Patrick Cripps has shoulder reconstruction, set for four-month rehab period


“Patrick had an instability episode with his shoulder [on Saturday night] and what that basically means is that the shoulder slips out of the joint and goes back into the joint again,” Carlton’s director of high performance Andrew Russell said last week, ahead of the surgery.

“It is quite common: it happens to a lot of players and players can play a whole season having these instability episodes.

“He has had three minor instability episodes throughout the course of the season, every time he has recovered 100 per cent. His strength has been 100 per cent going into the next game.”

“He will likely have 4-6 weeks of no running: he’ll get back, he’ll have a really good running preparation and we expect him to have a full pre-season on the track and be available for round one.”

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The Blues delisted four players last week, including father-son Ben Silvagni. Hugh Goddard, Darcy Lang and Finbar O’Dwyer were also let go.

Veteran small forward Eddie Betts has been offered a one-year deal to play on in 2021, while they are expected to secure GWS’ Zac Williams as a free agent.

Kade Simpson retired following a 342-game career, with the Blues missing the finals in am improved 2020 season.



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Callum Wilson: Striker set to join Newcastle from Bournemouth in £20m deal


Callum Wilson joined Bournemouth from Coventry for £3m in 2014

Newcastle United have had a £20m bid accepted for Bournemouth’s England striker Callum Wilson.

Aston Villa have withdrawn a higher bid of £21m, with Wilson preferring a move to St James’ Park.

The 28-year-old, who has won four England caps, made 184 appearances for the Cherries and scored 67 goals, having joined from Coventry in 2014.

Newcastle manager Steve Bruce wants to reunite Wilson with his former Cherries team-mate Ryan Fraser.

Scotland winger Fraser is close to completing a free transfer to St James’ Park.

Wilson has one England goal to his name – scored on his debut against the United States in November 2018 – and won his most recent international cap in the 6-0 win over Bulgaria in Sofia in October 2019.

The striker is set to be the latest high-profile departure from Bournemouth following their relegation from the Premier League in July, with Nathan Ake moving to Manchester City in a £41m deal and goalkeeper Aaron Ramsdale signed by Sheffield United for £18.5m.

Bournemouth remain very keen to bring their former winger Matt Ritchie back south from Newcastle, with finances the big hurdle to overcome.

Analysis

For Bournemouth, it was a case of where – rather than if – Callum Wilson would go.

After a couple of cheeky water-testing low bids from Newcastle and Aston Villa, £20m seems a fair price for the player, given his age – 29 in February – and the fact that last season wasn’t a spectacular success for Wilson personally, albeit in a struggling team, with just nine goal involvements, compared with 23 during the previous Premier League campaign.

He’ll certainly suit the way Newcastle like to play; he has a great engine when utilised as a lone striker, but does need to regain the confidence and form that brought him his England caps, having just lost his place in the international set-up.

Bournemouth could still realistically lose Joshua King, while David Brooks also has admirers, but with Nathan Ake, Aaron Ramsdale and now Wilson departing, in addition to the earlier exit of Ryan Fraser, the need for two or three quality reinforcements is clear.



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‘Protesters’ Set Man on Fire with Bomb Thrown at Portland Police



A firebomb thrown by rioters at police in Portland, Oregon, on Saturday night set a “protester” on fire, according to the Portland Police Bureau.

Video taken at the scene and retweeted by the police showed fire erupting in the middle of a street, as a man caught in the flames attempted to run out of the way. He emerged with his legs ablaze, as rioters attempted to help him.

Reporter Andy Ngô of the Post Millenial tweeted that Antifa and Black Lives Matter staged the riot to mark more than 100 days of violent protest in Portland since the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Rioters used Molotov cocktails in confrontations with police:

Earlier Saturday, the Oregonian remarked on the 100-day anniversary of violent demonstrations: “In Portland, the whitest major city in the U.S., demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality have stretched for 100 straight days, sparking unprecedented cuts to the city police bureau, night after night of violence by law enforcement officers and protesters, presidential condemnation and national attention.”
Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler has refused support from President Donald Trump, blaming him for the violence.

Democrats, including presidential nominee Joe Biden, have referred to the rioters as “peaceful protesters,” blaming President Donald Trump for the violence, saying that the presence of federal law enforcement officials had been a provocation.

The violence has continued since federal officials withdrew several weeks ago.

Joel B. Pollak is Senior Editor-at-Large at Breitbart News and the host of Breitbart News Sunday on Sirius XM Patriot on Sunday evenings from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ET (4 p.m. to 7 p.m. PT). His new book, RED NOVEMBER, tells the story of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary from a conservative perspective. He is a winner of the 2018 Robert Novak Journalism Alumni Fellowship. Follow him on Twitter at @joelpollak.

Photo: file (Sep. 5)





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Daniel Prude Case: Grand Jury Will Be Set Up in Rochester Death


New York’s attorney general announced on Saturday that she would set up a grand jury to consider evidence in the death of a Black man in Rochester, N.Y., who suffocated after he had been placed in a hood by police officers and pinned to the ground.

The unusual weekend announcement by the attorney general, Letitia James, signaled a significant ramping up of the response to the March 23 arrest of Daniel Prude, 41, after months of official silence. Mr. Prude’s family in recent days has accused officials of covering up his death to protect the police officers involved.

Mr. Prude went into cardiac arrest during a struggle with officers and died a week later. The county medical examiner labeled his death a homicide caused by complications of asphyxiation in a prone position. But for months, the police in Rochester treated the case as a drug overdose after PCP, or angel dust, was found in his bloodstream.

“The Prude family and the Rochester community have been through great pain and anguish,” Ms. James said in a statement on Saturday. “My office will immediately move to empanel a grand jury as part of our exhaustive investigation into this matter.”

Her office became aware of Mr. Prude’s death in mid-April with the release of the autopsy’s findings, but made no public mention of the case until this week, even as protests erupted nationwide over mistreatment and brutality directed at Black people by the police.

The case came to public attention only on Wednesday, more than five months after Mr. Prude’s death, when his family’s lawyer released body camera footage from the officers involved in detaining Mr. Prude. The footage was obtained through a public records request by the lawyer.

Mr. Prude’s brother, Joe Prude, had accused local authorities this week of failing to investigate the case in order to protect the police. On Saturday night, Mr. Prude said he was pleased by the attorney general’s announcement.

“I am ecstatic about this,” Mr. Prude said, “but right now I’m still waiting on seeing the indictment and them being prosecuted to the full extent of the law.”

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said he supported the decision to set up a grand jury. “Justice delayed is justice denied and the people of New York deserve the truth,” Mr. Cuomo said in a statement.

The Rochester police chief has denied that the department covered up Mr. Prude’s death. The seven officers found to be involved in the encounter with Mr. Prude were suspended this week after the release of the videos.

Protesters have taken to the streets of Rochester every night since the release of the body camera footage, and on Friday night, what began as a peaceful rally took a violent turn.

Protesters marching past restaurants overturned tables and threw furniture and bottles as diners scattered. Police officers in riot gear responded with pepper spray and orders to disperse.

Soon after, two cars drove into a crowd of demonstrators, knocking at least two people to the ground. In videos shared on Twitter, the driver of at least one car can be seen spraying demonstrators with an irritant and racing away.

Daniel Prude, who is from Chicago, arrived at his brother’s home in Rochester on March 22, behaving erratically and seemed to be hallucinating. His brother had him hospitalized for an evaluation, but Mr. Prude was sent home hours later.

Early on the morning of March 23, Mr. Prude bolted from his brother’s house, and was found naked in the street shortly after 3 a.m. A group of police officers arrived and handcuffed him without incident, but when Mr. Prude began spitting in the street — as coronavirus cases were rising sharply throughout the state — officers placed a hood over his head.

Mr. Prude became agitated and tried to rise, according to video from the officers’ body cameras. The officers pinned him to the ground, one holding his head to the pavement.

Mr. Prude pleaded to be let up, but seemed to struggle for breath, and his words turned to gurgles, then stopped, according to footage from the officers’ cameras. When paramedics arrived about two minutes after he had been pinned, he had no heartbeat.

They revived him and took him to a hospital, where he later died.

Hours after the encounter with officers, the Rochester police chief, La’Ron Singletary, told Lovely Warren, the mayor of Rochester, that a man in custody had suffered a drug overdose, Ms. Warren said this week.

That police narrative essentially held for months, even as Ms. James’s office began an investigation.

Her office did not announce its involvement in the matter and, according to Rochester officials, told them to keep quiet as well.

On June 4, a top official in Ms. James’s office asked city officials not to release body camera footage so as not to “interfere with the attorney general’s ongoing investigation,” Ms. Warren’s office said this week.

Ms. James’s office has denied that characterization of events.

“There was never a request from the attorney general’s office to the City of Rochester corporation counsel to withhold information about the events surrounding the death of Daniel Prude, plain and simple,” Ms. James’s office said in a statement.

Ms. James’s office has also said it does not routinely comment on investigations into deaths in police custody until they are concluded.

The office shared footage from the body cameras with a lawyer for the Prude family in June and with family members on July 21.

Sarah Maslin Nir contributed reporting.





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Lionel Messi now set to stay at Barcelona, says Catalan club is ‘club of his life’


Lionel Messi made it clear that it was time to move on, seek new challenges and be happy somewhere other than Barcelona.

He had won dozens of titles and broken numerous records with the Catalan club but didn’t like the direction it was going, so the time had come to try to succeed somewhere else.

But despite being promised that he could leave, he wasn’t allowed to. So he is staying for another year to avoid a lengthy legal battle with “the club of his life”.

Putting an end to uncertainty about his future, Messi announced on Friday (local time) that he would continue with Barcelona for the upcoming season despite having wanted to leave.

Messi made the announcement in a video interview published by Goal.com. He said he wanted “to seek a new direction” in his career but didn’t want to fight with the club.

Messi takes aim at Barcelona president

Lionel Messi holds his hand to his forehead as he stands on his own
Messi said he wanted to leave Barcelona in August.(Reuters: Manu Fernandez/Pool)

He made it clear that he wasn’t happy with club president Josep Bartomeu, saying the club official did not keep his word to let him leave for free at the end of the season.

Messi officially told Barcelona 10 days ago about his decision, but Barcelona said it wanted him to finish his contract, which runs until June 2021.

The club claimed the clause invoked by Messi to leave had expired on June 10 and said he had to pay a buyout clause of 700 million euros [$1.1 billion] if he wanted to depart.

“The president always said that at the end of the season I could decide if I wanted to go or if I wanted to stay and in the end he did not end up keeping his word,” Messi said.

Messi had told the club about his intention to leave by sending a burofax, a certified document similar to a telegram.

“The burofax was simply to make it official that he was not following the rules, not to get into a fight because I did not want to fight with the club,” Messi said.

There had been no agreement when Messi’s father and Bartomeu met on Wednesday to discuss the player’s future.

“I’ll continue at Barcelona and my attitude won’t change, no matter how much I have wanted to go,” Messi said.

“I told the club and the president that I wanted to go. I’ve been telling him all year.

‘Brutal drama’ over decision

A La Liga footballer with his back to camera has his head down in disappointment.
Barcelona was humbled in the Champions League by Bayern Munich.(AP / Pool: Manu Fernandez)

Messi had not made any public statements since the team’s 8-2 loss to Bayern Munich in the quarterfinals of the Champions League on August 14.

He said the defeat, one of the worst in his career, was not what made him decide to leave.

“It was a very difficult year, I suffered a lot in training, in games and in the dressing room,” Messi said.

“I wanted a winning project and to win titles with the club to continue expanding the legend of Barcelona.

“The truth is that there has been no project or anything for a long time, they juggle and cover holes as things go by.”

Still, Messi said it wasn’t easy to decide to leave the club.

“When I communicated my wish to leave to my wife and children, it was a brutal drama,” he said.

“The whole family began crying, my children did not want to leave Barcelona, nor did they want to change schools.”

Barcelona relief

Messi’s announcement came a few hours after his father had sent a letter to the Spanish league saying his son felt he was free to leave Barcelona immediately without having to pay the 700 million euro buyout clause.

The league contested, saying he was under contract and could not leave without the clause being paid.

A Lionel Messi poster and action figure can be seen through a Barcelona team shop window.
Messi’s popularity in Barcelona is unparalleled.(AP: Emilio Morenatti)

Messi’s decision to stay came as a huge relief for Barcelona, which is still mired in crisis three weeks after the devastating loss to Bayern.

Bartomeu and incoming coach Ronald Koeman had said the team’s restructuring project revolved around the Argentine forward, so convincing him to stay was key to helping lift the club out of one of its worst crises ever.

The club will start its season against Villarreal in the Spanish league at the end of the month. The squad had been training without Messi since Monday.

“What I can say is that I’m staying and I’m going to give my best for Barcelona,” Messi said.

“No matter what, my love for Barca will never change.”

AP



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Extra clinics are being set up in NSW multicultural communities to help bust coronavirus myths


New clinics are popping up in multicultural communities in NSW to help dispel misconceptions that are stopping people from getting tested for coronavirus.

NSW Health is setting up clinics in local community centres and places of worship to encourage people from migrant backgrounds to come forward amid concerns of misinformation around safety and cost. 

One clinic has been set up at Wat Phrayortkeo Dhammayanaram Lao Buddhist Temple in western Sydney, where Buddist monk Mai Somdeth said he is encouraging all members of the Lao community to get tested. 

“It doesn’t matter what part of the world you’re from, you stay here together, you have to get yourself tested and be safe for yourself and for the people around you,” he told SBS News.

“I would like to ask every [person], it doesn’t matter if you’re Buddhist, Christian or Muslim, to be tested for COVID-19.” 

Buddhist Venerable Da Seng Chanphakeo.

Buddhist Venerable Da Seng Chanphakeo

SBS News

NSW Multicultural Communication Service Deputy Director Jesusa Helaratne said several misconceptions are stopping people from multicultural backgrounds from visiting testing clinics.

Among the obstacles are concerns about the cost of getting tested and fears those on temporary visas may be denied treatment.

“They have that fear that maybe it’s going to cost them money to come and get tested,” Ms Helaratne said.

“If they’re international students or they don’t have a visa, or they have a working visa, they think they can’t work here, they think they don’t have a Medicare card.

“You don’t need a Medicare card. You can come to a clinic and get tested, just [with] an identification card.”

Inside the coronavirus clinic at Wat Phrayortkeo Dhammayanaram Lao Buddhist Temple

Inside one of the pop-up coronavirus clinics

SBS News

Buddhist Venerable Da Seng Chanphakeo said language barriers are also a challenge. 

“I know the Lao community, usually they cannot speak English and communication is difficult, so we always encourage them to get to know this COVID-19,” he said.

“If they need help, they can always come to the community centre here or go to the temple to ask me and ask the monks.”

Ms Helaratne said another common misconception is a person who tests positive to COVID-19 will need to pay for treatment. 

“That’s not the case,” she said. 

“If they tested positive, the health service will call them up and NSW Health will guide them through the process.

“And, it’s all for free without a Medicare card.”

Jesusa Helaratne, Deputy Director of the New South Wales Multicultural Communication Service

Jesusa Helaratne, deputy director of the New South Wales Multicultural Communication Service

SBS News

NSW Health hopes setting up pop-up clinics at local community centres or places of worship will help people feel more comfortable with getting tested.

“When we set up a pop-up centre, we make sure that it is accessible to the community, that it’s safe, and they’re familiar with the environment,” Theresa Isedale, disaster manager for the South Western Sydney’s Local Health District, said. 

“It has to be visible to the community, so they know that we’re here.”

Having a clinic embedded in the community also means health officials can work with local organisations, interpreters and doctors to give the best, culturally-appropriate care.

“Through them, we’re able to understand what are the key messages that need to be sent out. And, not just that – it has to be culturally-appropriate and linguistically-appropriate,” Ms Isedale said.

Community leaders are working to ensure the message is being received throughout the community, and say using trusted spokespeople along with the right communication channels is key.

Deth Sysengrath, president of the Lao Community Advancement Co-op, said social media platforms have been helpful in spreading the latest health advice.

“We talked to members of our community, we phoned them, we put them [the health advice] on Facebook, and we asked them to come over for everyone’s safety – for them, for their family and for the public,” he said.

But Mr Sysengrath added in-person conversations are often the most effective. 

“Even if you put it in Lao, they still don’t understand the concept. We have to work face-to-face with them, that’s more appropriate,” he said. 

Deth Sysengrath - President, Lao Community Advancement Co-Op

Deth Sysengrath, president of the Lao Community Advancement Co-op

SBS News

Mr Sysengrath wants to make sure everyone in the Lao community is comfortable getting tested.

“They worry about the cost, safety, or they don’t want to go through the hardship of being tested … But actually, it’s very easy,” he said.

“I know it’s very easy, I went through it two times… [it’s] very easy, and very comfortable.

“Even people who don’t have Medicare, they can be tested and we protect their identity.”

People in Australia must stay at least 1.5 metres away from others. Check your state’s restrictions on gathering limits.

If you are experiencing cold or flu symptoms, stay home and arrange a test by calling your doctor or contact the Coronavirus Health Information Hotline on 1800 020 080.

News and information is available in 63 languages at https://sbs.com.au/coronavirus



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Looming pain for tenants with freeze on rental evictions set to end as economic fallout of coronavirus continues


Tenants Queensland says the Federal Government must extend a moratorium on rental evictions to stop thousands of tenants in financially precarious situations from “falling off a cliff” amid the ongoing economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic.

Earlier this year, the Government imposed a ban on landlords evicting tenants who had lost jobs or income due to the pandemic.

The freeze has applied to any tenants who has suffered an income loss of 25 per cent, and to those whose rent equates to more than 30 per cent of their income.

With the freeze on evictions due to end on September 30, advocacy groups and tenants are anxious for extensions to be granted until December 31.

Mum risks homelessness amid rent dispute

Joanne Harding-Smith rents a shopfront in Samford, north of Brisbane, where she runs a travel agency business.

Due to global coronavirus travel restrictions, Ms Harding-Smith lost 97.3 per cent of her income, leaving her in a dire financial situation.

“It’s been a tough six months financially, as well as all the anxiety that goes with it as well,” she said.

When Ms Harding-Smith tried to negotiate her rent down, she was only offered $50 off her weekly rent, which she said wasn’t enough.

She has written to her real estate agent 13 times since March asking to discuss the matter further.

“I still to this day don’t know what the situation is. I’m happy to negotiate, but all they would give me was a deferral option.”

Travel agent Joanne Harding-Smith is hopeful the freeze on evictions will be extended to December 31.(ABC News: Curtis Rodda)

When Ms Harding-Smith tried to explain that she wouldn’t have the money at the end of the rental period, her landlord took her to the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT).

QCAT ordered her to pay the unpaid rent in a decision Ms Harding-Smith describes as “gut-wrenching”.

“I’m a single mum to two teenage boys.”

She said when the moratorium ends she could end up homeless.

“I’d like to see a more tailored approach where it’s not a blanket, ‘oh everyone gets an extension’,” she said.

She said she hoped it would take into account the industry someone worked in and how impacted it might have been by the pandemic.

Tenants risk financially ‘falling off a cliff’

Tenants Queensland chief executive Penny Carr said some renters were also facing a reduction in Commonwealth payments at the end of the month.

“The impact on their jobs particularly [in] travel, events, arts [sectors] — they’re not seeing any return of those jobs,” Ms Carr said.

Tenants Queensland CEO Penny Carr in the office.
Tenants Queensland chief executive Penny Carr is campaigning for the freeze to continue.(ABC News: Tim Swanston)

“And at the end of September, not only do the protections from evictions get removed, they’ll also be facing a lower income level as the Commonwealth income payments are reduced and they’ll also have a return to those contracted rents.

“So all of those things coming together are a big cliff and those people are not going to be in any better situation to manage their problems — the problems that they’re already experiencing.”

Ms Carr said thousands of Queenslanders had gone through mediation with the Residential Tenancies Authority (RTA) since the onset of the pandemic.

“What we don’t know is how many people are out there who are managing their own negotiations.

“We are aware of a number of people, a number of tenants who think that they’ve negotiated a genuine rent reduction, only to find out that the information that they sent back on the forms wasn’t returned.

“They’re now being approached to start paying that rent back.”

Burden of income loss should be shared

Ms Carr said the pain of coronavirus job losses should be shared between landlords and tenants.

“What we’re seeing with our clients is there’s a push from the real estate industry for tenants to bear the whole burden, so there are many people out there who don’t want to give them any genuine reduction,” she said.

“People don’t want to give their tenant a genuine reduction, they want a rent deferral so if that’s all the tenant ever gets is a rent deferral, the only people paying in this situation is the tenant because eventually the owner and the agent gets their cut.

“So the tenant who lost their job pretty much overnight, probably is going to be the one paying.”

Chief executive of the Real Estate Institute of Queensland Antonia Mercorella said the moratorium had given renters stability, but had also caused pain to some owners.

“It would be naive to suggest that we won’t see any evictions occurring in a post-September world,” Ms Mercorella said.

Antonia Mercorella is CEO of the Real Estate Institute of Queensland.
Ms Mercorella said the moratorium had also negatively affected mum-and-dad investors.(Supplied)

“A six-month moratorium has been reasonable in the circumstances.

“The majority of properties that exist as rental properties in Queensland are owned by everyday Queenslanders, by mum-and-dad investors.”

Ms Mercorella said there would still be protections for tenants for the rest of the calendar year.

She said protections included a database that was designed to protect tenants from being listed on a tenancy blacklist if they were to fall into rental arrears due to the pandemic.

There were also protections for domestic violence survivors and the right to refuse entry due to COVID-19 health restrictions.



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AFL grand final host decision set for Wednesday as premiership cup loaded onto flight to Queensland


The host for the AFL grand final has been decided, with the league set to make an official announcement on Wednesday.

AFL executives are currently on the Gold Coast for a meeting to decide the venue for the 2020 grand final, with the Gabba in Brisbane firming as a favourite.

Chief executive Gillon McLachlan said on Tuesday afternoon that the AFL Commission had accepted the recommendation from the executives but there were details that still needed to be worked out “with the Victorian Government and the relevant bodies”.

“Hopefully, we get there and then we’re looking forward to completing it tonight or in the morning, and making an announcement tomorrow,” he said.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the state “made a very comprehensive pitch to the AFL” and touted its role in hosting a number of AFL teams in hubs in South-East Queensland.

“We know when the AFL first floated the idea of a hub, we welcomed that idea and worked with the Chief Health Officer to make that happen. Since then we have hosted nearly the entire AFL competition,” she said.

Where will this be hoisted in 2020?(AAP: Julian Smith)

“We also know that AFL is growing in Queensland. Hopefully they give due consideration to Queensland. I’ve got my fingers crossed.

“If Queensland is fortunate [enough to host the grand final], we know that it is just this once and it is to look after the AFL whilst Victoria is going through a very difficult time.”

Last week, the AFL announced the decider would be played on October 24, but is yet to reveal the host city or whether the game will remain in its traditional afternoon slot or move to a night game.

Earlier on Tuesday, the AFL premiership cup was flown to Queensland as league bosses weighed up the options.

Two secure cases with AFL branding were seen getting wheeled through Melbourne Airport this afternoon and were put on a flight to the Gold Coast.

An AFL official confirmed the premiership cup was encased within.

Aside from the Gabba, Perth Stadium and Adelaide Oval are the other major options, although the league also received a pitch from New South Wales on Thursday.

The 15th round of the compressed 18-week home-and-away season kicks off tonight, with a rest week for all teams before four weeks of finals.



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Eat Out to Help Out scheme is set to smash 80million-meal barrier tonight at £400m cost to taxpayer


The Eat Out to Help Out scheme is set to smash through the 80 million-meal barrier tonight at a £400 million cost to the taxpayer on the last night of Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s scheme.

Diners have endured three hour queues for their final 50% discounts of up to £10 per head which have been offered at restaurants across the country since the beginning of August.

The Treasury estimates that the average claim is close to £5, and after 64million meals were claimed for during the increasingly-popular scheme’s first three weeks, the 80million expected to have participated in ‘Rishi’s Dish’s’ will have cost the taxpayer around £400 million. 

Customers at Josie’s cafe in Winchester were told it would take three hours to get a table if they joined a virtual queuing system via a mobile app while those heading to Nando’s in Hammersmith, London, claimed they faced a two-hour wait.

One of the lucky few to get a seat was accountant Brandon Reis, 25, who told MailOnline: ‘The opportunity to make savings like this may never come again, so I’ve been eating out two to three times a week.’  

Scroll down for video.  

LONDON: Diners in central London’s China Town on Monday night making the most of the last ever Eat Out to Help Out – the Government’s scheme to promote business amid the pandemic estimated to have cost the taxpayer £400 million

WINDSOR: Diners in busy Windsor, Berkshire, on Monday afternoon as thousands sought to make the most of the Chancellor's generous meal scheme

WINDSOR: Diners in busy Windsor, Berkshire, on Monday afternoon as thousands sought to make the most of the Chancellor’s generous meal scheme

BRIGHTON: A large queue forms outside Wagamamas in the city centre. The chain was where Rishi Sunak first launched the deal

BRIGHTON: A large queue forms outside Wagamamas in the city centre. The chain was where Rishi Sunak first launched the deal 

LEEDS: McDonald's has, unsurprisingly, done well out of the offer, with diners seen queuing outside this branch today for table service

LEEDS: McDonald’s has, unsurprisingly, done well out of the offer, with diners seen queuing outside this branch today for table service  

SOUTHAMPTON: Shangai Bay, a Chinese restaurant, was doing a roaring trade thanks to a stream of bargain hunters today

SOUTHAMPTON: Shangai Bay, a Chinese restaurant, was doing a roaring trade thanks to a stream of bargain hunters today 

Twitter user Edmund O'Leary enjoyed a bumper All English Breakfast at the Hay Wain in Epson, which he thanked for offering 'great service'

Twitter user Edmund O’Leary enjoyed a bumper All English Breakfast at the Hay Wain in Epson, which he thanked for offering ‘great service’ 

Alex Sparkes with his friends Max Tracey and Adam Telling enjoying £4 burgers reduced from £8 at Pyrford golf club in Woking. Mr Sparkes said: 'We're usually more into our fish suppers - particularly on a big sports away day - but decided to mix it up this time'

Alex Sparkes with his friends Max Tracey and Adam Telling enjoying £4 burgers reduced from £8 at Pyrford golf club in Woking. Mr Sparkes said: ‘We’re usually more into our fish suppers – particularly on a big sports away day – but decided to mix it up this time’

Twitter user Vicky Osgood enjoyed a nine-item breakfast at Gloucester Services, including bubble and squeak and haggis, plus a coffee for £6.20. She tweeted: 'Probably our last #EatOutToHelpOut meal, but we've finished on a cracker'

Ms Osgood's recepeit

Twitter user Vicky Osgood enjoyed a nine-item breakfast at Gloucester Services, including bubble and squeak and haggis, plus a coffee for £6.20. She tweeted: ‘Probably our last #EatOutToHelpOut meal, but we’ve finished on a cracker’

Diners joked it was 'food binge day' and they would try to 'eat as much as possible' to make the most of the programme

Diners joked it was ‘food binge day’ and they would try to ‘eat as much as possible’ to make the most of the programme

There were also long queues outside restaurants at the Westfield shopping centre in White City, west London.  

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get into Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13 and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and told there were five people ahead of them.  

Jacob said: ‘I thought because there’s so many restaurants in Westfield we wouldn’t have to wait. But we went to Wagamamas and it looked like a 25 minute wait, and Ping Pong was even more, about 40 minutes.’

A last roll of the dice? Chains continuing the Eat Out to Help Out scheme with their own money 

Harvester

Toby Carvery

Franco Manca 

Bill’s

Three Cheers Pub Company

Stonehouse Pizza and Carvery

Q Hotels Group

Signature Pub Group

True North Brew Co

Cityglen pubs

The Coconut Tree

56 North – Edinburgh

Smiths Restaurant, Uddingston

Peru Perdu, Manchester

Craft Dining Room, Birmingham

The Wilderness, Birmingham

SIX, Cambridge

Harleys Smokehouse in Staffordshire 

Meanwhile, carpenter Simon Davies, 51, hardly had to queue at all when he popped into his local Wetherspoons in nearby Shepherds Bush, for a traditional breakfast and Bud Light for £3.85. 

‘You can’t beat a breakfast and beer,’ he said. ‘It’s less than you’d pay for a sandwich, and the food’s great.’ 

The Chancellor said more than 64million meals had been claimed since the initiative was launched at the beginning of August. 

The scheme has seen the government pay 50% of the bill up to £10 per head at participating restaurants from Monday to Wednesday in a bid to boost the hospitality industry and keep jobs.  

Reports that it could be extended to help hard-pressed city centres were today dismissed by a senior Treasury source, who told MailOnline: ‘We love it as much as everyone else but Rishi is very clear about hard stops.’ 

Pub operator JD Wetherspoon has said it will fund discounts on meals from Monday to Wednesday until at least November 11, describing the scheme as a ‘great boost’ to the hospitality industry. 

Eat out to Help Out was part of an attempt to boost the hospitality industry in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak and help hard-pressed town centres.

Every table was full today at Josie’s, which is one of the most popular cafés in Winchester. 

Jackie Reis had taken her children Jessica, 19, a waitress, and accountant Brendon, 25, out for brunch with their partners.

‘I’ve just got back from Portugal and I’ve never felt safer,’ she said. ‘I felt safe over there and I feel safe here. I’ve been avoiding big gatherings of people, but I’m just looking forward to things going back to normal.’

Her son, Brendon, agreed. ‘I’ve been going out a lot more since Eat Out To Help Out was introduced,’ he said. ‘I’ve ending up spending way more than I would otherwise. It’s like when a shop has a sale and you buy loads of things you never knew you needed.

‘The opportunity to make savings like this may never come again, so I’ve been eating out two to three times a week. The scheme has definitely worked.’

His partner, 24-year-old Zoe Martin, a primary school teacher, agreed. ‘The fear is all behind us now,’ she said. ‘We’re all just looking forward to a bit of normality when school starts again next week.’

Waitress Jessica Reis, who was on her day off with her family, said that the opportunity to save had changed her habits. ‘Before Covid, I used to go out a couple of times a month. Now it’s a weekly occurrence,’ she said. 

Her partner, Rob King, 19, who works in a garage in Eastleigh, added that the discount had ‘given everyone the confidence we need to get the economy moving’.

‘Everyone wants to make the most of it,’ he said. ‘There was a slight anxiety at first, after emerging from lockdown, but we soon shrugged that off.

London: Diners in Soho are served to tables on the street as they take part in the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out discount

London: Diners in Soho are served to tables on the street as they take part in the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out discount 

Soho in London has relaxed planning laws to allow restaurants to put out tables and chairs on closed-down roads (pictured today)

Soho in London has relaxed planning laws to allow restaurants to put out tables and chairs on closed-down roads (pictured today) 

‘With the safety measures in place everywhere, we don’t feel in any danger and things are pretty much back to normal. But that could all change if there was a sudden increase in cases.’

But the Government’s discount scheme had not motivated everyone. Hannah Busby, 25, and her sister Emily, 22, were standing outside the café trying to decide whether it was worth waiting three hours for a table.

‘We were expecting it to be busy, but not like this,’ Hannah said. ‘To be honest, we’ve only come out because it’s a Bank Holiday. Saving ten quid is neither here nor there.’

Emily added: ‘The savings haven’t made a difference throughout. We didn’t normally go out from Monday to Wednesday, and we don’t now either. It’s only due to the Bank Holiday that we’re here.’

Their friend, bricklayer Craig Caisley, 24, agreed. ‘People are motivated to get out into town after the lockdown anyway,’ he said. ‘It’s not really about the money.’ 

 In Hammersmith, west London, Liezle Greyling, 49, was at a Wetherspoons enjoying the discount with her daughters Lilia, 12, and Mea, 9.

‘Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds,’ she said. ‘It’s amazing. We’ve been using the scheme a lot, and have been to places such as Tortilla and Nando’s.’ 

There were also long queues outside restaurants at the nearby Westfield shopping centre, where mother Pinz Sanie, 43, said she had used the discount on each of the 13 days it has been active for.   

A socially-distanced queue outside 202, a high-end restaurant specialising in brunch dishes in Notting Hill, west London

A socially-distanced queue outside 202, a high-end restaurant specialising in brunch dishes in Notting Hill, west London

Diners in Soho enjoying discounted lunches on the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme - dubbed 'Rishi's Dishes'

Diners in Soho enjoying discounted lunches on the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme – dubbed ‘Rishi’s Dishes’ 

Soho's China Town was packed with hungry diners taking advantage of the discount, which is meant to boost trade in hard-pressed city centres

Soho’s China Town was packed with hungry diners taking advantage of the discount, which is meant to boost trade in hard-pressed city centres 

A queue forming outside a cafe in Leeds city centre, where parts of the road have been separated off to provide more room for social distancing

A queue forming outside a cafe in Leeds city centre, where parts of the road have been separated off to provide more room for social distancing 

A shopping centre in Leeds where there was a queue of people queuing for lunch at Nandos this afternoon

A shopping centre in Leeds where there was a queue of people queuing for lunch at Nandos this afternoon  

A queue for Wagamamas inside the shopping centre in Leeds. The government today ruled out extending the discount

A queue for Wagamamas inside the shopping centre in Leeds. The government today ruled out extending the discount 

People queue up outside Wagamama in Windsor on Monday. Diners are able to claim 50% on meals up to £10 per head

People queue up outside Wagamama in Windsor on Monday. Diners are able to claim 50% on meals up to £10 per head 

Some stores are vowing to continue the discount out of their pockets to try and sustain demand. Pictured is  McDonald's in Leeds

Some stores are vowing to continue the discount out of their pockets to try and sustain demand. Pictured is  McDonald’s in Leeds 

Pinz Sanie, 43, (middle) went to Wagamama's in Westfield today with her partner and children Simren, 9, Rohan, 7. She said: ‘We’ve done it every day at loads of different places like Nando’s... We’ve been queuing for 15 minutes to get in as soon as it opens at 12'

Pinz Sanie, 43, (middle) went to Wagamama’s in Westfield today with her partner and children Simren, 9, Rohan, 7. She said: ‘We’ve done it every day at loads of different places like Nando’s… We’ve been queuing for 15 minutes to get in as soon as it opens at 12’

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get into Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13 and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and told there were five people ahead of them

Sylvia Betterman had tried to get into Wahaca with her three children Jacob, 18, Stella, 13 and Lydia, 14, but they were turned away and told there were five people ahead of them

Liezle Greyling, 49, was at a Wetherspoons in Shepherds Bush, West London, with her daughters Lilia, 12, and Mea, 9. 'Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds,' she told MailOnline. 'It's amazing. We've been using the scheme a lot, and have been to places such as Tortilla and Nando's'

Liezle Greyling, 49, was at a Wetherspoons in Shepherds Bush, West London, with her daughters Lilia, 12, and Mea, 9. ‘Three breakfasts and juices cost us eight pounds,’ she told MailOnline. ‘It’s amazing. We’ve been using the scheme a lot, and have been to places such as Tortilla and Nando’s’

The Eat Out to Help Out scheme is ending today as its creator Rishi Sunak thanks diners for taking part – but urged them to keep going to restaurants 

Solicitor Sarah Campbell, 29, was standing next to them in the queue while she waited for a friend. ‘The weather has also played a factor,’ she said.

‘I live in a flat, so when it was sunny I went out to beer gardens a lot, as I don’t work on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

‘The discount was nice but it wasn’t a dealbreaker. I think it did give a lot of people confidence, though. And heaven knows we need it at the moment.’ 

Wetherspoon’s plans to keep discounts after Eat Out scheme ends 

Pub operator JD Wetherspoon is launching its own reduced prices scheme after the end of the Government’s Eat Out to Help Out initiative.

The move will see prices on a range of meals and drinks reduced from Monday to Wednesday until November 11.

The cheaper prices will start on Tuesday, following the end of the Government’s drive to encourage people to eat out by subsidising meals during August.

Wetherspoon said prices on some of its meals and drinks will be cheaper than those available in takeaways.

Chairman Tim Martin said: ‘The Government’s Eat Out to Help Out scheme was extremely popular with our customers and a great boost to the hospitality industry.

‘We are keen to offer our customers a superb choice of food and drink at great value for money prices.

‘Our offer means that a classic beef burger in our pubs will be even better value than McDonald’s.’

Manee, 19, and Meena, 19, from Southall, queued for just under 10 minutes to get a table at Wagamamas in Westfield in White City, London. 

Manee said: ‘We would queue for about 20 minutes before we’d walk away.’

She was unsure if Wagamamas even did the Eat Out to Help Out, and said she never gets the chance to do it during the day because of her job in a charity shop. 

Asked what they were going to get, Manee, who works at another Wagamama branch in Heathrow Airport, said: ‘We usually get the sides, so we’ll get them today.’  

Piers Morgan also praised the scheme, tweeting: ‘The ‘Eat Out to Help Out’ scheme has been a great success & helped so many restaurants/cafes/pubs get back on their feet. 

‘Once again, Rishi Sunak appears to be the only member of the Govt who knows what he’s doing in this crisis.’ 

Announcing the end of the scheme, Mr Sunak said: ‘As the Eat Out to Help Out scheme draws to a close, I want to say thank you to the diners who have fallen back in love with their local.

‘To the managers who have spent weeks ensuring their restaurants were safe and to the chefs, waiters and waitresses across the country who have worked tirelessly, sometimes with more customers than they’ve ever had before – all helping to protect 1.8 million jobs in the hospitality sector.

‘The scheme reminded us why we as a nation love dining out and I urge diners to maintain the momentum to help continue our economic recovery.’

The idea of keeping the scheme going was said to be a matter of live discussion within the Treasury.

One minister told The Daily Telegraph: ‘The scheme has been a big success in general, but it’s all very well going to your local restaurant down the road for a cheap meal when those restaurants are already doing good business because of people working from home.

‘It is the destination restaurants in city centres that need the help, and that’s where resources should be concentrated.’

But a Treasury source has now ruled this out.  

Diners queuing outside a Bill's at the Westfield shopping centre in White City, west London, for the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme today

Diners queuing outside a Bill’s at the Westfield shopping centre in White City, west London, for the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme today 

On social media, diners joked it was 'food binge day' and they would try to 'eat as much as possible'. Pictured are the queues outside Westfield

On social media, diners joked it was ‘food binge day’ and they would try to ‘eat as much as possible’. Pictured are the queues outside Westfield 

Ryan Palmer said he was having 'breakfast on Rishi while we still can' as he shared this photo of a tasty meal at Indian restaurant Dishoom

Ryan Palmer said he was having ‘breakfast on Rishi while we still can’ as he shared this photo of a tasty meal at Indian restaurant Dishoom 

 

Diners celebrated their meal deals today as they made the most of the scheme before it ended

Diners celebrated their meal deals today as they made the most of the scheme before it ended

Diners celebrated their meal deals today as they made the most of the scheme before it ended, including Chris Goldsmith who visited McDonalds 

Piers Morgan praised the scheme as a 'great success' and claimed Mr Sunak was 'the only member of the government who knows what he's doing'

Piers Morgan praised the scheme as a ‘great success’ and claimed Mr Sunak was ‘the only member of the government who knows what he’s doing’ 

One Twitter user said they couldn't book a table 'for love nor money' due to the popularity of the government's discount

One Twitter user said they couldn’t book a table ‘for love nor money’ due to the popularity of the government’s discount 

‘Greedy chancer’ tried to blag a weeks’ worth of meals at a chippy – and then whinged on social media when staff refused 

By Rory Tingle for MailOnline 

A ‘greedy’ chancer tried to blag a weeks’ worth of meals at a chippy using the Eat Out to Help Out scheme – and then whinged on social media when staff refused.

The man was eating alone at Eglinton Diner and Fish Fry in Saltcoats, North Ayrshire, when he ordered eight meals – one to eat, and seven to take away, in a bid to get them at half price.

He told workers it was ‘to keep him going for the next few days’.

Furious staff told him the Eat Out to Help Out scheme was not supposed to be used like that, but the ‘greedy’ customer took his complaint to social media posting a review to the business’s Facebook.

The man wrote: ‘Attitude totally pants and insulting, lost out on eight different meals, KFC loved your money, long time customer never be back.’

A post from Eglinton Diner and Fish Fry said: ‘I can only assume you were the person in the diner yesterday who was dining alone but asked to order eight suppers.

‘One to eat and the other seven to take away to keep you going for the next few days. Please read the rules on the Eat Out to Help Out scheme as this is certainly not the way it is intended to work.

‘It is people with your greed that puts schemes like this in jeopardy and we value our business too much to be bending rules for greedy customers. I hope you enjoyed your meal.’

Eglinton Diner shared the review from the ‘obviously upset customer’.

The business posted: ‘I think the attitude of the staff was utter disbelief. Trying to order eight meals for one person so he can get them half price. Unbelievable!’

A number of chains and establishments have said they will continue the practice into September despite Government financial support being withdrawn.

Wetherspoon’s said prices on a range of meals and drinks will be reduced from Monday to Wednesday until November 11.

The cheaper prices will start on Tuesday, following the end of the Government’s drive to encourage people to eat out by subsidising meals during August.

Wetherspoon said prices on some of its meals and drinks will be cheaper than those available in takeaways. 

Chairman Tim Martin said: ‘The Government’s Eat Out to Help Out scheme was extremely popular with our customers and a great boost to the hospitality industry.

‘We are keen to offer our customers a superb choice of food and drink at great value for money prices.

‘Our offer means that a classic beef burger in our pubs will be even better value than McDonald’s.’ 

Jemima Ferguson, marketing director at itsu, said: ‘The scheme has been hugely successful for us at itsu.

‘It’s helped to drive over 50% more transactions during the Eat Out to Help Out period each week, without negatively impacting our trade during the rest of the week.

‘We believe ripple effects from the positive impact of this scheme will be felt for many months to come.’

Meg Ellis, of Honest Burgers, said: ‘We’ve been really encouraged by the shift in energy in our sector as a result of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme.

‘We’ve been able to bring more people back into work as a result of the scheme, which they have really enjoyed, and for some of our friends operating independently in the sector this has been the opportunity to confidently re-open for the first time.

‘Seeing the vitality coming back into their restaurants has been a joy to witness.’

The boss of the Greene King pub chain told the BBC that that city centre sites were still struggling, especially in London, despite some of its 3,100 sites seeing a significant boost in sales.  

Andy Lennox, who runs two Zim Braii restaurants in Bournemouth and also founded The Wonky Table network of around 500 hospitality firms, said: ‘Trade’s record-breaking at the moment.

‘It is a false bubble so we’re not getting too excited, but Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday are up probably 100% [on last year]. The week’s up 50%. Thursday has pivoted – it’s the new Monday.’

Customers queuing outside Franco Manca in Southampton for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme today

Customers queuing outside Franco Manca in Southampton for the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme today 

Diners taking part in the Eat Out To Help Out scheme in Windsor today as thousands across the country rushed to take advantage

Diners taking part in the Eat Out To Help Out scheme in Windsor today as thousands across the country rushed to take advantage 

Bills in Southampton was full of diners using the discount today, with outdoor tables making it easier to manage the crowds

Bills in Southampton was full of diners using the discount today, with outdoor tables making it easier to manage the crowds 

There was also a socially-distanced queue outside Bill's in Southampton as customers raced to take advantage of the programme before it ends

There was also a socially-distanced queue outside Bill’s in Southampton as customers raced to take advantage of the programme before it ends 

Diners at a Cafe Rouge in Windsor. Chancellor Rishi Sunak says the scheme has given a financial boost to restaurants and helped get people back into the habit of eating out

Diners at a Cafe Rouge in Windsor. Chancellor Rishi Sunak says the scheme has given a financial boost to restaurants and helped get people back into the habit of eating out 

Customers waiting outside the Ivy in Winchester to take their seats for the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme

Customers waiting outside the Ivy in Winchester to take their seats for the last day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme 

Diners enjoying sit-down meals outside a branch of Balans Soho Society at Westfield shopping centre in White City, west London

Diners enjoying sit-down meals outside a branch of Balans Soho Society at Westfield shopping centre in White City, west London 

A queue of hungry customers outside Wagamamas in Westfield, which is one of the largest shopping centres in Europe

A queue of hungry customers outside Wagamamas in Westfield, which is one of the largest shopping centres in Europe 

DOMINIC LAWSON: Now we’ve got the appetite back, we must all keep eating for Britain

Good luck getting into your favourite restaurant today, if you haven’t booked long in advance. 

This Bank Holiday Monday is the final day of the Eat Out to Help Out scheme, in which diners can claim 50 per cent of the cost of their meal (up to a maximum of £10 a head) from the Government. 

Or rather, from all of us, as taxpayers. 

But this is no time for cavilling. Chancellor Rishi Sunak‘s ploy was regarded by Treasury civil servants as so abnormal that he compelled them to authorise it with a ‘ministerial direction’. 

David Williams, owner of the Baltic Market in Liverpool, said businesses 'underestimated' the effect Eat Out to Help Out would have

David Williams, owner of the Baltic Market in Liverpool, said businesses ‘underestimated’ the effect Eat Out to Help Out would have

This is the formal instrument required when a Permanent Secretary (the most senior civil servant in each department) believes a spending proposal is ‘improper or represents poor value for money’. 

But the sheer scale of its take-up — in the first three weeks, no fewer than 64million discounted meals were claimed in over 80,000 restaurants and pubs — has helped rescue our hospitality industry at a time of unprecedented commercial peril. 

Jolt 

Perhaps the civil servants believed the scheme would simply subsidise meals that would be sold anyway, or would just shift business to the early part of the week (the discount was available from Monday to Wednesday). 

But the extent of the surge in demand, even above levels in normal, pre-Covid times, suggests it has done much more than that. 

As David Williams, owner of the Baltic Market, which houses a dozen catering businesses in a converted 18th century brewery in Liverpool, observed earlier this month: ‘People, myself included, underestimated the effect it was going to have.

Chancellor is warned not to hammer middle classes on fuel, capital gains and pensions to pay off coronavirus bill 

Senior Tories last night urged Rishi Sunak to abandon plans for a £30billion tax grab over fears it could throttle an economic recovery.

The Chancellor is said to be considering a huge fiscal raid in this autumn’s Budget to plug the gaping hole in public finances after record spending on coronavirus.

Many of the proposals would hammer the middle classes and better-off.

Fuel duty, capital gains tax, corporation tax, the pension triple lock and pension tax relief are all said to be in the firing line

The proposals are reported to have been drawn up by Treasury officials as ‘options’ for ministers in the Budget, which is pencilled in for November.

No decisions have yet been taken by ministers about how to deal with a deficit expected to top £300billion this year.

But one Cabinet minister said the Chancellor would face a revolt if he pressed ahead with the tax grab.

‘Tax rises of this sort would be the worst possible economic policy to adopt right now,’ the minister said. 

‘It would guarantee a much deeper recession. Large parts of the economy are still fragile – we need to nurture it, not throttle it.’

‘Most restaurants in Liverpool now, you can’t even get a table for the whole of August, Monday to Wednesday.’ 

The scheme sent a jolt of electricity through a population which was reluctant to eat out at all, not necessarily through fear of infection but just inertia or a habit acquired during lockdown. 

But there is a second, much less popular Government policy which must also take some credit for the salvation (temporary or not) of countless small businesses associated with domestic tourism. 

This is the sudden imposition of quarantine restrictions on Britons returning from certain other countries. 

First it was Spain, then France, then Croatia. 

Now even ultra-hygienic Switzerland has been removed from the list of nations with a quarantine-free ‘travel corridor’ to the UK. 

In all these cases, the requirement that returning travellers should self-isolate for a fortnight has been rushed through with little warning, based on reported increases in Covid infections in the countries concerned. 

That is the official line, and is justified publicly as a means of limiting further outbreaks of the virus in the UK. 

It is therefore odd that, unlike in other countries, the quarantining process here seems to be so ineffectually invigilated. 

As the journalist Jenni Russell observed: ‘I have come through the e-gates at Heathrow twice this summer and watched fellow passengers passing through en masse without either filling in their forms or being stopped. 

‘There’s no reinforcement of the quarantine message on arrival, no leaflets, no sense that this really matters.’ 

Hotspots

It is almost as if the real reason for the apparently capricious imposition of these requirements was to deter people from taking their holidays overseas and instead spend their money here — as an additional inducement to Sunak’s Eat Out to Help Out scheme. 

If so, it has worked — and not just in such obvious hotspots as Cornwall, where one in three private sector jobs are connected to tourism. 

James Mason, the chief executive of Welcome to Yorkshire, said: ‘We’ve been doing a roaring trade since July . . . supply can’t meet demand and many businesses are saying they’re booked into September and October.’ 

The chairman of the Wales Tourism Alliance, Andrew Campbell, happily reported that ‘self-catering is flying. It’s been booked out to an unprecedented level’. 

In 2018, international tourists spent just shy of £20billion in Britain. 

So, given that the big spenders, notably the Chinese and the Americans, were always going to stay away from the UK this summer, it was essential for British families to replace the absent foreign tourists. 

That does seem to have happened. Indeed, we have just returned from a fortnight in Cornwall. 

In our case, this was standard: in the more than a quarter of a century since our children were born, we have spent all but two of our summer holidays in either Cornwall or the Isles of Scilly. 

We were braced for the Cornish roads to be even more busy than usual in August — and they were. 

Crowded 

But still, the astoundingly beautiful coastal path was in no way crowded, and on our walks from the cottage we rented, we would generally be able to take in those glorious views with no one else within eyeshot. 

The point about tourism is that while the most well-known beauty spots are always inundated with holidaymakers, you don’t have to go far off the beaten track for less competitive sightseeing. 

Some of the most sought-after restaurants in England, including the Heron Inn at Malpas, near Truro, dropped out of Eat Out to Help Out as they simply couldn't cope with the volume of people turning up

Some of the most sought-after restaurants in England, including the Heron Inn at Malpas, near Truro, dropped out of Eat Out to Help Out as they simply couldn’t cope with the volume of people turning up

But it was noticeable how some of the most sought-after restaurants had dropped out of Eat Out to Help Out: they simply couldn’t cope with the volume of people turning up. 

So we paid full whack for lunch at the Heron Inn, with its gorgeous estuary vista high above Truro. 

Please note, we were not having a ‘staycation’. 

This term, properly used to describe those who take their holiday while staying at home, is now being applied to all vacations taken in one’s own country, which is a nonsense. 

Actually, the term ‘staycation’ describes what millions of Britons did for months during lockdown and furlough. 

But now the eating out and holidaying in Britain habits have returned, they need to continue even in the absence of Sunak’s ingenious stimulus. 

Your nation’s hostelries need you. 



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Simon Case: Prince William’s former private secretary ‘set to be UK’s new top civil servant’ | Politics News


A former private secretary to Prince William will reportedly be named the UK’s new top civil servant.

Simon Case will be named as cabinet secretary on Tuesday, the Financial Times reports.

He spent almost two years working as the Duke of Cambridge’s right-hand man, before temporarily moving to Downing Street earlier this year to help with the government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Image:
Sir Mark Sedwill announced in June that he would be stepping down from the role

Government sources have declined to comment on the reports, but a Cabinet Office spokesman said: “An official announcement on the new cabinet secretary will be made on Tuesday 1 September.”

It comes after Sir Mark Sedwill announced in June that he would be stepping down from the role.

His decision followed reports of clashes with Dominic Cummings, Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s chief adviser.

Analysis: He’s a Brexit expert – but critics will dismiss Case as the PM’s “yes man”
By Jon Craig, chief political correspondent

Simon Case instantly became a leading contender for the top job in the Civil Service after Boris Johnson poached him from Prince William to work in 10 Downing Street.

A former private secretary to David Cameron when he was prime minister, the 41-year-old had been working at Kensington Palace for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

It’s claimed the PM rang William personally and asked permission to borrow his invaluable “Man Friday”. Mr Case won’t be returning to the Royals now, though few in Whitehall thought that was likely.

Mr Case is credited with turning William and Kate into a PR success story and it’s claimed his experience with the dysfunctional Royal household will help him cope with the PM’s controversial aide Dominic Cummings.

When Mr Case took on the newly created post of permanent secretary in Downing Street, it was also clear Sir Mark Sedwill’s days as cabinet secretary were numbered and the ex-courtier was the PM’s choice to succeed him.

Just like the Royals, he wears tweed suits and a Barbour jacket and is described as “slightly pompous”.

But crucially, he is seen as a Brexit expert, which is no doubt why he got the job. Critics will claim, however, that this makes him the PM’s “yes man”.



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