Dedicated camps could be future quarantine solution, says AMA


“But mainland facilities, not too far from appropriate levels of healthcare, are definitely worth considering in the longer term,” he said, while adding that by the time new facilities were completed, they may no longer be needed.

Support for alternative models of quarantine has been growing, buoyed by the threat of a more infectious UK strain of coronavirus, and continued leaks from city hotels across the country.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has plans to quarantine returned travellers at regional mining camps, with a number of options on the table, including in Gladstone and Toowoomba.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews also backed a potential collaboration with the Commonwealth this week, saying there was an argument to have a series of large facilities for thousands of people, similar to Howard Springs.

He said the facilities could also be used for bushfires and other future emergencies.

“We couldn’t build a facility that say housed a couple of thousand people safely with all protocols without the federal government’s help. But there’s an argument I think, to maybe do that.”

A rainbow over the Howard Springs Quarantine Facility in Darwin.Credit:Louise Radcliffe-Smith

The issue of quarantining people in regional Australia was briefly raised at Friday’s National Cabinet, according to Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who said he was keeping an open mind on the Queensland government’s proposal.

Camp-style quarantine facilities offer a number of benefits, including access to fresh air and better separation of returned travellers. They are also challenging to set up and run.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said earlier this month she did not think it would be a good idea to move hotel quarantine to regional areas, citing the risk posed by transporting people over longer distances and the fact that police, health staff and ADF personnel all needed to participate.

“When you have people travelling for long periods of time, you’re more likely to spread the virus than when the trips are shorter,” she said.

“All you’d be doing is simply moving those challenges somewhere else, perhaps with greater difficulty.”

However, a number of experts are now arguing the new facilities don’t need to be located far from cities.

“Preferably it would be a location or a facility where people can get some sunshine and some fresh air,” said University of New South Wales epidemiologist Professor Mary-Louise McLaws.

Professor McLaws said high-rise hotels and apartments were not built with infection control in mind and this would be a greater risk with the emergence of the new more contagious strains of the virus.

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“On a COVID ward, they’re supposed to have 12 complete airflow changes per hour but in most hotels, they’re probably lucky to have a third of that,” she said.

“I’m very pleased that some of the authorities in some of the states and territories are reconsidering where they place quarantine because it is our biggest single risk now.”

Dr Ian Norton, who previously led the World Health Organisation’s Emergency Medical Team Initiative and has given expert advice on managing Howard Springs, said the complexity of running a quarantine camp couldn’t be underestimated.

“There’s so many moving parts. And it’s got to have a health focus … to make sure it’s safe, but it’s mostly about the logistics [such as] making sure the food is the right quality, and good enough to keep people happy,” he said.

“It’s incredible how people focus on the tiny things when they’re in solitary confinement for two weeks.”

However, Dr Norton also said there was no reason the camps had to be placed in remote locations, where they could overwhelm any local health facilities. He said they could be safely operated in the city, if the right site could be found.

“We went though this so often in West Africa with Ebola where the community kept on trying to drive the Ebola treatment centres out into the bush,” he said.

“There is no risk to you, as long as we control the boundaries of this health facility, whether it is in this suburb or 400 kilometres away.”

Howard Springs, a former workers camp lauded as a quarantine success story, is less than 30 kilometres from the centre of Darwin.

Run by the National Critical Care and Trauma Response Centre, it has welcomed more than 3050 international arrivals since late October and has seen 61 confirmed coronavirus cases, without any leaks into the community.

Guests are allowed to sit on their balcony to get fresh air, but can not interact with others.

There have been a number of high-profile breaches out of high-rise hotels in Australia’s major cities, accepting larger numbers of travellers. Recent outbreaks in Adelaide and Brisbane led to temporary lock downs, and there is growing concern about the impact of poor hotel ventilation.

Victoria’s deadly second wave has also been linked to infection control breaches in hotel quarantine.

A statement from the Victorian government on Saturday indicated that there were no plans to change the state’s revamped hotel quarantine model, even as it prepared to accept more travellers.

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UK Considering Australia-Style COVID ‘Quarantine Hotels’ for International Travellers, Says Report



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Currently in the UK, there are approximately 3.58 million confirmed cases of Covid-19, with around 96,000 deaths reported.

The UK government is to consider the enforcement of “Covid hotels” as part of a broader effort to restrict international travel, according to the BBC. 

The news comes hot on the heels of comments by Boris Johnson that suggested tighter border restrictions were a likely necessity in order to prevent dangerous new Covid-19 strains from entering British territory.

In a move that has risen the eyebrows of anti-lockdown Conservative Party backbenchers in parliament, BoJo’s cabinet are also said to be considering a total shut down of the UK’s borders to outside travel, although government sources have been widely quoted as saying that they suspect such an outcome, while still under discussion, is unlikely.

However, a system similar to that employed by the governments of Australia and New Zealand, in which hotels used to quarantine international arrivals are likely to be established, is being taken seriously. According to this approach, it would be legally mandated for travellers entering the UK to carry out a 10-day quarantine in a hotel for which they would have to foot the bill. In Australia, travellers have to pay for their hotel room at a select number of Covid-19 quarantine facilities where they have all of their meals brought to their room throughout the 14-day stay. They are also tested twice for the virus during that period. If the measure is adopted by the UK government, then ministers must decide whether it will apply across the board to all travellers, or only those coming from high-risk countries. According to the BBC, among those supporting the measure’s implementation in the UK is London Mayor, Sadiq Khan.

This week, the government suspended all UK travel corridors, which had previously allowed some arriving to the UK from particular countries to avoid having to quarantine. Furthermore, nationals heading to Britain now have to provide a negative Covid-19 test up to 72 hours before their departure. Those arriving – including British nationals – must quarantine for 10 days.

Discoveries of new and contagious more variants in South Africa and Brazil recently resulted in the UK suspending flights from those two nations, as well as several other South American and African states.

At a Downing Street press conference on Friday, January 22, Bojo did not rule out taking harsher action against international travel.

“I really don’t rule it out, we may need to take further measures still. We may need to go further to protect our borders. We don’t want to put that [efforts to control Covid-19] at risk by having a new variant come back in,” said the prime minister.

The news comes on the heels of the emergence of a new variant of Covid-19 in Kent, England. At his above-mentioned Friday press briefing, BoJo said that the new strain may in fact be more deadly than previous versions by up to “30 percent.” However, Public Health England’s medical director, Yvonne Doyle, has been quoted as saying that it is “too early” to say whether the new variant is more deadly.

“There is some evidence, but it is very early evidence. It is small numbers of cases and it is far too early to say this will actually happen,” she said.

 



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Australian Open, Spain backflip, UK strain, quarantine complaints


The Royal Spanish Tennis Federation (RFET) has backflipped from the criticism of the Australian Open quarantine measures after a Spanish player tested positive for COVID-19.

It comes after Spain’s Paula Badosa apologised after revealing she tested positive for coronavirus while in quarantine ahead of the Australian Open.

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She is the first female tennis player on the tournament’s roster to have a confirmed positive test and is one of 10 cases linked to the Australian Open.

“I have some bad news. Today I received a positive COVID-19 test result. I’m feeling unwell and have some symptoms,” the world No. 67 tweeted. “But I’ll try to recover as soon as possible listening to the doctors.

“I’ve been taken to a health hotel to self isolate and be monitored.

“Thanks for your support. We’ll be back stronger.”

Badosa had earlier complained about being forced to quarantine when nobody in her team had tested positive, but changed her tune when taking to social media again on Friday.

“Please, don’t get me wrong. Health will always come first & I feel grateful for being in Australia,” she tweeted. “Quarantine & preventive measures are pivotal right now.

“I talked about rules that changed overnight but I understand the sad situation we are living. Sorry guys. Stay safe.”

On Saturday night, The Age reported that COVID-19 Quarantine Victoria, who are in charge of Victoria’s hotel quarantine scheme, had confirmed three positive cases linked to the Australian Open UK virus variant which is more highly transmissible.

Two men in their 30s and a man in his 50s were revealed as carrying the strain. None of the three are tennis players reportedly.

The news put egg on the faces of the RFET who called out the Australian Open organisers and said Tennis Australia should change the rules specifically for their players.

“(Players) were not informed about the possibility that they would be severely confined if they travelled on the same plane with a passenger who tested positive, without taking into account the physical proximity of the players affected with that positive,” the statement read.

“Mario Vilella and Carlos Alcaraz are confined in a room without being able to leave for 14 days when they have both performed multiple PCRs that have been negative.

“It is evident that these two players … will not be able to compete on equal terms with the rest of the players. And it is no longer only a strictly competitive problem of this first Grand Slam. The point is that his season could be seriously damaged by a 14-day lockdown.”

However, just over 24 hours later and after Badosa’s positive test was revealed, tennis journalist Jose Morgado shared the second letter, with a much softer language.

“First of all, we apologise to Tennis Australia if our statement has at any time been interpreted as a criticism of their working methods, nothing is further from our intention,” the new release read.

“The RFET thanks Tennis Australia for the effort to organise, in these times so complicated by the global pandemic, the first Grand Slam of the season, something vital for our tennis players who are going to compete again and generate resources.

“The Australian Government has demonstrated the effectiveness of its measures against COVID-19, as reflected by the evolution of the disease in this country, which is setting an example for the world.

“The RFET wants to reiterate its solidarity with all the players who have tested positive. He also wants to support Spanish athletes who, due to different circumstances, are undergoing strict 14-day confinement.”

The week has been filled with tennis stars unhappy with the quarantine measures in Australia.

Serbian David Cup captain and former World No. 12 Viktor Troicki was one of the latest.

Speaking to Sportski Zurnal, a Serbian daily sports newspaper, the 34-year-old World No. 202 slammed the lockdown as he attempts to resurrect his career.

“If I knew, I wouldn’t come,” Troicki told Sportski Zurnal.

“Total chaos, horror as far as everything is concerned. I’m locked up for 14 days, I can’t leave the room. No training, nothing. My Grand Slam is failing, I can’t get ready for five sets in the room.

“All preparations are failing. Two weeks of lying in bed, it is certain that I will have to get back in shape for the next month and a half. All this is creating chaos in my career.”

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Andy Murray gets COVID-19, quarantine troubles


Former world No. 1 Andy Murray said he had decided against competing in the Australian Open after failing to find a “workable quarantine” following his recovery from the coronavirus.

Murray has finished his period of self-isolation and had hoped to compete in the first grand slam of 2021 in Melbourne.

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But the former Wimbledon and US Open champion said he could not find a way of getting to Australia and then quarantining ahead of the tournament’s scheduled start on February 8.

Murray would have had to head to Australia by Saturday to ensure he could observe the mandatory two-week hotel quarantine period.

“Gutted to share that I won’t be flying out to Australia to compete at the Australian Open,” Murray said.

“We’ve been in constant dialogue with Tennis Australia to try and find a solution which would allow some form of workable quarantine, but we couldn’t make it work.

“I want to thank everyone there for their efforts, I’m devastated not to be playing out in Australia. It’s a country and tournament that I love.”

Murray, a five-time Australian Open runner-up, was unable to travel on one of the charter flights laid on by tournament organisers after recording a positive test.

After heading to Australia, 72 players set to compete in the tournament have been confined to their rooms for two weeks after passengers on their flights tested positive.

RELATED: Tennis whinger tests positive, says sorry

RELATED: Nadal blasted for hotel silence

Players who weren’t on those flights can only leave their rooms for a few hours a day to practice. Murray, who was asymptomatic, was unable to come to an agreement over quarantine, despite constructive talks with tournament director Craig Tiley.

He had been given a wildcard entry into the tournament as he looked to make his first Australian Open appearance since 2019, when he revealed the extent of his right hip problems and raised the possibility of retiring.

The 33-year-old Scot’s decision to pull out is another blow to his hopes of returning to the top of the sport.

Murray, currently ranked 123rd in the world, has not gone past the second round of a grand slam since 2017 after being plagued by the hip injury.

His last grand slam final appearance came when he won Wimbledon in 2016.

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Djokovic requested Melbourne quarantine “instead of Adelaide”


Tennis star Novak Djokovic has revealed he requested to quarantine “with his team” in a Melbourne hotel “instead of Adelaide” ahead of his appearance at a Memorial Drive curtain-raiser to the Australian Open.

Djokovic is the headline act of a star-studded cast – which will now also feature world number one Ash Barty – that will warm up at the Drive on January 29, and is quarantining at the newly-opened Majestic M Suites Hotel in North Adelaide.

He made headlines this week after he lobbied tennis authorities on behalf of Open contestants quarantining in Melbourne, seeking improved conditions.

In a social media post last night, the men’s world number one player made an impassioned defence of his comments, saying his “good intentions” have been misconstrued by critics.

Djokovic insists he was not being “selfish, difficult and ungrateful” in speaking out about quarantine conditions for players ahead of the Australian Open, saying he had felt obliged to use his “hard-earned” privileges to make suggestions to tournament director Craig Tiley on how to improve conditions for players in Melbourne.

He also revealed he had earlier sought to avoid his less-onerous quarantine in Adelaide, a request that was refused because of “government regulations”.

“There were a few suggestions and ideas that I gathered from other players from our chat group and there was no harm intended to try and help,” he said of his requests to Tiley.

“I was aware that the chances were low that any of our suggestions would be accepted – just like my request to quarantine with my team in Melbourne instead of Adelaide was denied prior to our travel because of strict government regulations.

“Since I couldn’t be with other players in Melbourne, I made myself available to them.”

SA’s chief public health officer Professor Nicola Spurrier said she was not aware of Djokovic’s request.

“We were asked by the State Government to provide quarantine for this group of tennis players and we have done that,” she said today.

“My responsibility is to keep South Australians safe, and that’s really what my focus has been.”

She said SA Health “haven’t had any complaints whatsoever” from players quarantining locally, who are allowed out of their hotel accommodation to train at Memorial Drive under the supervision of nurses “looking for any breaches of PPE”.

“There certainly haven’t been any significant breaches that I’m aware of,” Spurrier said.

Djokovic serving at the 2013 Australian Open. Photo: Michael Errey / InDaily

In a long social media post, Djokovic, who has been criticised widely, wrote: “My good intentions for my fellow competitors in Melbourne have been misconstrued as being selfish, difficult and ungrateful. This couldn’t be farther from the truth.

“I genuinely care about my fellow players and I also understand very well how the world is run and who gets bigger and better and why.

“I’ve earned my privileges the hard way and for that reason it is very difficult for me to be a mere onlooker knowing how much every help, gesture and good word mattered to me when I was small and insignificant in the world pecking order.

“Hence I use my position of privilege to be of service as much as I can where and when needed.”

Regarding his suggestions to Tiley, Djokovic added: “In our email exchange I used an opportunity to brainstorm about potential improvements that could be made to the quarantine of players in Melbourne that were in full lockdown…

“I understand that organising international sporting events during a pandemic poses health risks to the local community and to the players themselves.

“Therefore, I would like to express my full gratitude to Tennis Australia, the Australian Government and local citizens for being willing to take this risk with us for the love of the game and the multiple opportunities it brings to the economy of the country and its people.

“We are honoured and we will all do our best to follow the guidelines and protocols put in place. We do hope that we will be able to nurture our bodies and be ready for the mental and physical endurance and strength tests that are ahead of us once the competition starts.

“Things in the media escalated and there was a general impression that the players (including myself) are ungrateful, weak and selfish because of their unpleasant feelings in quarantine. I am very sorry that it has come that because I do know how grateful many are.

“We all came to Australia to compete. Not being able to train and prepare before the tournament starts is really not easy.

“None of us ever questioned 14 days of quarantine despite what is being said by media outlets.”

Ten people who have flown to Melbourne for the first grand slam of the year have tested positive for coronavirus, resulting in 72 players being confined to their rooms.

Meanwhile, SA Police have warned Adelaide media to stay away from the visiting tennis stars, after being “informed that various media outlets are attempting to speak directly to tennis players in hotel quarantine at the Majestic M Apartments in North Adelaide, by putting microphones to their balconies”.

In a release entitled “Media warned not to approach tennis players”, SAPOL reminded local outlets to adhere to COVID regulations, adding: “Any microphones that come within close proximity of anyone in quarantine will have to be decontaminated, and the person operating the microphone and people in their vicinity will likely be directed to undertake 14 days quarantine at their own cost.”

“If media representatives are on the roadway they will be asked to move for safety reasons, and if they do not comply, police will take action,” the missive warned.

-with AAP

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Richmond’s Sydney Stack pleads guilty to WA quarantine breach


Richmond player Sydney Stack has pleaded guilty to breaching Western Australia’s quarantine rules after he was issued a move-on notice by police at a Perth entertainment precinct when he was meant to be in self-isolation.

The Tiger was granted an exemption to return home to WA on December 10 to attend his grandfather’s funeral, however he was required to complete 14 days quarantine at a residence in Northam, the country town where he grew up.

Sydney Stack.Credit:Getty Images

The quarantine requirement was sparked by his Melbourne flight’s brief stopover in Adelaide, which was experiencing a COVID-19 outbreak at the time.

On Wednesday, the 20-year-old pleaded guilty in Perth Magistrates Court to one count of failing to comply with a direction under the Emergency Management Act after police issued him a move-on notice in Northbridge on December 19.

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Australian Open 2021, Novak Djokovic letter, hotel quarantine, COVID protocol, angry response, updates


World number one Novak Djokovic published an open letter to the Australian public on Twitter on Wednesday night in which he tried to “clarify” demands he appeared to make to the organisers of the Australian Open.

Djokovic, an eight-times champion in Melbourne, was widely harangued on Tuesday after reportedly issuing a list of demands in a letter to Tennis Australia that included moving quarantined players into private homes with tennis courts and getting them better meals.

Australian media zeroed in on the demands, portraying them as petulant and selfish while fellow player Nick Kyrgios called him a “tool”.

In Wednesday’s tweet, Djokovic said his letter to Australian Open director Craig Tiley had been taken the wrong way.

“My good intentions for my fellow competitors in Melbourne have been misconstrued as being selfish, difficult and ungrateful,” said Djokovic. “This couldn’t be farther from the truth.”

Djokovic said he was merely speaking up for fellow players who were not being treated as well as him.

At least 72 players have been barred from leaving their rooms for two weeks after coronavirus cases were detected on their charter flights into the country.

Others are allowed out of their rooms for up to five hours a day to train under strictly-controlled conditions.

“I genuinely care about my fellow players and I also understand very well how the world is run and who gets bigger and better and why,” said the 33-year-old Serb.

“I’ve earned my privileges the hard way and for that reason, it is very difficult for me to be a mere onlooker knowing how much every help, gesture and good word mattered to me when I was small and insignificant in the world pecking order.

“Hence, I use my position of privilege to be of service as much as I can where and when needed.”

Djokovic said his letter to Tiley was a “brainstorm about potential improvements that could be made to the quarantine of players in Melbourne that were in full lockdown” and not a list of demands.

“There were a few suggestions and ideas that I gathered from other players from our chat group and there was no harm intended to try and help.

“Things in the media escalated and there was a general impression that the players (including myself) are ungrateful, weak and selfish because of their unpleasant feelings in quarantine,” he wrote.

“I am very sorry that is has come to that because I do know how grateful many are.”

The Australian Open is due to start on February 8.

– AFP

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Australian Open: Novak Djokovic says he is not ‘selfish, difficult and ungrateful’ for quarantine requests | World News


Tennis star Novak Djokovic has insisted he was not being “selfish, difficult and ungrateful” after making a list of requests for players in quarantine ahead of the Australian Open.

The men’s world number one reportedly sent a letter to Australian officials asking for a reduction in the time players spend in isolation, permission to see coaches and for athletes to be moved to private houses.

His suggestions were firmly rebuffed by Victoria’s premier Daniel Andrews, who said: “People are free to provide lists of demands, but the answer is no… There’s no special treatment here.”

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State premier lays down law to tennis stars

A total of 72 players are in quarantine after 10 people who flew to Melbourne for the first Grand Slam of the year tested positive for coronavirus – leaving many forced to train in their hotel rooms.

Djokovic has since defended speaking out about the quarantine conditions, writing in a lengthy social media post: “My good intentions for my fellow competitors in Melbourne have been misconstrued as being selfish, difficult and ungrateful.

“This couldn’t be farther from the truth.”

He said his email exchange regarding suggestions for the quarantine conditions was an “opportunity to brainstorm” and he was “aware that the chances were low that any of our suggestions would be accepted”.

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“There were a few suggestions and ideas that I gathered from other players from our chat group and there was no harm intended to try and help,” he said.

While many players are under the strictest quarantine conditions and unable to leave their rooms, others who were not on the affected flights – including Djokovic – are able to train outside for five hours a day under COVID-secure protocols.

The men's world number one smiles from his balcony while in quarantine
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The men’s world number one smiles from his balcony while in quarantine

The star player said he wanted to use his “position of privilege” to help others.

“I’ve earned my privileges the hard way and for that reason it is very difficult for me to be a mere onlooker knowing how much every help, gesture and good word mattered to me when I was small and insignificant in the world pecking order,” he said.

He added: “Things in the media escalated and there was a general impression that the players (including myself) are ungrateful, weak and selfish because of their unpleasant feelings in quarantine.

“I am very sorry that it has come that because I do know how grateful many are.”

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Quarantined tennis stars train in hotel rooms

Going ahead with the tournament amid the global pandemic and harsh restrictions in Melbourne has caused some controversy, particularly as many Australians remain stuck overseas.

Three new coronavirus cases related to the tournament were reported on Wednesday, including a player who has been in hard lockdown since they arrived.

The second case related to another player and the third is a support person with the player.

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Australian Open: Players told not to feed mice while in Covid quarantine


A Victorian MP said she “understands” mice have been fed by players in the quarantine hotel used for the Australian Open

Australian Open players have been told not to feed mice at the quarantine hotel in Melbourne after one player complained of rodents in her room.

Yulia Putintseva, the world number 28, swapped rooms after finding a mouse but said her new room is also infested.

The 26-year-old is among more than 70 players and their entourages confined to their hotel rooms for 14 days.

Victoria state police minister Lisa Neville “encouraged” players to “minimise interaction” with the mice.

“As I understand, there may have been some feeding going on,” Neville added, without giving further details.

“We will keep doing pest control if we need to, but hopefully that pest control work that was done this week will have fixed the problem.”

Neville also said 10 people in total who have flown to Melbourne for the tournament had now tested positive for coronavirus, with three new cases on Wednesday comprising two players and a support person.

Kazakhstan’s Putintseva – who was among the first players to complain about the hotel quarantine rules for the Grand Slam event – again used social media to post a video of a mouse in her room jumping out from behind a cupboard.

Putintseva says she has lost sleep because of the rodents scurrying around, and also expressed frustration about being unable to open a window in her room.

“We need fresh air to breathe,” she posted on Instagram.external-link

A total of four players, have now tested positive for the virus according to officials, but there has been confusion over the figures with several test results later reclassified by authorities as “viral shedding” from previous infections, meaning they are not contagious.

The row over quarantine rules and allowances afforded to travelling players compared to residents, has cast huge controversy over the year’s first major tennis tournament.

Tennis Australia chief executive Craig Tiley said a “tightrope” was being walked, but that the safety of Victorians would not be compromised.

“I do understand the players, this is a new experience for them and I don’t think anyone expected to know what the 14 days was like and they are adapting to it,” he told ABC News Breakfast.

“At the beginning, it was pretty challenging with their adaptation It’s got a lot better, I think the majority of the players understand and accept it and there is a minority struggling with it but we are going to do whatever we can to make it better for them.”



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Conor McGregor, hotel quarantine, UFC 257, Dustin Poirier, UFC news, The Project


UFC superstar Conor McGregor has called on tennis players complaining about quarantine conditions to “get their act together” ahead of the Australian Open.

After the biggest names in tennis touched down in Australia earlier this week, several players have complained about the living conditions of their mandatory 14-day quarantine.

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Reigning champion Novak Djokovic reportedly sent a list of demands to Australian Open organisers, including allowing players to move to private homes with tennis courts.

Spain’s Roberto Bautista Agut said the 14-day Melbourne quarantine was “really tough” and like a prison “with Wi-Fi”.

French player Alize Cornet called the situation “insane”, arguing that her weeks of preparation were going to waste.

And Kazakh star Yulia Putintseva also raged about the quarantine, venting her angst on social media as she protested against the lack of exposure to fresh air.

But McGregor has little sympathy for the tennis icons.

Speaking on Channel 10’s The Project, the Irish fighter offered a timely reality check for the Australian Open competitors.

“I am surprised the tennis players would be kicking up,” McGregor said on Wednesday evening.

“We have got to correct ourselves here, you know. There is a lot going on. There is at lot at risk. It is everyone’s duty here on this Earth to do what they can.

“To get to compete in such a prestigious tennis tournament or any tournament, a two-week lockdown prior they should welcome that with open arms.

“I would urge the tennis players to get their act together and also embrace it and relish it and be happy they get to compete.

“People can’t go to work and children can’t even go to school. Professional athletes are complaining about a bit of isolation? C’mon, guys.”

McGregor recently began his 48-hour quarantine after arriving at the UFC’s Fight Island by sailing into Abu Dhabi on a luxury yacht.

The 32-year-old will return to the Octagon on Sunday (AEDT) after a 12-month absence at UFC 257 in a rematch with American fighter Dustin Poirier.

“I came from a mega yacht. My yacht is parked across from the hotel, but this is inside the bubble,” McGregor told The Project.

“I brought myself off the yacht into this hotel. There is not a complaint.

“I am eager to compete. I want to perform for any fans and give entertainment to the people around the world who are going through so much at this time. It is an honour for me to do so.”

Thank you for checking out this news release regarding Australian sport titled “Conor McGregor, hotel quarantine, UFC 257, Dustin Poirier, UFC news, The Project”. This story was posted by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local news services.

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