Assistant coach should replace Robbie Fowler at the Roar


Brisbane Goalkeeper Jamie Young says Darren Davies should replace departed Roar coach Fowler.

With Liverpool legend Fowler opting out of his Roar coaching deal to stay in England with his family during the COVID-19 crisis, Davies and the club’s academy boss Warren Moon are set to assume the reins for the rest of the A-League season, which restarts on July 16.

How the coaching structure will work remains unknown, with the club yet to announce whether Davies and Moon will be in charge on the bench.

Davies is also yet to commit to taking training beyond next Friday.

The Welshman was interim coach of the Roar last season in tough circumstances following the December 2018 departure of John Aloisi.

But Young stressed that Davies should not be judged on Brisbane’s poor 2018-19 campaign, in which the Roar finished second from bottom with just four wins from 27 matches. Three of those victories came during Davies’ 18-match stint in charge.

Camera IconBrisbane Roar assistant coach Darren Davies is in contention to replace the departed Robbie Fowler. Credit: AAP, AAP Image/Glenn Hunt.

“I think it would be very harsh to judge him on the back of John Aloisi’s team,” said Young, the club’s reigning player of the year.

“He was picking up the slack from a previous manager, and that’s very difficult.

“That was a team in decline versus a team now on the rise.”

Under Fowler, the Roar lifted themselves to fourth on the ladder, having lost just two of their previous 13 matches before the competition was suspended.

“Darren’s tried to continue on in training what Robbie’s done. If it’s not broke don’t fix it,” Young said.

“What people need to remember is that Darren has worked under (former Socceroos coach) Ange Postecoglou, (ex-Melbourne Victory mentor) Kevin Muscat, John Aloisi and Robbie Fowler – that’s some pretty good people there.

“Darren has a very good CV in terms of the people he’s worked with, and he has been in A-League managerial role in the past as well so he has that experience. I think a lot of him as a coach.

Roar goalkeeper Jamie Young has backed the coaching credentials of Darren Davies.
Camera IconRoar goalkeeper Jamie Young has backed the coaching credentials of Darren Davies. Credit: AAP, AAP Image/Mark Evans

“You put him in charge of our team right now and you’ve got to say there are some very good characters in there like Tom Aldred, Scott Neville, Jack Hingert, Scott McDonald, Jay O’Shea … there are about eight or nine leaders in our team.

“I think Darren does well with this team regardless.”

Other contenders for the permanent Roar job include Moon, current Brisbane marksman McDonald, Guam national team coach and ex-Roar defender Karl Dodd, and former Brisbane Strikers midfielder Kasey Wehrman.

“Warren’s played for the club, he’s built up an intimate connection with the community in Brisbane, and that’s very important for a club like us,” Young said.

“It’s great that the club has people (Moon and Davies) like that to draw from in a time like this.

“The one thing that Robbie brought is stability. We have an obligation to get the right person for the job.”



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Davies a chance to replace Fowler


The Roar don’t have to look far for Robbie Fowler’s permanent replacement, with Brisbane goalkeeper Jamie Young endorsing the credentials of the club’s assistant coach Darren Davies.

With Liverpool legend Fowler opting out of his Roar coaching deal to stay in England with his family during the COVID-19 crisis, Davies and the club’s academy boss Warren Moon are set to assume the reins for the rest of the A-League season, which restarts on July 16.

How the coaching structure will work remains unknown, with the club yet to announce whether Davies and Moon will be in charge on the bench.

Davies is also yet to commit to taking training beyond next Friday.

The Welshman was interim coach of the Roar last season in tough circumstances following the December 2018 departure of John Aloisi.

But Young stressed that Davies should not be judged on Brisbane’s poor 2018-19 campaign, in which the Roar finished second from bottom with just four wins from 27 matches. Three of those victories came during Davies’ 18-match stint in charge.

“I think it would be very harsh to judge him on the back of John Aloisi’s team,” said Young, the club’s reigning player of the year.

“He was picking up the slack from a previous manager, and that’s very difficult.

“That was a team in decline versus a team now on the rise.”

Under Fowler, the Roar lifted themselves to fourth on the ladder, having lost just two of their previous 13 matches before the competition was suspended.

“Darren’s tried to continue on in training what Robbie’s done. If it’s not broke don’t fix it,” Young said.

“What people need to remember is that Darren has worked under (former Socceroos coach) Ange Postecoglou, (ex-Melbourne Victory mentor) Kevin Muscat, John Aloisi and Robbie Fowler – that’s some pretty good people there.

“Darren has a very good CV in terms of the people he’s worked with, and he has been in A-League managerial role in the past as well so he has that experience. I think a lot of him as a coach.

“You put him in charge of our team right now and you’ve got to say there are some very good characters in there like Tom Aldred, Scott Neville, Jack Hingert, Scott McDonald, Jay O’Shea … there are about eight or nine leaders in our team.

“I think Darren does well with this team regardless.”

Other contenders for the permanent Roar job include Moon, current Brisbane marksman McDonald, Guam national team coach and ex-Roar defender Karl Dodd, and former Brisbane Strikers midfielder Kasey Wehrman.

“Warren’s played for the club, he’s built up an intimate connection with the community in Brisbane, and that’s very important for a club like us,” Young said.

“It’s great that the club has people (Moon and Davies) like that to draw from in a time like this.

“The one thing that Robbie brought is stability. We have an obligation to get the right person for the job.”



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Push to ban strip searches in custody for children, replace with body scanning


Tasmanian mother Sarah knows exactly the kind of trauma that can be caused to children who are strip searched in custody.

Her teenage son has been searched numerous times.

“It causes shocking anxiety for him and for me. It’s horrible,” she said.

Sarah, who can’t be identified for legal reasons, said she and her son had made complaints.

“Even though, yes, they may have done the wrong thing to be going there [reception prison], he’s still a child, he’s still my child.”

She said in one instance, an apology had been issued to her son from the Director of Prisons, after a review of one search at the Hobart Reception Prison found procedures were “not fully complied with” and may have caused him “distress and confusion”.

The Commissioner for Children and Young People in Tasmania, Leanne McLean, described strip searching of children as “extremely undignified”.

“If you put yourself in the shoes of a child in that position, it would be an awful process,” Ms McLean said.

Children’s commissioner Leanne McLean says strip searching children can’t be justified.(Supplied)

Last year, Ms McLean called for the routine strip-searching of children in custody to end.

“As a routine practice, it can’t be justified. That is the advice I gave the Government. And the Government have accepted that advice,” she said.

She said following operational changes, including the introduction of a risk assessment process, the number of children strip searched at both the Hobart and Launceston Reception Prisons had reduced significantly.

Where, previously, almost all young people were strip-searched, between July 1, 2019, and the end of February 2020, that had dropped to about 35 per cent, or about 70 children.

Those children were subjected to either a “full personal search”, in which the child removes half their clothes at a time, and is required to bend at the waist and part their buttocks, or a “modified personal search”, in which the buttocks inspection is not required.

“I remain concerned at the numbers of children continuing to be strip searched, and will continue to monitor the effect of the changes in practice and policy and the effect of the proposed legislative reforms,” Ms McLean said.

Aboriginal children over-represented in searches

Despite making up 4.6 per cent of the Tasmanian population, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people made up 21 per cent of the 199 young people strip searched.

Michael Mansell, from the Aboriginal Land Council, said police were still using discretion in who they searched.

“We need to change the law and the Parliament needs to legislate to prevent police and custodial officers from strip searching children, and unless that legislation is in place nothing’s going to change,” Mr Mansell said.

Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell in office.
Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell wants the law changed to ban strip searching children.(ABC News: Damian McIntyre)

“The Parliament needs to take that discretion away, and make a statement saying this is forbidden.”

Of the nine recommendations Ms McLean made regarding the strip-searching of children in custody last year, the Government has accepted six, and three “in-principle”.

In a statement, the Attorney-General Elise Archer said the Government would consult on draft legislation later this year to address the recommendations.

“We remain committed to implementing any measures that will ensure the dignity and self-respect of children and young people in the custodial process.”

Rodney Dillon is the Aboriginal advisor to Amnesty International, and said technology like that used in airport screening should be replacing strip searches.

 Aboriginal elder and former Tasmanian ATSIC Commissioner Rodney Dillon
Rodney Dillon believes scanning technology will minimise trauma for children.(ABC News: Sam Ikin)

“This is only about money and we should invest in the appropriate machines so we can have this done with the least amount of privacy invaded.”

A spokeswoman said the Department of Justice was considering electronic security as part of a broader upgrade of technology, and would continue to explore technologies that might offer an appropriate and effective alternative to personal searches.

Tasmania, along with other states and territories, is looking at whether the age of criminal responsibility should be raised.

Both Mr Dillon and Ms McLean would like it raised from 10 to 14.

But Ms McLean said that could only happen once Tasmania had a supportive and therapeutic youth justice system.



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Push to ban strip searches for children, replace with body scanning


Tasmanian mother Sarah knows exactly the kind of trauma that can be caused to children who are strip searched in custody.

Her teenage son has been searched numerous times.

“It causes shocking anxiety for him and for me. It’s horrible,” she said.

Sarah, who can’t be identified for legal reasons, said she and her son had made complaints.

“Even though, yes, they may have done the wrong thing to be going there [reception prison], he’s still a child, he’s still my child.”

She said in one instance, an apology had been issued to her son from the Director of Prisons, after a review of one search at the Hobart Reception Prison found procedures were “not fully complied with” and may have caused him “distress and confusion”.

The Commissioner for Children and Young People in Tasmania, Leanne McLean, described strip searching of children as “extremely undignified”.

“If you put yourself in the shoes of a child in that position, it would be an awful process,” Ms McLean said.

Children’s commissioner Leanne McLean says strip searching children can’t be justified.(Supplied)

Last year, Ms McLean called for the routine strip-searching of children in custody to end.

“As a routine practice, it can’t be justified. That is the advice I gave the Government. And the Government have accepted that advice,” she said.

She said following operational changes, including the introduction of a risk assessment process, the number of children strip searched at both the Hobart and Launceston Reception Prisons had reduced significantly.

Where, previously, almost all young people were strip-searched, between July 1, 2019, and the end of February 2020, that had dropped to about 35 per cent, or about 70 children.

Those children were subjected to either a “full personal search”, in which the child removes half their clothes at a time, and is required to bend at the waist and part their buttocks, or a “modified personal search”, in which the buttocks inspection is not required.

“I remain concerned at the numbers of children continuing to be strip searched, and will continue to monitor the effect of the changes in practice and policy and the effect of the proposed legislative reforms,” Ms McLean said.

Aboriginal children over-represented in searches

Despite making up 4.6 per cent of the Tasmanian population, Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people made up 21 per cent of the 199 young people strip searched.

Michael Mansell, from the Aboriginal Land Council, said police were still using discretion in who they searched.

“We need to change the law and the Parliament needs to legislate to prevent police and custodial officers from strip searching children, and unless that legislation is in place nothing’s going to change,” Mr Mansell said.

Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell in office.
Tasmanian Aboriginal lawyer Michael Mansell wants the law changed to ban strip searching children.(ABC News: Damian McIntyre)

“The Parliament needs to take that discretion away, and make a statement saying this is forbidden.”

Of the nine recommendations Ms McLean made regarding the strip-searching of children in custody last year, the Government has accepted six, and three “in-principle”.

In a statement, the Attorney-General Elise Archer said the Government would consult on draft legislation later this year to address the recommendations.

“We remain committed to implementing any measures that will ensure the dignity and self-respect of children and young people in the custodial process.”

Rodney Dillon is the Aboriginal advisor to Amnesty International, and said technology like that used in airport screening should be replacing strip searches.

 Aboriginal elder and former Tasmanian ATSIC Commissioner Rodney Dillon
Rodney Dillon believes scanning technology will minimise trauma for children.(ABC News: Sam Ikin)

“This is only about money and we should invest in the appropriate machines so we can have this done with the least amount of privacy invaded.”

A spokeswoman said the Department of Justice was considering electronic security as part of a broader upgrade of technology, and would continue to explore technologies that might offer an appropriate and effective alternative to personal searches.

Tasmania, along with other states and territories, is looking at whether the age of criminal responsibility should be raised.

Both Mr Dillon and Ms McLean would like it raised from 10 to 14.

But Ms McLean said that could only happen once Tasmania had a supportive and therapeutic youth justice system.



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Replace Teddy Roosevelt Statue With a One of Robin Williams


The woke panic gripping the nation now includes the board of New York City’s American Museum of Natural History. The museum and city are set to remove the iconic 14-foot statue of former president Theodore Roosevelt that’s sat outside the museum entrance for the past 80 years. And actor-director Ben Stiller has declared it be replaced with a statue of actor Robin Williams.

“How about replacing it with a statue of Robin Williams. He deserves one,” said Ben Stiller on Sunday, responding to the news.

Stiller, of course, co-starred with Robin Williams in the 2006 adventure comedy Night at the Museum. Williams — who committed suicide by hanging in 2014 — played the role of Roosevelt, who, like several of the exhibits in the Museum of Natural History, comes to life atop his horse.

Robin Williams and Ben Stiller in Night at the Museum (2006) TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX.

“The time has come to move it,” said Museum of Natural History president, Ellen V. Futter, citing “the ever-widening movement for racial justice that has emerged after the killing of George Floyd” as part of the reason behind the decision to remove the statue.

Stiller cosigning the toppling of Rosevelt’s statue — which the New York Times says “has long prompted objections as a symbol of colonialism and racism” — comes just days after the Comcast-owned, U.K.-based network Sky slapped a trigger warning on 16 films for their “outdated attitudes.” One of those movies with “outdated … cultural depictions which may cause offence today” includes Tropic Thunder, the 2008 hit comedy which Ben Stiller directed, co-wrote, and starred in, alongside Robert Downey Jr. in blackface.

Robert Downey Jr. and Ben Stiller in Tropic Thunder (2008) Dreamworks.

To many, Tropic Thunder is a classic, including Breitbart News’ John Nolte. “The performance is brilliant and brilliantly funny. There’s nothing racist about it — quite the opposite. The whole point of the character is good-natured satire. Co-writer, director, and star Ben Stiller uses Lazarus like buckshot to satirize too many things to count…” Nolte wrote on Sunday. […] “Hollywood is one of America’s rule-makers, and Hollywood has declared blackface in any form racist regardless of intent.”

Again, many agree with Notle.

But are the New York Times right? Was the intent behind the statue honoring one America’s most iconic presidents, flanked by a Native American and an African American man, as the Times claims some say to glorify “a symbol of colonialism and racism”? If the statue “does not reflect Theodore Roosevelt’s legacy,” as his great grandson now says, was that true before George Floyd died in police custody? In other words, if the statue of Roosevelt doesn’t reflect “the values of equality and justice,” then why did it take the Museum of Natural History 80 years realize it?

Robert Downey Jr.’s performance in Tropic Thunder earned him a Best Supporting Actor nomination at the 2009 Academy Award. I wonder Ben Stiller, did he deserve it?

Jerome Hudson is Breitbart News Entertainment Editor and author of the bestselling book 50 Things They Don’t Want You to Know. Order your copy today. Follow Jerome Hudson on Twitter and Instagram @jeromeehudson.





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Phil Neville: England Women need ‘experienced manager’ to replace departing boss, says Rachel Brown-Finnis


Phil Neville led the Lionesses to a first SheBelieves Cup success and a fourth-place finish at the World Cup in 2019.

Phil Neville boosted the profile of women’s football but a more experienced manager is required to take England to the next level, says former Lionesses goalkeeper Rachel Brown-Finnis.

Neville, 43, is to step down as England women’s manager next summer, though Brown-Finnis says he should leave now.

She told BBC Sport: ”Stepping down now I think would be right thing to do.

“He did have a brilliant effect on the profile of women’s football. But we need the next level now.”

Chelsea boss Emma Hayes, Manchester United’s Casey Stoney and former United States coach Jill Ellis are among the names to be linked with the job.

Brown-Finnis, who made 82 appearances for the Lionesses, says Hayes and Stoney may not have the required experience for the role yet, but someone of Ellis’ profile is the type of candidate the Football Association should be looking at.

The 52-year-old coached the US from 2014 to 2019, winning the World Cup twice.

“They have to cast the net worldwide. Someone who has been there and done it, who has got the experience but is very progressive,” said former Everton and Liverpool player Brown-Finnis.

“Jill Ellis has the best experience as a female manager at the very, very top of the game. Emma Hayes and Casey Stoney have been mentioned – but they are both tied up at clubs.

“They are also both young coaches and have plenty of time in the future to become England managers.

“If Stoney was brought in she the would do an excellent job. She has every capacity to become a top level manager.

“I think she will hesitate – not just because of her work at Manchester United, but I think she would want the best for the team, and if she didn’t feel ready for that she would forsake her opportunity at this time for the betterment of the Lionesses.

“Managers in America are on the front page of newspapers and every form of media, under scrutiny every minute of every single day.

“There are managers out there who understand the media and flourish under the pressure, and that’s what we need now.”

What next for Neville?

Despite thinking Neville should leave the job now, Brown-Finnis believes it was a worthwhile appointment.

She also thinks the ex-England defender will become a better coach for the experience.

Neville, a former Manchester United and Everton player, was appointed in January 2018 on a contract until the summer of 2021. He led the Lionesses to a first SheBelieves Cup success and a fourth-place finish at the World Cup in 2019.

“He was a left-field appointment, but he has had a positive effect on the squad and women’s football in general. It brought it to the forefront of people’s minds,” said Brown-Finnis.

“He will have learned a hell of a lot. He’s coached in football before – not a huge amount, but he went through the schooling of [former Manchester United manager] Sir Alex Ferguson.

“It has given him an understanding that it’s not quite as simple to go from playing to passing those things on. And there are differences to coaching men and coaching women.

“So he will be a much more well-rounded coach from this experience and will put him in a better place moving forwards.”



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