Trump Pardoning Himself ‘Would Certainly Imperil’ 2024 Run



CNN’s S.E. Cupp said Thursday on “Newsroom” that if President Donald Trump used his pardon powers to pardon himself, it was an admission of guilt which “would certainly imperil” a 2024 presidential run.

When asked about Trump pardoning himself, Cupp said, “This would be pretty unadvisable for the president to do because it is admission you’ve done something wrong. If the president has designs on running again for president, this would certainly imperil that, and I would think encourage other justice departments to really look at what he had done while in office if he is tacitly admitting he needed to be pardoned for stuff. I’m not sure this is constitutional or legal, but it seems pretty clear it would be unadvisable for him to do that.”

Follow Pam Key on Twitter @pamkeyNEN





Source link

Republicans commend President Trump for pardoning Gen. Michael Flynn


FILE – President Donald Trump’s former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn arrives at federal court in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 18, 2018. President Donald Trump has pardoned Michael Flynn. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 9:13 AM PT – Thursday, November 26, 2020

President Trump formally pardoned former national security advisor, General Michael Flynn. The President took to Twitter Wednesday to announce the move. He went on to congratulate Flynn while wishing him and his family a happy Thanksgiving.

“What General Flynn went through is so unfair and he’s still going through it,” stated President Trump.”If he were a Democrat, that would’ve never happened number one.”

This came after Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI during the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Attorneys for Flynn argued, however, that he was entrapped by so-called “Obama holdovers” who allegedly coerced him into lying and set him up for prosecution.

The President’s pardon, which spares Flynn the possibility of any prison sentence, won praise from several Republicans, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Rep. Lee Zeldin who both said it was “100-percent the right call.”

Additionally, House Minority Whip Steve Scalise said in a statement that Flynn’s prosecution was politically motivated and should never have happened. Scalise argued further, stating that Democrats and the FBI destroyed Flynn’s life to try to attack the President.

MORE NEWS: U.S. pledges up to $600M in civilian assistance aid to Afghanistan





Source link

Rewriting history? President Trump pardons Michael Flynn



Washington

President Donald Trump pardoned former national security adviser Michael Flynn on Wednesday, taking direct aim in the final days of his administration at a Russia investigation that he has long insisted was motivated by political bias.

“It is my Great Honor to announce that General Michael T. Flynn has been granted a Full Pardon,” Trump tweeted. “Congratulations to @GenFlynn and his wonderful family, I know you will now have a truly fantastic Thanksgiving!”

Flynn is the second Trump associate convicted in the Russia probe to be granted clemency by the president. Trump commuted the sentence of longtime confidant Roger Stone just days before he was to report to prison. It is part of a broader effort to undo the results of an investigation that for years has shadowed his administration and yielded criminal charges against a half dozen associates.

The action voids the criminal case against Flynn just as a federal judge was weighing, skeptically, whether to grant a Justice Department request to dismiss the prosecution despite Flynn’s own guilty plea to lying to the FBI about his Russia contacts.

The move, coming as Trump winds down his single term, is likely to energize supporters who have taken up the case as a cause celebre and rallied around the retired Army lieutenant general as the victim of what they assert is an unfair prosecution. Trump himself has repeatedly spoken warmly about Flynn, even though special counsel Robert Mueller’s prosecutors once praised him as a model cooperator in their probe into ties between Russia and the 2016 Trump campaign.

House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler said the pardon was undeserved and unprincipled.

“The President’s enablers have constructed an elaborate narrative in which Trump and Flynn are victims and the Constitution is subject to the whims of the president,” the Democratic congressman said in a statement. “Americans soundly rejected this nonsense when they voted out President Trump. ”

The pardon is the final step in a case defined by twists and turns over the last year after the Justice Department abruptly move to dismiss the case, insisting that Flynn should have never been interviewed by the FBI in the first place, only to have U.S. District Justice Emmet Sullivan refuse the request and appoint a former judge to argue against the federal government’s position.

In the months since, a three-judge panel’s decision ordering Sullivan to dismiss the case was overturned by the full appeals court, which sent the matter back to Sullivan. At a hearing in September, Flynn lawyer Sidney Powell told the judge that she had discussed the Flynn case with Trump but also said she did not want a pardon — presumably because she wanted him to be vindicated in the courts.

Powell emerged separately in recent weeks as a public face of the Trump’s efforts to overturn the results of his election loss to President-elect Joe Biden, but the Trump legal team ultimately distanced itself from her after she advanced a series of uncorroborated conspiracy claims.

The pardon spares Flynn the possibility of any prison sentence, which Sullivan could potentially have imposed had he ultimately decided to reject the Justice Department’s dismissal request. That request was made in May after a review of the case by a federal prosecutor from St. Louis who had been specially appointed by Attorney General William Barr.

Flynn acknowledged lying during the FBI interview by saying he had not discussed with the then-Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, sanctions that had just been imposed on Russia for election interference by the outgoing Obama administration. During that conversation, Flynn urged Kislyak for Russia to be “even-keeled” in response to the punitive measures, and assured him “we can have a better conversation” about relations between the two countries after Trump became president.

The conversation alarmed the FBI, which at the time was investigating whether the Trump campaign and Russia had coordinated to sway the election’s outcome. In addition, White House officials were stating publicly that Flynn and Kislyak had not discussed sanctions.

But last May, the Justice Department abruptly reversed its position in the case. It said the FBI had no basis to interview Flynn about Kislyak, then the Russian ambassador to the United States, and that any statements he may have made were not relevant to the FBI’s broader counterintelligence probe. It cited internal FBI notes showing that agents had planned to close out their investigation into Flynn weeks earlier.

Flynn was ousted from his position in February 2017 after news broke that he had indeed discussed sanctions with Kislyak and that former Obama administration officials had warned the White House that he could be vulnerable to blackmail.

Flynn, of Middletown, Rhode Island, was among the first of the president’s aides to admit guilt in Mueller’s investigation and cooperated extensively for months. He provided such extensive cooperation that prosecutors did not recommend any prison time and suggested that they would be fine with probation.

But on the morning he was to have been sentenced, after a stern rebuke about his behavior from Sullivan, Flynn asked for the hearing to be cut short so that he could continue cooperating and earn credit toward a more lenient sentence.

After that, though, he hired new attorneys — including Powell, a conservative commentator and outspoken critic of Mueller’s investigation — who took a far more confrontational stance to the government.

The lawyers accused prosecutors of withholding documents and evidence they said was favorable to the case and repeatedly noted that one of the two agents who interviewed Flynn was fired from the FBI for having sent derogatory text messages about Trump during the 2016 campaign.



Source link

A Speedy Recovery Depends on More Aid. Will Trump Deliver?


Majority Leader Mitch McConnell sent the Senate home for recess without passing a new coronavirus relief bill. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has said he will pull the plug on several of the Federal Reserve’s emergency lending facilities. What are these men thinking?

Yes, the recent news on the vaccine front is wonderful. We are all indebted to the scientists who have worked so long, hard and successfully on the various vaccine projects. Thanks to them, the proverbial light at the end of the tunnel is dimly visible. But only dimly. Widespread vaccination is many months away. As Yogi Berra might have said, this horror show “ain’t over.”

When Congress passed the Cares Act in March, the pandemic looked absolutely frightening. The act was a sloppy piece of legislation with many flaws. But it had two huge virtues: It was big, and it came fast, both of which helped pull the economy back from the abyss. The pandemic is now worse than it was then. Yet Mr. McConnell is a roadblock to more relief funds.

Remember, it was Cares, plus a few other laws, plus rapid actions by the Fed, that enabled the economy to make what looks like a V-shaped recovery—so far. The expected tsunami of bankruptcies hasn’t materialized—so far. It even looks possible—so far—that the feared scarring of both workers and businesses may be limited.

Senators and the public need to understand that it was Cares and the rest that propped up the economy “artificially” as the virus was pulling it down. But now, with Covid-19 raging uncontrolled, most of the Cares money has been spent and more will expire in late December; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention moratorium on evictions will end Dec. 31; and Treasury intends to end its lending facilities by the end of the year as well.



Source link

Donald Trump has started the transition process. What’s left for him to do before Joe Biden’s inauguration?


After a delay, the presidential transition process has officially begun.

President-elect Joe Biden and vice-president-elect Kamala Harris will have 57 days to prepare to govern a nation of 330 million people.

At the same time, US President Donald Trump has 57 days to carry out the final duties of his term in office.

There aren’t official rules that outline what exactly should occupy both their schedules between now and inauguration day.

But we can get a good gist by looking at the final schedule of the last person to leave the Oval Office — Barack Obama.

Here’s what might happen.

A meeting between Trump and Biden

Donald Trump and Barack Obama met just days after the 2016 US eleciton.(AP: Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Yesterday Biden said that he remained open to meeting the outgoing President.

This meeting normally happens a lot closer to election day.

Just two days after the election was called, Barack Obama hosted Donald Trump in the White House for a meeting.

Likewise, then vice-president-elect Mike Pence and the outgoing vice-president Joe Biden shared a meeting as well.

Loading

The Obama-Trump meeting lasted about 90 minutes before the pair fronted the media together.

“I very much look forward to dealing with the president in the future, including counsel. He explained some of the difficulties, some of the high-flying assets, and some of the really great things that have been achieved,” Trump said at the time.

At the moment, there is no indication that Trump will invite Biden to the White House for a meeting (even as their aides do just that).

The President has said on Twitter that his legal challenges to the election are still proceeding and he will “never concede to fake ballots”. There is no evidence of widespread fraud or fake ballots at the election.

Pardons, executive orders, medals

There are a lot of things a US president can do with the stroke of a pen.

One of them is the power to pardon people who have been convicted of a federal crime (remove the conviction) or to commute their sentence (ending a sentence without removing the conviction).

And compared to his predecessor, who used this power more frequently than any president had in decades, Trump has used it less often than any president in modern history, according to Pew Research.

But that looks like it will change in his final days in office.

Yesterday Trump pardoned his former national security adviser Michael Flynn. US media reports that it could be the first of many before Trump hands over to Biden.

Loading

Obama himself shortened the sentences of 330 prison inmates convicted of drug crimes just one day before leaving the White House.

The executive order is another area where the US president has a lot of power without a lot of oversight. And the president can keep signing them right up until the moment they leave office.

Again, Obama signed seven executive orders between January 12-17 in his final days in office.

Those orders can be challenged in the courts, and a new president can revoke or change those orders if they want (something Biden is already planning to do).

And finally, the president can recognise any American he likes with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honour.

Obama did that when he awarded it to Biden in their final week in office.

Loading…

Some light-hearted stuff

The final weeks of a president’s term in office line up with the holiday season in the United States.

That means taking part in the annual pardoning of a turkey for Thanksgiving.

Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.

Play Video. Duration: 1 minute 18 seconds

Donald Trump “pardons” the White House Thanksgiving turkey.

Soon after, it also means flicking the official switch at the National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony.

Loading…

The president often takes some phone calls from American children on Christmas Eve.

Loading…

A farewell address … of sorts

Presidents normally say their farewell to the American people in some form or another. Barack Obama gave his in Chicago in early January of 2017.

But by its very nature, it involves an acknowledgement that you’ll be moving out of the Oval Office, which Trump has refused to do so far.

That doesn’t mean he won’t go out with a flurry of public appearances of his own.

President Donald Trump stands at a podium in front of a big crowd at a US election rally in Pennsylvania.
Donald Trump held a flurry of rallies at the end of the campaign. It’s expected he’ll return soon.(AP: Alex Brandon)

US media has reported that Trump plans to hold campaign-style rallies not only in the coming weeks, but also well after inauguration day has come and gone.

A pair of hotly contested runoffs in Georgia that will determine who controls the Senate in 2021 and beyond could draw both the President and the president-elect back onto the campaign trail.

Biden’s staff said we should “expect” to see the president-elect in the state before election day. We’re yet to hear of similar plans from the President.

When is Inauguration Day?

January 21, 2021 AEDT, for anyone wanting to save the date.

We don’t have any idea of what Biden’s inauguration will look like yet, given that the US is in the grip of its worst-ever wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

Donald Trump’s participation in the event is not required.

But it is a longstanding tradition that the outgoing president attends the inauguration, as a very public showing of the peaceful transfer of power and a symbolic showing of national unity after a tough election campaign.

Michelle Obama looks stern while standing with Melania Trump, Donald Trump and Barack Obama
The Obamas participated in the inauguration of Donald Trump in 2017.(Reuters: Rob Carr)

Despite White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany claiming the President was “never given an orderly transition of power”, he said otherwise in his inaugural address.

Only five US presidents have chosen not to attend the inauguration of the president-elect, the most recent being Richard Nixon in 1974 after his resignation.

This is the last chance Trump will have to appear as President in any official capacity (unless of course, he runs and wins in 2024).

At noon, Joe Biden will take the oath of office and become the 46th president of the United States.



Source link

Trump spends Thanksgiving playing golf and tweeting about election


President Trump was busy on Twitter retweeting his favorite commentators who falsely suggested there’s still a chance he can overturn the results of the election while venting his frustration at the media, Alexandria-Ocasio Cortez, kneeling NFL players, and Fox News.

Earlier on Thursday, video footage surfaced showing Trump getting frustrated while playing golf at his Virginia country club.

‘I hate this f*****g hole,’ the president said after he struggled with a tee shot on his course on Thursday. Video footage was obtained by TMZ.

After playing golf, the president returned to the White House and took to Twitter, where he praised a Pennsylvania judge who placed a hold on the certification process for down-ballot races in the Keystone State.

‘A brilliant woman of courage!’ the president tweeted on Thursday. He was reacting to a tweet posted by David J. Harris Jr, a conservative commentator who linked to a news story on his web site about the case. 

President Trump spent his Thanksgiving holiday playing golf and then tweeting about the election. He is seen above at his golf course in Sterling, Virginia, on Thursday

The president agreed with a tweet by conservative commentator David J Harris Jr, who said that Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was 'in panic mode!'

The president agreed with a tweet by conservative commentator David J Harris Jr, who said that Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was ‘in panic mode!’

The president took to Twitter to praise a Pennsylvania judge as a 'brilliant woman of courage' for delaying the certification of down-ballot races in the Keyston State - though it appears he is under the mistaken impression that it will affect the outcome of the election that he lost to Joe Biden

The president took to Twitter to praise a Pennsylvania judge as a ‘brilliant woman of courage’ for delaying the certification of down-ballot races in the Keyston State – though it appears he is under the mistaken impression that it will affect the outcome of the election that he lost to Joe Biden

Harris’ headline read: ‘Judge Blocks Certification of Pennsylvania Election Results.’

But the headline and the article incorrectly suggest that the decision by Commonwealth Court Judge Patricia A. McCullough will have any impact on the presidential race.

The state has already certified the results of the presidential election, with Democrat Joe Biden winning its 20 electoral college votes.

Governor Tom Wolf, a Democrat, sent a ‘certificate of ascertainment’ to the national archivist in Washington with the slate of electors who support President-elect Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. 

Pennsylvania’s 20 electors, a mix of elected Democrats, party activists and other staunch Biden backers, will meet in the state Capitol on December 14.

McCullough’s ruling on Wednesday temporarily blocks the portion of the election that had yet to be certified – namely the state legislature results. A majority of the legislature is controlled by Republicans.

The president on Thursday also retweeted a post from Harris which links to an article about the ‘voter fraud hearing’ led by Trump lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis.

Trump also retweeted another post by Harris, this one claiming that ‘AOC is in panic mode!’

The post was linked to a news story about a lawsuit filed by pro-Trump attorneys Sidney Powell and Lin Wood, who are suing Georgia because of an ‘unlawful election.’

Biden won Georgia’s 16 electoral college votes, defeating Trump by slightly more than 12,000 votes.

Trump on Thursday also retweeted a post from Harris whose web site includes a news story about a lawsuit filed in Georgia by two pro-Trump attorneys - Sidney Powell and Lin Wood

Trump on Thursday also retweeted a post from Harris whose web site includes a news story about a lawsuit filed in Georgia by two pro-Trump attorneys – Sidney Powell and Lin Wood

The president also retweeted a post by Harris linking to a news story about the 'voter fraud hearing' in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, led by Trump campaign lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis

The president also retweeted a post by Harris linking to a news story about the ‘voter fraud hearing’ in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, led by Trump campaign lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jenna Ellis

The link to the news story on Harris’ site alleges that AOC is ‘in trouble,’ though the basis for that claim is unclear.

Trump also reacted negatively to a news story about the two quarterbacks of the Houston Texans and the Detroit Lions, the NFL teams who faced off against each other in the Thanksgiving game on Thursday.

The Texans’ Deshaun Watson and the Lions’ Matthew Stafford were seen kneeling on their respective sidelines during the national anthem just before kickoff at Ford Field in Detroit. The Texans won the game 41-25.

Trump has been a vocal critic of professional athletes who kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice. He demanded that NFL owners fire players who do so after the Colin Kaepernick controversy.

Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback, ignited a fierce, nationwide debate in 2015 and 2016 by kneeling on the sidelines during the Star Spangled Banner.

Earlier on Thursday, Trump kicked off his Thanksgiving with a round of golf at his Trump National Golf Club in Virginia and a lot of whining on Twitter, insisting there was no way Biden won the ‘rigged’ election and slamming Fox News. 

Trump left the White House Thursday morning for 18 holes at his golf club in Sterling, Virginia. 

But before and after his game, his focus was on the presidential election – which he still insists he won – instead of the holiday.

‘Just saw the vote tabulations. There is NO WAY Biden got 80,000,000 votes!!! This was a 100% RIGGED ELECTION,’ Trump complained about his Democratic rival. 

Twitter flagged the tweet, noting on it: ‘This claim about election fraud is disputed.’ 

The president has refused to concede the election even as his legal cases challenging the results in battleground states have gone nowhere, his campaign has turned up no evidence of major voter fraud, and states have begun to certify Biden’s victory.

Trump also reacted negatively to a news story about the Texans' Deshaun Watson and the Lions' Matthew Stafford who were seen kneeling on their respective sidelines during the national anthem just before kickoff at Ford Field in Detroit. The Texans won the game 41-25

Trump also reacted negatively to a news story about the Texans’ Deshaun Watson and the Lions’ Matthew Stafford who were seen kneeling on their respective sidelines during the national anthem just before kickoff at Ford Field in Detroit. The Texans won the game 41-25

The current tally of the popular votes stand at: 80,045,066 (51%) for Biden and 73,897,658 (47%) for Trump. Additionally, Biden has 306 electoral votes to Trump’s 232.

The 2020 contest saw a record number of votes. Biden was the first candidate to earn over 80 million.  

Trump also got in a dig at Fox News. The news organization infuriated him by being the first on election night to call Arizona for Biden. 

The president retweeted a tweet on the network seeing declining ratings and added his own commentary: ‘Will go down much further. Weekend daytime even worse, dead. They still don’t get it. Fantastic alternatives! The late/great Roger Ailes is seriously missed, but I still won LEGAL VOTES by a lot!!!’

Ailes, who was ousted from Fox News in 2016 over charges of sexual harassment, advised Trump on the presidential debates that year. He died in 2017 and some credit him for Trump’s rise in politics.  

And Trump retweeted a tweet about a lawsuit Sidney Powell, the attorney dumped from his legal team, brought about in Georgia. 

And he complained about Pennsylvania, where his legal team is trying to stop certification of the state’s 20 electoral votes for Biden: ‘A total FRAUD. Statehouse Republicans, proud, strong and honest, will never let this travesty stand!’ 

Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s personal attorney who is leading the charge in trying to overturn the election, testified at a Republican-led hearing of sorts on Wednesday, which Trump called into to implore GOP officials in the state to find he won Pennsylvania. 

‘This election has to be turned around. We won Pennsylvania by a lot and we won all of these swing states by a lot,’ Trump said via a cellphone his attorney Jenna Ellis held up to a microphone.   

‘We got 11 million votes more than we had four years ago in 2016. And we got many more votes than Ronald Reagan had when he won 49 states,’ Trump said, pointing to an election forty years ago when the population was considerably smaller.

Trump did receive 73 million votes – the most ever of an incumbent president. But Biden won over 80 million votes and the electoral college, which hands him the White House.

The Trump team has shown no evidence of voter fraud in Pennsylvania or any other state.  

President Trump tosses a golf ball from his cart as he plays golf at his club in Virginia

President Trump tosses a golf ball from his cart as he plays golf at his club in Virginia

President Donald Trump kicked off his Thanksgiving with a round of golf at his Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia

President Donald Trump kicked off his Thanksgiving with a round of golf at his Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia

President Trump drives a golf cart on his course near Washington D.C.

President Trump drives a golf cart on his course near Washington D.C. 

President Trump gives a fist bump to a fellow golfer

President Trump gives a fist bump to a fellow golfer

President Donald Trump holds his phone as he stands next to a golf cart on his course

President Donald Trump holds his phone as he stands next to a golf cart on his course

President Trump in his golf cart with security in golf carts around him

President Trump in his golf cart with security in golf carts around him

President Trump wore one of his signature red 'Make America Great Again' caps when he played golf on Thanksgiving

President Trump wore one of his signature red ‘Make America Great Again’ caps when he played golf on Thanksgiving

Trump had switched into holiday mode earlier in the day, writing ‘HAPPY THANKSGIVING’ atop a retweet from the SCOTUS blog, which covers Supreme Court cases. It reported that: ‘Just before midnight on the night before Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court blocked New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo from enforcing attendance limits at religious services. The vote is 5-4, with Roberts and the three liberals dissenting.’

The Supreme Court late Wednesday temporarily barred New York from enforcing attendance limits at houses of worship in areas designated as hard hit by the coronavirus. 

The court’s 5-4 vote granted requests made by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and two Orthodox Jewish congregations who were fighting Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s October 6 decision about houses of worship in areas designated red and orange zones, where attendance was capped at 10 and 25 people, respectively.

New Justice Amy Coney Barrett ruled  in the majority whereas the court’s three liberal justices and Chief Justice John Roberts dissented.

In two previous cases this year, the court on 5-4 votes turned away similar requests by churches in Nevada and California. Those votes occurred before the death of liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 

The president is having Thanksgiving dinner with his immediate family.

‘The First Family will be celebrating the day with immediate family for dinner at the White House. The President and First Lady wish everyone across the country a safe and wonderful Thanksgiving,’ said Stephanie Grisham, the chief of staff to first lady Melania Trump, in a statement.

She did not detail who was included in the immediate family, which could consist of the president’s adult children from his first marriages and the first lady’s parents, who live near the White House.

In his Thanksgiving proclamation, President Trump encouraged Americans to gather and give thanks.

‘I encourage all Americans to gather, in homes and places of worship, to offer a prayer of thanks to God for our many blessings,’ he said in a statement.

Trump’s urging Americans to gather for the holiday comes as daily deaths from COVID-19 in the United States have surpassed 2,100 for the first since May as millions of Americans continue to ignore CDC travel guidance and dire warnings from health experts that Thanksgiving could be the ‘mother of all superspreader events’. 

President Trump is expected to make the traditional call to members of the U.S. armed forces serving overseas. That call was scheduled for 3 p.m. Thursday but got moved back to 5 p.m. It is closed to the media and public.  

President Trump returns to the White House after a round of golf on Thanksgiving - both before and after the game he tweeted on the election

President Trump returns to the White House after a round of golf on Thanksgiving – both before and after the game he tweeted on the election

President Trump checks his phone while on the golf course

President Trump checks his phone while on the golf course

President Trump, in red jacket, driving his golf cart on his golf course

President Trump, in red jacket, driving his golf cart on his golf course

President Trump takes aim as he plays golf on Thanksgiving day

President Trump takes aim as he plays golf on Thanksgiving day

President Trump on his golf course

President Trump on his golf course 

President Trump walks back to his golf cart

President Trump walks back to his golf cart

Supporters cheer as President Donald Trump passes them outside the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia

Supporters cheer as President Donald Trump passes them outside the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia

President Trump's motorcade arrives at his Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va, on Thanksgiving Day

President Trump’s motorcade arrives at his Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va, on Thanksgiving Day

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are spending Thanksgiving at the White House instead of traveling to Mar-a-Lago, where they'll have dinner with immediate family

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump are spending Thanksgiving at the White House instead of traveling to Mar-a-Lago, where they’ll have dinner with immediate family

Don Jr., the president's oldest son who tested positive for coronavirus a couple of weeks ago, posted a message to Instagram he is 'done with Rona' and will spend Thanksgiving with family

Don Jr., the president’s oldest son who tested positive for coronavirus a couple of weeks ago, posted a message to Instagram he is ‘done with Rona’ and will spend Thanksgiving with family

Lara Trump posted a photo of a roadtrip to an undisclosed location with husband Eric Trump and their kids

Lara Trump posted a photo of a roadtrip to an undisclosed location with husband Eric Trump and their kids

Don Jr., the president’s oldest son who tested positive for coronavirus a couple of weeks ago, posted a message to Instagram he is ‘done with Rona’ and will spend Thanksgiving with family. 

He videotaped the message on Wednesday with girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle, noting the couple will be eating their ‘back up meal’ that day and then enjoying a second Thanksgiving feast.

‘I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to be cleared to be with my family but I got the medical OK I’m all done with the Rona,’ he noted. 

‘I got cleared and we get to spend Thanksgiving the way it’s meant to be,’ he said in the video message. 

And Lara Trump, the president’s daughter-in-law, posted a photo to Instagram of her, husband Eric Trump and their two kids taking a road trip to an unnamed location.  

The president is also reaching out to friends who could be having a tough time over the holidays.

Eric Bolling, the Sinclair TV host whose son died of an accidental drug overdose in 2017, tweeted that Trump called him on Thanksgiving Day.

‘3 years ago today: A difficult first holiday without my Eric Chase.. the empty Thanksgiving seat being too real having just lost our son. The phone rang: ‘Eric, Melania and I want to tell you how much we feel for you today’ That call just came again. Thank you @realDonaldTrump,’ he wrote. 

Last year on Thanksgiving, Trump made a surprise visit Afghanistan where he met with President Ashraf Ghani and served Thanksgiving dinner to U.S. troops stationed there. 





Source link

Trump says he’ll leave White House peacefully; Victoria’s 28-day virus milestone, officially coronavirus-free; NSW train delays; Biden faces test over sharing Trump’s secret calls; Nation braces for severe heatwave; Shopping centres added to South Australia virus alert list


People who attended certain shopping centres are certain times need to monitor for symptoms and get tested, South Australia’s Chief Medical Officer has said.

“Even mild symptoms, so feeling a bit down or tired, a slightly itchy nose, scratchy throat, a bit of a headache even, a bit of an upset tummy,” Dr Nicola Spurrier said.

“Anything at all and you’ve been in this locations, get tested.”

The Kilkenny Arndale shopping centre last Sunday from 11am to 11.30am, or Sunday, November 15, from 11.30am to 12.30pm.

Port Adelaide Plaza on Friday November 13 from 6.40pm until 9.30pm, or Sunday November 15 from 3pm to 3.30pm.



Source link

In an era of political polarization, ‘Trump TV’ makes perfect sense


Our mission to make business better is fueled by readers like you. To enjoy unlimited access to our journalism, subscribe today.

Though he may never publicly admit it, Donald Trump effectively conceded the 2020 presidential election on Monday, when his federal government’s General Services Administration finally signed off on the transition to President-elect Joe Biden’s incoming regime.

With a constitutional crisis, for now, averted, there is much speculation on what the future will hold for Trump. Whatever follows his remarkable, unprecedented four-year term in the White House, it’s hard to envisage him settling into a quiet post-presidency—perhaps one spent designing his presidential library and keeping quiet on his successor’s job performance.

What’s clear is that he leaves Washington much as he arrived: a divisive, polarizing figure who, despite losing a national election by millions of votes, retains a fiercely devoted following among segments of the American electorate. A new CNBC/Change Research poll this week found that 73% of Trump voters, apparently parroting the President’s baseless propaganda, believe that he was the legitimate winner of the 2020 election. Should Trump decide to break away from the Republicans and start a political party of his own, 72% of those voters said they would gladly desert the GOP and follow him to a fledgling Trump Party.

If Trump really did run for president in 2015 primarily to bolster his brand and generate publicity—if he truly did think his long-shot candidacy would, if nothing else, lead to future media opportunities, or at the very least provide the upcoming season of The Apprentice with a ratings bump—then, all in all, the entire affair was a raging, unmitigated success. For all the talk of the Trump Organization’s sullied reputation and the millions of dollars in revenue lost as a result of Trump’s presidential joyride, the man himself will leave the White House with a built-in audience of tens of millions of Americans willing to hang on his every word and posture. As a public-facing brand, Trump’s is perhaps the most formidable in the history of American politics.

As such, there’s been heightened conjecture that Trump will finally realize what his presidency may have always been about in the first place: capitalizing on his burnished brand, and its fervent following, via a media venture of his own. Talk of “Trump TV” sprang up almost immediately after the election, apparently fueled by the President’s fury at Fox News Channel—and, reportedly, News Corp baron Rupert Murdoch—over the conservative network’s coverage of the race.

What that venture could look like is anybody’s guess at this point. Given the financial and logistical barriers to launching a cable news network from the ground up, a subscription-based online streaming channel has been floated—one that could see Trump parlay his campaign’s enviable troves of cell phone and email contact information into a database of would-be subscribers, according to Axios. And last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that allies of the President have explored an investment into Newsmax, the conservative website and broadcast network run by Trump confidant Christopher Ruddy, with the aim of building Newsmax into a legitimate challenger to Fox News. (Ruddy, for his part, has denied there being any such deal in the works.)

Both Newsmax and fellow right-wing cable channel One American News Network (OAN) have grown their reach substantially during the Trump era, thanks in no small part to co-signs from the President in the form of retweets and endorsements. In turn, they’ve displayed a willingness to do his bidding by disseminating talking points that are factually dubious at best and misinformation at worst—such as peddling spurious claims about COVID-19 and promoting Trump’s baseless allegations that the election was somehow stolen from him. It is content that “MAGA Nation” has proven all too ready to gobble up.

Indeed, Trump’s foray into politics was always a product of the sprawling, reactionary echo chamber that is the right-wing media apparatus. With his keen grasp of television and his mastery of social media, Trump was able to parlay his rhetoric of nativism and economic populism into a national political movement. Spurred on by conservative media figureheads like Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, he has long since surpassed them in both his gravitational pull and tenuous relationship to the truth—driving conservative political discourse even further to the fringe in the process. With an army of devotees willing to follow him down any rabbit hole, no matter how bizarre and factually challenged, “Trump TV” would be the logical next step for America’s propagandist-in-chief, a man for whom even Fox News isn’t cutting it these days.

And should Trump somehow manage to avoid the myriad legal storm clouds looming on his post-presidential horizon, an upstart media vertical could not only prove a profitable endeavor, but also a launching point for yet another run for the White House in 2024. Deprived of the platform afforded to him by the White House, “Trump TV” would provide a bully pulpit from which he could strengthen his command of a conservative electorate that already appears to favor him as its preferred candidate the next time around.

While it would take some feat to challenge Fox News’ dominance of the conservative airwaves, there are signs that the Murdoch empire is taking notice. This week, Vanity Fair reported that News Corp is considering offering Trump a $100 million deal to bring him back into the fold—one that would involve publishing his presidential memoir through its HarperCollins subsidiary, and potentially rewarding him with his very own show on Fox News. “Rupert is going to make a humongous offer,” a source told the publication. “The thinking is, Let’s buy Trump off so he shuts the f— up.”

It remains to be seen whether such a reconciliation truly is in the cards, or if Trump decides to strike out on his own. Whatever path he chooses, any foray Trump takes into the media world will certainly be followed by the tens of millions of Americans who still look to him as their political truth-teller, despite ample evidence to the contrary. The era of hyper-polarization that he ushered in has equipped Trump with an enormous audience eager to tune in to what he’s pitching. In the media business, there are few things as valuable.

More politics coverage from Fortune:

  • Betting markets called the presidential election more accurately than polls
  • Biden beat Trump but now faces the final boss: Mitch McConnell
  • Lockdown, superspreader, unprecedented: 2020 has changed the English language, for good
  • The women joining the Biden-Harris administration
  • Biden’s corporate tax plan depends on Georgia’s Senate results



Source link

US election result: Trump moves step closer to conceding as he says he will respect Electoral College vote | US News


Donald Trump has moved a step closer to conceding the US election.

Taking questions for the first time since the election, the president was asked whether he will leave the White House if the Electoral College votes for president-elect Joe Biden.

He replied: “Certainly I will, certainly I will, and you know that.”

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

How does The Electoral College work?

But he said it is “going to be a very hard thing to concede”, adding: “I think that there will be a lot of things happening between now and the 20th of January. A lot of things.”

Mr Biden, who is due to be inaugurated on that date, won 306 Electoral College votes to Mr Trump’s 232 following the 3 November election.

Despite the popular vote being settled, the US system means the formal process of the college choosing a president will not happen until 14 December.

Mr Trump made the comments at the White House after speaking to US troops during a traditional Thanksgiving Day address.

He continues to claim, without evidence, that the election was skewed by “massive fraud”, and said the USA was “like a third world country”.

But he has been inching towards a concession.

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

Trump’s team to cooperate with transition

Earlier this week, he said he had given Emily Murphy, head of the General Services Administration (GSA), the go-ahead to proceed with a transition for Mr Biden’s administration.

The GSA is responsible for many of the basic services that allow the US government to function, from buildings and transport management to IT, financial services, supply chains and human resources.

Last week, the president said Mr Biden had “won” the US election – but then added that he was not conceding.



Source link

Trump says he will leave White House if Electoral College votes for Biden


President Donald Trump participates in a Thanksgiving teleconference with members of the United States Military, at the White House in Washington, DC, on November 26, 2020.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds | AFP | Getty Images

President Donald Trump said on Thursday he will leave the White House if the Electoral College votes for President-elect Joe Biden, the closest he has come to conceding the Nov. 3 election, even as he reiterated his unfounded claims of massive voter fraud.

Speaking to reporters on the Thanksgiving holiday, Republican Trump said if Democrat Biden — who is due to be sworn in on Jan. 20 — is certified the election winner by the Electoral College, he will depart the White House.

But Trump said it would be hard for him to concede under the current circumstances and declined to say whether he would attend Biden’s inauguration. The electors are scheduled to meet on Dec. 14.

“This election was a fraud,” Trump insisted, while offering no concrete evidence of such voting irregularities.

Biden and Trump both stayed close to home to celebrate Thanksgiving on Thursday as the coronavirus pandemic raged across the country.

Biden spent the holiday in the small seaside town of Rehoboth, Delaware, where he and his wife Jill have a vacation home. The Bidens are hosting daughter Ashley Biden and her husband Dr. Howard Krein for the holiday meal.

The former vice president, appearing with his wife in a video message posted to his Twitter account on Thanksgiving, said his family typically holds a large gathering on the island of Nantucket off Massachusetts, but would remain in Delaware this year “with just a small group around our dinner table” because of the pandemic.

In the presidential-style address to a nation that has lost more than 260,000 lives to the coronavirus, the Democratic president-elect said Americans were making a “shared sacrifice for the whole country” and a “statement of common purpose” by staying at home with their immediate families.

“I know this isn’t the way many of us hoped we’d spend our holiday. We know that a small act of staying home is a gift to our fellow Americans,” said Biden. “I know better days are coming.”

Republican President Trump often likes to celebrate holidays at his Mar-a-Largo resort in Florida. But on Thursday he remained in the Washington area, spending part of the morning at his Trump National Golf Club in Virginia where he played a round of golf.

It was a far cry from last year when he made a surprise visit to Afghanistan, where he served turkey to U.S. troops before sitting down to eat Thanksgiving dinner with them.

This time, Trump spoke by video link from the White House to members of the military.



Source link