Severe thunderstorm warning for Southern Tablelands area | Goulburn Post


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The Southern Tableland area will be on high alert this week with a severe thunder storm warning and temperatures set to rise throughout the week. The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) have suggested that Southern Tableland residents prepare by ensuring the safety of themselves and their surrounding neighbours. Read: Restrictions to ease in NSW, putting Christmas carols back on the agenda Read More: Hurricane Fall has a chance of taking out the Golden Guitar Awards Read Further: Shirley Roberts celebrates 50 years as a nurse in Crookwell and Goulburn “There is a severe thunderstorm warning for the Southern Tablelands and parts of the Illawarra region also,” the BOM spokesperson said. “Damaging winds will be the main concern with large hail possible. “We would advise for people to move their cars under shelter and away from trees. “If they have any loose items around the house, balcony or in the backyard to secure them down or pack them away. “Also ensure things are at least eight metres away from power lines.” As the week progresses the Southern Tablelands area may experience higher heat levels that appear likely to reach official Heatwave levels. A fire warning will be in place for parts of northern New South Wales as hot and windy conditions impact the region, and there are active fires in the area. “By the end of this week it could be very hot,” BOM spokesperson said. “We advise to follow all fire warnings and be safe in the hot, dry conditions.” Did you know the Goulburn Post is now offering breaking news alerts and a weekly email newsletter? Keep up-to-date with all the local news: sign up below.

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Severe thunderstorm warning issued for parts Melbourne as rain lashes state


“The situation will continue to be monitored and further warnings will be issued if necessary.”

However, Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Richard Russell said Melburnians will likely see more rain over the next few hours before it eases to a drizzle on Monday morning.

“There will be rain with occasional thunder for the majority of Melbourne. In the next two hours [from 7pm] it will mostly clear the Melbourne area but we will still see further rain return to the city in the early hours of Monday morning and there may also be lightning,” he said.

“By the time most people get up it should have eased to drizzly rain and there won’t be much of it by late morning.”

There will then be a “rollercoaster of temperatures” throughout next week, however it will stay mostly dry.

Ballarat copped a drenching on Sunday, recording 26.4 millimetres of rain. Most of this – 22 millimetres – fell in the half hour to 5.45pm. The average November rainfall for Ballarat is 55 millimetres.

The weather station at Bullengarook, near Bacchus Marsh, recorded 19 millimetres of rain on Sunday in about an hour.

On Sunday night, the State Emergency Service was advising those in affected areas to check any loose outdoor items are secured and vehicles are under cover or away from trees.

They also advised residents to stay indoors and away from windows, and to avoid travelling if possible.

In the Melbourne area, the SES had 36 call outs in the six hours to 8pm, with the Melton and Craigieburn units the busiest. Of the 36 requests for help, 19 were for building damage, ten were for flooding and six for trees down.

A severe thunderstorm warning is also current for parts of the Central, Mallee, South West and North Central districts, with warnings for damaging winds, large hailstones and heavy rainfall.

The thunderstorms are being cause by a broad trough sitting right across Victoria, creating a warm and unstable air mass, Mr Russell said.

The strongest winds gusts recorded on Sunday were 89 km/h at Yarrawonga 1.06pm, 87 km/h at Rutherglen 1.44pm and 78 km/h at Albury Airport at 2.22pm.

Casterton recorded 10 millimetres of rain in 9 minutes around 3pm, and Hamilton recorded 9.4 millimetres in 6 minutes around 4pm.

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Severe thunderstorm warning issued for parts Melbourne as rain lashes state


“The situation will continue to be monitored and further warnings will be issued if necessary.”

However, Bureau of Meteorology senior forecaster Richard Russell said Melburnians will likely see more rain over the next few hours before it eases to a drizzle on Monday morning.

“There will be rain with occasional thunder for the majority of Melbourne. In the next two hours [from 7pm] it will mostly clear the Melbourne area but we will still see further rain return to the city in the early hours of Monday morning and there may also be lightning,” he said.

“By the time most people get up it should have eased to drizzly rain and there won’t be much of it by late morning.”

There will then be a “rollercoaster of temperatures” throughout next week, however it will stay mostly dry.

Ballarat copped a drenching on Sunday, recording 26.4 millimetres of rain. Most of this – 22 millimetres – fell in the half hour to 5.45pm. The average November rainfall for Ballarat is 55 millimetres.

The weather station at Bullengarook, near Bacchus Marsh, recorded 19 millimetres of rain on Sunday in about an hour.

On Sunday night, the State Emergency Service was advising those in affected areas to check any loose outdoor items are secured and vehicles are under cover or away from trees.

They also advised residents to stay indoors and away from windows, and to avoid travelling if possible.

A severe thunderstorm warning is also current for parts of the Central, Mallee, South West and North Central districts, with warnings for damaging winds, large hailstones and heavy rainfall.

The thunderstorms are being cause by a broad trough sitting right across Victoria, creating a warm and unstable air mass, Mr Russell said.

The strongest winds gusts recorded on Sunday were 89 km/h at Yarrawonga 1.06pm, 87 km/h at Rutherglen 1.44pm and 78 km/h at Albury Airport at 2.22pm.

Casterton recorded 10 millimetres of rain in 9 minutes around 3pm, and Hamilton recorded 9.4 millimetres in 6 minutes around 4pm.

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Record grass pollen in Canberra to blame for hay fever, thunderstorm asthma warnings


Coronavirus has brought months of lockdowns, isolation and staying at home, but for some, the need to shut up the house and isolate due to an invisible health threat isn’t new.

Thunderstorm asthma warnings issued for the ACT yesterday and today have seen many take extra precautions and stay inside.

For Eloise Robertson, who suffers from asthma triggered by pollen, it’s not the first time she’s had to bunker down in her house, and it probably won’t be the last.

“My whole world basically stops,” she said.

“When there’s thunderstorm warnings I will just stay in the house, pretty much stay in my bedroom.

Once, Eloise could manage her allergy symptoms to avoid triggering an asthma flare-up. But after this year’s horror hay fever season in the ACT, her doctor has had to prescribe her a stronger medication.

And she’s not alone.

ACT Pharmacy Guild president Simon Blacker said he had seen a lot more Canberrans with prescriptions for hay fever relief this year.

“Given the seriousness of their symptoms this year, they are looking for the best treatment they can get,” he said.

ANU points finger at grass pollen

Spring in Canberra has brought the highest rates of pollen recorded by the Australian National University’s pollen monitoring program in over five years.

Experts say Canberra is recording high levels of grass pollen.(ABC News: Greg Nelson)

Professor Simon Haberle, from the ANU’s pollen monitoring program, said a wetter than average spring was prolonging the problem.

Imported oaks, birches and other introduced trees in older suburbs that produce large pollen loads wear a lot of the blame for the city’s particularly bad hay fever seasons.

But Mr Haberle said Canberra’s hay fever seasons were made worse because of the region’s grass types, which many people are allergic to.

“We have quite a lot of grass, particularly to the north-west and north and east of us, and people are quite allergic to those different grass types, particularly rye grass, which is the strongest allergy grass we’ve got in our region.”

And while peaks of pollen loads in September were due to introduced trees, Paterson’s Curse and grasses are more likely to be the pollen culprits at this time of year.

High levels of pollen are expected for the rest of the week.



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Storm activity, high pollen levels spark fears of thunderstorm asthma in Victoria


The Bureau of Meteorology says there is a “high risk” of thunderstorm asthma across parts of Victoria today, where a combination of high pollen levels, gusty winds, rain and thunderstorms are forecast.

The areas most at risk are in western Victoria. They include the Mallee, Wimmera, Northern Country and South West forecast districts.

The risk is moderate in the Central area, which includes Melbourne, and in the North Central, West and South Gippsland weather districts.

Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) forecaster Richard Russell said anyone with hay fever could attest pollen levels were currently very high.

They usually peak for a six-week period beginning in November.

Mr Russell said the current high pollen levels, combined with potential thunderstorm activity in the west of the state, later moving east into central areas, could create a “low-end” severe weather event.

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The worst thunderstorm asthma event occurred in Melbourne in 2016, when more than 3,500 people presented at hospital emergency departments with symptoms of asthma.

Ten people died and the majority of those affected were young people.

In another event earlier this month, emergency departments in southern New South Wales saw a surge in cases, with more than a dozen people seen at emergency departments in the Riverina.

Not every storm triggers asthma

A severe thunderstorm warning is in place for north-western parts of Victoria as a slow-moving pressure trough crosses the state.

With that there could be damaging winds and heavy rainfall, the BOM warns.

A severe weather warning for damaging winds is also in place for elevated parts of the Central district into Gippsland and the North East forecast districts.

“The trough that is driving this is slowly moving eastwards and will reach central parts of the state in the late afternoon, including Melbourne in the early evening,” Mr Russell said.

“The biggest risk in Melbourne will be early this evening, but it’s an outside chance from afternoon through to early hours of the morning.”

Mr Russell said not every storm on a high-pollen day triggered thunderstorm asthma because every storm was different.

“The behaviour and interaction between an area of high pollen, the way it reacts with the gustiness of thunderstorms, you need to concentrate that pollen into the outflow from the thunderstorm,” he said.

“The concern with thunderstorm asthma is you really need the right combination of high or extreme pollen levels across a broad area of the state and also gusty thunderstorms — or any really good mechanism to concentrate that pollen into a small area at any one time — so that you really are exposed to a really high dose of the pollens, as thunderstorms typically do.”



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Queensland weather: Brisbane hit by hailstones the size of tennis balls as thunderstorm strikes


Queensland has been smashed by tennis ball-sized hailstones with a warning more are likely to fall as a series of dangerous supercell thunderstorms race across the state’s southeast.

Severe thunderstorms formed along the Great Dividing Range from the NSW border to Wide Bay, north of the Sunshine Coast, on Saturday before pushing towards the coast throughout the afternoon.

More are expected during the evening, the Bureau of Meteorology warns.

“The situation is volatile and continuing to change quickly,” a spokesman said.

“Some of these storms are fast-moving and fast-forming, so people should consider whether they need to be outside or on the road at the moment.”

“These thunderstorms are a significant threat to property and life,” the bureau tweeted.

Camera IconHuge hailstones which fell in Springfield. Credit: facebook/Cody Jack/supplied

Giant 14cm hail has been reported in Logan, south of Brisbane.

Hail up to 7cm in diameter fell at Ipswich and the Lockyer Valley, west of the city.

“We don’t often see severe storms on this scale,” meteorologist Lauren Pattie told AAP.

Some of the hailstones were the size of tennis balls.
Camera IconSome of the hailstones were the size of tennis balls. Credit: facebook/Cody Jack/supplied

“For us to get a number supercell thunderstorms all with large to giant hail, significant wind gusts, and the damage from that, across that wide area is exceptional.”

A roof reportedly collapsed in Logan, and dozens of photos and videos of battered cars and homes have been posted on social media.

Queensland Fire And Emergency Service reports more than 1300 people have called for help.

Trains from Nerang & Kuraby on the Gold Coast have been suspended due to fallen powerlines.

Hail from Beaudesert and Yarrabilba.
Camera IconHail from Beaudesert and Yarrabilba. Credit: facebook/Off the Radar Storm Chasers Queensland;Australia/supplied

Energex reports more than 42,000 electricity users are without power.

Severe thunderstorm warnings remain in place for Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Redland City, Moreton Bay, parts of Ipswich and Gympie, Somerset, South Burnett, the Scenic Rim, and the Sunshine Coast.

People are urged to move cars undercover, secure loose outdoor items and stay indoors.

A general severe thunderstorm warning is also current for Wide Bay and Burnett, Southeast Coast and parts of Capricornia and Darling Downs and Granite Belt Forecast Districts.

A huge hailstone from Springfield.
Camera IconA huge hailstone from Springfield. Credit: facebook/South West Storm Chasers/supplied

The storms come less than a week after two days of storms delivered a month worth of rain and flash flooding to some parts of the state, including Brisbane.

Tennis ball-sized hailstones pummelled the region on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Beachmere, near Caboolture, recorded 80mm of rain in an hour and 70mm fell on the Upper Lockyer, west of Brisbane.

Tiaro, north of the Sunshine Coast, recorded 51mm in an hour, with 22mm of it falling in five minutes.

Flash flooding affected some Brisbane areas at the height of the storms on Tuesday, which was the wettest October day in the city since 2010.



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Thunderstorm asthma strikes early in Riverina, emergency department on alert


Emergency departments in southern New South Wales are preparing for an increase in people needing treatment for thunderstorm asthma, with dangerous conditions expected over the weekend.

Murrumbidgee Local Health District (MLHD) saw a surge in cases last weekend, with more than a dozen presentations of thunderstorm asthma at emergency departments across the Riverina.

Thunderstorm asthma can be deadly, with nine people dying after an event in Melbourne in 2016.

MLHD respiratory clinical nurse consultant Robyn Paton said another thunderstorm asthma alert had been issued for Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

“It’s the sort of asthma that comes on very quickly,” she said.

“We’ve got lots of pollens in the air at the moment because we’re having a really good season and lots of intermittent rain.

Ms Paton said last weekend’s thunderstorm asthma alert came a week earlier than normal. And with increased rain, she expected the danger period would go beyond the usual four-week period.

She said their predicted timeline for the most dangerous period in the Riverina was usually the two weeks before and after the Melbourne Cup on the first Tuesday of November.

“Sometimes we need to extend [the timeline] if the pollen in the air is still ripening and we’re still getting thunderstorms in late spring,” Ms Paton said.

Ms Paton said thunderstorm asthma could affect people who hadn’t had asthma before, and it was common among those people with hayfever who often breathed through their mouths.

She encouraged Riverina residents with asthma to stay indoors this weekend, carry an asthma puffer and wear a mask when going outside.

“If your medication doesn’t hold you, please don’t hesitate to call an ambulance or get someone to drive you to the emergency department,” Ms Paton said.

“I think what’s happened since COVID, people are a little loath to come to the emergency department or even to go to their GPs because they’re concerned about the COVID presentations.”

Asthma sufferers already on alert

Asthma sufferer Craig Giles has started exercising indoors to avoid getting sick.(Supplied: Craig Giles)

Temora resident Craig Giles, who suffers from asthma and hayfever, said he had started exercising inside.

Mr Giles said he would increase his medication and exercise over the coming months to manage the increased risk.

“This last month the weather has been really unpredictable,” he said.

“Normally we don’t start this sort of business until early November, but it started four to six weeks ago and the season is ahead of itself for sure.”



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Lightning Crackles Through Colorful Clouds Near Marco Island During ‘Strong’ Thunderstorm



A thunderstorm forming off the coast of southwest Florida on Wednesday, August 12, prompted weather warnings in the region, according to the National Weather Service (NWS). The NWS warned of gusty winds and lightning from the “strong” thunderstorm in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. This video, filmed by photographer Scott Schilke in Marco Island, shows lightning strikes over the ocean on Wednesday. Credit: Scott Schilke via Storyful



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Lightning Strikes as Thunderstorm Rolls Over Minneapolis Area


Lightning Strikes as Thunderstorm Rolls Over Minneapolis Area

Thunderstorms moved through the Twin Cities region of Minnesota on Wednesday, August 12, bringing gusty winds and heavy rain, according to the National Weather Service (NWS). This video shows repeated lightning strikes on Wednesday as storm clouds loom over Corcoran, west of Minneapolis. The NWS said severe storms were forecast throughout the week, with a possibility of tornadoes, “damaging” winds, and “very large” hail on Friday. Credit: Jordan Meyer via Storyful



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