Building to start: Perfect timing to boost recovery



Last night a rescission motion which would have effectively stalled the project was voted down meaning the motion from last Thursday – to proceed with the build – was carried forward.FULL STORY: Another marathon: protest sets dramatic tone for CCS voteCoffs Harbour Mayor Councillor Denise Knight has been one of the four Councillors passionately behind the project. The others who have consistently backed it are Crs Sally Townley, George Cecato and Michael Adendorff while Crs Keith Rhoades, Tegan Swan, Paul Amos and John Arkan have made several moves to halt it.RELATED: Councillors break the deadlock in fiery meeting“This project will be a true game-changer for Coffs Harbour as we move forward from being a small coastal city to a bustling regional hub,” Mayor Knight said.“Coffs Harbour needs this project, not only to help our recovery from the pandemic and support our transition after the bypass, but also to bring our cultural and civic facilities up to the standard our beautiful region and its community deserves. “I have always supported the development of cultural facilities for Coffs Harbour, and I am so excited to finally see our new building take shape.”The offer was put forward by Lipman Pty Ltd (Lipman), the company that won the Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) tender for the building.The Design and Construct contract with Lipman includes finalisation of the building’s design and construction of the building in accordance with that design.Lipman is required to deliver the building for the agreed cost they have offered to finalise design and construction of the project.“Having Lipman involved in the Detailed Design process alongside BVN Architecture has given them a strong and very thorough understanding of the scope and brief of the project,” Coffs Harbour City Council’s General Manager Steve McGrath said.“In addition, the ECI process has resulted in strong interest from local tradies, with approximately 55 per cent of the cost of the building materials and labour being supplied by locals. We believe that this project is perfectly timed and placed to support local and region wide recovery from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.“The total cost of the project is now expected to be $81.27 million, which is approximately $4.75 million (6.2 per cent) over the $76.52 million project budget, established in 2018,” explained Mr McGrath.He said the project is still very much deliverable within Council’s long-term financial plan, especially considering that the current interest rate is 2.3 per cent compared to the rate of 4.0 per cent originally budgeted for. “The main contributor to the increased project cost is the greater than expected escalation in construction costs over the past two and a half years.”The building is due to be finished by the end of 2022.

Thank you for dropping in and checking out this story regarding National and NSW news and updates called “Building to start: Perfect timing to boost recovery”. This story was posted by My Local Pages as part of our local and national news services.

#Building #start #Perfect #timing #boost #recovery



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V8 Supercars 2021: Mount Panorama 500, Bathurst, news, results, timing, update, Shane van Gisbergen,


For the first time in 50 years, a Supercars season began at the same track where the prior season concluded.

Bathurst. Mount Panorama – the most hallowed track in Australian motorsport. And just like last season’s finale, it was Shane van Gisbergen who emerged triumphant this weekend, claiming back-to-back victories the perfect start to his title bid.

Commentators declared it a “big, big statement” as the 31-year-old veteran chases his second Supercars crown, after winning in 2016.

Stream the Repco Mt Panorama 500 Live & Free on Kayo Freebies. No Credit Card Needed. Register now and stream instantly >

Van Gisbergen completes Bathurst double

3:17

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#Supercars #Mount #Panorama #Bathurst #news #results #timing #update #Shane #van #Gisbergen



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‘Christmas gift’ or ‘bad timing’? Brexit deal greeted with joy and foreboding around world | Brexit


Britain should be congratulated for coming to a Brexit deal with the EU, but be wary of the very different world they are walking into, international analysts have said.

Outside Europe, politicians, experts, and media took a short break from Christmas and the pandemic to welcome the end of Britain’s long and torturous Brexit process, but there was little in the way of celebration.

In the New York Times, Mark Landler reflected on how much Britain, and the world, had changed since the 2016 vote, when a narrow majority of people were “tempted by an argument that the country would prosper by throwing off the bureaucratic shackles of Brussels”, develop new industries and cut its own trade deals.

But now the world is more protectionist and nationalistic, and vulnerable post-pandemic.

“The world is now dominated by three gargantuan economic blocs – the United States, China and the European Union,” wrote Landler. “Britain has finalised its divorce from one of them, leaving it isolated at a time when the path forward seems more perilous than it once did.”

In that same piece, Thomas Wright, the director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution cut to the chase: “Becoming a global free trader in 2016 is a bit like turning into a communist in 1989. It’s bad timing.”

In a comprehensive step through of the politics behind history, Linton Besser, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Europe correspondent, predicted Boris Johnson, ever the populist, would swing with the wind on whether the deal was working out.

“The prime minister will continue to trumpet the breakthrough for as long as it’s advantageous to do so,” wrote Besser. “Then, in the not-too-distant future, when electoral profit beckons, he and his allies will find a way, whatever rhetorical contortions are required, to condemn the EU all the same.

The deal will be reprosecuted – perhaps by Johnson himself – in pursuit of another chance to wave a kipper at those pesky Europeans from up on a stage.

“And that’s because Europe has for decades been a very handy straw man for many in the establishment, not least Johnson himself, who paved a path to politics with wildly exaggerated newspaper columns pouring scorn on European cooperation.”

Chinese state media reports on Brexit were viewed more than 140m times on microblogging platform, Weibo, but they did not appear to publish any Chinese-language commentary.

The state-backed tabloid, Global Times, said the deal was “a Christmas gift not only for the British economy but also for the Covid-19-battered global financial market”.

The editorial said the world’s markets were still struggling with the pandemic, and looking for “less chaos”. It commended the British government’s “last ditch efforts” to secure a deal under so much pressure. “There is no denying that a no-deal Brexit would lead to a dramatic change in the life and employment prospects of the Britons,” it said.

In English, Xinhua said that while the deal will “certainly help avoid a Brexit cliff edge”, it was not “a Christmas gift for all”.

Other English-language state media, including CGTN and China Daily, went with an op-ed by former MEP Jonathan Arnott. Arnott wrote that the last-minute nature of the deal – on Christmas eve and a week before deadline – was “breathtaking, though hardly surprising”. “The world is changing,” he said, and how the UK deals with the growing markets of China, India, and South America will be “pivotal”.

“One way or another, it must demonstrate a clear strategy: unless such trading relationships are signed, sealed and delivered, the UK cannot claim to have gained economically from Brexit.”

Japan’s finance minister, Taro Aso, told reporters he welcomed the deal, and “it should be highly valued that a broad agreement was clinched between the two”.

New Zealand’s minister for foreign affairs, Nanaia Mahuta, also congratulated both sides. “We welcome continued stability and continuity,” she tweeted.

A US state department official said the US was committed to negotiating a comprehensive free trade agreement with the UK. “We support the UK in its sovereign decision to depart the EU, and we look forward to continued strong relationships with both the UK and EU,” they said.

The Times of India reported the agreement left “critical parts of the relationship to be worked out later”, and WIO News reported the two parties had “finally agreed” on a deal, and led on reassuring comments by the EU’s Ursula von der Leyen, that the two sides would “stand shoulder to shoulder to deliver on our common global goals”.

However it also reported on economists’ warnings that “leaving the EU’s orbit will still hurt” the world’s current sixth largest economy.





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‘Christmas gift’ or ‘bad timing’? Brexit deal greeted with joy and foreboding around world | Brexit


Britain should be congratulated for coming to a Brexit deal with the EU, but be wary of the very different world they are walking into, international analysts have said.

Outside Europe, politicians, experts, and media took a short break from Christmas and the pandemic to welcome the end of Britain’s long and torturous Brexit process, but there was little in the way of celebration.

In the New York Times, Mark Landler reflected on how much Britain, and the world, had changed since the 2016 vote, when a narrow majority of people were “tempted by an argument that the country would prosper by throwing off the bureaucratic shackles of Brussels”, develop new industries and cut its own trade deals.

But now the world is more protectionist and nationalistic, and vulnerable post-pandemic.

“The world is now dominated by three gargantuan economic blocs – the United States, China and the European Union,” wrote Landler. “Britain has finalised its divorce from one of them, leaving it isolated at a time when the path forward seems more perilous than it once did.”

In that same piece, Thomas Wright, the director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution cut to the chase: “Becoming a global free trader in 2016 is a bit like turning into a communist in 1989. It’s bad timing.”

In a comprehensive step through of the politics behind history, Linton Besser, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Europe correspondent, predicted Boris Johnson, ever the populist, would swing with the wind on whether the deal was working out.

“The prime minister will continue to trumpet the breakthrough for as long as it’s advantageous to do so,” wrote Besser. “Then, in the not-too-distant future, when electoral profit beckons, he and his allies will find a way, whatever rhetorical contortions are required, to condemn the EU all the same.

The deal will be reprosecuted – perhaps by Johnson himself – in pursuit of another chance to wave a kipper at those pesky Europeans from up on a stage.

“And that’s because Europe has for decades been a very handy straw man for many in the establishment, not least Johnson himself, who paved a path to politics with wildly exaggerated newspaper columns pouring scorn on European cooperation.”

Chinese state media reports on Brexit were viewed more than 140m times on microblogging platform, Weibo, but they did not appear to publish any Chinese-language commentary.

The state-backed tabloid, Global Times, said the deal was “a Christmas gift not only for the British economy but also for the Covid-19-battered global financial market”.

The editorial said the world’s markets were still struggling with the pandemic, and looking for “less chaos”. It commended the British government’s “last ditch efforts” to secure a deal under so much pressure. “There is no denying that a no-deal Brexit would lead to a dramatic change in the life and employment prospects of the Britons,” it said.

In English, Xinhua said that while the deal will “certainly help avoid a Brexit cliff edge”, it was not “a Christmas gift for all”.

Other English-language state media, including CGTN and China Daily, went with an op-ed by former MEP Jonathan Arnott. Arnott wrote that the last-minute nature of the deal – on Christmas eve and a week before deadline – was “breathtaking, though hardly surprising”. “The world is changing,” he said, and how the UK deals with the growing markets of China, India, and South America will be “pivotal”.

“One way or another, it must demonstrate a clear strategy: unless such trading relationships are signed, sealed and delivered, the UK cannot claim to have gained economically from Brexit.”

Japan’s finance minister, Taro Aso, told reporters he welcomed the deal, and “it should be highly valued that a broad agreement was clinched between the two”.

New Zealand’s minister for foreign affairs, Nanaia Mahuta, also congratulated both sides. “We welcome continued stability and continuity,” she tweeted.

A US state department official said the US was committed to negotiating a comprehensive free trade agreement with the UK. “We support the UK in its sovereign decision to depart the EU, and we look forward to continued strong relationships with both the UK and EU,” they said.

The Times of India reported the agreement left “critical parts of the relationship to be worked out later”, and WIO News reported the two parties had “finally agreed” on a deal, and led on reassuring comments by the EU’s Ursula von der Leyen, that the two sides would “stand shoulder to shoulder to deliver on our common global goals”.

However it also reported on economists’ warnings that “leaving the EU’s orbit will still hurt” the world’s current sixth largest economy.





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MotoGP 2020: Portuguese Grand Prix live, timing, live stream, Jack Miller, grid position, Moto2, Remy Gardner, pole position, news


Australia’s top MotoGP and Moto2 hopes, Jack Miller and Remy Gardner, are chasing glory with front-row starts in the final round of their respective seasons in Portugal.

Miller (Pramac Ducati) will start third in the premier class finale at Portimao, ahead of new world champion Joan Mir, in the MotoGP race starting at 1am AEDT.

Earlier Gardner will start on pole in the Moto2 season finale, after he earned the third pole position of his career and second of the season (Austria). One of Enea Bastianini, Sam Lowes, Luca Marini or Marco Bezzecchi will be crowned champion in the race that begins at 11:20pm AEDT.

Watch the final race of the 2020 MotoGP Season Live & On-Demand on Kayo. New to Kayo? Get your free trial now & start streaming instantly >

LIVE TIMING: Follow the Portuguese Grand Prix here



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Timing is everything when it comes to qualifying for this home seller’s tax break


If you sell your main home for a healthy profit, the federal income tax home-sale gain exclusion can be one of the most valuable tax breaks on the books. You can potentially exclude (pay no federal income tax on) up to $250,000 of home-sale profit or up to $500,000 if you’re a married joint-filer. Good.

Here’s the second installment of our two-part series on how to take advantage. For Part 1, see this previous Tax Guy.   

Qualification rules

Singles can exclude home-sale gains up to $250,000 and married joint-filing couples can exclude up to $500,000. However, you must pass the following tests to be eligible.

Ownership test

You must have owned the property for at least two years during the five-year period ending on the sale date. Two years means periods aggregating 24 months or 730 days.   

Use test

You must have used the property as your principal residence for at least two years during the same five-year period.  

Periods of ownership and use need not overlap. For example, you could rent a house and use it as your principal residence for Years 1 and 2 and then buy it and rent it out to others for Years 3 and 4. If you sold the house in Year 5, you would pass both the ownership and use tests and qualify for the gain exclusion privilege.  

Joint-filer test

To qualify for the larger $500,000 joint-filer exclusion, at least one spouse must pass the ownership test and both spouses must pass the use test. 

Anti-recycling rule

If you excluded an earlier gain within the two-year period ending on the date of a later sale, you are ineligible for the gain exclusion break for the later sale. In other words, the gain exclusion privilege cannot be “recycled” until two years have passed since you used it last.  

Joint filers with one home

To qualify for the larger $500,000 joint-filer gain exclusion, at least one spouse must pass the ownership test and both spouses must pass the use test. When only one spouse passes both tests, the maximum gain exclusion is only $250,000. However, if you and your spouse own two houses, you can each potentially separate $250,000 exclusions.      

Example 1: Say you get married and immediately sell your valuable home, which you had owned and used as your principal residence for many years, for a whopping $600,000 gain. You then file a joint return for the year of sale with your new spouse. Unfortunately, you do not qualify for the larger $500,000 joint-filer exclusion, because your spouse does not pass the use test. Therefore, you must report a $350,000 taxable gain ($600,000 profit – $250,000 exclusion) on your return for the year of sale. Ouch.

Tax-saving strategy: Instead of selling immediately, you and your new spouse should consider living in your home for at least two years after the marriage. That way, you will qualify for the larger $500,000 joint-filer, because you will pass the ownership test and both you and your spouse will pass the use test. 

Joint filers with two homes

If you own two homes and file jointly, each spouse’s eligibility for the $250,000 exclusion is determined separately, and each spouse is considered to own each property for any period the property is actually owned by either spouse. Actual ownership doesn’t matter as long as you file jointly. 

Example 2: You and your spouse have a commuter marriage and own two homes. You work in L.A. and live most of the time in a condo there. Your spouse works in D.C. and lives most of the time in a townhouse there. The larger $500,000 joint-filer exclusion is not available for either home, because both you and your spouse must pass the use test to qualify for the bigger exclusion. However, two separate $250,000 exclusions are potentially available in this situation. Here’s how that would work. 

Assume both homes have been owned for more than a few years. As long as you file jointly in the year when a home is sold, the ownership test will be passed for that home, regardless of whether the home is owned jointly or separately. That’s because, as stated earlier, each spouse considered to own a property for any period the property is actually owned by either spouse. So, if you sell the L.A. home, you pass both the ownership test and the test for that property. If the D.C. home is sold, your spouse would pass both tests for that property. 

So, on a joint return, you would qualify for a $250,000 exclusion if you sell the L.A. home. Your spouse would qualify for a separate $250,000 exclusion if the D.C. home is sold. This would be true whether you sell both homes in the same year or in separate years. 

Married but filing separate returns 

If you and your spouse file separate returns, it gets more complicated, but you can still potentially qualify for two separate $250,000 exclusions. In the separate return scenario, actual ownership matters. 

If you and your spouse own a property jointly and you both live there, you can potentially exclude up to $250,000 of your share of the gain on your separate return if the property is sold. Your spouse can do the same. 

If you and your spouse own two properties separately and live in them separately, you can potentially exclude up to $250,000 of gain on the sale of your property. Your spouse can do the same on the sale of his or her property.       

Surviving spouse  

If your spouse died and you have not remarried, you cannot file a joint return for any year after the year in which your spouse died. Not too long ago, this little rule could have prevented you from taking advantage of the larger $500,000 exclusion that is allowed to joint filers, because you would have been limited to the smaller $250,000 single-filer exclusion if you sold your home in a year after the year in which your spouse died. Our beloved Congress addressed this problem but did not completely cure it. 

Under today’s rules, an unmarried surviving spouse can claim the larger $500,000 gain exclusion for a principal residence sale that occurs within two years after the spouse’s date of death, assuming all the other requirements for the $500,000 exclusion were met immediately before the spouse died. Beware: since the two-year eligibility period for the larger exclusion begins on the date of the spouse’s death, a sale that occurs in the second calendar year following the year of death but more than 24 months after the date of death won’t qualify for the larger $500,000 gain exclusion. You have to get the timing just right to qualify.   

Reduced gain exclusion when you don’t meet all the timing rules 

What happens when you fail to meet all the aforementioned qualification rules? For example, you might sell your home for a healthy profit after living there only 18 months instead of the required two years. Or you might sell your current home less than two years after excluding gain from the sale of a previous residence. Must you pay tax on the entire gain when you make such a “premature” sale? Not necessarily. IRS regulations allow you to claim a reduced exclusion (some fraction of the full $250,000 or $500,000 amount) in quite a few circumstances.    

The reduced exclusion equals the full $250,000 single-filer or $500,000 joint-filer exclusion (whichever applies) multiplied by a fraction. The numerator is the shorter of: (1) the aggregate period of time the property is owned and used as your principal residence during the five-year period ending on the sale date or (2) the period between the last sale for which you claimed an exclusion and the sale date for the home currently being sold. The denominator is two years (12 months or 730 days). That sounds more complicated than it really is. Here are some clarifying examples.  

Example 3: You and your spouse file jointly. Due to a job change that required a long-distance move, you sold your home, which you had owned and used as your principal residence for 11 months. Because you bought at exactly the right time, you snagged a $200,000 gain. You are entitled to a reduced gain exclusion of $229,167 ($500,000 x 11/24). So, you can exclude the entire gain for federal income tax purposes.   

Example 4: You sold your previous home 15 months ago and claimed the gain exclusion privilege. Due to health reasons, you are now about to close on the sale of your current home, which you’ve owned and used as your principal residence for 15 months, for a $125,000 gain. You are entitled to a reduced gain exclusion of $156,250 ($250,000 x 15/24). So, you can exclude the entire gain for federal income tax purposes.    

Eligibility for reduced exclusion

The reduced exclusion deal is only available when you sell your home due to: 

* A change of place of employment.

* Health reasons.

* Other unforeseen circumstances, as specified by the IRS. 

For details on eligibility for a reduced exclusion, see IRS Publication 523 (Selling Your Home) at www.irs.gov.

The bottom line

As I said at the beginning, the home-sale gain exclusion break can be one of the best tax-saving deals of your life. And you can qualify in some circumstances that might surprise you. 



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Bathurst 1000 2020: V8 Supercars, live, start time, how to watch, timing, full grid, Cameron Waters, weather forecast, storm,


Bathurst 1000, V8 Supercars, race start 11am AEDT: LIVE –

It’s finally here. The Great Race. A 2020 Supercars season like no other will be capped off at the pinnacle of motorsport in the southern hemisphere: Mount Panorama.

161 laps of mayhem and madness kicks off at 11am AEDT.

While Cameron Waters will start from pole position after a lightning-fast Top 10 Shootout lap, it is water and lightning of a different sort that could prove decisive to who tastes glory – or defeat – on Sunday.

Rain played a decisive role in Friday’s qualifying, arriving late in the session and cruelling multiple contenders’ chances, before forecasted storms failed to materialise during Saturday’s Shootout.



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Bathurst 1000 2020, V8 Supercars live: Top 10 Shootout, weather updates, start time, timing, practice results


Bathurst 1000, V8 Supercars, Saturday Practice and Top 10 Shootout (5.05pm AEDT) LIVE –

A thrilling qualifying session saw Lee Holdsworth claim a shock provisional pole on Friday, but the threat of wild weather could shake up Saturday afternoon’s Top 10 Shootout.

Rain hit Mount Panorama late in an exciting qualifying session which had earlier been red-flagged by a Jake Kostecki shunt, the weather helping Holdsworth to cling to the top of the leaderboard in his Tickford Mustang.

With Sunday’s race start already moved forward half an hour to 11am due to looming wild weather, Saturday’s Shootout could also be heavily impacted by the heavens.

Follow Saturday’s action in the live blog below!



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Tweak Your Carb Timing to Optimize Your Health and Physique


Even the most casual bodybuilder knows a little something about “protein timing” — but if you’re in need of a quick refresher, it refers to the distribution of protein throughout the day, and before/after training sessions, for optimal muscle protein synthesis. There are different studies and philosophies on how this should be accomplished, depending on your overall goals, and if you train regularly then you probably have a system down pat already.

But are you paying attention to “carb timing?” If you’re not, you might be putting yourself at a disadvantage when it comes to your health and physique. You’re also probably not alone, according to Gabrielle Lyon, D.O., a functional medicine physician specializing in muscle-centric medicine.

“​The research for carbs and high-intensity exercise is very clear,” Lyon says. “The research about meal distribution for metabolic flexibility and body composition is not as well-established and definitely not widely-recognized.”

So why should you pay attention to how you distribute carbs throughout the day? It primarily has to deal with “metabolic flexibility,” or your body’s ability to adapt to different metabolic demands (aka the stress you put on it through eating and training).

We know that the consumption of any carbohydrates requires an insulin response so that our cells can absorb the sugars from the macronutrient for energy. Eat too many carbs, though, and your body might not be able to keep up.

“Research studies have shown that the body can use (burn) and store up to about 40 grams of carbs after a meal,” Lyon says. “Any meal that exceeds 30-40 g of carbs requires large insulin response that shuts down fat metabolism. This limits the body’s ability to burn fats, increases fluctuations in blood glucose and increases hunger.”

For the average person focused on keeping body fat to a minimum, Lyon recommends keeping carbs lower at the beginning of the day and higher at the end of it.

“The research has shown the first meal, breakfast, that limit carbs and increase protein maximizes metabolic flexibility for use of fatty acid fuels,” she says. “Carbs consumed at the last meal, dinner, have the least impact on metabolism and appetite.”

Of course, the strategy wouldn’t be the same for people who spend hours in the weight room and need plenty of energy for their training sessions. “Athletes focused on high-intensity performance may want more carbs earlier in the day,” Lyon says.

Keep in mind, that’s only for people who do intense training sessions — i.e. powerlifters or professional CrossFitters. “For routine training, normal meals are usually sufficient,” Lyon says.

But no matter what skill level you’re at, be sure your pre-workout carbs don’t involve foods high on the glycemic index (or foods that create a large spike in blood sugar), Lyon says.

Most people know that carb replenishment after a training session is vital to replace glycogen that’s been burned by the body. But Lyon says most gym-goers don’t have to stress too much about it. “For routine training, normal meals are usually sufficient,” she says.





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Timing Your Carb and Protein Intake


By Team PrettyFit

Before we begin, let’s cover the basics.

1. Having slightly more muscle mass allows your body to have a faster metabolism, and therefore allows you to burn more fat.
2. It takes both carbs and protein to build muscle.
3. By timing your carbohydrate and protein intake properly, you can maximize the benefits of your workout.

Your body needs proper fuel in order to operate— plain and simple. Combined with resistance training, it takes both carbohydrates and protein to build muscle and thereby naturally raise your metabolism.

For more info on weight training and fat loss, check out “5 Reasons Weightlifting is Critical For Fat Loss.”

However, the best results don’t just happen from eating the right amount of protein and carbs; they come from eating the right amount of protein and carbs at the right time.

By optimizing the timing of your carbohydrate and protein intake, you can maximize results from your workouts and acquire the physique results you’re looking for.

Studies have shown that proper exercise timing can benefit muscle recovery, growth and athletic potential and body composition— which means the right eating habits can lead to significant changes in your body composition.

Pre-Workout Nutrition Is Key

There’s nothing worse than attempting to workout with low blood sugar. You get headaches, your body aches and you feel much weaker than your normal self.

In order to raise your blood sugar for a workout, it’s always smart to eat a snack or light meal 30 minutes to an hour before your workout.

That being said, it also turns out that proper pre-workout nutrition is vital to maximizing your muscle growth (protein synthesis) after your workout. This will in turn help you raise your metabolism.

According to studies, eating protein and carbs before a workout has an even greater influence on muscle growth than protein and carbs ingested post workout.

Takeaway: Always eat a snack or light meal that contains both carbohydrates and protein before a workout, even if it’s as simple as a protein shake and a banana.

Intra-Workout Nutrition

Intra-workout nutrition? That’s right, studies show that ingesting carbohydrates during your workout allows your muscles to perform more work.

This means potential for more reps and results simply by adding a few carbohydrates to your workout.

Now we’re not saying you need to chug a whole Gatorade or eat a bar during every workout. However, if you perform high-intensity training that calls for a large amount of reps like CrossFit or HIIT, you may want to consider the occasional carb beverage during your workout.

Takeaway: Eating or drinking carbohydrates during your most intense workouts can lead to better muscle performance and result in more gains.

Post-workout nutrition

Though the studies we cited earlier show that pre- and intra-workout nutrition is critical for hitting your body composition goals, studies also show that post-workout nutrition is still important. Consuming carbs and protein during early stages of recovery has been shown to positively affect exercise performance.

However, gone are the days of the “30-minute window” after you work out. As long as you eat sometime after your workout, you’re golden.

Timing Your Carb Intake

ConclusionAs a takeaway, worry more about your pre-workout nutrition than your post-workout nutrition.

Review your workout timing and the eating habits that surround them. Do these habits match up with your goals to change your body composition by increasing muscle and burning fat?

Do you work out in the morning on an empty stomach?

Do you work out right after work on an empty stomach?

Do you practice fasted cardio in the morning?

We recommend the following:

1. Try to find space in your schedule to eat a light snack of protein and carbs 30 minutes to an hour pre-workout.
2. Consider drinking a carbohydrate-rich beverage during intense workouts.
3. Don’t stress over eating right after a workout, as long as you eat at some point.





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