Dirty hotel sheets tell the tale of fewer tourists on the Gold Coast


While Easter tourism data won’t officially be released for some months, a Gold Coast laundry business said its tally of dirty sheets and towels from hotels revealed the first week of school holidays had been tough.

“We saw nearly 30 to 40 per cent less than we would have sold at Easter pre-COVID,” Princes Linen Services State Operations Manager Jaspinder Singh said.

The factory at Burleigh Heads is home to the Gold Coast’s biggest washing machine, which launders up to 10,000 sheets and 20,000 towels a week from hotels and resorts across the Gold Coast and northern New South Wales.

“We had more casual staff ready because one would have thought that people are going to come from all over Australia to the Gold Coast but having that snap lockdown in Brisbane didn’t help.

“We are not out of school holidays yet. We are still putting our hopes high, but already the damage has been done.”

A manager of one high-rise accommodation tower on the Gold Coast said the pandemic had even changed guest expectations.

“They wipe everything with wet wipes, and God help us if there’s any kind of residue or anything,” the manager of Boulevard North Holiday Apartments at Broadbeach, Marion Simon said.

“We’re right across the road from the beach, so we get an incredible amount of moisture build-up.”

“People will come in and go, ‘No, the tabletop’s dirty we’re not staying here,’ and we’ll say, It’s not dirty, it’s moisture.'”

“People have become unrealistic in their expectation of things because everyone’s just so frightened of this thing,” she said. 

Destination Gold Coast CEO Patricia O’Callaghan said the Easter holidays had so far been a mixed bag for accommodation providers and tour operators.

“We know there are operators who weren’t able to recover some of the lost business from the Greater Brisbane lockdown, but there are positive reports that bookings have strengthened into the first week of the school holidays and we hope for more to materialise,” Ms O’Callaghan said.

“Encouragingly, Gold Coast Airport reported its strongest weekend since the pandemic began with 50 return flights a day and up to 15,000 daily passengers direct to our doorstep.”

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COVID-battered Malta to pay tourists who visit this summer


FILE PHOTO: Tourists at Upper Barrakka Gardens admire the view of Grand Harbour in Valletta, Malta
FILE PHOTO: Tourists at Upper Barrakka Gardens admire the view of Grand Harbour in Valletta, Malta, July 31, 2017. REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi/File Photo

April 9, 2021

VALLETTA (Reuters) – Aiming to revive its tourism industry and get ahead of rival destinations, Malta plans to offer foreign visitors a handout of up to 200 euros ($238.10) each if they stay at least three days on the Mediterranean island this summer.

Tourism Minister Clayton Bartolo announced the scheme on Friday, saying that with most COVID restrictions expected to be lifted by June 1, tourists booking summer holidays directly through local hotels would receive the handout.

World Travel and Tourism Council data show the tourist industry directly and indirectly accounts for more than 27% of Malta’s economy, but the sector has been hammered by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The country attracted more than 2.7 million foreign visitors in 2019 but figures have fallen by more than 80% since the virus was detected in March 2020.

Bartolo said tourists booking accommodation at a five-star hotel will get 100 euros from Malta’s Tourism Authority, which will be matched by the hotel for a total of 200 euros.

In a similar arrangement, those opting for a four-star hotel will receive a total of 150 euros and those booking a three-star hotel will receive 100 euros.

The grant grows by 10% when bookings are made with hotels on the smaller Maltese island of Gozo, three kilometres (two miles) north of the mainland.

“The scheme is aimed at putting Malta’s hotels in a very competitive position as international tourism restarts,” Bartolo said.

It is expected to benefit some 35,000 visitors.

Malta has the highest virus vaccination rate in the European Union, having given at least one dose to 42% of adults.

It has seen a sharp drop in new COVID-19 cases, with the positivity rate – the percentage of tests that show a positive result – down to 2.6%, and the government has been urging the EU to introduce vaccine passports to facilitate travel.

Bartolo said he was also having talks to encourage travel between Malta and Britain, whose inhabitants account for a third of tourists in the former British colony.

($1 = 0.8400 euros)

(Reporting by Christopher Scicluna, editing by Gavin Jones and Susan Fenton)

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Central Australia sees first signs of recovery as tourists flock to the Red Centre




The area is becoming such a popular destination there’s concern there may not be enough staff to cater for the influx of travellers. Isabel Moussalli reports.

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Chinese tourists discovered it, now locals are flocking to Sea Lake


Before tourism took off in Sea Lake the town’s future appeared bleak as businesses folded and locals worried there was little to keep young people from being lured to bigger population centres.

Julie Pringle near painted silos. Credit:Jason South

Sea Lake has also joined the silo art trail, helping to consolidate its place on the local travel circuit.

A group of locals banded together to rescue the Royal Hotel on the main street. A range of accommodation is now available and houses have sold so they can be listed on AirBnB.

Local farmer and tourism business operator Rohan Mott found a niche with domestic travellers after opening a gallery displaying photographs of Lake Tyrrell.

Mr Mott had already been running a successful accommodation business for a couple of years. But he concedes the decision to open the gallery in 2020 may have seemed a little odd.

“A lot of people looked at us and thought ‘what the hell are you doing? Why would you have a gallery in Sea Lake’?” he says.

But Mr Mott says he saw an “opportunity greater than international tourists” for the town.

“It’s where I live, where my kids are growing up. I want them to be proud of where they’re growing up.”

Mr Mott says finding staff to work is now among his biggest problems but he is still planning to install a kitchen in the gallery so he can add a cafe.

Farmer Rohan Mott on Lake Tyrrell at dawn.

Farmer Rohan Mott on Lake Tyrrell at dawn. Credit:Jason South

“We think this is a sustainable industry and certainly has growth potential.”

Buloke Shire mayor Daryl Warren says tourism is now picking up across the Mallee region after the extended lockdown delivered a heavy blow for tourism businesses last year.

“It kicked them hard,” he says.

But he believes communities are “cautiously optimistic” that domestic tourism will continue and the signs so far are positive.

“Caravans are everywhere,” he says. “People are out and about.”

And Cr Warren says real estate agents are reporting they cannot get enough houses to sell while some young people who left the region are starting to move back.

But he credits local tourists with helping to preserve Sea Lake’s tourism-based economy.

“It’s the Victorians who kept it going once we came out of hard lockdown.”

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Chinese tourists discovered it, now locals are flocking to Sea Lake


Before tourism took off in Sea Lake the town’s future appeared bleak as businesses folded and locals worried there was little to keep young people from being lured to bigger population centres.

Julie Pringle near painted silos. Credit:Jason South

Sea Lake has also joined the silo art trail, helping to consolidate its place on the local travel circuit.

A group of locals banded together to rescue the Royal Hotel on the main street. A range of accommodation is now available and houses have sold so they can be listed on AirBnB.

Local farmer and tourism business operator Rohan Mott found a niche with domestic travellers after opening a gallery displaying photographs of Lake Tyrrell.

Mr Mott had already been running a successful accommodation business for a couple of years. But he concedes the decision to open the gallery in 2020 may have seemed a little odd.

“A lot of people looked at us and thought ‘what the hell are you doing? Why would you have a gallery in Sea Lake’?” he says.

But Mr Mott says he saw an “opportunity greater than international tourists” for the town.

“It’s where I live, where my kids are growing up. I want them to be proud of where they’re growing up.”

Mr Mott says finding staff to work is now among his biggest problems but he is still planning to install a kitchen in the gallery so he can add a cafe.

Farmer Rohan Mott on Lake Tyrrell at dawn.

Farmer Rohan Mott on Lake Tyrrell at dawn. Credit:Jason South

“We think this is a sustainable industry and certainly has growth potential.”

Buloke Shire mayor Daryl Warren says tourism is now picking up across the Mallee region after the extended lockdown delivered a heavy blow for tourism businesses last year.

“It kicked them hard,” he says.

But he believes communities are “cautiously optimistic” that domestic tourism will continue and the signs so far are positive.

“Caravans are everywhere,” he says. “People are out and about.”

And Cr Warren says real estate agents are reporting they cannot get enough houses to sell while some young people who left the region are starting to move back.

But he credits local tourists with helping to preserve Sea Lake’s tourism-based economy.

“It’s the Victorians who kept it going once we came out of hard lockdown.”

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Our Morning Edition newsletter is a curated guide to the most important and interesting stories, analysis and insights. Sign up here.

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Darwin businesses hunt for staff before tourists arrive for dry season


One year on from the mass closure of hospitality businesses due to the coronavirus pandemic, some Darwin venues are facing an odd problem: They’re too busy.

With Australia’s border still closed, migrants and travellers have not taken up their usual jobs to fill the gaps in rosters ahead of the peak dry season.

Many people believe this dry season will be a make-or-break moment for many NT businesses.

Like every other restaurant in Australia, Darren Lynch and wife Pina Somerville shut the doors of their 300-capacity Wharf One restaurant a year ago today in response to federal government orders in a bid to curb COVID-19 cases.

Between Wharf One and their other businesses they had 100 staff on the books.

Pina Somerville says the pasta machine has been working overtime to keep up with demand.(

ABC Radio Darwin: Conor Byrne

)

Pivot business

While many restaurants turned to takeaway, the couple brainstormed and had an idea 20 minutes later.

They had already been making pasta in-house, and supermarkets had just sold out.

Their pasta maker has been running overtime ever since.

“A lot of the team got on board and they ate a lot of pasta testing,” Ms Somerville said.

They soon had their new pasta brand on the shelves of local corner stores and they were distributing it on a borrowed scooter.

The idea evolved into the Bella Fresh Pasta restaurant and three other shopfronts.

Man smiling wearing a buoyancy aid standing on a dock beside a fleet of jetskis.
Darwin entrepreneur Darren Lynch has branched out into jet ski tours.(

ABC Radio Darwin: Conor Byrne

)

Harbour from another angle

Mr Lynch also embarked on his passion project and began jetski tours of the harbour.

“There’s Darwin people not leaving town to go to Bali or other places,” he said.

“Now we’re gearing up for the interstaters to come up this dry season.”

Business is booming and the bank manager is happy, but the couple are down about 20 staff for the busy tourist season.

“It means we have to look at our structure,” Ms Somerville said.

Begging friends to work

Also suffering are the owners of Moorish Cafe, Gertrude Knight and Marc Wagnon.

Despite advertising, they’re down to about eight staff after having a roster of 14.

“We’re begging friends and family to come and help, and we’re working ridiculous hours ourselves,” Ms Knight said.

“Mark and I probably work two full-time jobs.

“It’s long hours for chefs as well.

“In terms of sustaining that kind of work level and sustaining a healthy family life and mental health and general physical health, that’s a big ask for two people that are close to 50.”

Man and woman smiling sitting at a restaurant table after-hours.
Husband and wife restaurateurs Marc Wagnon and Gertrude Knight are asking friends and family to work for them because they can’t find staff.(

ABC Radio Darwin: Conor Byrne

)

They are calling for migration initiatives to bring workers to the NT, such as covering quarantine costs.

“My greatest fear is that we’re going to invite people [to the NT], they’re going to have great experiences, and then when they want to go for dinner, they’re going to be refused at every doorway that they get to, which is really, really poor service,” Ms Knight said.

The Home Affairs Department has said while hospitality workers are included in the skilled migration program, they are not on the priority list of 18 occupations in the pandemic, nor are quarantine fees covered.

NT Department of Industry, Tourism and Trade; NT Tourism and Hospitality Minister Natasha Fyles, and small Business Minister Paul Kirby were also asked if quarantine costs could be covered by the NT government, but all failed to answer that question.

How about working two jobs?

Alex Bruce, from Hospitality NT, said despite interstate campaigns, this shortage has been brewing.

“There’s absolutely a gap right now and it’s getting acute,” he said.

“We are putting together a local campaign encouraging Territorians to consider taking up a second job.”

posed headshot of man standing on a pub veranda smiling. Top button open
Alex Bruce says the staff shortage across the city is now acute.(

ABC News: Terry McDonald

)

Hotelier Michael Anthony said staff would be in more demand as more hotels reopened.

“Jobseeker has made it easier for people to stay at home than to work,” he said.

Ramada Zen Hotel assistant manager Michael Anthony
Hotelier Michael Anthony says he changed the menu to suit the staffing levels.(

ABC News: Alan Dowler

)

What are the authorities doing?

A spokesperson said the NT Department of Industry, Tourism and Trade had been involved in the following initiatives:

  • Targeting skilled and semi-skilled workers in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and New Zealand.
  • JobMaker Booster to assist small businesses with hiring needs.
  • JobTrainer to provide access to courses to support young people and jobseekers.
  • The Australian Government Boosting Apprentices Commencement wage subsidy program, supporting businesses and Group Training Organisations take on new apprentices and trainees.
Natasha Fyles wearing a pink shirt.
NT Tourism and Hospitality Minister Natasha Fyles.(

ABC News

)

NT Tourism and Hospitality Minister Natasha Fyles said the government had connected international students with hospitality employers.

“We are working closely with the federal government around opportunities to attract skilled workers, international students and working holiday makers when it is safe to do so,” she said.

NT Small Business Minister Paul Kirby said an increase in job ads and low unemployment was an indicator of the economy was turning around.

“One of the challenges of a strong economy is businesses being able to find skilled staff to meet their needs,” he said.

A view of the city from the sea with sunset light reflecting off the high-rise. Yachts are moored in the foreground.
Some Darwin businesses may have dodged a bullet with COVID-19, but hard times may be on the horizon.(

Supplied: Geoff Whalan/Flickr

)

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Metung Hot Springs redevelopment expected to open to tourists next summer


The normally busy streets of Gippsland’s coastal towns in eastern Victoria turned eerily quiet when the state’s COVID-19 lockdowns were enforced last year.

Almost a year after the prolonged lockdowns, many tourism operators are still feeling the economic side effects.

But with the first construction stage of a new $100 million hot springs resort at Metung set to kick off, locals are excited for the region’s future.

The team behind the Peninsula Hot Springs has joined forces with Bairnsdale accommodation owners Rachel and Adrian Bromage to develop the site, which will open to the public ahead of next summer.

Although the Metung Hot Springs (MHS) are expected to become a major drawcard for Gippsland, it is not the first time the town has welcomed a popular natural springs attraction.

In the 1970s, Metung became the home of Victoria’s first hot springs bathing experience, which locals then called the Hot Pools.

The pools were fed by a bore that was originally drilled for oil in 1929/30 but the springs were later channelled and transformed into cemented public pools.

Ms Bromage said she had fond memories of splashing around in the pools as a child.

“So when we were approached by Peninsula Hot Springs we thought now is the time to make this happen.”

In 1996 the hot pools were closed due to treatment issues, vandalism, and security concerns.

“They were never actually designed for public bathing,” Ms Bromage said.

“Over time, they were developed from corrugated iron drums to concrete pools but never really had the space because there wasn’t enough water flowing at the right rates and some of it even started to flow into Chinaman’s Creek.”

After lying dormant for almost 25 years, the MHS will be redesigned and built in two stages along a picturesque stretch of the Gippsland Lakes.

It will operate all year round with a glamping village, a spa relaxation centre and the final product will see the Kings Cove Golf Club integrated with the springs.

Nearby cafe owner Ben West said he welcomed the project, which he expected would benefit most of the town’s businesses amid a post-lockdown domestic tourism boom.

“We’ve actually been in talks with MHS to sort out plans to get their customers to come and see us,” he said.

The project received a $1.5m grant, as part of the State and Federal Government’s Local Economic Recovery Program earlier this year, to assist with the first stage of development.

The East Gippsland Shire Council has also endorsed the new attraction and the 60 local jobs set to come with it.

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Thailand launches yacht quarantine for tourists – NewsIn.Asia


Thailand, March 10 – Visitors to Thailand can now spend their mandatory two-week coronavirus quarantine on a yacht.

The government is hoping that the new initiative will bring 1.8 billion baht (£42m, $58m) in yacht tourism revenue.

The move is aimed at reviving the country’s struggling tourism industry, which was hit hard by the pandemic.

Previously, in January, the country had announced a scheme to allow visitors to spend their quarantine on a golf course.

The South East Asian nation relies heavily on tourists, but banned them last year to limit the virus spreading.

Announced on Monday, the yacht quarantine programme will allow visitors with a negative coronavirus test to spend their time on board a yacht or small cruise ship in Phuket.

The pandemic saw the number of tourists on the popular tourist destination plummet from 40,000-50,000 a day to just hundreds.

Trial run

The programme has already begun accepting yachters for a trial run, and around 100 yachts are expected to take part once it gets off the ground.

Travellers are required to wear a smart wristband that monitors vital signs including temperature and blood pressure, as well as tracking the wearer’s location via GPS.

The device can transmit information even at sea, within a 10 km radius, the government said.

Having banned foreign tourists in March last year, Thailand has been gradually reopening its borders since October.

Last week, Thailand’s tourism minister said he would propose a plan for foreigners to undertake quarantine in popular tourist areas, including beach resorts.

The hotel quarantine plan is expected to start in April or May in popular provinces including Phuket, Krabi and Chiang Mai.

Source – BBC



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In Hong Kong, Foreign Tourists Are Replaced by a Local Variety


HONG KONG — Of all the problems created by the pandemic, Sisi Wong did not expect that finding parking would be one of them.

Travel to Hong Kong was cut off. Residents were urged to stay home. And besides, Ms. Wong lived in a remote northern pocket of the territory, where rolling hills outnumbered skyscrapers and few visitors ventured even in normal times.

Yet there she was, arriving home to find trash scattered near her house, taxis clogging the single narrow road and her usual parking spot occupied by a stranger’s car.

“We’ve called the police, we’ve blocked the road, but there are still so many people,” Ms. Wong said on a recent Sunday, as yet more cars trundled by her tiny village, which sits — to her newfound dismay — next to a photogenic reservoir ringed by weeping willows.

“Before the epidemic, usually no one came, except maybe on weekends,” she said. “Now, there are people all the time.”

In tourist magnets around the world, from Paris to the Galápagos, the pandemic has brought one small blessing, to the relief of many locals: the disappearance of some obnoxious visitors. That’s also true in the postcard-famous parts of Hong Kong, where lines no longer spill out of designer showrooms and travel coaches no longer block the neon-lit streets.

But as foreign tourists have vanished, a new, local species has emerged.

Bored and trapped in an area one-third the size of Rhode Island, Hong Kongers have sought out the most far-flung, once-quiet corners of their territory of 7.5 million people, mobbing nature trails and parks with the kinds of crowds previously limited to the Causeway Bay shopping district.

Even though the subtropical humidity can make being outdoors unbearable much of the year — and despite an abundance of mega-malls offering ample entertainment excuses to never leave their air-conditioned interiors — Hong Kongers seem to be experiencing the collective thrill of discovering nature.

About 75 percent of Hong Kong is undeveloped, much of it protected parkland roamed by wild boars and monkeys. Just outside the glittering cityscape is a quilt of islands and peaks ringed by the turquoise South China Sea.

At some of the island’s most popular nature spots, like Devil’s Peak, a rocky outcrop strewn with century-old military ruins, climbers now find themselves in standstill pedestrian traffic. Hikers scaling Lion Rock — a steep, feline-shaped mound that yields a breathtaking skyline view — can sweat on the ascent without fear because the lines for photos are so long, they are able to dry off before their first selfie.

The crowds aren’t the only problem. Crumpled surgical masks dot the trails like strange new flora. Environmental groups have fretted over illegal camp fires. The number of mountain rescues by the Fire Services Department nearly tripled last year, to 602, as some newbie hikers perhaps pushed themselves too far.

“They’re often taking a tourist mind-set to the countryside,” said Vivien Cheng, the director of community partnerships at the Green Earth, a sustainability nonprofit. “If someone discovers a place with a very beautiful rock, then that place is doomed.”

Agnes Cheung is one of the recent converts to nature’s appeal. A college student, she was visiting Lau Shui Heung, the reservoir near Ms. Wong’s village. Before the outbreak, Ms. Cheung spent her weekends shopping, visiting museums or playing video games. “Without this pandemic, I wouldn’t even know there is such a place in Hong Kong,” she said.

But she was tired of staring at a screen after so many Zoom classes. In malls, “you’re just breathing germs.” As for the museums — “all closed!” she said, her voice despairing.

“And no more cinemas! No more karaoke!” chimed in her friend, Michelle Wong.

So the two had turned to Instagram to seek out new destinations. They had been lured by what they saw of the reservoir: neat rows of cypress trees, like soldiers, flanking the water’s placid green surface.

But now that they had arrived, some things were getting in the way of the perfect shot. “We just saw glass bottles there when were taking photos,” Ms. Cheung said, gesturing to the opposite shore. “People are so bad.”

And there were the crowds — skipping rocks, picnicking and, of course, taking photos. “They’re everywhere,” Ms. Wong said. “There are too many people, so you cannot really take your mask off, even if you want to take a good picture.”

This is likely not what the government imagined when it created the countryside parks in the 1970s. The goal was to give residents a place to “regain equilibrium,” according to a government adviser who recommended the parks’ establishment.

For a while, few residents felt so unbalanced. In the 1980s, just around 12 percent of Hong Kongers said they hiked in the parks, according to survey data.

But over the past two decades, park usage has more than doubled. Outdoor activity spiked after the outbreak of SARS in 2003, leading the government to expand and promote the trails.

Even so, the pandemic influx has been on a new level. The parks logged 12 million visitors in 2020, an 11 percent increase from the year before, according to government statistics, even though public barbecue areas and campsites were closed for more than seven months because of the virus.

The crowds have created a conundrum for outdoor evangelists like Dan Van Hoy, a senior leader with Hong Kong Hiking Meetup. Of course, Mr. Van Hoy says, he is thrilled to see more people venturing beyond the high-rises. When he first joined the group eight years ago, it had about 8,000 registered members. It now has 25,000.

But he will admit that the crowds and litter can be overwhelming these days, even on weekdays. On weekends — “it’s just, oh my goodness,” he said.

Ms. Cheng, from the environmental group, was less diplomatic. Some new hobbyists were transplanting Hong Kong’s famous “consumerist attitude” to its natural oases, she said, citing trampled vegetation and illegal dirt biking that has left once-lush hilltops barren.

The government said it punished more than 700 people last year for violating anti-epidemic measures in the parks and had deployed workers to remind people to pick up their litter; Ms. Cheng said enforcement had not been strict enough.

She issued a bleak warning: “We’ll also need this countryside when the next epidemic comes, so we need to protect it.”

There are still refuges for those in the know. When the crowds get too dense at Lau Shui Heung Reservoir, Tsao King-kwun, a retired professor, drives to small villages nearby, where he likes to admire the traditional architecture. It’s a departure from his usual walking route around the reservoir, but Mr. Tsao can rest assured that the crowds won’t follow.

“Because they don’t know it,” he laughed. “This” — he gestured to the reservoir, where he had deemed the crowds acceptable for a walk that afternoon — “is quite obvious. They go on Facebook.”

Those who live nearby have no such escape. Ms. Wong, the village resident, said she had watched tourists flow in and out for weeks now, taking up seats on the public minibus that older residents relied on for transportation and ignoring the blue police tape that had been strung up to prevent roadside parking after locals complained.

The reservoir is famous for its winter foliage, when the cypress leaves turn a spectacular orange, but she hadn’t seen it this year because of the crowds.

Still, she took solace in the fact that, as the seasons and foliage changed, so would the number of visitors. “After a while, there won’t be this many people,” she said. “They’ll all go to Tai Mo Shan” — Hong Kong’s highest peak — “to see the bell flowers.”

Elsie Chen contributed research.

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England in New Zealand: Tourists secure series with another assured victory


England opener Tammy Beaumont scored her second half-century in a row
New Zealand 192 (49.5 overs): Halliday 60 (80); Sciver 3-26
England 194-3 (37.4 overs): Beaumont 72* (112), Sciver 63 (61), Jones 46* (45)
England won by seven wickets; lead series 2-0
Scorecard

England secured a series victory over New Zealand with a comprehensive seven-wicket win in the second one-day international in Dunedin.

The hosts fell to 34-5 and, despite Brooke Halliday scoring 60, were dismissed for 192 with a ball to spare.

England opener Tammy Beaumont hit an unbeaten 72 in reply, backed by 63 from Nat Sciver, who had earlier taken 3-26.

Wicketkeeper Amy Jones added 46 not out to help the tourists reach their target with 12.2 overs to spare.

Victory gives England an unassailable 2-0 lead in the three-match series, with the final ODI also taking place at the University Oval in Dunedin at 22:00 GMT on Saturday.

It is also England’s 10th consecutive win across all formats.

“We hadn’t played ODIs for a long time so we wanted to hit the ground running in this series,” said Sciver, who was named player of the match.

“We are in a really good place and hopefully we can wrap up victory in the third ODI too.”

Sciver stars as England repeat easy win

England all-rounder Nat Sciver celebrates taking a wicket against New Zealand in the second ODI
Nat Sciver took 3-26 from nine overs before hitting 63

The pattern of this match was similar to England’s comfortable eight-wicket win over the White Ferns in the series opener, which was their first one-day international since December 2019 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Several bowlers made key contributions to restrict the hosts to a sub-par total, before England’s top order chased it down in largely serene fashion.

Fast bowler Katherine Brunt did immediate damage, removing New Zealand openers Natalie Dodd and Hayley Jensen in her first two overs.

Sciver dismissed Kiwi captain Sophie Devine for six, before bowling Amelia Kerr with a beautiful inswinger to leave the hosts 27-4 inside eight overs.

Kate Cross, on her return to the side, had Amy Satterthwaite caught behind for 13, before Katey Martin and Halliday led a brief recovery,

But with leg-spinner Sarah Glenn picking up 2-37, Sciver finally removing Halliday as Jones took her third catch, and two run outs, New Zealand again posted a total that was unlikely to trouble England.

That still proved to be the case even after opener Danni Wyatt was bowled for a two-ball duck and captain Heather Knight was run out by Devine for eight to leave England 12-2.

Beaumont and Sciver responded with consummate knocks – the former hitting her second half-century in a row, with 72 off 112 balls, and Sciver smashing five fours and one six in her 63 off 61 balls.

England were already on pace for a quick victory when Sciver fell to Halliday, but Jones made it even more emphatic, hitting eight fours in her 46 off 45 balls to guide the tourists to 194-3 in 37.4 overs.

The White Ferns have now lost their past 11 ODIs but England will be rightly pleased with another clinical victory as they build towards defending their World Cup title in New Zealand in just over a year’s time.

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