Migrants sharpen their English while keeping Queensland’s school tuckshops afloat


The city of Logan, south of Brisbane, is home to people from 217 different cultures — many are new residents who have only recently arrived in Australia and feel daunted by the prospect of trying to find a job.

Now a local school tuckshop program, Connections Through Cooking, is working with refugees and migrants to help them make friends, gain work experience and sharpen their English-speaking skills.

After launching two years ago, the program now operates across 15 schools around Logan City and South Brisbane.

Aimee Johnston from Queensland Association of School Tuckshops (QAST) said the not-for-profit organisation thought the program was a win-win for volunteers, school students and the tuckshops, which are often struggling to secure volunteers.

“We were working at the time to try and encourage people from diverse backgrounds to understand what a tuckshop is and how it runs,” she said.

“It’s quite different from countries overseas where students might go home for lunch or it’s provided by the schools.”

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Woman interviewed by police over alleged hit and run near Melbourne school that left lollipop man in hospital



A woman has been interview by police over the alleged hit-and-run of a lollipop man near a North Melbourne school this week.

Jim Tzimas had just finished helping a group of children to cross outside a school on Findon Road in Epping at around 9am on Monday and was removing flags when he was hit by a car.

READ MORE: Family of injured lollipop man calls on driver to come forward

The collision caused the lollipop man to fall hard into the gutter and hit his head, with his hip and upper body also badly hurt.
Witnesses allege the female driver of the small silver sedan stopped about 100-200 metres up the road and paused for 10 seconds before taking off again.
Highway patrol officers arrested a South Morang woman over the alleged hit-and-run yesterday.

The 50-year-old was taken to Mernda Police Station, where she was interviewed by police about the incident.
She was later released pending further inquiries.
Mr Tzimas remains at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and is awaiting scan results to confirm any internal injuries.

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Child’s play unearths tools for school success


“It makes a big difference and the gains made continue into school and beyond; we know it works and that they hit the ground running,” she said.

Professor Fleer said the more formal setting of school presented challenges for children who couldn’t regulate their behaviour.

“They want to be like every other child listening and sitting still et cetera, but if they have to focus on that they can’t focus on the curriculum, there’s no space left,” she said.

“You can see the school failure happening over time because students are so focused on behaviour instead of the joy of learning.”

The Playworlds model was developed with early childhood educators to make it easy for them to do in their classrooms. The reliance on imagination and lack of props or expensive resources also make it accessible regardless of a preschool’s socioeconomic status.

The success of such early learning further strengthens the case for universal free childcare, Professor Fleer said.

“What’s the best way to invest in the future? It’s invest in infants, invest in toddlers, invest in preschoolers,” she said.

“The long-standing research is out there. We know that investing in early childcare matters.”

Calls for universal free childcare are mounting as Australia begins to repair the economic damage of the coronavirus pandemic.

Billionaire philanthropist Nicola Forrest and Thrive by Five chief executive Jay Weatherill addressed the National Press Club this month to push for an overhaul of the childcare system.

“High-quality early learning centres should be a basic human right for every single Australian kid, no matter their postcode and regardless of whether both or neither parent works. It’s about uniformity, consistency and equality of access,” Ms Forrest said.

Helen Gibbons, director of early education and care for the United Workers Union, said she was pleased to see increasing momentum to change the system to improve things for children, their families and educators.

“A lot of voices are coming together now,” she said. “We need to be opening up barriers for children to access high-quality environments.”

Ms Gibbons said the government needed not only to make childcare more financially accessible for families but also improve the structural issues faced by staff, such as low pay and insecure work.

“The COVID-19 crisis really highlighted what an enormous crisis there was in the early education workforce,” she said. “It showed us the government can do direct intervention when it wants to.”

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Preschool play leads to school success


“It makes a big difference and the gains made continue into school and beyond; we know it works and that they hit the ground running,” she said.

Professor Fleer said the more formal setting of school presented challenges for children who couldn’t regulate their behaviour.

“They want to be like every other child listening and sitting still et cetera, but if they have to focus on that they can’t focus on the curriculum, there’s no space left,” she said.

“You can see the school failure happening over time because students are so focused on behaviour instead of the joy of learning.”

The Playworlds model was developed with early childhood educators to make it easy for them to do in their classrooms. The reliance on imagination and lack of props or expensive resources also make it accessible regardless of a preschool’s socioeconomic status.

The success of such early learning further strengthens the case for universal free childcare, Professor Fleer said.

“What’s the best way to invest in the future? It’s invest in infants, invest in toddlers, invest in preschoolers,” she said.

“The long-standing research is out there. We know that investing in early childcare matters.”

Calls for universal free childcare are mounting as Australia begins to repair the economic damage of the coronavirus pandemic.

Billionaire philanthropist Nicola Forrest and Thrive by Five chief executive Jay Weatherill addressed the National Press Club this month to push for an overhaul of the childcare system.

“High-quality early learning centres should be a basic human right for every single Australian kid, no matter their postcode and regardless of whether both or neither parent works. It’s about uniformity, consistency and equality of access,” Ms Forrest said.

Helen Gibbons, director of early education and care for the United Workers Union, said she was pleased to see increasing momentum to change the system to improve things for children, their families and educators.

“A lot of voices are coming together now,” she said. “We need to be opening up barriers for children to access high-quality environments.”

Ms Gibbons said the government needed not only to make childcare more financially accessible for families but also improve the structural issues faced by staff, such as low pay and insecure work.

“The COVID-19 crisis really highlighted what an enormous crisis there was in the early education workforce,” she said. “It showed us the government can do direct intervention when it wants to.”

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Melbourne east school tells families to avoid shopping on Glenferrie Road in Hawthorn


A private girls’ school in Melbourne’s east has issued a warning to its families to avoid a popular shopping precinct.

On Monday, Strathcona Girls’ Grammar in Canterbury sent a note to families on Monday, telling them to avoid Glenferrie Road in Hawthorn.

One of their Year 10 students was allegedly assaulted just off Glenferrie Road on Friday afternoon.

She was allegedly cornered by a group of girls from another school in a car park after leaving a nearby McDonald’s.

Victoria Police confirmed they were called to an incident along Grace Street, but have left the situation to the schools to handle.

The letter to parents said it was not an isolated incident.

Glenferrie Road in Hawthorn is usually packed with students after school.

Local businesses have been left frustrated at the message to avoid the area after already struggling to survive multiple lockdowns.

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Gunmen kidnap more than 300 girls in raid on northwest Nigerian school


An operation to rescue more than 300 girls kidnapped in Nigeria had failed to pinpoint their location by late on Friday, almost 24 hours after gunmen seized them in a raid on their school.

The raid in Zamfara state, where the governor ordered all boarding schools to close immediately, was the second such kidnapping in little over a week in the country’s northwest, a region increasingly targeted by militants and criminal gangs.

Zamfara police said they had begun search-and-rescue operations with the army to find the “bandits” who took the 317 girls from the Government Girls Science Secondary School in the town of Jangebe.

“There’s information that they were moved to a neighbouring forest, and we are tracking and exercising caution,” Zamfara police commissioner Abutu Yaro told a news conference.

All the abductees remained at large, but the parent of one of them, Mohammed Usman Jangebe, said seven of their schoolmates had resurfaced after escaping the raiders by hiding in gutters.

The assailants stormed in at around 1 am, firing sporadically, said Zamfara’s information commissioner, Sulaiman Tanau Anka.

“Information available to me said they came with vehicles and moved the students. They also moved some on foot,” he told Reuters.

By late Friday, there had been no claim of responsibility for the raid.

School kidnappings were first carried out by jihadist groups Boko Haram and Islamic State West Africa Province but the tactic has now been adopted by other militants whose agenda is unclear.

They have become endemic around the increasingly lawless north, to the anguish of families and frustration of Nigeria’s government and armed forces. Friday’s was the third such incident since December.

An empty classroom of the Government Science College where gunmen kidnapped dozens of students and staffs, in Kagara, Nigeria on 18 February, 2021.

AFP

The rise in abductions is fuelled in part by sizeable government payoffs in exchange for child hostages, catalysing a broader breakdown of security in the north, officials have said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The government denies making such payouts, and President Muhammadu Buhari reiterated on Friday that it would will not succumb to blackmail.

In a statement isued late on Friday, he also appealed to state administrations not to reward bandits with money or vehicles.

Rage and frustration in Jangebe

The town of Jangebe seethed with anger over the abduction, said a government official who was part of the delegation to the community.

Young men hurled rocks at journalists driving through the town, injuring a cameraman, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

“People mobilised to block security operatives, journalists and government officials from getting access to the main town,” he said.

Parents arrive at the school compound in search of children kidnapped by bandits, in Jangede, Zamfara State in northwest Nigeria.

Parents arrive at the school compound in search of children kidnapped by bandits, in Jangede, Zamfara State in northwest Nigeria.

AFP

Parents also had no faith in authorities to return their kidnapped girls, Mohammed Usman Jangebe told Reuters by phone.

“We are going to rescue our children, since the government isn’t ready to give them protection,” he said.

“All of us that have had our children abducted have agreed to follow them into the forest. We will not listen to anyone now until we rescue our children.”

A military shake-up 

Mr Buhari replaced his long-standing military chiefs this month amid the worsening violence.

Last week, unidentified gunmen kidnapped 42 people including 27 students, and killed one pupil, in an overnight attack on a boarding school in the north-central state of Niger. The hostages are yet to be released.

In December, dozens of gunmen abducted 344 schoolboys in northwest Katsina state. They were freed after six days but the government denied paying a ransom.

Islamic State’s West Africa branch in 2018 kidnapped more than 100 schoolgirls in northeast Nigeria, all but one of whom – the only Christian – were released. A ransom was paid, according to the United Nations.

Perhaps the most notorious kidnapping in recent years was when Boko Haram militants abducted 276 schoolgirls from Chibok in Borno state in April 2014. The incident drew widespread global attention, with then US first lady Michelle Obama among the prominent figures calling for their return.

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Private Sydney boy’s school Waverley College bans students from wearing mullets


It’s one of the world’s most recognisable and ridiculed haircuts, but now the mullet is fast becoming rejected by schools.

Waverley College in Sydney is the latest educational institution to rule the ‘do often described as “business at the front and party at the back” inappropriate for its campus.

“A lot of people are getting it,” Kim Van Heel from Ziggy’s Barber Salon said of the mullet.

The mullet hairstyle has been banned at a Sydney private school. (9News)

“I doesn’t matter if you’re old, young, every one is seeing it as normal now.”

The popular barber shop saw requests for mullets grow throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone started realising they can grow their hair out,” Ms Van Heel said.

“When you’re working from home there is less pressure.

Waverley College has told its students to avoid the do. (9News)

“Then they realised you can go shorter on the sides but still have fun at the back like Billy Ray Cyrus said.”

The haircut was known as an 80s and 90s staple with rock stars like David Bowie, John Farnham joining the country star Cyrus in leading the craze.

Australia’s footballers also caught mullet mania.

Mullets are becoming more popular – again. (9News)

Now, three decades on, the hairdo has infiltrated the once stuffy world of professional golf.

“It’s become a good luck charm,” Australian golfer and world number 27 Cameron Smith said recently showing off his longer locks.

“It needs a bit of a trim at the front.

“I’d really like to go full business at the front and party at the back.”

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A swimming carnival for the ages: Goulburn West Public School students shine | Goulburn Post


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There’s no better time for a splash in the pool than during the summer. Well that’s what Goulburn West Public School students did on Tuesday, February 9. School teacher Bron Livesey said the school’s annual swimming carnival went exactly to plan, despite COVID-19 restrictions still lingering. READ ALSO: David Ryrie captures the beauty of fleeting moments “We managed to have the support of some of our parents who gave great feedback on the day,” Ms Livesey said. “They called it absolutely amazing and claimed it was the best swimming carnival ever.” The weather may not have been the best in the morning, but it cleared just in time for a perfect carnival. READ ALSO: Goulburn Mulwaree Council to rollout Goulburn Reuse Scheme Ms Livesey said without the help of the pool staff and student volunteers from Mulwaree High School, the carnival wouldn’t have been as good as it was. Miss Betts and her team also contributed to a seamless event. READ ALSO: Preliminary report released on cause of fatal helicopter crash “With her great organising, Miss Betts even found time to put two teacher races into the program as well as novelty events and an aqua aerobics class,” Ms Livesey said. Some competitive swimmers will now move on to the district swimming carnival on Friday, February 26. Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can access our trusted content:

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School days ‘will not be longer’ says Gavin Williamson



The Education Secretary has ruled out lengthening school days and promised not to be “timid in terms of our aspirations” when getting children to catch up on the schooling they have missed. At a Downing Street press conference, Gavin Williamson also confirmed there will be “no algorithms whatsoever” in this summer’s exam results, adding it will be “firmly in the hands of teachers”. Mr Williamson also said:

However, there was a warning for grandparents from Dr Jenny Harries, England’s chief deputy medical officer. She urged pupils “not to go hugging them too much”, even if they have been tested at school until the impact of the vaccine rollout is fully understood. It is worth reading this from Telegraph readers debating face masks in schools.

Meanwhile, at least 150,000 more people with learning disabilities will be prioritised for a Covid vaccine, officials have announced following a campaign by Jo Whiley. The BBC DJ said it was a “seismic day” after the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation recommended that all patients on the GP Learning Disability Register should be called forward, after conceding limitations in the GP system. Details here.

Woods was ‘agitated’ ahead of car crash, says witness

Tiger Woods almost hit another car and was “agitated and impatient” before his near-fatal crash in the outskirts of LA, according to a witness. Oliver Konteh, a fellow guest at the five-star resort where Woods was staying, said he saw the golfing legend in the carpark at 7am, shortly before he was meant to be at the Rolling Hill Country Club. Mr Konteh, part of a film crew at the resort, claims Woods grew frustrated as he waited for a vehicle blocking his exit to unload luggage, according to American news site TMZ. Read on for details and here is everything we know about the crash and the 15-time major winner’s recovery.

In pictures: How lockdown emptied the world

It’s hard to fathom that, just over a year ago, we would stand elbow-to-elbow with our fellow humans, without a second thought as to whether they might infect us with a highly contagious disease called Covid-19. Every February, revellers would take to the streets in Venice, wearing masks for fun, rather than to prevent infection. In spring, thousands of marathon runners would trample the streets in London, while on Easter Sundays the Pope would address the masses in St Peter’s Square. In this series of photographs, Greg Dickinson look at how, over 12 months, the pandemic has transformed some of the world’s busiest sights.

At a glance: More coronavirus headlines

Also in the news: Today’s other headlines

SNP civil war | Alex Salmond has been invited to give evidence on Friday to the Holyrood inquiry into the Scottish Government’s botched investigation of him. Nicola Sturgeon has insisted it is “downright wrong” to suggest the Crown Office’s intervention in the redaction of Mr Salmond’s evidence to the inquiry was politically influenced. Tom Harris analyses how Scottish voters may yet punish Mrs Sturgeon for her handling of the affair and Adam Tompkins sets out why Holyrood caving in to the Crown Office over the evidence is an historic mistake.

Around the world: Myanmar protests turn on China

The chorus of banging pots and pans begins in Chinatown at about 8pm. The district in Myanmar’s commercial city of Yangon is normally festooned with bright red lanterns to celebrate Chinese New Year. But when the Year of the Ox arrived in mid-February, the usual festive atmosphere was gone – replaced by tension. Read how swelling ranks of young ethnic Chinese protesters are joining mass rallies against the brutal junta that abruptly deposed Aung San Suu Kyi’s government.

Wednesday big-read

Is the electric vehicle bubble starting to burst?



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Joseph Suaalii’s King’s School friend Villami Penisini chasing NRL debut for Parramatta Eels


Eels coach Brad Arthur has never been one to bring through a player before he is ready. Tom Opacic and Michael Oldfield, who is nursing a minor knee injury, are two players standing in Penisini’s way. But judging by Penisini’s rugby highlights reel – and the love from the Parramatta playing group – The King’s School graduate will give Arthur plenty to think about.

Penisini is expected to spend some time on the ground against Penrith in the club’s final trial this weekend.

“Will is a great kid, he wants to learn and he’s lucky he’s got some great players out there to help him,” Gutherson said.

“He’s come from King’s, which is a good rugby school, but he chose to stay with us. He’s a big boy – he’s not small for 18 – and the sky is the limit for him. You never know when the right time is to debut a kid. I’m sure if his time comes this year, he’ll take it with both hands.”

Five-eighth Dylan Brown came from a rugby background and said he respected Penisini’s path to Parramatta.

“He’s a freak, he’s confident, he’s so smart, he has the looks, the face for it – he will do some big things,” Brown said. “Will isn’t in the limelight, and he doesn’t need to be, and I’m sure Brad won’t throw him in too soon. We’ve got Waqa Blake, we’ve got Tom Opacic. The good thing is we have these kids pushing us.”

Jennings remains provisionally suspended after returning a positive to the banned substance Ligandrol on the eve of last year’s semi-final against South Sydney.

Winger Maika Sivo said he had learnt a lot playing outside Jennings the past two years and “we connected on and off the field”.

As for what Sivo does beyond this season remains a mystery with the Eels cult hero understood to have received inquiries from at least two French rugby clubs. Sivo is 27 and knows he can make better money overseas in the code he grew up playing. His current deal, worth about $350,000, could be almost doubled abroad.

But Sivo also loves the NRL and the Eels who took a punt on him when unwanted by Penrith and then coach Anthony Griffin.

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