New company wants recycled plastic path next to rail line



A rally will be held in Casino on Wednesday in an effort to get trains back on the tracks.

 

But the new not-for-profit company hosting the rally, Northern Rivers Rail Ltd, also wants a walking path built alongside the rail line.

Their idea is to gain a “large number of members from our region and beyond”, who will make donations to help pay for new recycled plastic walking paths.

Secretary Lydia Kindred said the plastic pathways were “environmentally sound”.

“This in itself prevents thousands of tons of plastic from going into landfill,” she said.

“They are Australian made, in Victoria and South Australia, and can be built over low lying parts of the track and will be more enjoyable to ride on for cyclists and more comfortable to walk on than bitumen or concrete.

“Better routes can be found around trees and closer to streams and including other pleasant outlooks.

“The raised cycle ways can be tailored to the landscape to make the journey more enjoyable, more inspiring and more comfortable for travellers.”

At the rally at the Casino post office, which will be held from 11am on Wednesday, locals can hear from speakers who are concerned the future of trains on the Northern Rivers will be “lost forever” if plans for a rail trail proceed.

Northern Rivers Rail Ltd would also like to see rail services extended to Tyagarah where drivers can ‘park and ride’ into Byron Bay, then on to Mullumbimby and beyond.

Upcoming public meetings will be held at the Bangalow Bowlo on Wednesday, March 10 at 6pm and the Mullumbimby Ex-Services Club on Wednesday, March 17, at 6pm.

Byron Shire Mayor Simon Richardson will speak at both events and Ballina MP Tamara Smith will speak at the Bangalow event.

For more information email admin@northernriversrail.com.au.



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Sam’s best friend Jai died suddenly — the grief veered Sam off a dark path and toward post traumatic growth


Sam Ellis’s best friend Jai Reed was in the waiting room when Sam was born, and for the next 16 years they were inseparable.

Their mothers were childhood best friends and the two boys — born six months apart — looked set to extend that bond for another generation.

“Jai was this really outgoing kid, there wasn’t a single person that met him that didn’t love him,” Sam said.

“He was just one of those people you’d meet at a party and speak to him for 10 seconds and become best mates with him.

The friends couldn’t have been more different — while Sam was quiet and more impressionable, Jai knew who he was from a young age.

“He was one of those kids where if he didn’t want to do something, he wasn’t scared to say no,” Sam said.

“You couldn’t be pressuring him, he had that much confidence in himself and self-esteem.”

When the boys entered adolescence, Sam’s choices deviated. He started treating his worsening anxiety and depression by abusing progressively harder forms of drugs.

“I’ve suffered a lot of mental health issues, I’ve seen psychiatrists and psychologists since I was about nine,” Sam said.

“I ended up using marijuana therapeutically because I thought it was helping, but eventually it stopped working.

“I started moving on to heavier and heavier drugs and going down a really dark path towards criminal activity, and my mental health was suffering more and more.”

Before he turned 16, Sam had suffered multiple drug overdoses, undergone treatment in rehab and hospital, and was running into trouble with the police.

“I ended up having an overdose at one point, and I was pronounced medically dead,” he said.

“And then got revived after 47 seconds. I was 15 at the time of that, almost 16.”

Whatever Sam went through, Jai was beside him to offer support without judgement.

“My mum would come in, and then he’d be following straight behind.”

In 2018, Jai — who was epileptic — had a seizure, hit his head, went into cardiac arrest, and died. He was 16 years old.

Sam was devastated. It felt like he’d lost a limb.

“I thought: ‘You have [Jai], this amazing kid, 16 years old, who’s going to achieve everything, had all these plans in place, he had so much potential for his future, and it all got taken away’,” Sam said.

“And you’ve got me who does have potential, but he’s throwing that potential away.”

Jai’s death shifted something within Sam, and he hasn’t touched drugs since.

“It’s almost like my body’s rejected that side of my life, where I just am no longer interested at all,” he said.

Jackie Taraway, a specialist bereavement counsellor at the Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement, works with people of all ages who are processing grief over a recent death.

She says grief among teenagers mourning the loss of a friend can manifest differently than grief over other losses.

“The death of a friend can really violate their basic assumptions,” Ms Taraway said.

“It’s interesting the closeness teenagers have with their friends because their sense of belonging is with their friends.

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Vaccine passports: path back to normality or problem in the making?



FILE PHOTO: Vials with AstraZeneca’s coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine are seen at the vaccination centre in the Newcastle Eagles Community Arena, in Newcastle upon Tyne, Britain, January 30, 2021. REUTERS/Lee Smith

February 4, 2021

By Natalie Thomas

LONDON (Reuters) – Governments and developers around the world are exploring the potential use of “vaccine passports” as a way of reopening the economy by identifying those protected against the coronavirus.

Those developing the technologies however, say such tools come with consequences such as potentially excluding whole groups from social participation, and are urging lawmakers to think seriously about how they are used.

The travel and entertainment industries, which have struggled to operate at a profit while imposing social distancing regulations, are particularly interested in a way of swiftly checking who has protection.

Among those developing passports are biometrics company iProov and cyber security firm Mvine which have built a vaccine pass now being tested within Britain’s National Health Service after receiving UK government funding.

iProov founder and chief executive Andrew Bud believes such vaccine passports only really need to hold two pieces of information.

“One is, has this person been vaccinated? And the other is, what does this person look like?”

You need only match a face to a vaccination status, you don’t need to know a person’s identity, he added.

Confirmation of patrons’ vaccination status could help the night-time economy, which employs some 420,000 people in the northern English city of Manchester, off its knees, experts say.

“We have to look at how to get back to normal,” said Sacha Lord, an industry adviser and co-founder of the city’s Parklife music festival.

While there have been experiments in socially distanced concerts and events over the last year, they weren’t financially viable, he said.

“A gig isn’t a gig or a festival isn’t a festival unless you are stood shoulder to shoulder with your friends.

“I don’t think we should be forcing people into the vaccine passports. It should be a choice. But on entry, if you don’t have that passport, then we will give you another option,” he added, suggesting the use of rapid result coronavirus tests.

Bud said vaccine certificates were being rolled out in some countries, and in the United Sates, some private sector health passes were being used to admit customers to sports events.

“I think vaccine certificates raise huge social and political issues. Our job is to provide the technology basis for making vaccine passports and certificates possible … It is not our place to make judgments about whether they are a good idea or not,” he said.

Potential issues could arise around discrimination, privilege and exclusion of the younger generation who would be last in line to be vaccinated, he said, adding he believed government was giving it careful consideration.

(Reporting by Natalie Thomas; Writing by Alexandra Hudson; Editing by Mike Collett-White)



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Blackstone’s Tynan sets the group on a growth path


Blackstone is one of the most closely watched firms in the US investment markets – Schwarzman, whose net worth is estimated at $US19 billion, is one of America’s most celebrated business figures (although he has recently suffered criticism for his strident support of former US president Donald Trump).

The firm has kept a low profile in Australia since setting up an outpost here a decade ago, although the size and significance of its presence, particularly in real estate, is rising.

Since Tynan joined Blackstone in 2015 to work on the drawn out takeover battle for Investa Office Fund the global real estate investor has grown its Australian property portfolio to more than $15 billion in Australia and NZ. Its headcount has grown from one employee to more than 30 and it remains one of only a handful of global real estate investors to keep a dedicated team on the ground in Australia.

The biggest chunk of its Australian operations are in real estate where its portfolio is split 20 per cent retail, 45 per cent logistics, with the remainder in office. Its logistics portfolio, which includes nine industrial estates with key tenants like Woolworths and global food packaging giant Huhtamäki, returns $150 million annual income fully leased.

Perhaps most notably, Blackstone emerged with a 10 per cent stake in James Packer’s Crown Resorts in April last year. It applied to increase that stake in October, fuelling speculation it could be interested in a broader play for the besieged casino operator.

Mr Tynan wouldn’t be drawn on the group’s intentions for Crown. But Blackstone’s investment mantra is famously ‘buy it, fix it, sell it’. And Crown may fit the bill nicely. The gaming group was last year hit by two shareholder class actions, an enforcement investigation by financial intelligence operator AUSTRAC, and a damaging inquiry led by the NSW gaming regulator.

Tynan is more forthcoming on Blackstone’s other potential targets for growth in areas such as data centres, land-rich shopping malls and even redundant office towers.

Globally, Blackstone has tracked the expansion of internet giant Amazon’s fulfilment centres, buying up logistics real estate in high growth segments. It has been a profitable exercise, and Tynan expects to see more of it in Australia. “We identified ecommerce as a growth sector and started buying up logistics assets pretty aggressively, not because we thought, it’s going to be the flavour of the month in Australia in 2020,” he says.

“But because we thought there’s a catalyst for demand [of online shopping] that we haven’t actually seen hit Australia yet. And I think that that probably is still the case. So if you’re asking whether we’re done on logistics yet? Our answer is definitely ‘No’.“

But even with the rising tide of e-commerce, he warns that once the government’s pandemic-busting JobKeeper wage subsidy and other lifelines are withdrawn next year, it will spell trouble.

“Retail has been impacted already. And COVID made it worse. I think as they wean the retail industry off those lifelines, you will see the real impact of Coronavirus and the subsequent rise in ecommerce.“

“That’s not to say that you can’t go and find good value in a shopping centre, but I think a lot of centres are going to need help. I don’t think that the distresses have truly come home to roost just yet.“

Tynan says shopping centres will survive with more tenants looking to use their stores as part showcase, part click and collect and part warehouse.

But coming into 2021, the talk of the town is whether staff will return to office towers en masse or continue to work from home, and what that means for occupancy rates.

“The Blackstone view is that Steve and John who are the CEO and COO, are huge believers that collaboration and creativity happens best when you’re together. And whilst tools like Zoom are phenomenal versus being on the phone, they aren’t the only answer,” he says.

“And so they are very encouraging of the offices getting back together when it’s safe. And when it’s practical to do so.″

“Where we’ve found ourselves most inclined to make investments in the office space, certainly in the last little while, has been trying to think of themes that are going to really drive that office take up regardless of whether people partially working from home and fully working,” he says.

Chris Tynan, the head of Blackstone real estate investments in Australia, SydneyCredit:Jessica Hromas

“These meetings are a hugely important part of our process and global investment committee, and for real estate, the investment committee starts at 10am New York time on Monday,” Tynan, the senior managing director and the head of Real Estate Australia, says in an exclusive interview with The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

“And the reason that it’s fairly inflexible is because Steve and John attend all of the investment committees during the day.”

Using the Blackstone mantra of buy it, fix it and sell it, Tynan says every proposal is considered by the committee and benchmarked against global deals.

These meetings are a hugely important part of our process and global investment committee, and for real estate, the investment committee starts at 10am New York time on Monday

Chris Tynan, Blackstone

Having completed a Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Law at the University of New South Wales, Tynan joined Morgan Stanley where over the course of almost 13 years he left as the managing director.

But when not at work he spends most of his time chauffeuring kids around to various sporting events. He, with wife Nancy, have three children, two girls and a boy at primary school.

“I swim next to my girls who are in regular squads when they’re not at ballet or gymnastics. On the weekends I’m doing the sport shuffle between Jujitsu, ballet, swimming all Saturday and Sundays are for family time,” he says.

Since Tynan joined Blackstone in 2015, where his first high-profile deal was working on the long takeover battle for Investa Office Fund, which eventually went to Oxford Properties, the global real estate investor has grown its Australian property portfolio to more than $15 billion in Australia and NZ. Australia accounts for the lion’s share with $12 billion of real estate assets.

Blackstone also owns La Trobe Financial and the former Valad Property group, which is now called 151 Property.

The global business is run using three investment fund principles: a more aggressive ‘opportunistic’ platform, a longer term ‘core plus’ profile, and non-bank debt lending.

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The biggest chunk of its Australian operations are in focused around real estate. In general, its portfolio mix is split towards 20 per cent of retail and 45 per cent logistics, with the remainder in office and the rapidly evolving build-to-rent sector.

It has teamed up with Beck Property Group, run by property veteran Max Beck’s son, Sam, to take the next stage of its Caulfield Village project. Under the deal, Blackstone signed a fund-through for 437 apartments across seven buildings with an end value around $300 million, an investment it will hold and manage in its portfolio.

Other targets for acquisition and expansion are data centres, land-rich shopping malls and even redundant office towers.

Starting with one employee ten years ago, its Sydney office now houses a robust team of 30 employees, one of only a handful of global real estate investors keeping a dedicated team on the ground in Australia.

That team will grow amid expectations the property outlook will improve over the coming year, underpinned by a reliable vaccine and Australia’s ability to manage the pandemic’s impact.

Globally, Blackstone has tracked the expansion of internet giant Amazon’s fulfilment centres, buying up logistics real estate in high growth segments, a profitable exercise.

For Tynan, there is more growth to come, particularly in Australia. “We identified ecommerce as a growth sector and started buying up logistics assets pretty aggressively, not because we thought, it’s going to be the flavour of the month in Australia in 2020,” he says.

“But because we thought there’s a catalyst for demand [of online shopping] that we haven’t actually seen hit Australia yet. And I think that that probably is still the case. So if you’re asking whether we’re done on logistics yet? Our answer is definitely ‘No’.”

But even with the rising tide of e-commerce, he warns that once the government’s pandemic-busting JobKeeper and other lifelines are withdrawn next year, it will spell trouble.

“Retail has been impacted already. And COVID made it worse. I think as they wean the retail industry off those lifelines, you will see the real impact of Coronavirus and the subsequent rise in ecommerce.”

“That’s not to say that you can’t go and find good value in a shopping centre, but I think a lot of centres are going to need help. I don’t think that the distresses have truly come home to roost just yet.”

Tynan says shopping centres will survive with more tenants looking to use their stores as part showcase, part click and collect and part warehouse.

But coming into 2021, the talk of the town is the impact on the office market and whether staff will return to work and what that means for occupancy.

“The Blackstone view is that Steve and John who are the CEO and COO, are huge believers that collaboration and creativity happens best when you’re together. And whilst tools like zoom are phenomenal versus being on the phone, they aren’t the only answer,” he says.

“And so they are very encouraging of the offices getting back together when it’s safe. And when it’s practical to do so.”

He says from the Blackstone real estate view, there is a range of different tenants with different outcomes that they’re talking about with respect to 2021.

“Where we’ve found ourselves most inclined to make investments in the office space, certainly in the last little while, has been trying to think of themes that are going to really drive that office take up regardless of whether people partially working from home and fully working,” he says.

“Time will tell when we enter 2021.”

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Are lockdowns our only option? Sweden took a different path, and found out. – Channel 4 News



25 Jan 2021

Our foreign affairs correspondent Jonathan Rugman, has been to Sweden to figure out why they decided to go it alone – and why it was always a risky strategy.


In March 2020, when most of the world went into lockdown, Sweden took a different path; pubs stayed open, kids stayed in school and life carried quite normally. The “Swedish model” was touted by some as an alternative approach to pandemic management. But as the second wave hits, has Sweden’s gamble paid off?

Our foreign affairs correspondent Jonathan Rugman, has been to Sweden to figure out why they decided to go it alone – and why it was always a risky strategy.

Sources: NBC, SVT

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Biden and the EU can forge a new path on global warming


Of these cap-and-trade systems, the EU, Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein jointly have the world’s largest. Still, it only covers sectors – from power generators to steelmakers and airlines – that account for 40 per cent of European emissions, so the system must be expanded. Even then it still faces a bigger problem.

It’s that the rest of the world isn’t in the system. This both slants the economic playing field against European companies and leads to “carbon leakage.” Take a European steel company, for example. It must buy allowances to emit carbon, which is a cost. To avoid that cost, it can invest in technology that makes production cleaner, but that’s also expensive.

By contrast, a Chinese steelmaker doesn’t incur this cost yet. A European firm that uses steel could therefore simply switch to buying it more cheaply from China than from the home market. The European steelmaker and its workers lose. And the world loses because the same amount of carbon – or even more – has been emitted, just elsewhere. Only the Chinese supplier wins.

This is the classic problem of free riding, as analysed by the economist William Nordhaus among others. In a nutshell, countries have an incentive to share in the benefits of a global public good – saving the climate – while shirking the costs of abatement. This logic, also known as the “tragedy of the commons,” explains why purely voluntary international climate deals such as the defunct Kyoto Protocol or the Paris Agreement tend to disappoint.

The solution to the free-riding dilemma is the club model proposed by Nordhaus and now endorsed by sharp minds such as Guntram Wolff, the director of Bruegel, a think tank in Brussels. Here a group of countries would agree on a minimum international carbon price.

All club members would then set about reaching that price with either a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade system, the equivalent of their club dues. As long as their domestic carbon prices are high enough and comparable, there’s no need for club members to punish each other’s imports, so they trade freely (if you ignore other tariffs and quotas for the moment).

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Non-members of the club, by contrast, would have to pay countervailing carbon duties on their exports to the club. The EU calls this a “carbon border adjustment mechanism” (CBAM). Unlike ordinary tariffs, the surcharges wouldn’t aim at making domestic producers more competitive but at spreading the cost of global carbon abatement. So they should be allowed by the World Trade Organization.

To existing members, the benefits of membership would be obvious, so the club would be a stable coalition. All others would quickly see the upside of joining the club by aiming for the same international carbon price at home.

As a first and relatively small demonstration project, the EU could link its emissions trading system with whatever the UK implements, now that it’s left the European regime (thereby causing that system to shrink by 11 per cent overnight). Simultaneously, the Biden administration could work on the bigger goal of introducing a national cap-and-trade for the US.

Climate change means businesses must prepare for more extreme weather events, say insurers.Credit:Getty.

All the while, diplomats on both sides of the pond would be preparing the transatlantic carbon club, a trade zone without internal carbon duties. Compared to negotiating comprehensive free-trade deals, such as the moribund Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, this should be a cinch.

In the process, the Western democracies would once again act as world leaders playing on the same team. But their club isn’t meant to be exclusive. Rather, it would measure its own success largely by how many new members it can attract over time. It would welcome the world’s biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, China, with particular enthusiasm.

If we still have a shot at controlling global warming, this might be it. Moreover, this kind of positive cooperation between rivals in east and west would have other benefits. Anxiety is growing that the enmity between the US and China could one day end as the contest between Imperial Germany and the British Empire once did: in war. A successful collaboration against the common enemy, global warming, could defuse this conflict – and save the planet along the way.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Andreas Kluth is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. He was previously editor in chief of Handelsblatt Global and a writer for the Economist. He’s the author of ‘Hannibal and Me.’

Bloomberg L.P.

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Pursuing a Path of Lifelong Learning Through Informal Continuing Education 


The cornerstone of a successful and fulfilling career is a commitment to lifelong learning, both personally and professionally. As it was once said by the incredibly wise Dr. Seuss, “The more you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you will go.” 

Many health coaches and exercise professionals associate learning with the formal education required to achieve and maintain their primary certifications. While accumulating the specified number of continuing education credits is an essential part of professional development, it is only one of the many ways to nourish a long and satisfying career. Enhancing and expanding your knowledge and skillset should not be limited to the certifications, specialty certifications, courses and conferences where you earn “credits.” Learning can happen whenever and wherever you open your mind to the abundance of opportunities around you.  

What Is Informal Continuing Education? 

Informal continuing education is any learning that occurs outside of a structured and conventional environment. It is often self-directed and consists of the things you do on a regular basis to evolve in not only your career but also your personal life. It might be the steps you take to explore an area of interest, the activities you participate in when searching for motivation or how you fill your cup in order to give to others. These valuable learning moments can be planned for in small daily doses or occur through experiential learning. By making curiosity and exploration a way of life, you will begin to cultivate a habit of lifelong learning.  
 

Informal Continuing Education as a Way of Life 

How you want to learn, what you wish to study and the type of learning you choose to engage in are all individual decisions. Regardless of what and how you want to learn, the opportunities and resources to support lifelong learning are endless. Here are a few ways to incorporate informal continuing education into your daily life:  

  • Read: Read on a regular basis to gain a deeper understanding of the topics that interest you most. Choose books or publications from within the fitness industry, as well as from outside the industry. Research to develop more knowledge about concepts with which you are familiar and move outside your comfort zone by delving into subjects with which you are unfamiliar. Industry magazines or ongoing publications such as ACE Certified or the ACE Insights Blog, in addition to self-improvement books on topics such as leadership, communication, emotional intelligence, behavior change and stress management are a great place to start.  
  • Absorb: Finding the time to read everything you’d like to can be difficult, if not impossible, which is why it can be valuable to add listening and watching to your to-do list. Podcasts, webinars, and instructional videos can add another dimension to your learning. Webinars and instructional videos layer on visual and auditory information that may help you absorb the information better. And, you can multi-task – listening or watching while you workout! Check out the many free live webinars from ACE or explore TED Talks. And, for podcasts, try Fitness Business Podcast, IDEA Listen and Learn, Ted Radio Hour or How I Built This
  • Experience: It’s important you continue to be a student and consumer of health and wellness opportunities once you become a professional. Be sure you continue taking advantage of all the industry has to offer. Participating in new fitness modalities, such as group fitness classes (in-person and virtual) you have not tried before, circuit training or high-intensity interval training (HIIT) sessions, or outdoor experiences like hiking, mountain biking or adult recreation clubs is a great way to expand your horizons and meet new people in your community. In addition, exploring fitness apps or shadowing—or even hiring—another health coach or exercise professional to add variety to your routine and learn new techniques can help expand your knowledge and develop your skills through experiential learning. 

Connect to the Community  

Finally, consider becoming a part of a community where you can tap into the power of learning through social interactions. Connecting with like-minded professionals provides you with a network of resources and recommendations for things to read, absorb, and experience. ACE supports Pros through several Facebook pages and groups. Consider joining us at our ACE Fitness PageACE Group Fit Facebook Group or the ACE Health Coach Network. And be sure to take advantage of more local opportunities to meet people in your community. You never know who may be your next mentor or newest client. 
 

Informal continuing education is not something you “have to” do, it is something you choose to do. It’s a choice and commitment to the pursuit of ongoing learning with a positive attitude and growth mindset.     

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Finland to gradually do away with unemployment path to retirement


THE GOVERNMENT of Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) on Thursday struck an agreement on measures to promote employment among over 55-year-olds, deciding to gradually do away with the so-called unemployment path to retirement.

The unemployment path to retirement refers to the additional days of unemployment allowance available to ageing job seekers who meet certain work-related conditions.

“The government’s objective is to improve employment with structural reforms. The employment impact of the decisions we’ve now made is 10,000 additional employed people,” Marin stated in Helsinki on Thursday. “The removal of the additional days will be scheduled for the post-coronavirus crisis time.”

YLE on Thursday reported that people born in 1965 or later will not have the option to use the additional days of unemployment allowance to transition to retirement. The lower age limit for the allowance, the public broadcaster added, will additionally be raised by a year for each group starting with people born in 1963.

The decision will have no impact on people already on the unemployment path to retirement.

Removing the path was a bitter pill to swallow especially for the Left Alliance. Chairperson Li Andersson confirmed that the party does not believe the abolition to be justified in the current economic conditions.

“Our central concern has been securing livelihood for people who’ll lose their jobs regardless,” she commented.

The Left Alliance demanded that the abolition be offset by improving the livelihood, employment and protection in the event of re-structuring of over 55-year-olds. The decision will instate a supplementary support scheme for over 55-year-old job seekers, entitling employees who had worked for the same employer for over five years to a package consisting of a training subsidy worth two months’ wage and severance package worth one month’s wage.

“It was important for the government to find a balanced solution that places strong emphasis on working-life security,” commented Marin.

“We’re talking about a balanced package that takes into account the interests of taxpayers, the needs of employees and the perspective of employers,” echoed Minister of Science and Culture Annika Saarikko (Centre). “The obligations of employers won’t increase excessively.”

The ruling parties also agreed to raise the wage subsidy of over 55-year-olds who have been without a job for 24 of the last 28 months to 70 per cent of wage. The maximum amount of the earned income tax credit will additionally be raised by 200 euros for over 60-year-olds as of 2023, according to YLE.

Estimated to narrow the deficit in the public economy by 165 million euros, the measures are part of a government effort to agree on measures that add at least 31,000 people to the ranks of the employed by the end of the year.

Aleksi Teivainen – HT



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Winter storm trackers show snow path through Northeast, NYC



Remember snow? It’s back. Although it’s not officially winter yet, the East Coast of the United States is bracing for a powerful winter storm that could dump close to two feet of snow in parts of the area. According to CNN, more than 45 million people are already under a winter weather watch. New York City could see up to a foot of the white stuff, while parts of Pennsylvania could see up to 20 inches.

The storm is expected to hit Wednesday and continue into Thursday. For many in the region, it’s the first time they’ve had to worry about a snowy forecast in a while—not that anyone is going out much these days.

If you’re looking for ways to track the storm and wintery weather as it makes its way across the Northeast, I’ve rounded up some resources that offer real-time tracking. Good luck!





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Looking inwards and outwards for a path going forwards


It is common advice, driven by a century of psychoanalysis, that we should look within to better understand our conscious and unconscious drives. In careers we are encouraged to first understand ourselves, then to understand the world of work opportunity, and then (mystically) to find a path between the two. Good luck with that.

Having gone 50, I am most likely at least a quarter of the way through my life, and I still present as a mystery to myself. I surprise myself when I allow it, but hopefully not the constabulary. And frankly I like it that way. I like to be open to surprise, I can live with a less than perfect self-image.

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After all, was it not Mr Leonard Cohen who wrote “there is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in”.

While self-reflection as opposed to self-admiration or compensation is a healthy and useful thing to do, it must never be at the expense of exploration and connection. We must look out as much as we look in. Looking out for other people, we know is psychologically very satisfying. Most jobs are, in the end, about serving others – whether you are a monarch, a milliner, a massage therapist or a machine operator. Work is social contribution. We do it not only to help ourselves, but to help others.

Without others we have no colleagues, no employers, no clients, and no customers. Its also true we have no complaints! I never said the world is perfect!

Illustration by Kerrie LeishmanCredit:

I think it is also important to look up as much if not more than to look down, or to look back. Seeking a bigger picture and locating yourself within it can bring a sense of belonging, meaning, connection, community and therefore identity. Looking up to others can involve setting high standards, having faith, having humility, seeing the best qualities of others, encouraging people, nurturing, and ultimately truly caring about others.

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It is powerful and outward looking. It is also career and capacity building for others, but ultimately for yourself as well. What we are doing when we look up, is inevitably as much about looking forward, and that is, I believe, generally more important that looking within. As 2020 comes to a close, most of us have rarely needed more not only to look out, but to look up and to look forward.

Jim Bright, FAPS is Professor of Career Education and Development at ACU and owns Bright and Associates, a Career Management Consultancy. Email to opinion@jimbright.com. Follow him on Twitter @DrJimBright

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