AFL journalist Mitch Cleary resumes job after being stood down for tweeting photo of Brooke Cotchin’s coronavirus breach


Journalist Mitch Cleary’s task has been reinstated by AFL Media after he was stood down for tweeting an impression of the given that-deleted Brooke Cotchin Instagram publish which ended up earning Richmond a $45,000 wonderful.

The Instagram put up, manufactured by Richmond captain Trent Cotchin’s spouse, confirmed a working day spa which Brooke Cotchin attended for a facial — a breach of the AFL’s COVID-19 protocols for family customers who are residing in Queensland hubs. $25,000 of the fine has been suspended.

Cleary, who also is effective for ABC Grandstand, was due to work for AFL.com.au at the weekend but was stood down on Friday.

The AFL has considering that confirmed Cleary experienced returned to function this afternoon.

Cleary claimed he was not aware of AFL Media’s conclusion not to publish the names of those people sanctioned by the league, like the good handed to Richmond for Brooke Cotchin’s journey to the beautician, just before posting his tweet.

“Clearly I wasn’t aware of the security of names that were in place and can see I really should have been,” Cleary instructed ABC Grandstand’s Corbin & Ben program.

Cleary stated he posted the graphic as he thought he was introducing to the story.

“Supplied the size of the story and the genuine interest in it, I felt like I was adding a different layer to the tale, supplied that it was on the public document,” he stated.

“I know it experienced been stated on radio a pair of moments and Brooke herself had certainly posted it to Instagram. Clearly experienced no malice supposed, I just preferred to increase additional detail to the story.”

Cleary explained he appreciated the assist he experienced obtained right after currently being stood down.

“It really is been really overwhelming, the previous 24 several hours due to the fact it all grew to become general public,” he stated.

“I am really grateful for all of the assistance of absolutely everyone, not only in our workforce at AFL.com.au and the people that I’ve labored extremely intently with around a lengthy time period of time, but individuals from the wider footy market.

“I’ve experienced a host of texts and calls and messages from a large amount of persons who I really regard and it is been genuinely coronary heart-warming to know that men and women have got your back again.”

The AFL verified Mitch Cleary experienced resumed his reporting part.(AAP: Julian Smith)

The AFL released a statement this afternoon expressing it designed the final decision to stand Cleary down due to the fact he experienced failed to abide by editorial assistance.

“Past week, AFL Media (afl.com.au) produced an editorial final decision to not identify any family members associates relating to the latest club breaches of the Return to Play protocols,” the assertion read.

“The reasoning behind this determination was to shield the wellbeing of all men and women associated, a message that was reiterated in the formal AFL Media Statement on Friday afternoon.

“Mitch mistakenly did not abide by his department’s editorial conclusion and named a family member on his have own Twitter channel on Friday night.

“On talking to his editor and then realising his tweet was at odds with AFL Media’s editorial decision, Mitch quickly eradicated his tweet and has acknowledged it was a oversight on his behalf.

“The subject has now been resolved internally, with Mitch today co-web hosting the weekly exhibit AFL Exchange on afl.com.au.”

Brooke Cotchin reveals support

Previously, Brooke Cotchin claimed she disagreed with the AFL’s determination to stand Cleary down.

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“I never know Mitch Cleary, but I do not concur with him currently being stood down and I have voiced that to the AFL,” she posted on social media.

“It is his task and it does not support anyone’s situation specially in present instances. Regrettably I had no enter and it is a thing that is out of my command.”

She also revealed she and her husband would pay out the high-quality and not Richmond football club.

“This was my slip-up which I accept full duty for,” she wrote.

The AFL’s choice to stand Cleary down experienced sparked a media storm.

Cleary began to trend on Twitter immediately after the tale appeared in the Herald Sun on Sunday evening. Former Melbourne footballer Brad Green labelled the AFL “bullies”.

“The AFL is a laughing stock, bullies,” Green tweeted.

Collingwood football legend Tony Shaw publicly requested the AFL’s main government Gillon McLachlan to reverse his determination.

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Collingwood President Eddie McGuire also weighed in on his Triple M breakfast demonstrate on Monday morning.

“They have no issue telling us they are impartial when they are shredding gamers, clubs and officials,” he reported.

“This is likely to have some ramifications down the keep track of on what the AFL Media section is all about.”



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AFL journalist Mitch Cleary’s job in limbo after he tweeted photo of Brooke Cotchin’s coronavirus breach

AFL Media journalist Mitch Cleary’s occupation continues to be in limbo right after he was stood down for tweeting an impression of the considering that-deleted Brooke Cotchin Instagram post which finished up earning Richmond a $45,000 wonderful.

The Instagram submit, produced by Richmond captain Trent Cotchin’s spouse, confirmed a working day spa which Brooke Cotchin attended for a facial — a breach of the AFL’s COVID-19 protocols for loved ones members who are living in Queensland hubs. $25,000 of the great has been suspended.

Cleary, who also works for ABC Grandstand, was because of to perform for AFL.com.au at the weekend but was stood down on Friday.

The ABC understands that AFL Media — the media arm of the AFL’s organization which is funded by the league — has however to notify Cleary of the duration of the standdown interval.

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Brooke Cotchin mentioned she disagreed with the AFL’s conclusion to stand Cleary down.

“I will not know Mitch Cleary, but I do not concur with him being stood down and I have voiced that to the AFL,” she posted on social media.

“It is his occupation and it does not help anyone’s circumstance primarily in existing conditions. However I experienced no input and it is some thing that is out of my control.”

She also exposed she and her partner would fork out the great and not Richmond football club.

“This was my blunder which I accept overall responsibility for,” she wrote.

The AFL’s selection sparked a media storm and Cleary started to trend on Twitter after the story appeared in the Herald Solar on Sunday night. Former Melbourne footballer Brad Eco-friendly labelled the AFL “bullies”.

“The AFL is a laughing inventory, bullies,” Eco-friendly tweeted.

Collingwood soccer legend Tony Shaw publicly asked the AFL’s main executive Gillon McLachlan to reverse his decision.

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Collingwood President Eddie McGuire also weighed in on his Triple M breakfast present on Monday early morning.

“They have no dilemma telling us they are unbiased when they’re shredding gamers, golf equipment and officers,” he explained.

“This is going to have some ramifications down the observe on what the AFL Media division is all about.”



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Photo essay: The drive-in sees a resurgence throughout the world


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As movie theaters, concert venues, museums, and the majority of large event spaces remain mostly closed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, people are turning to a retro solution to continue experiencing arts and entertainment.

Drive-in movie theaters have made a comeback, but that’s not all. People are attending drive-in concerts, watching sporting events via drive-in gatherings, and even going to drive-by art shows. Big retailers like Walmart are buying into the trend; the chain is teaming up with Tribeca Enterprises to turn 160 of its parking lots into drive-in theaters from August to October. And while the drive-in is evocative of the U.S. in the 1950s and 1960s, people are taking part in drive-in activities throughout the globe—sometimes using boats and bicycles for similar purposes—as seen in the photos below.

Take a look at how people are getting creative about absorbing their arts and culture in a socially distant group setting.

The opening night of Paris Plages “Le Cinema Sur L’Eau”, a free floating cinema at La Villette on July 18 in Paris, France. Thirty-eight Electric boats were installed on the Quai de Seine in compliance with social distancing rules, with 150 deck chairs on the banks of the canal, to screen the short film “Corona Story” by Victor Mirabel.
Kiran Ridley—Getty Images
Drive-In-03-GettyImages-1224884740.
A woman gives concession snacks to a man sitting in a car as racing fans watch the Austrian Formula One Grand Prix race, the first race of the season, at a drive-in cinema at the Zandvoort circuit in the Netherlands on July 5.
ROBIN VAN LONKHUIJSEN—ANP/AFP/Getty Images
Drive-In-04-2020-07-14T051024Z_368383162_NOCID_RTRMADP_3_MLS-LA-GALAXY-DRIVE-IN-VIEWING-PARTY
L.A. Galaxy fans watch the MLS is Back Tournament game against the Portland Timbers at a drive-in viewing party at the Rose Bowl in California on July 13.
Kirby Lee—USA Toay Sports/Reuters
Drive-In-05-GettyImages-1221654449
A performer from the Las Vegas Circus performs in front of the car crowd at Porto Alegre in Southern Brazil on June 21. The Brazilian show was closed since March due to the coronavirus pandemic.
SILVIO AVILA—AFP/Getty Images
Drive-In-06-GettyImages-1224872627
An aerial view shows a packed Tribeca Drive-In, a monthlong temporary drive-in theater in Pasadena, Calif.
David McNew—Getty Images
Drive-In-07-GettyImages-1226343307.
Two women sit in front of their car as they watch the American musical movie “La La Land” at the new DiverAuto drive-in cinema in Bormujos, Spain on July 11.
CRISTINA QUICLER—AFP/Getty Images
Drive-In-08-GettyImages-1255840088
A bike-in concert in Mantova, Italy on July 12. Concertgoers ride their bicycles to a live show, allowing fans to experience a traditional open-air concert from the comfort of their saddles.
Francesco Prandoni—Getty Images
Drive-In-09-GettyImages-1256693203
Dancers wearing traditional South Korean clothes perform on stage at a drive-in concert in Seoul on July 17.
Chung Sung-Jun—Getty Images
Drive-In-10-GettyImages-1225391647
People watch a movie at a drive-in cinema in Sabaneta municipality near Medellin, Colombia on July 7.
JOAQUIN SARMIENTO—AFP/Getty Images

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Olympian Karolina Sevastyanova hits out after Conor McGregor photo criticism


Olympic gold medallist Karolina Sevastyanova has hit back at claims she got a little too close to UFC star Conor McGregor when she shared a snap of the duo on Instagram.

The 25-year-old posted a picture of her and the Notorious hugging to her 417,000 followers last week, though she didn’t reveal the location of where they bumped into each other,The Sun reports.

Some fans weren’t pleased with the Russian gymnast — who scooped gold in the group event at the 2012 London Games.

Supporters of McGregor’s UFC rival Khabib Nurmagomedov criticised the now-retired athlete for posing with the Irishman, while others commented on how McGregor, married with kids, had his arm around Sevastyanova’s waist.

It was the suggestion she was getting a little too cosy with McGregor that caused a reaction from Sevastyanova, who took to her Instagram stories to set things straight.

“Guys, stop asking me these questions!” she said.

“I approached him with my man, and he was with his wife.”

After claiming gold in London and having already dominated the European Championships — winning individual and group events — Sevastyanova retired from competitive gymnastics at age 17, and went on to study at Michigan State University in America.

In 2015, she appeared on the cover of Maxim magazine, and with more than 400,000 Instagram followers, her public profile — and her modelling career — continues to grow.

It is likely she bumped into McGregor in Monaco, where Sevastyanova is based, and where the 32-year-old was recently on holiday with his wife Dee Devlin and their two children.

RELATED: Who is Karolina Sevastyanova?

The fighter and his partner also posed for a picture alongside Charlene, Princess of Monaco and her husband Prince Albert II.

Despite announcing his third retirement in four years, McGregor has hinted he could be set to return to the Octagon.

This article first appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission



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Photo of Gary Ablett and his son Levi sums up 2020 as our window into AFL players’ lives grows larger, for better and worse


COVID-19 eager, this AFL season nonetheless has a few tumultuous and extremely unpredictable months to run. But I suspect it has by now made its most effective and symbolic impression.

It is not the stereotypical back web site image of a participant rising more than a pack to choose a soaring mark or an legendary act these kinds of as Nicky Winmar’s defiant “black and very pleased” gesture.

The photograph was not even taken by a expert photographer but shared on Instagram by a spouse and children that is both intensely happy and underneath terrific psychological stress.

The graphic that will symbolise this bizarre disrupted year is that of Geelong winner Gary Ablett Jr keeping his son in his arms at the airport at the weekend right after his untimely return from the team’s Perth hub.

It is a heart-warming picture despite the fact that, unfortunately, it is the backstory that lifts it from the web pages of the Ablett relatives album to the centre of our present-day sporting consciousness.

Eighteen month-outdated Levi Ablett suffers a exceptional degenerative illness, when his mother, Jordan, is caring for her possess mother who has cancer. This prompted the 36-12 months-previous Geelong star to go away quarantine in Perth and travel residence to his loved ones.

Gary Ablett has opened up a short while ago about his son’s medical situation.(Instagram: Gary Ablett)

Beneath these kinds of conditions, the Ablett’s did what most mother and father would do. But his selection was made at a time when we are expecting — even demanding — that athletes do substantially additional than we would typically look at reasonable.

In Victoria, especially, the latest lockdown caused by the next wave of COVID-19 and now highlighted by the smart imposition of the obligatory donning of masks in general public has put still more emphasis on sport as a vital distraction.

The monumental modern viewing figures for AFL online games demonstrate how sport is supplying comfort and also that no-just one wants to go through another lockdown without the need of our common correct of reside games as we did the 1st time.

Consequently, athletes have taken — or been lumped with — the position of crucial employees. Like Bob Hope entertaining the US troops in Korea, they are our distraction, our joy, our aid. While for these despatched to hubs, their individual tours of obligation are significantly extended than Hope’s fly-in fly-out performances.

As you will be promptly reminded upon lauding (now considerably considerably less) properly-compensated athletes for leaving property to participate in activity, the sacrifices of most sporting activities stars are reasonably insignificant compared with the troubles of all those who have missing livelihoods or even liked types in the course of the pandemic.

This is why the image of Gary Ablett hugging Levi to his upper body is each impressive and significant. It is a timely reminder that our instances, even these of the greatest and wealthiest athletes, are all diverse even as our priorities keep on being substantially the identical.

The relevance of furnishing context about the choices of athletes who could require to abandon their teams temporarily has adjusted the media reporting dynamic rather.

A Geelong Cats AFL player handballs against the Gold Coast Suns.
This is widely predicted to be Ablett’s last AFL time, so there are thoughts as to whether or not he will enjoy once again.(AAP: Dylan Burns)

In some circumstances, a footy star or a golfing champion’s off-area lifestyle, even his or her persona and lifestyle possibilities, are no for a longer period basically the substance of gossip-web page tittle-tattle or even more nuanced athletics website page profiles meant to offer viewpoint of “the true person”.

Aspects top to a player’s withdrawal from a game — and now a hub — that might generally be included by the catch-all phrase “personalized reasons” are staying discovered in detail, even publicised, to make sure the proper knowledge is extended to a player who has experienced to make that choice.

We would not generally have desired to know that Richmond’s star Bachar Houli’s mother Yemama experienced contracted COVID-19 if it was another issue at yet another time. But the story Houli generously shared gave context to his choice not to sign up for his teammates in Queensland.

But whilst the revelation of situation these as family members illnesses mood our rush to judgement on athletes unable to contend, the behavioural aspect of some athletes is being judged even more harshly.

At another time Novak Djokovic’s unorthodox sights on vaccination might have been merely a matter of personalized feeling, assuming he did not use his status to dissuade other folks from using the suitable safety measures.

In a pandemic, Djokovic’s ignorance educated the determination to operate a tennis match that remaining several star players and other folks infected by, or exposed to, COVID-19 at a time when his game was desperately striving to revive important gatherings and restore incomes.

Novak Djokovic can be seen among a large number of young volunteers, waving on court
The inner workings of Novak Djokovic’s individual daily life painted a unique picture of the tennis star.(AP: Darko Vojinovic)

At the other stop of the spectrum, an once in a while hysterical ambiance has inflamed our check out of athletes who commit what may at the time have been deemed minimal infractions — or no infraction at all.

This was symbolised by the case of Essendon’s Conor McKenna, who was vilified for returning what proved to be a wrong good take a look at that prompted an AFL sport to be postponed. Inevitably a rather minimal breach of quarantine introduced down the pounds of the football planet on the Irishman.

At this excessive, COVID-19 sport has only accentuated the modern day development to dehumanise and vilify athletes in specialist athletics wherever the barriers amongst the players and the media are normally intensely fortified and the ability for mutual empathy diminished.

Then there is a image of Gary Ablett at the airport clutching his son in a loving embrace an picture that is both exceptionally shifting and universally relatable.

A highly effective reminder that this time, far more than any other, footballers are just folks undertaking their best to search soon after their people though remaining held dependable for providing our amusement and also making sure the ongoing prosperity of their athletics.



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Photo of Gary Ablett and his son Levi sums up 2020 as our window into players’ lives grows larger, for better and worse


COVID-19 willing, this AFL season still has three tumultuous and highly unpredictable months to run. But I suspect it has already produced its most powerful and symbolic image.

It is not the stereotypical back page picture of a player rising over a pack to take a soaring mark or an iconic act such as Nicky Winmar’s defiant “black and proud” gesture.

The photograph was not even taken by a professional photographer but shared on Instagram by a family that is both intensely proud and under great emotional stress.

The image that will symbolise this strange disrupted season is that of Geelong champion Gary Ablett Jr holding his son in his arms at the airport at the weekend after his premature return from the team’s Perth hub.

It is a heart-warming photo although, sadly, it is the backstory that lifts it from the pages of the Ablett family album to the centre of our current sporting consciousness.

Eighteen month-old Levi Ablett suffers a rare degenerative disease, while his mother, Jordan, is caring for her own mother who has cancer. This prompted the 36-year-old Geelong star to leave quarantine in Perth and travel home to his family.

Gary Ablett holds his son and smiles at the camera
Gary Ablett has opened up recently about his son’s medical condition.(Instagram: Gary Ablett)

Under such circumstances, the Ablett’s did what most parents would do. But his decision was made at a time when we are expecting — even demanding — that athletes do much more than we would normally consider reasonable.

In Victoria, particularly, the latest lockdown caused by the second wave of COVID-19 and now highlighted by the sensible imposition of the mandatory wearing of masks in public has put yet more emphasis on sport as a vital distraction.

The enormous recent viewing figures for AFL games demonstrate how sport is providing comfort; and also that no-one wants to go through another lockdown without our regular fix of live games as we did the first time.

Consequently, athletes have taken — or been lumped with — the status of essential workers. Like Bob Hope entertaining the US troops in Korea, they are our distraction, our joy, our relief. Although for those sent to hubs, their personal tours of duty are much longer than Hope’s fly-in fly-out performances.

As you will be quickly reminded upon lauding (now somewhat less) well-paid athletes for leaving home to play sport, the sacrifices of most sports stars are relatively insignificant compared with the troubles of those who have lost livelihoods or even loved ones during the pandemic.

This is why the photo of Gary Ablett hugging Levi to his chest is both powerful and significant. It is a timely reminder that our circumstances, even those of the greatest and wealthiest athletes, are all different even as our priorities remain much the same.

The importance of providing context about the decisions of athletes who might need to abandon their teams temporarily has changed the media reporting dynamic somewhat.

A Geelong Cats AFL player handballs against the Gold Coast Suns.
This is widely expected to be Ablett’s last AFL season, so there are questions as to whether he will play again.(AAP: Dylan Burns)

In some situations, a footy star or a golf champion’s off-field life, even his or her persona and life choices, are no longer merely the substance of gossip-page tittle-tattle or even more nuanced sports page profiles intended to provide perspective of “the real person”.

Factors leading to a player’s withdrawal from a game — and now a hub — that might normally be covered by the catch-all phrase “personal reasons” are being revealed in detail, even publicised, to ensure the appropriate understanding is extended to a player who has had to make that decision.

We would not normally have needed to know that Richmond’s star Bachar Houli’s mother Yemama had contracted COVID-19 if it was another condition at another time. But the story Houli generously shared gave context to his decision not to join his teammates in Queensland.

But while the revelation of circumstances such as family illnesses temper our rush to judgement on athletes unable to compete, the behavioural aspect of some athletes is being judged even more harshly.

At another time Novak Djokovic’s unorthodox views on vaccination might have been merely a matter of personal opinion, assuming he did not use his status to dissuade others from taking the appropriate precautions.

In a pandemic, Djokovic’s ignorance informed the decision to run a tennis tournament that left several star players and others infected by, or exposed to, COVID-19 at a time when his game was desperately trying to revive major events and restore incomes.

Novak Djokovic can be seen among a large number of young volunteers, waving on court
The inner workings of Novak Djokovic’s personal life painted a different picture of the tennis star.(AP: Darko Vojinovic)

At the other end of the spectrum, an occasionally hysterical atmosphere has inflamed our view of athletes who commit what might once have been considered minor infractions — or no infraction at all.

This was symbolised by the case of Essendon’s Conor McKenna, who was vilified for returning what proved to be a false positive test that caused an AFL game to be postponed. Inevitably a relatively minor breach of quarantine brought down the weight of the football world upon the Irishman.

At this extreme, COVID-19 sport has only accentuated the modern trend to dehumanise and vilify athletes in professional sports where the barriers between the players and the media are often heavily fortified and the capacity for mutual empathy diminished.

Then there is a picture of Gary Ablett at the airport clutching his son in a loving embrace; an image that is both incredibly moving and universally relatable.

A powerful reminder that this season, more than any other, footballers are just people doing their best to look after their families while being held responsible for providing our entertainment and also ensuring the ongoing prosperity of their sports.



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Caprice Bourret Reveals her Secret to an Impressive Physique & Key to a Winning Photo Shoot


She is an American businesswoman, model, actress, television personality, mother of two boys and a girl. Named as the world’s sexiest woman by the News of the World, GQ’s Woman of the Year, and Maxim’s International Woman of the Year in three consecutive years. Caprice Boureet is the featured on Women Fitness website and magazine which has been rated by Forbes among the Top 100 Women Website for three consecutive years.

Miss Bourret is a huge philanthropist raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for her selected charities in which she is their patron or ambassador. In the last few years, Miss Bourret has been reaching out to a range of audiences, from University students to entrepreneurs/CEO’s starting new businesses.

In her interview with Namita Nayyar, President, Women Fitness Caprice Bourret shares input on her morning ritual, diet, exercise routine and charity.

Namita Nayyar:

A healthy morning ritual that you follow?

 Caprice Bourret:

I always try and meditate in the mornings. It really helps prepare my mind and body for the day ahead. It is a great focusing tool too! I always have a green juice and take my vitamins. I don’t eat a big breakfast as I believe that you should give your body a break… if I do have a late breakfast I love scrambled eggs and sourdough toast. Oh and of course, I have to fit my mediation around my kids who get up ridiculously early!

Namita Nayyar:

You are often referred to as ‘one of the most photographed women in the world’. What are your 5 key aspects for a great photo shoot?

Caprice Bourret:

I only have two rules when it comes to professional photo shoots…. great lighting and retouching! If you have this combination, then your photo shoots will look incredible.

Caprice Bourret
Namita Nayyar:

Share the best part of the job as an actor?

Caprice Bourret:

I love the fun part of acting out a character. It is like when you really enjoy a good book but with acting you are actually acting out the character in person. It is so interesting! I also meet lots of talented and fun people who are friends for life.

Namita Nayyar:

Exercises that are an integral part of your workout routine? Five must-do morning stretches?

Caprice Bourret:

I love Barrecore workouts which I do 6 days a week. During lockdown I am joining a live class and it has totally transformed my body. It targets your muscles with carefully choreographed low-impact movements.

There is a lot of repetition and restorative stretches. I do,

  • Leg pulls
  • Planks
  • Leg lifts
  • Ab crawler
  • Dead bugs

and much more!

Full interview is continued on next page

This interview is exclusive and taken by Namita Nayyar President womenfitness.net and should not be reproduced, copied or hosted in part or full anywhere without an express permission.

All Written Content Copyright © 2020 Women Fitness



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Social media turning Hobart’s Disappearing Tarn into photo hotspot


Social media users have rushed to Hobart’s Disappearing Tarn this week, but some are worried the exposure could damage the natural phenomenon.

The water that pools in a field of rocks within the kunanyi/Mount Wellington Park only appears after heavy rain, every year or two — taking on a turquoise colour — before it drains away.

Images of the photogenic phenomenon have again been shared widely resulting, in hundreds of people flocking to see it before it disappears again.

Nicholas Sawyer, president of Tasmanian National Parks Association, said it was no longer the tranquil experience people were expecting.

“If they were looking for any sort of quiet experience, looking at a peaceful mountain tarn, they’re not quite getting what they bargained for if there’s dozens or more people there at the same time,” he said.

Mr Sawyer said even though the tarn was formed in a boulder field, “there’s going to be a whole lot of mosses and lichens and things on the rocks that are going to suffer from so many people walking on it”.

He said there was no doubt social media has had a role to play in the increased popularity of the tarn.

“I’d really ask people publicising places on social media to think about the consequences of it, it must attract an awful lot of people who wouldn’t go otherwise,” he said.

Lenka Pelcova said there were “more than 100 people” when she visited.(ABC News: Katri Uibu)

Zac Major visited the tarn this week after seeing pictures of it on Instagram.

“One of my friends made a little video edit and I was able to look at it and go, ‘I forgot about that’, because it’s something everyone’s known about for years,” he said.

He said the exposure of the site was not necessarily a bad thing.

“Everyone’s being really respectful up there, there’s no real no idiots around … it’s not really a bad thing that people want to come and see such a lovely little place in Tasmania.”

Zac Major standing in a forest clearing.
Zac Major said people were being “really respectful” of the area.(ABC News: Katri Uibu)

“It’s fine to come and look, it’s a really cool place.”

Lenka Pelcova also visited the site after seeing photos on social media.

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, I have to go there’ … it looked amazing.”

She said when she visited there were “more than 100 people there, for sure”.

Another walker, Pam, said most people visiting the tarn “would never have seen it if it hadn’t been for social media”.

“They’re probably not bushwalkers, so they wouldn’t even know it was there,” she said.

Paul Grey said he had visited the tarn three times this week and said crowds grew significantly over that time.

“It’s not as nice when there’s heaps of people around, it gets hard to get a photo without getting people in shot.”

Swimmers at an outdoor waterhole.
The Disappearing Tarn is expected to live up to its name and vanish in the coming days.(Supplied: Zac Major)

Axel Von Krusenstierna, manager of the Wellington Park Management Trust, said the car park at The Springs had been overflowing, with “some people parking illegally on the road”.

He said people intending to visit the tarn should come ready for rough bushwalking conditions and “probably allow for at least a couple of hours there and back”.

Without more heavy rain, the tarn — and the social media photo opportunity — is expected to disappear this weekend.



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NASCAR releases photo of the suspected ‘noose’ found in Bubba Wallace’s garage


Bubba Wallace (pictured) wasn’t the person who reported the garage door pull rope to NASCAR or the FBI, but has insisted that what was shown to him was a ‘straight up noose’

NASCAR has released a photo of the suspected ‘noose’ found in Bubba Wallace’s garage stall at Talladega on Sunday that was initially investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime before being revealed to be a garage door pull-down rope that had been in use for at least a year.

The picture shows a long rope fashioned into a loop, but with one end coiled around the knot, the image does have a striking resemblance to a noose. 

On Monday, NASCAR and the FBI both launched investigations into the matter, which revealed that the rope was previously used in the same stall by a white driver, Paul Menard, in 2019. Footage from earlier years showed similar garage door pulls being used by other drivers, although none can be described, exactly, as a ‘noose.’ 

Circuit officials questioned representatives from every NASCAR track to learn exactly how many garage door pull-down ropes were tied in a similar manner. Of the 1,684 stalls across 29 tracks, only 11 had knotted pull-down ropes, and just one of those had been fashioned into a noose – the one in Wallace’s stall – according to NASCAR.com

It is not clear who tied the rope that way or when that person did so. A Talladega Superspeedway spokesman did not return the Daily Mail’s requests for comment.  

NASCAR has released a photo of the suspected 'noose' found in Bubba Wallace's garage stall at Talladega on Sunday that at was investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime before being revealed to be an innocent garage door pull rope that had been in use for at least a year

NASCAR has released a photo of the suspected ‘noose’ found in Bubba Wallace’s garage stall at Talladega on Sunday that at was investigated by the FBI as a possible hate crime before being revealed to be an innocent garage door pull rope that had been in use for at least a year

Wallace's garage stall at Talladega pictured after the suspected noose was cut down from the left side of the door opening. The 26-year-old Wallace was not the person who reported it

Wallace’s garage stall at Talladega pictured after the suspected noose was cut down from the left side of the door opening. The 26-year-old Wallace was not the person who reported it

A Youtube video from 2019 showed a pull rope featuring a noose (circled) hanging from the garage door in the same stall used by Wallace and his team at Talladega earlier this week. At the time the video was taken, it was being used by a white driver, Paul Menard

A Youtube video from 2019 showed a pull rope featuring a noose (circled) hanging from the garage door in the same stall used by Wallace and his team at Talladega earlier this week. At the time the video was taken, it was being used by a white driver, Paul Menard

NASCAR President Steve Phelps did release a statement Thursday to explain the decision to report the rope to the FBI as a ‘noose.’

‘Upon learning of and seeing the noose, our initial reaction was to protect our driver,’ Phelps said. ‘We’re living in a highly charged and emotional time. What we saw was a symbol of hate and was only present in one area of the garage and that was of the 43 car of Bubba Wallace,’ Phelps said.

‘In hindsight, I should have used the word “alleged” in our statement.

‘As you can see from the photo, the noose was real, as was our concern for Bubba’ Phelps continued. 

NOOSE TIMELINE

  • June 9 – Bubba Wallace, NASCAR’s only black full-time driver on its top circuit, calls on the sport to permanently ban the Confederate flag
  • June 10 – NASCAR bans the Confederate flag at all races after 70 years
  • June 21 – Ahead of the scheduled start of the GEICO 500 in Alabama, a Confederate flag is flown over the Talladega track while a caravan of protestors drive rebel banners back and forth in front of the entrance
  • June 21 – After the race is postponed by rain, someone from Wallace’s team discovers the suspected noose in his garage stall
  • June 21 – NASCAR confirms the discovery of the ‘noose’ 
  • June 22 – The FBI launches an investigation into the suspected hate crime
  • June 22 – All 39 other NASCAR drivers rally in support of Wallace ahead of the GEICO 500 restart, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity
  • June 23 – The FBI reveals that the suspected ‘noose’ is a garage door pull-down rope that had been in use for at least a year
  • June 24 – Wallace praises the FBI for its investigation and says he is ‘relieved’ that he was not the target of a racist gesture
  • June 25 – NASCAR releases a picture of the garage door pull, showing a long length of rope fashioned into a loop with one end coiled around the knot
  • June 25 – NASCAR reveals that of the 1,684 garage stalls across its 29 tracks, only 11 had knotted pull-down ropes, and just one of those had been fashioned into a noose – the one in Wallace’s stall 

 

‘With similar emotion, others across our industry and our media stood up to defend the NASCAR family — our NASCAR family — because they are part of the NASCAR family too. We were proud to see so many stand up for what’s right.’

Wallace, who did not discover the noose and wasn’t the person who reported it to NASCAR or the FBI, faced criticism for the misunderstanding on Wednesday, but described himself as ‘relieved’ that it was not intended as a racist threat.

‘I think we’ll gladly take a little embarrassment over what the alternatives could have been,’ he said in a statement.

Wallace told NBC that he was actually suspicious the suspected noose was, in fact, a garage door pull-down rope, so he went looking for others to see if they were tied in a similar fashion. 

‘When I did find out, I was adamant about searching all the other garages and making sure that this wasn’t a garage pull, and it ended up being one,’ he told NBC on Wednesday.  

As for his mistaken belief that the rope was a racist message sent from an anonymous antagonist, Wallace defended himself Wednesday by telling CNN that a ‘straight-up noose’ was found in his garage. 

‘The photo evidence that I’ve seen, that I have in my possession, of what was in our garage, is exactly a garage pull, it is, that is a noose,’ he said before NASCAR released the photograph. ‘I don’t know when we get to the point to release that image, but anybody sees it, it’s alerting and it makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up for sure.’ 

He went on to say that he is ‘p****d’ with his critics who are using the incident to minimize accusations of racism within the sport.      

Before the FBI halted its investigation, all 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace at Monday’s restart, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity. 

Wallace, an Alabama native, became overwhelmed with emotion and fought back tears as his car owner, NASCAR legend Richard Petty, gave him a hug in the moments before the race began.

By Tuesday, the FBI investigation found that the item – which is described in a NASCAR statement as a ‘garage door pull rope fashioned like a noose’ – had been there since 2019.

Wallace stressed that he remains thankful for the outpouring of support he received before Monday’s restart in Alabama from both his NASCAR rivals and his fans. 

‘Make no mistake, though some will try, this should not detract from the show of unity we had on Monday, and the progress we’ve made as a sport to be a more welcoming environment for all.’

In this October 2017 shot, several similar ropes are seen being used in the Talladega garages

In this October 2017 shot, several similar ropes are seen being used in the Talladega garages

Videos from previous years revealed that the garage door ropes were often tied into loops. However, only the fourth stall at Talladega has been revealed to contain a noose

In this video from Talladega from 2017, a white mechanic is seen working alongside a similar pull-down rope

Videos from 2017 revealed that the garage door ropes at Talladega were often tied into loops

All 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace before Monday's restart, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity. Wallace, an Alabama native, became overwhelmed with emotion and fought back tears as his car owner, NASCAR legend Richard Petty, gave him a hug in the moments before the race began

All 39 other NASCAR drivers rallied in support of Wallace before Monday’s restart, collectively pushing his No. 43 car to the front of the grid in a show of solidarity. Wallace, an Alabama native, became overwhelmed with emotion and fought back tears as his car owner, NASCAR legend Richard Petty, gave him a hug in the moments before the race began

In response to NASCAR's ban, SCV had arranged for a small propeller plane to fly the Confederate Flag over the northern Alabama race track before Sunday's scheduled race at Talladega while a caravan of cars (pictured) paraded the rebel banner in front of the entrance

In response to NASCAR’s ban, SCV had arranged for a small propeller plane to fly the Confederate Flag over the northern Alabama race track before Sunday’s scheduled race at Talladega while a caravan of cars (pictured) paraded the rebel banner in front of the entrance

Wallace and NASCAR were understandably inclined to believe the noose-like rope was a racist gesture because the 26-year-old had successfully pushed the circuit to ban the Confederate flag from events a week earlier. 

As the only black full-time driver on NASCAR’s top circuit, Wallace faced increasing criticism among many of the sport’s southern fans. 

One driver on NASCAR’s truck series, Ray Ciccarelli, vowed to retire at season’s end over the move due to his objections. 

Paul C. Gramling Jr. (pictured), who is listed as the SCV 'Commander in Chief,' told the Columbia Daily Herald on Tuesday that his nearly 123-year-old organization was solely responsible for flying the 'DEFUND NASCAR' banner over Talladega in response to the ban

Paul C. Gramling Jr. (pictured), who is listed as the SCV ‘Commander in Chief,’ told the Columbia Daily Herald on Tuesday that his nearly 123-year-old organization was solely responsible for flying the ‘DEFUND NASCAR’ banner over Talladega in response to the ban

In response to NASCAR’s ban, a group called the Sons of Confederate Veterans arranged for a small propeller plane to fly the Confederate Flag over the northern Alabama race track before Sunday’s scheduled race while a caravan of cars paraded the rebel banner in front of Talladega’s main entrance.   

Paul C. Gramling Jr., who is listed as the SCV ‘Commander in Chief,’ told the Columbia Daily Herald on Tuesday that his nearly 123-year-old organization arranged for the banner to be flown over Talladega in response to that ban.

‘NASCAR’s banning the display of the Confederate battle flag by its fans is nothing less than trampling upon Southerners’ First Amendment Right of free expression,’ Gramling Jr. said. ‘This un-American act shall not go unchallenged.

‘[On Sunday], members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans’ Confederate Air Force displayed its disapproval of NASCAR’s trampling upon the First Amendment Rights of Southerners.’ 

Through an attorney, the SCV did condemn what was briefly believed to be a racist attack against Wallace on Sunday.  

‘The threat against Bubba Wallace is not only reprehensible, it is un-American,’ said attorney Edward Phillips.



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Photo finish: Crashing sales force Olympus to sell iconic camera business


Sometimes the vicissitudes of capitalism force companies to exit the businesses for which they’re best known. Olympus, once a leading light in the photography industry, is now joining that list.

On Wednesday the company said it planned to quit its 84-year-old camera business. The imaging giant, known for its once-pervasive digital cameras, agreed to sell off the declining unit by year’s end. Japan Industrial Partners, a private equity firm best known for buying Sony’s struggling Vaio computer line in 2014, agreed to purchase the business.

Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

A glance at Olympus’s financial statements provides all the rationale for the divestiture; as at rival manufacturers, camera sales have plummeted over the past decade. For the fiscal year ended March 31, Olympus’s camera unit declined 10% versus the year prior to ¥43.6 billion, or $407 million. The unit’s sales have collapsed by three-quarters from a decade ago, when the company brought in ¥175 billion, or $1.63 billion.

In 2007, Apple’s iPhone debut rang the camera industry’s death knell, though many people didn’t realize it at the time. As smartphones have improved their lenses, software, and image quality since, people have substituted them for stand-alone cameras. The floor fell out from underneath camera makers; digital cameras sales have fallen 87% since 2010.

The coronavirus pandemic hastened Olympus’s laggard camera unit’s decline. On June 17, the company noted that the spread of COVID-19 put revenues “on a downward trend.” No doubt the headwinds contributed to Olympus’s decision to sell.

The deal represents a win for ValueAct Capital, an activist investor that took a 5.5% stake in Olympus in 2018. The San Francisco fund had been agitating for Olympus to improve its financial performance, including by installing a new CEO, Yasuo Takeuchi, in 2019.

When rumors floated that Olympus might be exploring a sale of its camera business in the fall, the company first appeared to deny the reports. But Takeuchi confirmed the possibility of a spinoff to Bloomberg in November.

If the deal goes through, Olympus will concentrate on its remaining businesses, such as surgical equipment and medical devices like endoscopes. The company’s stock jumped as much as 7%, to $19, on the news.

Olympus’s exit follows similar ones by Kodak and Polaroid, two other iconic camera makers that called it quits on the business, preferring to license their brands instead.

Canon, Sony, and Nikon continue to slug it out.

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