweeted: “Clearly the best of Dusty’s three grand finals, I reckon. Hope (Jordan) De Goey is watching. That’s how you earn big money.”

AAP journalist Michael Ramsey added: “Dusty stamps himself as the player of his generation. Incredible and pretty much the difference between these two teams”.

NORM SMITH VOTING

15 – Dustin Martin (Richmond) – 33333

6 – Jayden Short (Richmond) – 222

4 – Shane Edwards (Richmond) – 1111

3 – Mitch Duncan (Geelong) – 21

2 – Nathan Broad (Richmond) – 2



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Martin wins third Norm Smith Medal to cement himself in football folklore


He’s done it again.

After another incredible performance in a Grand Final, Dustin Martin has cemented himself as one of the best players in AFL/VFL history by winning his third Norm Smith Medal.

Only three players have won the award more than once – Luke Hodge, Andrew McLeod and Gary Ayres – but it has never been won three times.

Until Saturday night.

When the game was on the line in the final quarter against Geelong, it was Martin who stepped up to kick two goals to seal Richmond’s third premiership in four years.

Overall, he had 21 touches (10 contested), nine score involvements, four goals and three tackes.

The 2020 Norm Smith Medal was voted on by a panel including Leigh Matthews (Chair), Lauren Arnell, Malcolm Blight, Damian Barrett and Peter Ryan.

FULL VOTES

15 – Dustin Martin
6 – Jayden Short
4 – Shane Edwards
3 – Mitch Duncan
2 – Nathan Broad

Leigh Matthews (Chair) – D Martin 3, N Broad 2, S Edwards 1

Lauren Arnell – D Martin 3, J Short 2, M Duncan 1

Malcolm Blight – D Martin 3, M Duncan 2, S Edwards 1

Damian Barrett – D Martin 3, J Short 2, S Edwards 1

Peter Ryan – D Martin 3, J Short 2, S Edwards 1









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Norm Smith Medal Tips and Odds – AFL Grand Final 2020


Who will win the Norm Smith Medal for the best afield in the 2020 AFL Grand Final? View the odds and read our preview for the 2020 AFL Grand Final Norm Smith Medal.

Starts: 7:30PM AEDT

Watch: Channel 7

Bet: Bet on the Norm Smith Medal HERE

Preview:

When picking the winner of the Norm Smith medal there are a couple of things to take into account.

Usually the winner is someone who catches the eye. Dustin Martin is an excitement machine so it’s no surprise he has already won two Norm Smith Medals.

He’s short odds to win again but there are a number of other players to consider.

I like Patrick Dangerfield from Geelong. He’s an absolute star who can get it done all over the ground. If he can catch the eye with his freakish runs out of the centre clearances and hit the scoreboard he’ll be hard to beat.

 

Tip: Patrick Dangerfield at $6.00

 





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