President Trump seeks to vote on SCOTUS pick before Election Day


FILE –  The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, D.C.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 8:50 AM PT – Monday, September 21, 2020

According to President Trump, his list of potential Supreme Court nominees is down to five people. In an interview Monday, he hinted that he will announce his pick on Friday or Saturday.

The President said he believes he should wait until services for late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg are over out of respect for her. He also said he’s looking to pick someone who really understands the law, abides by the Constitution and has high moral values.

President Trump asserted the vote on his nominee should happen before Election Day. He also said Republicans have an obligation to do what’s right and act as quickly as possible.

Meanwhile, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said the White House believes they will have the votes to confirm the President’s Supreme Court nominee and suggested they will push to have the individual confirmed before the election.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany speaks during a television news interview outside the White House, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

McEnany also pointed out late Justice Bader Ginsberg was confirmed just 42-days after she was nominated. She said the President’s pick will be a very talented woman who will be received by voters.

“Twenty-nine times in history a president in their last year of their term has, in fact, nominated someone and been considered by the Senate,” McEnany explained. “So, the President will be following that precedent, and we believe that voters will be supportive of this move as we move forward and they see the quality of our nominee.”

The press secretary also noted former vice President Joe Biden has previously said he would appoint a nominee in the few months before an election.

RELATED: Biden accused of hypocrisy after 2016 comments in favor of Supreme Court confirmation during election year





Source link

Religious groups will be even more ‘galvanised to vote for Trump’ than in 2016


A NOTE ABOUT RELEVANT ADVERTISING: We collect information about the content (including ads) you use across this site and use it to make both advertising and content more relevant to you on our network and other sites. Find out more about our policy and your choices, including how to opt-out.

Powered by WordPress.com VIP



Source link

Tyron Woodley broken rib X-ray, Colby Covington trash talk, Donald Trump, Dana White, Vegas 11


Former UFC welterweight champion Tyron Woodley has revealed his fight against Colby Covington ended with a gruesome broken rib in the main fight of UFC’s Vegas 11 Fight Night.

While Covington was dominant throughout the fight having won every round on the scorecards, it looked as though it could go the distance when early in the fifth round Woodley had Covington in a standing guillotine hold but Covington took it to the mat when Woodley shouted “I’ve hurt my rib”.

Watch UFC action with ESPN on KAYO. Stream full Fight Night events live plus prelim fights for PPV events. New to Kayo? Get your 14-day free trial & start streaming instantly

He laid on the canvas for some time while doctors tended to him and Covington celebrated the win.

He was soon helped out of the octagon and taken to hospital.

He initially told ESPN UFC reporter Ariel Helwani that his rib “popped out” but scans showed that it was more serious that first thought with a clean break.

Woodley said “it was the most pain ever”.

It was a big loss for Woodley who has lost three straight fights with UFC president Dana White even saying he thinks the former champ should retire.

“I think he should start thinking about hanging it up,” White said. “He’s had a great career. He’s made his money.

“We all get old, man. This happens to the best of us. Woodley’s had a good career. He’s been a champion. He’s been around awhile. He had a good run in Strikeforce, too.”

Covington rubbed in the victory as well.

An outspoken fan of US president Donald Trump and proudly sporting a “Make America Great Again” cap, the president even interrupted Covington’s post match press conference to congratulate the 32-year-old fighter.

The war of words between the men also continued after the fight with Covington taking a few more shots at Woodley.

Covington slammed the Black Lives Matter movement, labelling Woodley a “communist”, saying “he hates America” and taking aim at “woke athletes” and calling LeBron James a “spineless coward”.

Of the pre-fight war of words and post fight outburst, White said “I saw it a f***ing mile away” but wouldn’t step in.

“My point in saying that is we’ve never stopped anybody from expressing themselves and saying how they feel,” White explained. “My philosophy is always this is a fight. People are gonna say mean s*** to each other. It’s like, ‘they shouldn’t be allowed to say that.’ They’re gonna f***ing punch each other in the face tomorrow. This is the fight game. I don’t believe in all that.”



Source link

The Trump foreign policies Biden might keep


Just a handful of states could decide who becomes the next president. POLITICO reporters from across the country break down what it will take for Donald Trump and Joe Biden to win over the most critical voters.

There’s little question Biden’s foreign policy would look and feel a lot different than Trump’s. The former vice president speaks often about restoring alliances, promoting human rights and standing up to dictators — themes you don’t often hear from Trump. In his convention speech, Biden vowed to “work in common purpose for a more secure, peaceful, and prosperous world.”

Understandably, Biden tends to say less about the Trump policies he’d keep. His campaign would reveal only that his “focus is going to be on rebuilding America’s standing in the world and undoing the incredible damage Donald Trump has wreaked.”

Still, based on talks with a half-dozen people in and around the Biden campaign, here are some ways in which U.S. foreign policy may not change all that much if Trump loses to Biden in November.

A tougher tone

Trump has taken a bullying tone toward many countries, including some allies he’s accused of freeloading. “Angela, you owe me $1 trillion,” he’s reported to have once said to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, misstating the financial underpinnings of the NATO military alliance.

While Biden is not likely to be so crude, don’t be surprised if he at times takes a more forceful position toward both allies and adversaries than he did when he served as Barack Obama’s vice president.

The obvious top target for this tone is an adversary China, which itself has taken a more bellicose attitude toward the United States in recent months.

Unlike Trump, Biden probably won’t use terms like “China virus,” which have offended many Asians amid the coronavirus pandemic. But he appears to have laid aside his past hopes that increased global engagement would nudge China toward democracy. Biden once said “a rising China is a positive, positive development, not only for China but for America and the world writ large.” More recently, he’s called Chinese leader Xi Jinping a “thug,” accused China’s leaders of committing genocide against Uighur Muslims and pledged to rally countries to hold China accountable for its economic “cheating.”

Biden also is likely to keep up the pressure on allies, including Germany, when it comes to defense spending. Obama’s first Defense secretary, Robert Gates, bluntly warned NATO in a 2011 speech of “the real possibility for a dim, if not dismal future for the trans-Atlantic alliance.” U.S. pressure led to a 2014 deal in which NATO members agreed to strive for the goal of spending 2 percent of their gross domestic product on defense by 2024.

Trump’s harsh rhetoric on the topic — he’s privately threatened to pull the U.S. out of NATO — might even give Biden more room to push the issue while still presenting himself as a welcome alternative to Trump. And how much other NATO members spend on defense could be a particularly salient issue if Biden bows to demands from progressives to cut U.S. defense spending.

The removal of Trump as an irritant could expose the fact that certain trans-Atlantic differences of opinion go well beyond the current occupant of the Oval Office. Germany, for one, has been reluctant to sign up for across-the-board confrontation with China, which has become a major trading partner. Many European countries also rely on Russia for energy supplies, so they tread carefully in dealings with Moscow.

Trump’s overt hostility toward multilateral institutions could present Biden with an opportunity to push through reforms to some international bodies. That includes the World Health Organization, which Trump has moved to quit, and the World Trade Organization, which is increasingly dysfunctional thanks to U.S. decisions.

Another example: Trump quit the U.N. Human Rights Council on the grounds that it was too focused on Israel and that its members include notoriously abusive governments. Instead of simply reinstating its support for the council, Biden could engage it while echoing Trump’s criticisms to push for reforms.

Biden also wants to host a summit for the world’s democracies. Such a gathering is an obvious slap at Trump, who has praised many dictators. But it’s also an implicit challenge to bodies like the U.N. Security Council, where autocracies like China and Russia often block U.S. initiatives. The idea recalls a proposal once pushed by late Republican Sen. John McCain, who called for establishing a “league of democracies” during the 2008 presidential campaign.

Meaningful punishments

Trump is known for using sticks more than carrots in his interactions with other countries. Sanctions and tariffs, which don’t necessarily require congressional action, are among the president’s favorite sticks. He has relied on both to unusual degrees to pursue his agenda on everything from trade to the imprisonment of Americans overseas.

Expect Biden to keep many of these penalties in place.

Trump’s tariffs on China would give Biden some leverage over an increasingly hostile Beijing, and he has hinted he might keep at least some during the initial months of his presidency. Although Biden has described Trump’s use of tariffs as “shortsighted,” he’s also asserted: “I will use tariffs when they are needed, but the difference between me and Trump is that I will have a strategy — a plan — to use those tariffs to win, not just to fake toughness.”

The tariffs “could come off, but no administration is likely to remove them without getting something in return,” said Richard Fontaine, CEO of the Center for a New American Security.

Other Trump policies toward China, including technology restrictions and limits on the movements of its diplomats in the United States, also could be here to stay. Given the increasingly widespread and bipartisan desire in Washington to stand up to China’s communist government, Biden could face blowback for moves that could be portrayed as soft on Beijing.

The Trump administration also has imposed economic and visa sanctions against an array of individuals. Biden might decide to remove some of those sanctions, such as the ones targeting officials with the International Criminal Court; but he’s likely to keep many of the so-called Magnitsky sanctions Trump has imposed on individuals overseas for corruption and human rights abuses.

“He may not have agreed with some of the steps put in place by Trump, but now that they are in place, he’s not going to lift them wholesale without thinking through what he might be able to get for lifting them,” one former U.S. ambassador said about Biden.

Immigration is a particularly tricky area. Trump has put in place unusually stringent limits on people seeking to come to the U.S., including severely lowering the number of refugees and outright banning immigrants from some countries. Biden has pledged to reverse these and many other Trump immigration policies.

But if Biden wants to strike a comprehensive immigration reform deal with Republicans, it could help to keep at least some of the changes made under Trump. One obvious possibility: Successful enhancements to security procedures designed to keep out potential terrorists. Another possibility: New rules that make it harder for foreigners to come to America to give birth to children who would then have U.S. citizenship — so-called birth tourism.

At times, it appears Biden is trying to walk a fine line on immigration. He’s said, for instance, that he won’t tear down the existing portion of a wall Trump has built along the southern border, but that he won’t add to it. Instead, he’s pledged to pursue more technologically advanced ways to secure the boundary.

Hard to reverse

A few Trump-era moves would be politically and practically hard to jettison.

Biden already has said he won’t reverse Trump’s decision to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem and recognize that city as the Israeli capital. Biden has said relocating the embassy again won’t help the dormant peace process between Israelis and Palestinians. He has, however, pledged to reopen the U.S. Consulate that dealt with the Palestinians, which Trump shut down.

Biden also is unlikely to re-recognize Nicolas Maduro as president of Venezuela.

Trump dropped official U.S. recognition of Maduro in January 2019, instead recognizing opposition leader Juan Guaido as Venezuela’s interim president. Going back on all that would be … awkward. Besides, disdain for Maduro — a dictator who has overseen the economic ruin of his country — is widespread in Washington and among U.S. allies in Latin America.

Biden probably will tweak the overall U.S. policy toward Venezuela somewhat, possibly to encourage more dialogue between the opposition and the Maduro regime. Democrats also have criticized how little attention Trump has paid to humanitarian suffering and refugee flows from Venezuela and Central America. A Biden administration will likely try to address the problem.

Trump didn’t feel encumbered by international agreements made by his predecessor; he pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal despite the advice of some of his top aides. Iran, in response, has taken steps to restart its nuclear program, making it harder for Biden to achieve his stated goal of rejoining the deal.

Take the deal

The Trump administration negotiated an update to the North American Free Trade Agreement dubbed the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. Biden has already said he supports the USMCA. He also will likely hang on to Trump’s “phase one” trade deal with China, though that pact is fragile.

Overall, a President Biden is expected to show much more skepticism toward trade deals than he has before in his decadeslong political career. That skepticism also aligns him, to some degree, with Trump, though for different reasons.

Trump has long been convinced that both allies and adversaries have been ripping off the United States in trade deals. Biden, under pressure from progressives, says he wants to pursue trade deals that don’t exacerbate economic inequality. Trump withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership; Biden has been coy about whether he’d rejoin that massive pact, which he once championed, saying he’d want to renegotiate parts of it.

Biden campaign officials say they want to focus first on the domestic economic recovery, in a nod to the difficult political climate for launching any new trade deals right now. But the Trump administration is currently negotiating trade agreements with Britain and Kenya; if Biden wins and those deals are unfinished, he’ll have to decide whether to pursue them or put them on hiatus.

Why not build on it?

Obama wanted to leave Afghanistan. Trump wants to leave Afghanistan. And Biden also wants to leave Afghanistan. So expect the Biden team to look for ways to maintain peace talks with the Taliban, who, under Trump, have agreed to a deal that is still being implemented.

The details, though, could derail the agreement. Biden, for instance, wants to keep a small number of U.S. troops in the country to battle terrorist groups such as al Qaeda and the Islamic State. The Taliban want all U.S. and NATO troops out.

Events on the ground could also force Biden’s hand. As it makes peace plans with the U.S., the Taliban has continued to battle with forces loyal to the Afghan government, which remains fragmented and divided over how best to end the country’s internal conflict.

Even if the current deal falls apart, a Biden administration will likely try to keep the channels open to strike a new agreement. The Trump-era deal could offer a template to build upon.

In fact, one person close to the Biden campaign said it’s possible that if he wins, he may ask Trump’s envoy to the talks, Zalmay Khalilzad, to stick around for a few months to help the new administration find its footing with the Taliban.

When asked about this possibility during a recent call with reporters, Khalilzad said it was too soon to discuss the idea, but that he was committed to staying at least until November’s election.

Biden also has said he wants to build on a push by the Trump administration to get Arab countries to normalize their relations with Israel.

Earlier this month, representatives of the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain joined Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at a White House ceremony to sign pledges to establish diplomatic, economic and other ties. It was a historic moment, and one Biden applauded.

“A Biden-Harris administration will build on these steps, challenge other nations to keep pace,” Biden pledged.
He added a caveat, though, saying his administration would use the momentum to “leverage these growing ties into progress toward a two-state solution and a more stable, peaceful region.”

Trump’s approach to these agreements has made scant mention of the Palestinians, and put zero emphasis on the idea of a two-state solution. Biden’s desire to make a two-state solution a goal of the normalization push will no doubt complicate things, not least because the Israeli right wing would fight it.

Doug Palmer and Lara Seligman contributed to this report.



Source link

Trump gives his blessing to TikTok deal with Walmart, Oracle


Washington: President Donald Trump said Saturday he had approved a deal allowing Silicon Valley giant Oracle to become the data partner for TikTok to avert a shutdown of the massively popular Chinese-owned video app that Washington has called a security risk.

The deal, announced by the companies, also includes Walmart as a commercial partner and would create a new US company named TikTok Global.

 

“I think it’s going to be a fantastic deal,” Trump said. “I have given the deal my blessing. If they get it done that’s great, if they don’t that’s okay too.”

Shortly after, TikTok—owned by China’s ByteDance—confirmed the agreement, which came with companies racing against a Sunday deadline set by Trump’s administration after which new downloads of the app would be banned.

Oracle could buy a 12.5 percent stake in TikTok before a future IPO, and Walmart a 7.5 percent stake.

 

According to a source close to the matter, ByteDance would keep the rest of the shares. But since the Chinese company is 40 percent owned by American investors, TikTok would eventually be majority American-owned.

“We are pleased that the proposal by TikTok, Oracle, and Walmart will resolve the security concerns of the US Administration and settle questions around TikTok’s future in the US,” a spokeswoman for TikTok told AFP.

ByteDance also confirmed the deal on social media, saying the three companies would reach an agreement that was “in line with US and Chinese law” as soon as possible.

 

If it comes to fruition, the deal could mark the de-escalation of a technology battle between Washington and Beijing.

It could also allow Americans to continue using the wildly popular app: the US Department of Commerce announced it was postponing the ban on TikTok downloads until September 27, citing “recent positive developments.”

Security concerns

Trump said the “security will be 100 percent” and that the companies would use separate cloud servers.

The deal will lead to the creation of a new company, headquartered in Texas, which will have “nothing to do with China” but will still be called TikTok, according to the president.

 

Oracle will be in charge of hosting all US user data and the security of the associated computer systems, while Walmart will supply its online sales, order management and payment services.

In a joint statement, Oracle and Walmart said TikTok Global would “pay more than 5 billion in new tax dollars to the US Treasury,” while they and the other companies involved in the deal would launch an initiative to develop online education.

According to the US Treasury, the TikTok deal still needs to be finalised by the involved companies and approved by a federal national security committee.

 

Click on Deccan Chronicle Technology and Science for the latest news and reviews. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter





Source link

Trump Supporters Moved After Gathering Outside Fairfax Polling Station


media_play

Trump Supporters Moved After Gathering Outside Fairfax Polling Station

A group of Trump supporters gathered outside an early voting station in Fairfax, Virginia, on September 20, waving flags and temporarily forming a line that voters had to walk around to access the polling site, according to witnesses at the scene. Bryan Graham, the chair of Fairfax County Democrats, shared footage of the incident on Twitter. He said a group taking part in a “Trump Train” began circling the parking lot at the Fairfax County Government Center at around 11.45 am. “They circled the lot for at least 20 minutes revving engines, blaring horns, using bullhorns, and yelling out their windows right next to voters in line,” Graham said, adding that a group of the supporters parked up and approached the entrance of the building, where they gathered and chanted “Four more years.” Videos of the rally were widely shared on social media, showing the crowd chanting and holding campaign signs and flags. The group of supporters grew larger and partially blocked a sidewalk, Graham said, adding that they had to be moved by police and building security. Officials told local media that they separated the voters and group of Trump supporters, and that voting was not affected. Credit: Bryan Graham via Storyful



Source link

US judge halts Trump administration’s order to remove WeChat from app stores


Beeler’s preliminary injunction also blocked the Commerce order that would have barred other transactions with WeChat in the United States that could have dramatically degraded the site’s usability for current US users or potentially made it unusable. The US Commerce Department did not immediately comment.

WeChat has had an average of 19 million daily active users in the United States, analytics firms Apptopia said in early August. It is popular among Chinese students, Americans living in China and some Americans who have personal or business relationships in China.

The Justice Department said blocking the order would “frustrate and displace the president’s determination of how best to address threats to national security.”

Beeler wrote “certainly the government’s overarching national-security interest is significant. But on this record — while the government has established that China’s activities raise significant national security concerns — it has put in scant little evidence that its effective ban of WeChat for all US users addresses those concerns.”

WeChat is an all-in-one mobile app that combines services similar to Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram and Venmo. The app is an essential part of daily life for many in China and boasts more than 1 billion users.

The Justice Department also argued that WeChat users could switch to other apps or platforms.

The WeChat Users Alliance that had sued praised the ruling “as an important and hard-fought victory” for “millions of WeChat users in the US”

Loading

Michael Bien, a lawyer for the users, said “the United States has never shut down a major platform for communications, not even during war times. There are serious First Amendment problems with the WeChat ban, which targets the Chinese American community.”

He added the order “trampled on their First Amendment guaranteed freedoms to speak, to worship, to read and react to the press, and to organise and associate for numerous purposes.”

Beeler also noted “there are obvious alternatives to a complete ban, such as barring WeChat from government devices.

She added “The regulation – which eliminates a channel of communication without any apparent substitutes – burdens substantially more speech than is necessary to further the government’s significant interest.”

Separately, the Commerce Department late on Saturday said it was delaying enforcement of another order issued Friday that would also have banned US app stores from offering TikTok starting late Sunday.

The one-week delay came after US President Donald Trump on Saturday blessed a deal with TikTok owner ByteDance and US companies Oracle and Walmart to create a new company to handle TikTok’s US operations

Reuters

Most Viewed in World

Loading



Source link

Donald Trump gives his ‘blessing’ to deal to keep TikTok app available in the US


President Donald Trump says he”s given his “blessing” to a proposed deal that will allow the popular video-sharing app TikTok to continue operating in the US.

Trump had previously wanted the app banned over US security officials’ fears that data harvested from users would be handed over the Chinese state.

Two US companies, Oracle and Walmart, have agreed to partner TikTok to run the app in a deal that Trump says will keep the data of American users safe.

“Conceptually, I think it’s a great deal for America. They’ll be hiring at least 25,000 people. It will most likely be incorporated in Texas. Billions of dollars of taxes will be paid every year and hundreds of millions of users and they’ll be happy. So everybody will be happy. It’s a severance. It’ll continue to be named TikTok, as it was all along and that’s it, that’s it.”

Specialising in short, usually light-hearted videos, TikTok has become highly popular with people across the world, mostly teenagers and young adults.

In the US alone, the app has over 100m active users, and 50m of them use it on a daily basis.

The deal still has to be signed off by the Chinese government, but TikTok’s interim chief executive posted a video on Saturday saying the app was “here to stay” in the US.

TikTok’s owner, ByteDance, has always denied accusations that it shares data with the ruling Communist Party in China.



Source link

Trump okays ByteDance deal with Walmart, Oracle, TikTok may just escape ban


Oracle will host all US user data and manage security, while Walmart will supply its online sales, order management and payment services.

Washington: President Donald Trump said Saturday he had approved a deal allowing Silicon Valley giant Oracle to become the data partner for TikTok to avert a shutdown of the massively popular Chinese-owned video app that Washington has called a security risk.

The deal, announced by the companies, also includes Walmart as a commercial partner and would create a new US company named TikTok Global.

 

“I think it’s going to be a fantastic deal,” Trump said. “I have given the deal my blessing. If they get it done that’s great, if they don’t that’s okay too.”

Shortly after, TikTok—owned by China’s ByteDance—confirmed the agreement, which came with companies racing against a Sunday deadline set by Trump’s administration after which new downloads of the app would be banned.

Oracle could buy a 12.5 percent stake in TikTok before a future IPO, and Walmart a 7.5 percent stake.

According to a source close to the matter, ByteDance would keep the rest of the shares. But since the Chinese company is 40 percent owned by American investors, TikTok would eventually be majority American-owned.

 

“We are pleased that the proposal by TikTok, Oracle, and Walmart will resolve the security concerns of the US Administration and settle questions around TikTok’s future in the US,” a spokeswoman for TikTok told AFP.

ByteDance also confirmed the deal on social media, saying the three companies would reach an agreement that was “in line with US and Chinese law” as soon as possible.

If it comes to fruition, the deal could mark the de-escalation of a technology battle between Washington and Beijing.

It could also allow Americans to continue using the wildly popular app: the US Department of Commerce announced it was postponing the ban on TikTok downloads until September 27, citing “recent positive developments.”

 

Security concerns

Trump said the “security will be 100 percent” and that the companies would use separate cloud servers.

The deal will lead to the creation of a new company, headquartered in Texas, which will have “nothing to do with China” but will still be called TikTok, according to the president.

Oracle will be in charge of hosting all US user data and the security of the associated computer systems, while Walmart will supply its online sales, order management and payment services.

In a joint statement, Oracle and Walmart said TikTok Global would “pay more than 5 billion in new tax dollars to the US Treasury,” while they and the other companies involved in the deal would launch an initiative to develop online education.

 

According to the US Treasury, the TikTok deal still needs to be finalised by the involved companies and approved by a federal national security committee.



Source link