Here’s what you can expect with today’s Moreton weather



Moist air with a dew point of 19.5 at 5am today means the temperature will feel like 23.5 degrees making the day slightly humid. The relative humidity is 79 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 29, which is 1 degree lower than yesterday’s max.
Warmer conditions are expected on three of the next six days, with the mercury climbing above today’s maximum on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.
The chance of rain today is 30 per cent.
Showers are less likely tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slim (5 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 12. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be south-southeast around 20 km/h in the morning shifting to east-southeast around 30 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Tuesday, December 1: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 30.
Wednesday, December 2: Sunny. Min – 22. Max – 31.
Thursday, December 3: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 28.
Friday, December 4: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 30.
Saturday, December 5: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 29.
Sunday, December 6: Mostly sunny. Min – 22. Max – 29.



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Here’s what you can expect with today’s Dubbo weather



A dew point of 12.6 at 5am today means the temperature will feel like a comfortable 19.1 degrees. The relative humidity is 44 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 42, which is 1 degree higher than yesterday’s max.
Today’s maximum will be topped on Tuesday, but cooler conditions are expected on five of the next six days.
The chance of rain today is 20 per cent.
Showers are less likely tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slim (5 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 12. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be north around 37 km/h in the morning shifting to west-southwest around 29 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Monday, November 30: Sunny. Min – 17. Max – 37.
Tuesday, December 1: Very hot and mostly sunny. Min – 17. Max – 44.
Wednesday, December 2: Partly cloudy. Min – 18. Max – 32.
Thursday, December 3: Partly cloudy. Min – 15. Max – 34.
Friday, December 4: Partly cloudy. Min – 16. Max – 37.
Saturday, December 5: Partly cloudy. Min – 17. Max – 37.



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Here’s what you can expect with today’s Ipswich weather



Moist air with a dew point of 15 at 2am today means the temperature will feel like 19.7 degrees making the day slightly humid. The relative humidity is 82 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 38, which is 5 degrees higher than yesterday’s max.
Today’s maximum will be topped on Wednesday, but cooler conditions are expected on five of the next six days.
The chance of rain today is 5 per cent.
There is a similar chance of showers tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slim (5 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 12. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be north-northwest around 16 km/h in the morning shifting to north-northeast around 20 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Monday, November 30: Hot and mostly sunny. Min – 20. Max – 36.
Tuesday, December 1: Hot. Partly cloudy. Min – 20. Max – 37.
Wednesday, December 2: Very hot and mostly sunny. Min – 20. Max – 42.
Thursday, December 3: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 33.
Friday, December 4: Hot. Possible shower. Min – 20. Max – 37.
Saturday, December 5: Hot and mostly sunny. Min – 19. Max – 37.



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The ghost of Lady Chatterley’s lover protecting today’s feeble-minded


He became an icon to some and an effigy to others for suggesting that dominance hierarchies are as old as evolution. This is where the lobsters come in. Peterson uses their territorial and mating habits as an archetype of the behaviours that play out across different species, including humanity. He urges readers not to behave like a defeated lobster, but to change their habits – to literally stand up straight – to create a positive feedback loop that will improve their brain chemistry and set them on the path of success.

Among the most surprisingly controversial of Peterson’s recommendations is the idea that you should “clean up your own room”. It seems he hit a raw nerve with activists when he added: “I don’t know how you can protest the entire economic structure of the world if you can’t keep your room organised.”

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It is interesting to contrast the reaction to Peterson with the reaction to another book Penguin released the same year as 12 Rules. Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility has triggered no anguish within staff ranks. It is also a type of self-help book, which encourages white people to see everything through a prism of race in order to become actively anti-racist. DiAngelo’s central point, that we are often blind to the structures we are socialised into, is sound. She argues that, as a consequence of this socialisation, white people can’t help being racist. It seems she knows a lot of people who recite anti-racist mantras but have never engaged with the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to change. She therefore takes this hypocrisy to be typical of all white people and charges companies up to $US30,000 a session to lecture their employees on it.

That is not to say she is insincere. DiAngelo’s personal anecdotes repeatedly describe situations in which she has behaved badly toward black people in her life, or had racist thoughts. She seeks atonement for her own racism in foisting a very Catholic concept of the indelible stain of whiteness on those who are Caucasian by birth or have been conferred honorary whiteness by virtue of their success as a race. Mind you, the idea she perpetuates of whiteness as equated with success is a pernicious piece of racism in itself. For what it’s worth, DiAngelo is Jewish.

So the great irony of these two self-help books is that their authors seem to need them most. But neither seem particularly helped by the insights in their defining tomes. Granted, Robin DiAngelo has faired better, taking in tens of thousands consulting fees off the back of her bestseller, while Peterson spiralled into anxiety and dependence following the release of his.

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Nonetheless, they have made a big impact in the Western world. Contrasting the theses of the books offers us a window into the new political alignments taking form. If Peterson’s core thesis is “we must fix ourselves”, DiAngelo’s thesis is “we must fix other people”.

This perhaps explains why the authors have been labelled conservative and progressive respectively, or at least why people identifying with these classifications gravitate towards the author with whom they perceive themselves as aligning. Penguin junior staff are drawn to the notion of fixing a radicalised father or protecting a non-binary friend from being “negatively affected”.

Mervyn Griffith-Jones, the barrister who led the prosecution of Penguin over the publication of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, would have approved. As he announced in his opening statement, the novel was not something “you would even wish your wife or servants to read”.

This notion that we must guard the supposedly feeble-minded and less educated under our protection from ideas that might lead them into dissent from our own worldview sits comfortably with the demands of the Penguin activists. The circle of history is almost complete; both the publisher and the lobster might be surprised at the side of history they’ve ended up occupying.

Parnell Palme McGuinness is managing director, strategy and policy, at strategic communications firm Agenda C.

Most Viewed in National

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The ghost of Lady Chatterley’s lover protecting today’s feeble-minded


He became an icon to some and an effigy to others for suggesting that dominance hierarchies are as old as evolution. This is where the lobsters come in. Peterson uses their territorial and mating habits as an archetype of the behaviours that play out across different species, including humanity. He urges readers not to behave like a defeated lobster, but to change their habits – to literally stand up straight – to create a positive feedback loop that will improve their brain chemistry and set them on the path of success.

Among the most surprisingly controversial of Peterson’s recommendations is the idea that you should “clean up your own room”. It seems he hit a raw nerve with activists when he added: “I don’t know how you can protest the entire economic structure of the world if you can’t keep your room organised.”

Loading

It is interesting to contrast the reaction to Peterson with the reaction to another book Penguin released the same year as 12 Rules. Robin DiAngelo’s White Fragility has triggered no anguish within staff ranks. It is also a type of self-help book, which encourages white people to see everything through a prism of race in order to become actively anti-racist. DiAngelo’s central point, that we are often blind to the structures we are socialised into, is sound. She argues that, as a consequence of this socialisation, white people can’t help being racist. It seems she knows a lot of people who recite anti-racist mantras but have never engaged with the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to change. She therefore takes this hypocrisy to be typical of all white people and charges companies up to $US30,000 a session to lecture their employees on it.

That is not to say she is insincere. DiAngelo’s personal anecdotes repeatedly describe situations in which she has behaved badly toward black people in her life, or had racist thoughts. She seeks atonement for her own racism in foisting a very Catholic concept of the indelible stain of whiteness on those who are Caucasian by birth or have been conferred honorary whiteness by virtue of their success as a race. Mind you, the idea she perpetuates of whiteness as equated with success is a pernicious piece of racism in itself. For what it’s worth, DiAngelo is Jewish.

So the great irony of these two self-help books is that their authors seem to need them most. But neither seem particularly helped by the insights in their defining tomes. Granted, Robin DiAngelo has faired better, taking in tens of thousands consulting fees off the back of her bestseller, while Peterson spiralled into anxiety and dependence following the release of his.

Loading

Nonetheless, they have made a big impact in the Western world. Contrasting the theses of the books offers us a window into the new political alignments taking form. If Peterson’s core thesis is “we must fix ourselves”, DiAngelo’s thesis is “we must fix other people”.

This perhaps explains why the authors have been labelled conservative and progressive respectively, or at least why people identifying with these classifications gravitate towards the author with whom they perceive themselves as aligning. Penguin junior staff are drawn to the notion of fixing a radicalised father or protecting a non-binary friend from being “negatively affected”.

Mervyn Griffith-Jones, the barrister who led the prosecution of Penguin over the publication of Lady Chatterley’s Lover, would have approved. As he announced in his opening statement, the novel was not something “you would even wish your wife or servants to read”.

This notion that we must guard the supposedly feeble-minded and less educated under our protection from ideas that might lead them into dissent from our own worldview sits comfortably with the demands of the Penguin activists. The circle of history is almost complete; both the publisher and the lobster might be surprised at the side of history they’ve ended up occupying.

Parnell Palme McGuinness is managing director, strategy and policy, at strategic communications firm Agenda C.

Most Viewed in National

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Here’s what you can expect with today’s Rockhampton weather



Moist air with a dew point of 19.9 at 2am today means the temperature will feel like 27.9 degrees making the day slightly humid. The relative humidity is 77 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 32, which is 1 degree lower than yesterday’s max.
Warmer conditions are expected on five of the next six days, with the mercury climbing above today’s maximum on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
The chance of rain today is 30 per cent.
Showers are less likely tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slight (20 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 12. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be east around 15 km/h in the morning increasing to east around 25 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Saturday, November 28: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 31.
Sunday, November 29: Mostly sunny. Min – 19. Max – 33.
Monday, November 30: Sunny. Min – 19. Max – 35.
Tuesday, December 1: Sunny. Min – 20. Max – 34.
Wednesday, December 2: Mostly sunny. Min – 21. Max – 36.
Thursday, December 3: Partly cloudy. Min – 21. Max – 33.



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Here’s what you can expect with today’s The Inner-West weather



Moist air with a dew point of 17.5 at 3pm today means the temperature will feel like 32.4 degrees making the day slightly humid. The relative humidity is 41 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 30, which is 4 degrees higher than yesterday’s max.
Warmer conditions are expected on three of the next six days, with the mercury climbing above today’s maximum on Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday.
The chance of rain today is 10 per cent.
Showers are less likely tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slim (5 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 11. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be north-northwest around 4 km/h in the morning shifting to east-northeast around 19 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Friday, November 27: Mostly sunny. Min – 17. Max – 25.
Saturday, November 28: Mostly sunny. Min – 18. Max – 36.
Sunday, November 29: Hot. Becoming windy. Min – 22. Max – 39.
Monday, November 30: Partly cloudy. Min – 17. Max – 24.
Tuesday, December 1: Partly cloudy. Min – 17. Max – 31.
Wednesday, December 2: Possible shower. Min – 18. Max – 25.



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Here’s what you can expect with today’s Fairfield weather



Moist air with a dew point of 18.9 at 5am today means the temperature will feel like 22.5 degrees making the day slightly humid. The relative humidity is 87 per cent.
The highest expected temperature today is 31, which is 1 degree higher than yesterday’s max.
Warmer conditions are expected on three of the next six days, with the mercury climbing above today’s maximum on Thursday, Saturday and Sunday.
The chance of rain today is 70 per cent.
Showers are less likely tomorrow with the Bureau of Meteorology forecasting a slim (10 per cent) chance of rain.
The UV index is predicted to be 11. There is an extreme risk of harm from sun exposure. Unprotected skin can burn within minutes in today’s conditions. Experts suggest looking for shade and avoiding sun exposure around noon. General advice is to take all precautions such as using eye protection, sunscreen and covering up.
Winds will be north around 14 km/h in the morning shifting to west-northwest around 22 km/h in the afternoon.
Details for the next six days:
Tuesday, November 24: Partly cloudy. Min – 16. Max – 25.
Wednesday, November 25: Partly cloudy. Min – 15. Max – 26.
Thursday, November 26: Sunny. Min – 14. Max – 32.
Friday, November 27: Partly cloudy. Min – 16. Max – 29.
Saturday, November 28: Hot and sunny. Min – 16. Max – 38.
Sunday, November 29: Mostly sunny. Min – 21. Max – 35.



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