Immunity over lockdowns: push to change course



Welcome to live protection of the continuing coronavirus disaster. The Victorian federal government has warned of further more lockdown measures after it was exposed 10,000 people in hotspot suburbs are even now refusing to be analyzed, citing an alarming justification. In the meantime, in France, the bureaucrat who drew up the country’s coronavirus response has just been made its new primary minister.



Supply connection

Washington Redskins review team name, FedEx push for change


The Washington Redskins have announced they will be reviewing their “offensive” nickname amid widespread anti-racism protests.

The news was announced in a press release on Friday as pressure mounted on the team to change their name and logo, which some Native American groups find offensive.

Kayo is your ticket to the best sport streaming Live & On-Demand. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly >

The team cited “recent events around the country” and “feedback from our community” as reasons for the review as Americans continue to decry systemic racism around the country since George Floyd’s police custody death on May 25.

“This process takes into account not only the proud tradition and history of the franchise but also input from our alumni, the organisation sponsors, the National Football League and the local community it is proud to represent on and off the field,” the team’s owner Dan Snyder said.

Pressure is mounting on the Redskin’s to change their “racist” name and logo, depicting a Native American man — but Snyder “isn’t budging” on the name change for now, reports said.

A Sportico journalist tweeted that Snyder is pushing back again the pressure “for now” but sources believe he will eventually agree.

RELATED: Nike purges entire range over outcry

Speaking about the review, Head Coach Ron Riviera is quoted as saying “this issue is of personal importance to me” in the Redskins’ statement.

“I look forward to working closely with Dan Snyder to make sure we continue the mission of honouring and supporting Native Americans and our military,” he said.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell also remarked on the review, telling one reporter how “in the last few weeks we have had ongoing discussions with Dan and we are supportive of this important step.”

The Redskins’ Maryland stadium sponsor FedEx recently asked the team to change its “racist” team name following a letter from its investors.

Their headquarters are located at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Virginia and the training facility is in the Redskins Complex in Richmond, Virginia.

Ahead of the franchise’s statement, FedEx reached out to the NFL franchise about changing the team’s name.

“We have communicated to the team in Washington our request that they change the name,” FedEx said in a statement to FOX Business.

Previously, AdWeek reported that a group of 87 investment firms sent letters to three key team sponsors — FedEx, Nike and PepsiCo.

In the letters, the firms asked the companies to pressure Washington team officials to change the name and to cut ties with the franchise if it did not comply.

The investment firms have a combined worth of $620 billion in assets, saying the companies were not living up to their stated opposition to racial injustice.

In the letter to FedEx, investors criticised the company for owning the naming rights to FedEx Field in Landover.

FedEx released a statement on June 1, condemning racism and supporting the demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice following the death of Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police.

“There is absolutely no place for racism or unequal treatment anywhere, and we must unequivocally speak out and reject it when we see it,” the company said.

However, investors said that FedEx’s continued partnership with the football team amounts to “association with and facilitation of the racism inherent in the name and logo.”

The investors said that their continued sponsorship with the team “runs contrary to the very sentiments expressed by the company.”

In the letter addressed to Nike, the investors said for years they’ve tried to raise the issue to Nike, but to “little avail.”

“But in light of the Black Lives Matter movement that has focused the world’s attention on centuries of systemic racism, we are witnessing a fresh outpouring of opposition to the team name.”

“Therefore, it is time for Nike to meet the magnitude of this moment,” read the letter.

“To make their opposition to the racist team name clear, and to take tangible and meaningful steps to exert pressure on the team to cease using it.”

For years, Native American groups have argued that the Redskins team name and mascot are racist.

Redskins owner, Dan Snyder has said for years that he would never change the name.

In 1999, FedEx became the naming rights partner for the Redskins’ home stadium on a 27-year deal worth $205 million.

FedEx Chairman and CEO Fred Smith holds an ownership stake in the NFL franchise.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission.



Source link

Push to ban strip searches in custody for children, replace with body scanning


Tasmanian mother Sarah knows exactly the kind of trauma that can be caused to children who are strip searched in custody.

Her teenage son has been searched numerous times.

“It causes shocking anxiety for him and for me. It’s horrible,” she said.

Sarah, who can’t be identified for legal reasons, said she and her son had made complaints.

“Even though, yes, they may have done the wrong thing to be going there [reception prison], he’s still a child, he’s still my child.”

She said in one instance, an apology had been issued to her son from the Director of Prisons, after a review of one search at the Hobart Reception Prison found procedures were “not fully complied with” and may have caused him “distress and confusion”.

The Commissioner for Children and Young People in Tasmania, Leanne McLean, described strip searching of children as “extremely undignified”.

“If you put yourself in the shoes of a child in that position, it would be an awful process,” Ms McLean said.

Children’s commissioner Leanne McLean says strip searching children can’t be justified.(Supplied)

Last year, Ms McLean called for the routine strip-searching of children in custody to end.

“As a routine practice, it can’t be justified. That is the advice I gave the Government. And the Government have accepted that advice,” she said.

She said following operational changes, including the introduction of a risk assessment process, the number of children strip searched at both the Hobart and Launceston Reception Prisons had reduced significantly.

Where, previously, almost all young people were strip-searched, between July 1, 2019, and the end of February 2020, that had dropped to about 35 per cent, or about 70 children.

Those children were subjected to either a “full personal search”, in which the child removes half their clothes at a time, and is required to bend at the waist and part their buttocks, or a “modified personal search”, in which the buttocks inspection is not required.

“I remain concerned at the numbers of children continuing to be strip searched, and will continue to monitor the effect of the changes in practice and policy and the effect of the proposed legislative reforms,” Ms McLean said.

Aboriginal children over-represented in searches

Despite making up 4.6 per cent of the Tasmanian population, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people made up 21 per cent of the 199 young people strip searched.

Michael Mansell, from the Aboriginal Land Council, said police were still using discretion in who they searched.

“We need to change the law and the Parliament needs to legislate to prevent police and custodial officers from strip searching children, and unless that legislation is in place nothing’s going to change,” Mr Mansell said.

Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell in office.
Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell wants the law changed to ban strip searching children.(ABC News: Damian McIntyre)

“The Parliament needs to take that discretion away, and make a statement saying this is forbidden.”

Of the nine recommendations Ms McLean made regarding the strip-searching of children in custody last year, the Government has accepted six, and three “in-principle”.

In a statement, the Attorney-General Elise Archer said the Government would consult on draft legislation later this year to address the recommendations.

“We remain committed to implementing any measures that will ensure the dignity and self-respect of children and young people in the custodial process.”

Rodney Dillon is the Aboriginal advisor to Amnesty International, and said technology like that used in airport screening should be replacing strip searches.

 Aboriginal elder and former Tasmanian ATSIC Commissioner Rodney Dillon
Rodney Dillon believes scanning technology will minimise trauma for children.(ABC News: Sam Ikin)

“This is only about money and we should invest in the appropriate machines so we can have this done with the least amount of privacy invaded.”

A spokeswoman said the Department of Justice was considering electronic security as part of a broader upgrade of technology, and would continue to explore technologies that might offer an appropriate and effective alternative to personal searches.

Tasmania, along with other states and territories, is looking at whether the age of criminal responsibility should be raised.

Both Mr Dillon and Ms McLean would like it raised from 10 to 14.

But Ms McLean said that could only happen once Tasmania had a supportive and therapeutic youth justice system.



Source link

Labor calls for senior Liberal MP Terry Stephens to stand aside amid push for police probe


Labor is demanding the president of South Australia’s Legislative Council Terry Stephens stand aside, while it calls for a police investigation into the use of accommodation expenses by country MPs.

Mr Stephens has referred himself to the state’s tax commissioner, after an ABC investigation revealed he has not paid land tax on an Adelaide property that he insists is not his primary residence.

In South Australia, only primary residences and land which meets a limited range of other criteria are exempt from the tax.

The ABC investigation has also raised questions as to whether Mr Stephens has used an apartment he owned in Victor Harbor to claim tens of thousands of dollars in Country Members Accommodation Allowance.

Online videos, reviews and advertisements suggest the apartment was offered as a holiday rental as early as 2017, and was sold in April last year with a tenant.

Yesterday, Mr Stephens insisted he had moved from the Victor Harbor apartment to another in the same building in 2017.

But the ABC has confirmed he remained on the electoral roll at the first apartment until its sale in 2019.

Mr Stephens revealed in Parliament on Tuesday he has asked the state’s auditor-general to examine all MPs’ use of the Country Members Accommodation Allowance.

He told the Upper House his “principal place of residence is Victor Harbor” and insisted he had “complied with the rules”.

“The auditor-general has oversight of payments of the Country Members Allowance,” Mr Stephens said.

“Today, I’ve written to the auditor-general requesting an audit of all country members’ allowances and to expedite a review of my own as a priority.”

Terry Stephens’ land tax certificate.(Supplied)

Mr Stephens maintains he has done nothing wrong, and insists he has followed the rules in claiming the allowance.

Shadow Attorney-General, Kyam Maher, today questioned why Mr Stephens’s phone book address was in Norwood.

“Why does the White Pages list your sole contact address at Norwood?” he asked in Parliament.

Mr Stephens replied that the listing was in relation to internet access.

“If you ring the number listed in the White Pages, you are never going to get a response because I don’t use it,” he said.

The front of a house in suburban Adelaide.
The Norwood property of SA Liberal MP Terry Stephens.(ABC News: Patrick Martin)

Mr Maher said Labor has referred the matter to the anti-corruption branch of the South Australian police force.

“Terry Stephens cannot remain as Upper House President while there are unanswered questions about this matter.

“He must stand aside pending a full investigation.”

Parliament yesterday released an annual breakdown of Country Members Accommodation Allowance payments for 2018-19 and 2019-20.

But Mr Maher said Labor would move a resolution in Parliament, requiring the release of all paperwork detailing individual claims dating back to 2010.

“The public must have confidence in the Parliament and its parliamentarians,” he said.

Premier dismisses Labor calls

Premier Steven Marshall said he was standing by Mr Stephens and dismissed Labor’s calls for him to order the senior MP to release expense details over the past decade.

“I think this is really an issue that Terry Stephens is going to have to work out,” Mr Marshall said.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

Liberal MP Terry Stephens has been questioned by the ABC over his property arrangements.

Mr Marshall said it was also for Mr Stephens to explain why land tax had not been levied on his Adelaide property.

“Terry Stephens maintains that he has done nothing wrong,” the Premier said.

“He’s referring his own documents to the Commissioner for Taxation in South Australia and I certainly haven’t been provided with any information that suggests he’s done the wrong thing.

“But can I just say this — we have very, very strict rules regarding allowances in the South Australian Parliament and I expect all members to be doing the right thing, whether they’re a Liberal or not.”



Source link

Push to ban strip searches for children, replace with body scanning


Tasmanian mother Sarah knows exactly the kind of trauma that can be caused to children who are strip searched in custody.

Her teenage son has been searched numerous times.

“It causes shocking anxiety for him and for me. It’s horrible,” she said.

Sarah, who can’t be identified for legal reasons, said she and her son had made complaints.

“Even though, yes, they may have done the wrong thing to be going there [reception prison], he’s still a child, he’s still my child.”

She said in one instance, an apology had been issued to her son from the Director of Prisons, after a review of one search at the Hobart Reception Prison found procedures were “not fully complied with” and may have caused him “distress and confusion”.

The Commissioner for Children and Young People in Tasmania, Leanne McLean, described strip searching of children as “extremely undignified”.

“If you put yourself in the shoes of a child in that position, it would be an awful process,” Ms McLean said.

Children’s commissioner Leanne McLean says strip searching children can’t be justified.(Supplied)

Last year, Ms McLean called for the routine strip-searching of children in custody to end.

“As a routine practice, it can’t be justified. That is the advice I gave the Government. And the Government have accepted that advice,” she said.

She said following operational changes, including the introduction of a risk assessment process, the number of children strip searched at both the Hobart and Launceston Reception Prisons had reduced significantly.

Where, previously, almost all young people were strip-searched, between July 1, 2019, and the end of February 2020, that had dropped to about 35 per cent, or about 70 children.

Those children were subjected to either a “full personal search”, in which the child removes half their clothes at a time, and is required to bend at the waist and part their buttocks, or a “modified personal search”, in which the buttocks inspection is not required.

“I remain concerned at the numbers of children continuing to be strip searched, and will continue to monitor the effect of the changes in practice and policy and the effect of the proposed legislative reforms,” Ms McLean said.

Aboriginal children over-represented in searches

Despite making up 4.6 per cent of the Tasmanian population, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people made up 21 per cent of the 199 young people strip searched.

Michael Mansell, from the Aboriginal Land Council, said police were still using discretion in who they searched.

“We need to change the law and the Parliament needs to legislate to prevent police and custodial officers from strip searching children, and unless that legislation is in place nothing’s going to change,” Mr Mansell said.

Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell in office.
Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell wants the law changed to ban strip searching children.(ABC News: Damian McIntyre)

“The Parliament needs to take that discretion away, and make a statement saying this is forbidden.”

Of the nine recommendations Ms McLean made regarding the strip-searching of children in custody last year, the Government has accepted six, and three “in-principle”.

In a statement, the Attorney-General Elise Archer said the Government would consult on draft legislation later this year to address the recommendations.

“We remain committed to implementing any measures that will ensure the dignity and self-respect of children and young people in the custodial process.”

Rodney Dillon is the Aboriginal advisor to Amnesty International, and said technology like that used in airport screening should be replacing strip searches.

 Aboriginal elder and former Tasmanian ATSIC Commissioner Rodney Dillon
Rodney Dillon believes scanning technology will minimise trauma for children.(ABC News: Sam Ikin)

“This is only about money and we should invest in the appropriate machines so we can have this done with the least amount of privacy invaded.”

A spokeswoman said the Department of Justice was considering electronic security as part of a broader upgrade of technology, and would continue to explore technologies that might offer an appropriate and effective alternative to personal searches.

Tasmania, along with other states and territories, is looking at whether the age of criminal responsibility should be raised.

Both Mr Dillon and Ms McLean would like it raised from 10 to 14.

But Ms McLean said that could only happen once Tasmania had a supportive and therapeutic youth justice system.



Source link

Trump says push for less coronavirus testing was sarcasm – POLITICO


U.S. President Donald Trump | Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The US president’s comments add a new twist to the White House scramble to clarify his earlier messaging.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Thursday said he had “sarcastically” claimed that a decrease in coronavirus testing would lower U.S. infection rates, adding a new twist to the weeklong scramble by the White House to clarify the president’s comments on virus testing.

“Sometimes I jokingly say, or sarcastically say, if we didn’t do tests we would look great,” Trump said in an interview and Fox News town hall with Sean Hannity. “But you know what? It’s not the right thing to do.”

The president’s comments come nearly a week after he claimed at a campaign rally in Tulsa, Okla., that he’d ordered a slowdown in coronavirus testing. Trump on Tuesday insisted he was serious in slowing down testing, even after senior White House officials said the president made the comment in jest.

“I don’t kid,” Trump said when pressed by reporters on Tuesday. “Let me make it clear.”

The president’s comments at the Tulsa rally sparked days of jockeying by officials and White House aides to defend the president’s statements. Vice President Mike Pence told governors that the president’s comments on testing were a “passing observation,” while White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Trump’s claim was “made in jest.”

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told a House committee on Tuesday that the Trump administration was ramping up testing, not slowing it down.

The U.S. leads the world in coronavirus cases, a fact that Trump has repeatedly attributed to expanded virus testing. More than 2.4 million people have had confirmed Covid-19 infections nationwide, and nearly 125,000 people have died.

“If we didn’t do testing, we would have no cases,” Trump said at the town hall on Thursday in Wisconsin, echoing statements he has made over the last week on Twitter.

Trump also said on Thursday that he expected a coronavirus vaccine before the end of the year.





Source link

Push to stop Tasmania Police being first responders to mental health incidents


Tasmania’s health bureaucrats have promised a review into the “frightening” use of police in psychiatric emergencies after the force expressed unease at being routinely called to escort people with mental illness to hospital — even in incidents without crime.

Tasmania Police’s submission to a review of the state’s Mental Health Act, made public this week, revealed officers were spending “long periods of time at hospitals” supporting mental health patients after transporting them to emergency departments for professional assessment.

“Uniform police are often used as the primary responder to concerns for welfare of persons who appear to be mentally unwell, where no threat of violence is present,” the police submission said.

“This may impinge on their right to dignity and self-respect by uniformed police attending and implying a stigma of unlawfulness to the person, and such a perception to other members of the community witnessing the interaction, when the reality is that the person is suffering a health issue.”

The review went on: “Tasmania Police noted they often experience difficulty in handing over custody of people at hospitals”, noting that “hospital staff have claimed that it is unsafe to take custody of mental health patients due to staffing levels, when in Tasmania Police’s view the [laws requiring them to remain present were only enacted] … if the patient was violent and needed police to maintain control.”

Police often act as de facto mental health workers, Andrew Wilkie says.(ABC News: Dane Meale)

Police Association of Tasmania president Colin Riley said while police would respond to any call-out, it was a situation that was “bad for them and bad for us”.

“You have police officers who are trained to do certain functions sitting in hospitals minding people, and that process of minding makes them feel like criminals, and they’re not criminals,” Mr Riley said.

Maxine Griffiths from Mental Health Families and Friends Tasmania said having police arrive to escort people in severe mental distress could lead them to believe they were going to prison.

Having mental health professionals deployed to assist instead could help divert some people from hospital, Ms Griffiths said.

“It’s frightening and horrific to have police paddy wagons turn up with the lights on it — it is really scary for people,” she said.

“If a family member needs to call for help and police turn up, the likelihood is the relationship between the person and the family will break down because the person will blame them for calling the police.”

Ms Griffiths called for health authorities to think outside the box in how best to respond to psychiatric emergencies.

“Really, our police are [for] law enforcement and not [as] transport to hospital,” she said.

According to the Tasmania’s mental health laws, only police or approved mental health officers can be deployed to take people into protective custody.

Protective custody is invoked when a person who is acutely mentally unwell needs to be transported somewhere where they can be examined by a medical professional, who can then decide whether involuntary treatment is needed.

Blame rests with ‘chronically-underfunded’ system: Wilkie

Tasmania Police’s submission to the review of the Mental Health Act said uniformed officers were “often” requested to attend to people affected by mental illness when medical professionals should be the first port of call.

Labor health spokeswoman Sarah Lovell said Tasmania should follow in NSW’s footsteps and embed mental health nurses within the police force to assist in mental health emergencies.

That state announced $6.1 million for a new scheme including 36 specialist mental health clinicians earlier this month.

“I would be really keen to see the Tasmanian government do something along those lines,” she said.

Independent Clark MHR Andrew Wilkie said mental health should be a top priority but “often misses out”.

Health and Community Sector Union state secretary Tim Jacobson called for more community mental health workers.

In the Mental Health Act review paper, the Tasmanian Health Service committed to reviewing the processes around protective custody to ensure police officers were not routinely used as first responders and escorts for people with mental illness.

The THS did not respond to request for further detail on when the review would take place.



Source link

Huge push for Channel 9 to sack AFL great


Sam Newman has been pushing the envelope — and largely getting away with it — for 40 years as a radio and TV personality.

But has he finally gone one step too far?

A groundswell of opposition to the 74-year-old former AFL star is developing after his recent comments about George Floyd, an American man who died while being held by police in Minnesota.

While describing Floyd’s death as “disgraceful”, Newman suggested the pedestal he was being put up on as the face of the Black Lives Matter movement was wrong because of his history.

“George Floyd … is piece of shit,” Newman said on his podcast You Cannot Be Serious. “He has been in jail five times, he held up a pregnant black woman with a knife, he’s a drug addict, he’s a crackhead and he’s a pornstar.”

RELATED: Read exactly what Newman said

“He’s dead because of the police brutality and it never should have happened. But I am telling you who George Floyd is, now they’ve made a monument about him and he’s a piece of shit”.

The comments have ignited a furious response on social media, with Channel 9 — which recently brought back the long-time star of the AFL Footy Show in a weekly segment on its Sunday Footy Show program — under pressure to sack Newman.

There was even some friendly fire.

Jim Malo, a property writer with Nine-owned Domain, tweeted: “Genuinely ashamed this clown is employed by the same company as me.”

Mike Carlton added: “How much longer will Nine put up with this vulgar, ranting, knuckle-dragging f***wit?”

Rosie Thomas, the co-founder of Project Rockit, a youth-driven movement against bullying, hate and prejudice, tweeted to Channel 9 saying “it’s time to #StandDownSam hate is not commentary and it’s definitely not footy”.

She linked to an online petition calling for Newman’s long association with the broadcaster to end.

“Channel 9 has given one of Australia’s most prominent racists an unrivalled, paid platform to broadcast his hateful, racist views,” the petition read.

“In pursuit of ratings and profit during a shortened footy season, Channel 9 is banking on racism to make back their advertising bucks. And by doing so, Channel 9 has made itself complicit in fuelling hatred and violence.

“Newman’s hate speech normalises bigotry and emboldens those who seek to do harm to Black people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, Muslim people, and others.

“We need your help to show Channel 9 this is the wrong decision. It needs to take responsibility for its role in the spread of hatred, violence, and bigotry.”

Mary Konstantopoulos, a champion of women’s sport with her Ladies Who League website, said the fight against racism would fail if Newman remained employed in the media.

“Channel 9 announced that Sam Newman was returning to the Sunday Footy Show with his own segment,” she wrote. “How can we make progress when men like this are in positions of authority?”

Many others called for Australia to stop giving Newman airtime.

Veteran footy journalist Caroline Wilson this week cited Newman’s “terrible history in the area of race relations” after his criticism last weekend of AFL players kneeling in support of Black Lives Matter.

Newman infamously wore blackface on an episode of The Footy Show in 1999 and was forced to apologise to the indigenous community.



Source link

Port Adelaide prison bar guernsey push referred to AFL legal department, Eddie McGuire says


The battle over the Port Adelaide Football Club’s “prison bar” guernsey has again intensified, with Collingwood president Eddie McGuire saying he has referred the matter to the AFL’s legal department.

The Power launched an online petition on Wednesday to wear the historic black-and-white prison bar strip in future matches against cross-town rivals the Adelaide Crows.

Power players donned the guernsey, historically worn by the club’s SANFL side the Magpies, in the side’s 75-point Showdown win on Saturday after being granted permission.

Port Adelaide chairman David Koch said the petition, which has already attracted more than 15,000 expressions of support, would form part of the club’s official submission to the AFL.

“It is overwhelmingly clear that not only our members and supporters want to see this guernsey featured in Showdowns on the national stage, but it is also evident that we have widespread support from supporters of other clubs,” Koch said in a statement.

A rack of clothes in a shop
Port Adelaide heritage jumpers on sale at the club’s shop.(Supplied: Port Adelaide Football Club)

Koch said Australian Football Hall of Fame members including Kevin Sheedy, David Parkin, Malcolm Blight and Graham Cornes had also voiced public support for the club’s position.

Collingwood has previously opposed the Power wearing the guernsey, claiming it clashes with the Magpies’ black-and-white colours.

McGuire responded to the petition on Channel Nine’s Footy Classified, saying he had referred the push to the AFL’s chairman, chief executive and legal team.

“Port Adelaide signed a petition, it was called a contract. They signed it twice,” McGuire said.

“[They signed it] coming into the competition and another one that’s got my signature and Gil McLachlan’s signature on it, and the president of Port Adelaide.”

A group od Port Adelaide players running onto an oval wearing black and white jumpers
Port Adelaide run onto Adelaide Oval wearing the club’s traditional prison bar guernsey.(Port Adelaide Football Club)

McGuire said Collingwood and the AFL had sat down previously with Port Adelaide, allowing them to wear the guernsey in this year’s Showdown, but that he had now had enough.

“The AFL own the copyright, I’ve referred it now to the AFL chairman and to the CEO and to the legal department of the AFL.

“They must defend the copyright … otherwise they will be in breach of their own copyright and the constitution of the AFL.

“It’s a simple solution: they say ‘no’ and we move forward.”

‘Guernsey represents who we are’

McGuire suggested Port Adelaide could wear a prison bar top without black-and-white stripes, instead using teal.

Koch said the push was just about marking the club’s history, particularly amid its 150th year.

“All we are asking is that we are able to wear our historic black-and-white prison bar guernsey in all Showdowns moving forward,” he said.

“A football guernsey is more than a piece of cloth. It’s about identity, meaning, and purpose. This is why the traditional black-and-white prison bar guernsey is so important for our people.

Two Collingwood players celebrate a goal at an empty stadium.
Collingwood’s Tom Phillips (R) celebrates a goal against Richmond last week.(AAP: Michael Dodge)

Koch pens letter to ‘avoid confusion’

Koch on Thursday wrote an open letter to Port Adelaide members and supporters in a bid to clarify “several facts” about the club’s bid following its launch of the petition.

He said at no stage did the current board sign a “once and done” agreement with the AFL to enable the club to wear the guernsey in its 150th year.

“In fact, the Collingwood Football Club were prepared for Port Adelaide to wear this guernsey in both 2020 Showdowns, on the condition that we would sign off on it being the last time and no more,” he wrote on the club’s website.

“Subsequently, we refused to sign off on anything preventing us from wearing this guernsey beyond 2020 with ‘the parties agreeing to defer further consideration of that issue to a later point in time’.

“Therefore, we are doing exactly what was agreed, picking up the conversation to be able to wear the black-and-white prison bar guernsey in Showdowns ongoing.”

Koch said he had contacted the AFL and told them to expect the club’s submission soon.

Earlier this month, Koch hit back at McGuire’s comments that Collingwood would go to court to stop the guernsey push.



Source link

The Guardian faces push to shutdown from growing online petition



“The inherently destructive nature of identity politics” has been humorously outlined in a petition to end The Guardian which was founded using money linked to slavery, Institute of Public Affairs’ Daniel Wild says.

“It’s difficult not to enjoy the irony of this moment,” he told Sky News host Andrew Bolt.

A petition to tear down the left-leaning Guardian was initiated after it was discovered the newspaper’s founder, John Edward Taylor, made his money from a cotton plantation which used slave labour.

Mr Wild said “by their own analysis, by their own frameworks and by their own standards, justice demands that The Guardian be sold off and that all of the staff their donate all of their proceeds to reparations”.

“Through their faulty identity politics they are perpetuating structural disadvantage and imposing inter-generational trauma and the only way is for The Guardian to be completely shut down”.

“You can’t debate with people that want to look back and rewrite history and use it against people today,” Mr Wild said.

Image: Getty



Source link