Calculate your 10km bubble during Victoria’s lockdown


Melbourne will emerge from hard lockdown at 11.59pm on June 10, but a few restrictions remain in place. From 11.59pm on June 10, Melburnians can leave home for any reason, but you must stay within 25km of your home. 

This isn’t Victoria’s first rodeo, and where there’s a web connection, there’s a way. KM From Home is a website created by developer Dave Bolger when movement restrictions were introduced in his home country of Ireland back in March 2020. Luckily, KM From Home works across the world, meaning you can use the simple tool to work out exactly how far 25km is from your home.

All you have to do is type in your address (or let the website automatically see your device location) and the site will show you a 25km radius from your home address – you can also adjust the tool to show other size increments. Try the tool for yourself here

Here’s what you need to know about Melbourne’s current lockdown.

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Supercharging Victoria’s screen industry | Mirage News


The Andrews Labor Government has unveiled Victoria’s first screen strategy in more than a decade, to supercharge film, television, and digital games projects and create more jobs for Victorians.

Minister for Creative Industries Danny Pearson today launched VICSCREEN, investing a record $120.7 million as part of a $191.5 million four-year strategy to put Victoria at the forefront of the global screen entertainment boom.

The strategy is set to support more than 40,000 jobs and inject more than $1.2 billion back into the Victorian economy. As well as growing screen jobs, it will strengthen screen businesses, foster homegrown talent, and bring more local content to screens worldwide.

It will build on the recent success of local productions such as The Dry, the $46 million expansion at Docklands Studios Melbourne with a sixth sound stage and the $40 million transformation of our screen museum at the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI).

With a focus on supporting diversity and inclusion on screen and behind the scenes, VICSCREEN actions include the new Victorian Production Fund that will boost the production of Victorian-led film, television, online and digital games content and a new creators lab, with the first set of projects focused on premium drama.

As our screen workforce grows, we’re also making sure we have the right skills to keep our state ahead of the curve. Victoria’s screen workers – including creatives and crew – will be supported with career and development programs, focusing on training in innovative digital sectors such as visual effects, games and animation.

More international screen businesses like animation house Princess Bento Studio and games studio Sledgehammer Games will be attracted to set up in Victoria, while also supporting local businesses to develop their commercial capabilities and global connections. Blockbuster productions remain a focus through the expansion of the Victorian Screen Incentive, which seeks to attract international and interstate film, television, and games projects to the state, creating a pipeline of secure work for local screen workers and specialist businesses.

Opening up our industry to secure Victorian jobs relies on international cast and crew having certainty that they can travel to Victoria – that’s one of the reasons we’ve requested approval from the Commonwealth to accept small numbers of key economic cohorts into our state.

Cinema lovers will also get a look in with continued support for screen events and festivals – including revitalising Melbourne International Film Festival to propel it into a new era, with a stronger international profile.

ACMI will build on its success with Story of the Moving Image and continue its work developing new drawcard exhibitions and activities for audiences of all ages.

In line with the ambition of the strategy, the Government’s screen agency Film Victoria will be revitalised and expanded to lead the implementation of VICSCREEN in collaboration with Docklands Studios Melbourne, ACMI, Creative Victoria and industry stakeholders.

Read the full strategy here.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Creative Industries Danny Pearson

“The reputation of our screen industry is world-class and through VICSCREEN we will grow jobs, foster local talent and put Victorian projects on the map.”

“Films like The Dry, filmed in Victoria’s Wimmera region, show us how powerful local story-telling can be. This strategy will give even more Victorian stories a chance to shine.”

“We have an enormous pool of talent here in Victoria and this strategy will build on our strengths and position the industry for growth for decades to come.”

/Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.

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Victoria’s COVID-19 exposure sites expand to include Coles, Woolworths, BWS, 7-Eleven


Two supermarkets, a 7-Eleven outlet and a bottle shop are among the latest venues to be added to a growing list of COVID-19 exposure sites across Victoria.

The state recorded five new local COVID-19 infections, taking the current outbreak to 70 cases.

Three of the five new cases are direct primary close contacts of existing cases and have been in quarantine for their entire infectious period, however, two other “unlinked” cases have authorities on edge.

There are now 390 sites where exposure to the virus may have occurred.

Late on Saturday, the Department of Health expanded the list to include 7-Eleven Campbellfield, Psarakos Market in Thornbury, Coles Greenvale and Woolworths Preston South, as well as the attached BWS.

Anyone who attended these sites during the exposure periods must get tested and isolate until a negative result is received

The Victorian health department on Saturday said it expects to remove around 150 exposure sites over the coming days.

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Queensland set to impose border restrictions after Victoria’s COVID outbreak. Here’s what you need to know


All of Victoria has been declared a COVID-19 hotspot from 1:00am Friday meaning a hard border is in place for all non-residents without an exemption wanting to enter the state.

Only Queensland residents returning to the state will be allowed entry and they must enter 14-days of hotel quarantine.

The only other people allowed to enter Queensland will be those with a valid exemption.

People who entered Queensland in the 24 hours before the border closure — and who had been in Victoria in the last 14 days — are required to observe Victoria’s lockdown rules.

The lockdown will be in place until 11:59pm June 3.

Queensland Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young said people in that category should have received a text message from Queensland Health informing them of the rules.

“If you’ve filled out a declaration pass, you’ve been in Victoria in the last 14 days, you will need to follow exactly the same process as if you were still in Victoria,” Dr Young said.

“That means you must stay wherever you are for the next seven days, when it will be reviewed by Victoria and you can only leave for those essential reasons.”

The Victorian lockdown rules mean you can only leave your house to:

Dr Young also said people could attend pre-booked vaccine appointments, but needed to inform clinics they had been in Victoria and must wear a mask.

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath warned the situation in Victoria was dynamic and people who have been in Victoria in the last 14 days should frequently check Victoria’s list of updated exposure sites.

“Even if you checked it yesterday and a venue wasn’t on there that you’d been to, check it again, and keep checking it,” Ms D’Ath said.

“Because if you have been to one of those sites, you will need to follow the health advice depending on the tier of that site in terms of going into quarantine and getting tested.”

If you have been in Victoria in the last fortnight, authorities are warning people to closely monitor their health.

“Anyone in Queensland — anyone at all — if you have symptoms, this is the time to come forward and get tested,” Dr Young said.

From 1:00am on May 27, everyone entering Queensland must complete a border declaration.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll said all planes arriving from Victoria would be met by police officers at the airport, as well as all connecting flights.

“There will be random checks across our road borders in the coming days,” Commissioner Carroll said.

Assistant Deputy Commissioner Shane Chelepy said there was a sense of deja vu for Queensland police but the service was ready.

“We’ll stay on those borders and airport processing until our Chief Health Officer lifts her direction.”

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Victoria’s child protection department misled watchdogs after sex offender Alex Jones CRISSP data breach


Victorian child protection authorities misled the state’s privacy watchdog during an investigation of a data breach involving a sex offender and dozens of vulnerable children, telling the Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner it had contacted all affected children when it had not.

The state’s commissioner for children and young people says she is also making fresh enquiries with the Department of Families, Fairness and Housing (DFFH) after having been “reassured” more than two years ago that all children whose personal details were accessed by the offender had been contacted.

An ABC investigation has found former Melbourne City Mission (MCM) youth worker Alex Jones obtained the personal details of 43 children, including their home addresses and phone numbers, from a Victorian government database.

His access to the database should have been cancelled 13 months earlier, when he left MCM.

Jones raped a 13-year-old boy after searching his details on the Victorian database, known as CRISSP, which holds the personal details of child protection clients.

Jones has been jailed for that assault and will be eligible for parole next year.

The department has confirmed to the ABC it did not initially contact all the children whose details Jones searched, and more than two years after the breach was discovered it has been unable to speak to six children affected by the breach.

The ABC has discovered that Jones was able to access the information of 16 children who were not MCM clients, in addition to that of 27 children who were MCM clients.

DFFH maintains that Jones was not able to access the non-MCM children’s detailed case files but has confirmed the sex offender could see their dates of birth, home addresses, phone numbers and what child protection services they had been assigned to.

Zack was 13 years old when Alex Jones raped him.(

ABC News: Sean Warren

)

A teenager who was sexually assaulted by Jones, “Zack”, told the ABC he believed Jones had used personal information that he found on the CRISSP database to groom him.

Three weeks after approaching him at Flinders St Station in 2018, Jones convinced the then-13-year-old to go to a motel room with him where he raped him.

Jones had searched for his victim’s personal details on the CRISSP database in the lead-up to the sexual offence and continued to message the boy and search his details in the days afterwards.

DFFH said because Zack was not a Melbourne City Mission client, Jones would not have been able to view Zack’s full personal file.

However, the ABC has spoken to one of Jones’s former colleagues at Melbourne City Mission who said Jones was a “genius” with computers who showed colleagues how to get into CRISSP when the system was down and boasted he could hack into a separate database containing vulnerable children’s data.

‘They treated him a bit like a client’

“Daniel” used to work with Alex Jones at Melbourne City Mission and is highly critical of the organisation’s employment and management of Jones.

Daniel spoke to the ABC on the condition he be de-identified because he continues to work in the youth sector.

Daniel said Jones’s behaviour rang alarm bells.

Daniel said Jones frequently told colleagues about his sex life, and repeatedly wore his fly undone, ignoring requests to do it up.

“To me, it felt deliberate, it felt on purpose. It got to the point where myself and other colleagues would say to him, ‘Could you stop doing that?'” Daniel said.

Daniel and other workmates discussed this behaviour in the context of Jones’s claim that he held a degree in social work. Daniel said Jones’s behaviour did not fit the profile of a social work graduate.

Daniel said staff raised their doubts about Jones’s claimed qualifications with management but were assured it would have been verified by MCM’s human resources department.

Josie Taylor can be seen interviewing a person who has their back to camera.
ABC reporter Josie Taylor interviews “Daniel”, who worked with Alex Jones at Melbourne City Mission.(

ABC News: Daniel Fermer

)

Melbourne City Mission said in a statement to the ABC that Jones did not claim to have a degree.

“Qualifications noted were certificate and diploma level,” a spokesman said.

But in a magistrates’ court hearing last month, Jones’s lawyer stated that her client had “no further education” beyond year 12 equivalent.

MCM declined to respond to detailed questions from the ABC about whether or how it verified Jones’s qualifications.

The ABC has established that Jones also claimed to have worked for Anglicare Youth Services, WAYSS and Create Foundation. All three organisations have told the ABC Jones did not work for them in any capacity.

Daniel said Jones could become aggressive when challenged.

“He would clench his fists and his skin colour would change to red,” Daniel said.

“There was a time someone said something he didn’t like, it really challenged him, and he threw his keyboard and stormed off.”

Daniel said several MCM staff repeatedly expressed concern about Jones’s behaviour to management and team leaders at Melbourne City Mission.

“What did they do about it? Nothing. They tried, I suppose, to support him. They treated him a bit like a client,” Daniel said.

Daniel believed this was highly inappropriate given Jones had direct contact with and responsibility for extremely vulnerable children.

MCM said: “Some performance issues were identified and addressed with Mr Jones during his employment. None were related to any concerns with safety or behaviour towards young people.”

Liana Buchanan looks directly into the camera with a serious expression.
Liana Buchanan says she is concerned about Daniel’s account of Alex Jones’s behaviour when he worked at Melbourne City Mission.(

ABC News: Sean Warren

)

Victoria’s principal commissioner for children and young people, Liana Buchanan, is responsible for overseeing investigations into reportable conduct at organisations that work with children, such as Melbourne City Mission.

She is restricted by law from going into detail about the activities of her office in relation to any individual agency.

Asked about Daniel’s account of Jones’s behaviour and MCM’s management of him, she said: “What you’ve described is absolutely a set of circumstances that would not meet the child safe standards and would cause grave concerns about compliance with the child safe standards.”

Revelation ‘incredibly troubling’, children’s commissioner says

When the ABC approached DFFH six weeks ago, the department confirmed that, despite its undertakings to Ms Buchanan and Victoria’s information commissioner Sven Bluemmel, it had not spoken to 11 of the 43 children Jones had searched.

 “A number of young people were not contacted in the first instance — and they should have been,” a department spokesman said.

“This has now been rectified and we sincerely apologise for any distress this may have caused.”

However, some children still remain in the dark.

Shortly before publication, the department confirmed it had now contacted five of the 11 young people or their parents and confirmed that none of those had been approached by Jones.

Despite multiple attempts, however, six other children have not yet been contacted.

Ms Buchanan said when she learned about the privacy breaches more than two years ago, she was assured by DFFH that it had contacted all affected children.

She said it was “incredibly troubling” to be told by the ABC that the department had, in fact, not made contact with some children.

“It is a very long time since those issues first came to light,” she said. “I will be going back to the department (DFFH) and making further enquiries.”

A middle-aged man with short hair stands in an office building, looking at the camera.
Victorian information commissioner Sven Bluemmel said it was disappointing the department had not contacted all the children affected by the breach.(

ABC News: Sarah Curnow

)

Victoria’s information commissioner, Sven Bluemmel, said during his office’s investigation into Jones’s data breaches, it was assured by the department that every child whose privacy had been breached had been spoken to by the department.

 Mr Bluemmel told the ABC he now knew that had not happened. While he does not believe it was deliberate, he is still concerned at the “carelessness”.

The ABC understands the Victorian Ombudsman is now making enquiries into how the department handled the breach. That is a formal step which can result in a decision to launch an investigation.

‘It’s not justice’, teenager’s mother says

A magistrate has indicated he will sentence Alex Jones to one month in jail for his unauthorised access of the CRISSP database.

Jones will serve that term concurrently with his sentence of six years’ jail for assaulting Zack.

In a sentencing indication hearing at the Sunshine Magistrates’ Court last month, Magistrate Mike Wardell told the court he could only sentence Jones based on the information provided to him.

The police prosecutor agreed there was no evidence to put before the court showing what Jones had viewed, or whether his searches indicated any more concerning conduct.

The mother of the 13-year-old boy Jones sexually assaulted, “Sue”, is deeply angry by what she sees as the systemic failures that have led to the sentencing indication.

“When I heard the one month, I honestly couldn’t believe what I was hearing,” she said.

“It’s insane — it’s not justice.

A woman is shown sitting on the step of a house, holding a cup.
“Sue” says Jones should receive more than one month’s jail for the data breach.(

ABC News: Andrew Altree-Williams

)

“I don’t know why there wasn’t enough evidence given by the police.”

Sue is confused and deflated at how multiple agencies have responded to the case.

“They’ve had years to do this, actual years,” Sue said.

“I don’t understand.”

“It’s like they don’t care. They’re not taking this seriously enough. It wasn’t just one person’s file, it was multiple children’s. They’re just shoving it under a rug.”

Second database under scrutiny

Jones will be formally sentenced today.

In last month’s sentencing indication hearing, Jones’s lawyer told the court the issue had been extensively investigated by police and no further complainants had been discovered.

There was no police informant or DFFH representative in court to contradict or support that assertion.

However, new information uncovered by the ABC suggests the breadth of Jones’s activities has not been investigated fully.

While at MCM Jones worked on three services where he had direct contact with children: the Finding Solutions counselling and support program, the Frontyard youth homelessness drop-in service, and the federally funded early intervention service Western Reconnect.

DFFH now concedes it has not made contact with all of the children whose privacy was breached through Finding Solutions on CRISSP.

Little is known about what efforts have been made by MCM or DFFH to identify what children Jones dealt with through his work at Frontyard.

However, concerns have been raised with the ABC about the children Jones dealt with through that service, because the nature of that role allowed for transient, less-formalised interactions with those clients.

The entrance to a building with signs for Melbourne City Mission and Frontyard.
The Frontyard youth homelessness service was one of three programs Jones worked on while at Melbourne City Mission.(

Facebook: Melbourne City Mission

)

Through his work on Western Reconnect, the ABC has established that Jones had access to DEX — a separate database used for that program containing the private information of vulnerable children.

Despite discovering that Jones had repeatedly trawled children’s information on CRISSP after he left MCM, neither DFFH nor the federal Department of Social Services (DSS) which administers DEX, investigated whether he did the same with DEX.

DEX is used by service providers such as MCM as a case management system for information about clients they are working with through federally funded programs.

The ABC has been told that Jones boasted to others that he could easily hack into DEX.

Until the ABC raised the DEX database with the state and federal departments and information commissioners, no agency had considered Jones’s access to these children’s information, and whether he had made good on that boast.

Melbourne City Mission said in a statement to the ABC that Jones’s access to DEX “was deleted when he no longer required access for Western Reconnect” but declined to name a date.

It was human error at MCM that allowed Jones to continue to access the CRISSP database for 13 months after he left the organisation.

The Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner (OVIC) referred the DEX database matter to its federal counterpart, the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC), after the ABC made enquiries.

A spokesperson for the OAIC said in a statement to the ABC that it was “making preliminary inquiries” in relation to the issue.

The federal Department of Social Services distanced itself from responsibility for the protection of children’s personal information on DEX.

It said funded agencies (such as Melbourne City Mission) were required to de-identify their clients before sharing information with the department.

However, DSS also confirmed that DEX contained private identified information of children.

“Funded organisations may opt to use the Data Exchange as a free electronic case management system rather than purchasing another similar IT platform however, in such cases, none of the personal information is shared with the department,” it said.

While not commenting on the federal DSS specifically, Victorian children’s commissioner Liana Buchanan said the OVIC report into the Victorian privacy breaches was very clear that departments could not outsource their responsibility to protect children’s personal information.

“Predators can and will seek out information about children because that will help them find out what vulnerabilities these children have,” Ms Buchanan said.

“Any service, whether it’s the department or an agency working with vulnerable children, has to keep that information about them very, very close, very secure and also then if there is a breach, has to take every measure to tell those children and [ensure] their families are warned so they can take protective steps,” she said.

Jones lived with children in out-of-home care

While he was working for Melbourne City Mission, Alex Jones was also working for an organisation called Concern Australia as an out-of-home care mentor for vulnerable young people.

In 2018, Jones was living with young people as a lead tenant — a role that required living on-site with children — when a laptop he used was lost and handed in to police, who found child abuse material on it.

Police could not prove Jones was the sole user of the laptop but notified the Department of Health and Human Services (which had responsibility for child protection before the creation of DFFH) that they had grave concerns about Jones working with children.

“Within 30 minutes of Concern Australia being notified by DHHS of this situation, the offender had been suspended from his role as a live-in mentor,” Concern Australia said in a statement.

A purple Concern Australia sign hangs on a chain fence in front of a car park and building.
Concern Australia employed Jones as a live-in mentor for young people in out-of-home care.(

ABC News: Sean Warren

)

But Concern Australia declined to answer questions about how many children Jones had contact with through this role, or where he lived with them.

“We immediately began an internal process to determine the wellbeing of young people in our care and provide any support needed,” it said.

“We established clearly that there had been no breaches of our Code of Conduct or inappropriate interactions with young people in our care by the offender during his time as a live-in mentor with us.”

Concern Australia declined to answer how it established there had been no “inappropriate” behaviour by Jones, nor detail if it had spoken to every child Jones had had contact with while he was a lead tenant.

Jones’s lawyer declined a request for comment.

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League expects small, capped crowds after Victoria’s COVID-19 lockdown, St Kilda Saints home game may be moved from Cairns to Sydney


The AFL has not yet considered relocating a major game to Perth following the huge success of the Essendon v Richmond Dreamtime match on Saturday night, when more than 56,000 attended.

The West Coast v Richmond game has been brought forward from round 14 to this weekend (Sunday), in what promises to be another Perth blockbuster.

Sydney on standby again with Cairns game in doubt

St Kilda’s money-spinning home game in Cairns on Saturday night is in doubt, with the AFL no guarantee to receive clearance from Queensland health authorities for the match to proceed.

For the second week running, the Queensland Government is threatening to drop a planned Saints home game at Cazaly’s Stadium. Last Saturday’s match against Sydney was played at the SCG and this Saturday’s date with Adelaide is also a strong chance to be moved to Sydney, given the Saints have recently been in COVID-19-stricken Melbourne.

Bradley Hill and the beleaguered Saints may not get to Cairns this week.Credit:Getty Images

However, AFL Cairns hopes that even if this weekend’s match has to be shifted, a game later in the season, such as the round 18 St Kilda-Port Adelaide game, could be moved to Cairns as a replacement.

Playing in Cairns earns the debt-ridden Saints a return via a deal with Tourism and Events Queensland, Tourism Tropical North Queensland and the Cairns Regional Council.

AFL Cairns managing director Gary Young said on Monday that the body was hopeful of finding out whether the match could go ahead by Tuesday afternoon.

“We’re preparing as if it is going ahead, which is all we can do,” Young said.

“When you’ve got a venue that’s not permanently set up, a lot of work goes into just getting some extra toilets, a bit of temporary fencing, an extra [big] screen.

“Apparently we are going to find out by around the middle of tomorrow, so waiting patiently for that.

“We’re just going ahead as if the game’s happening. It’ll be disappointing if it doesn’t but in the midst of what we’ve got going on in the country and worldwide I suppose, it’s a small price to pay.”

He said he understood why there were issues surrounding the game but added players were less likely to be exposed to the coronavirus than others.

Tim Membrey is heading back to Melbourne.

Tim Membrey is heading back to Melbourne.Credit:Getty Images

“These people are probably in a way cleaner than we are, only because they’re in bubbles and have got to be protected so the business can continue,” he said.

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Young said local organisers would work hard to ensure some AFL football was played in Cairns this year. “We can always juggle things … we’re keen for footy.”

Moving the match to Sydney could however help the Saints on one front, making it more likely that leadership group members Tim Membrey and Seb Ross will be able to play against Adelaide.

The pair have departed Sydney – where the rest of the Saints are stationed – with Ross’ wife Marnie recently giving birth to twins and Membrey’s wife Emily expecting.

“They headed home after the game on Saturday,” Saints chief operating officer Simon Lethlean told SEN radio on Monday. “So, they’re not with us right now and I guess unlikely to join us for this game this week, wherever that might be. If it’s in Sydney it’s probably a bit easier, but if it’s Cairns it’s probably unlikely.

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“They’ve both headed back for various reasons. Their intention is to be home this week and not be playing because they’ve got family matters to deal with and that’s supported by us.”

Port Adelaide’s match with Geelong at Adelaide Oval on Thursday night is also yet to be officially confirmed as a goer, with Cats players sent into hard lockdown this week ahead of the game.

With Ross and Membrey both in doubt, the Saints’ list of unavailable players could leave them with few more than 22 fit men to select, following injuries on Saturday to Jarryn Geary (shoulder), Max King (back) and Mason Wood (hamstring).

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Mid-season draftee Cooper Sharman has travelled from Adelaide to join his new teammates in Sydney.

Lethlean meanwhile said he had taken issue with the AFL website and other media outlets over a “Missy Higgins” headline made in reference to forward Jack Higgins, who kicked 1.6 in the loss to the Swans. The headline was a play on words, a nod to singer Missy Higgins.

“There was some feedback about the use of nicknames like Missy Higgins and the like for Jack,” Lethlean said.

“No one likes young athletes being scrutinised with negativity but again our job here is to put support around those players here, which they’ve got.

“It’s all part of the game to be scrutinised. As long as it’s balanced, that’s all part of the industry.

“I put a call into the AFL. I think the AFL saw fit without us getting involved to change the headline yesterday.”

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Calculate your 10km bubble during Victoria’s lockdown


In case you didn’t hear the news, all of Victoria is back under stage four lockdown restrictions from 11.59pm Thursday, May 27. The lockdown was extended for a week until June 10, with a few amendments. From 11.59pm on June 3, Melburnians can travel 10km from home for essential shopping and exercise (increased from 5km). There are no travel limits for caregiving, medical treatment, to get vaccinated or for work or schooling if it cannot be done from home (though you cannot leave Melbourne). 

But this isn’t Victoria’s first rodeo, and where there’s a web connection, there’s a way. KM From Home is a website created by developer Dave Bolger when movement restrictions were introduced in his home country of Ireland back in March 2020. Luckily, KM From Home works across the world, meaning you can use the simple tool to work out exactly how far 10km is from your home.

All you have to do is type in your address (or let the website automatically see your device location) and the site will show you a 10km radius from your home address – you can also adjust the tool to show other size increments. Try the tool for yourself here

Here’s what you need to know about Melbourne’s current lockdown.

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Calculate your 10km bubble during Victoria’s lockdown


In case you didn’t hear the news, all of Victoria is back under stage four lockdown restrictions from 11.59pm Thursday, May 27. The lockdown was extended for a week until June 10, with a few amendments. From 11.59pm on June 3, Melburnians can travel 10km from home for essential shopping and exercise (increased from 5km). There are no travel limits for caregiving, medical treatment, to get vaccinated or for work or schooling if it cannot be done from home (though you cannot leave Melbourne). 

But this isn’t Victoria’s first rodeo, and where there’s a web connection, there’s a way. KM From Home is a website created by developer Dave Bolger when movement restrictions were introduced in his home country of Ireland back in March 2020. Luckily, KM From Home works across the world, meaning you can use the simple tool to work out exactly how far 10km is from your home.

All you have to do is type in your address (or let the website automatically see your device location) and the site will show you a 10km radius from your home address – you can also adjust the tool to show other size increments. Try the tool for yourself here

Here’s what you need to know about Melbourne’s current lockdown.

Thanks for stopping by and reading this news article about “News, Sports & What’s On in Seaford” named “Calculate your 10km bubble during Victoria’s lockdown”. This story was brought to you by My Local Pages as part of our Seaford events and what’s on news services.

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What’s next in Victoria’s COVID crisis? Here are four things to watch


Victorian health officials say the state is running neck-and-neck with this COVID-19 crisis and the next few days will be critical.

So far almost all the cases have been linked and ultimately traced back to the first case in almost three months, the man from Wollert who became infected in hotel quarantine in South Australia.

Health officials are hoping to find out today whether the new case in a worker at the Arcare Aged Care home at Maidstone, in Melbourne’s west, is linked to that case.   

There are currently more than 50 active cases.  

But Mr Merlino told reporters “it’s not just about the case numbers”.

“It’s the type of cases, it’s where it’s occurring, it’s do we know where they’re linked, are they high-risk sites?” he said.

“All of those things are taken into account by the public health team in terms of when they’re confident to provide advice to government that we can then go towards some easing of restrictions.”

Victoria’s contact tracers have been working at a furious pace trying to keep track of 4,200 active close contacts.

And those people still must complete 14 days of isolation before those cases are cleared. 

It’s a huge task, but Jeroen Weimar, the COVID-19 testing commander, says more than 77 per cent of them have so far tested negative. 

But each new case throws up a new group of primary close contacts and exposure sites. 

So the number of primary close contacts is one to watch.

The number of exposure sites has soared in recent days further complicating efforts to control the spread of the virus.

There are now more than 300 exposure sites including several schools and Footscray Market in Melbourne’s west and Brimbank Shopping Centre in the north.

Mr Merlino said there was no doubt the situation was “incredibly serious”.

Health officials are also very concerned about a number of high-risk exposure sites which are seeing a small number of cases infecting large number of contacts.

Mr Weimar said there was particular concern around the following four exposure sites:

JMD Grocers & Sweets at 768 High Street Epping; Healthy India at 276 Broadway, Reservoir, and two sites at Footscray Market — Thai Huy Butcher Shop 144, and Inday Filipino Store 121.

Anyone with symptoms or who had visited any of the exposure sites must get tested and isolate. 

For the most up-to-date information, visit the Department of Health coronavirus website.

Thank you for stopping by to visit My Local Pages and seeing this post on “What’s On in the City of Brisbane” titled “What’s next in Victoria’s COVID crisis? Here are four things to watch”. This article was shared by MyLocalPages Australia as part of our local and national events & news stories services.

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Victoria’s COVID-19 lockdown warning for state and Commonwealth to learn valuable lessons


As Victoria plunged back into lockdown, Google searches for Premier Daniel Andrews jumped through the roof.

The public wanted to know when the Premier — the face of the 2020 lockdowns — was returning and how his recovery from a broken back was going.

Despite having one of the best coordinated and most popular social media accounts in politics, there hasn’t been a peep from Andrews during Victoria’s fourth lockdown.

His temporary replacement, James Merlino, is in constant contact with the Premier.

So are a few key staff, but many ministers are either communicating only through texts or not at all.

To be fair, his is a major injury and Andrews is dealing with a lot, but the information vacuum has many in politics and the public scratching their heads, allowing wild, unhelpful rumours to swirl.

Andrews is due back this month. The tip is it won’t be until at least the middle of the month.

This lockdown, Merlino is in the hot seat.

It is a different-looking team to the marathon lockdown last year.

There’s no Jenny Mikakos around the cabinet table, no Andrews, and Police Minister Lisa Neville is also absent as she deals with a serious health issue.

The politics are a little different.

The spray directed at the federal government over financial assistance for crippled businesses on Sunday by Merlino and Treasurer Tim Pallas — while vintage Andrews in style — was more overt in its criticism.

For months, the Premier, bar a few outbursts at Josh Frydenberg, was constructive in his public comments about the PM, and was rarely drawn on criticism of Scott Morrison. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison was equally pointed.

“We will continue to support Victoria to get Victoria open and to do everything we can to ensure that Victoria does not close itself again,” he said.

There is palpable anger and frustration in the community that Victoria is once again in this mess — the only state to be stuck in the COVID-19 quagmire for a fourth time.

When it became apparent that Victoria was on the edge of the abyss again, the state government was quick to point out that this breakout was on the federal government for failing to step up to its quarantine responsibility.

This outbreak has its genesis in the Playford Hotel in Adelaide through aerosol transmission.

It also exposes a lack of national coordination. Why weren’t the tough lessons of Victoria’s hotel quarantine failures picked up by other states and a set of standards developed?

And why the dithering on a purpose-built quarantine site?

If it was a war — as COVID-19 has been so frequently referenced — it would be built by now, or at the very least, the idea signed off.

Monday’s news that the virus is now in aged care homes is a nightmare scenario but has highlighted the massive gap between the rhetoric and the reality of the vaccinations.

Not all residents have had the jab, and staff were told to source it themselves.

These are the vulnerable frontline workers, the spreaders of the last wave.

Why they were not prioritised and vaccinations made compulsory has experts shaking their heads.

It’s just one cog of a slow vaccine rollout.

In response to last year’s outbreaks, aged care workers were meant to only work at one site, but this latest outbreak has revealed that edict was lifted last year and it’s still happening.

Another lesson not learnt that could have tragic results.

Victoria, too, has failed to learn lessons from other states. The lack of a uniform QR code system until last Friday is galling, given most other states do have it.

And the enforcement in other states is high.

You cannot get into a pub, do your shopping or order a coffee without showing that you’ve checked in. So why has Victoria been so lax?

It’s an issue senior people in Victoria privately concede is a problem.

Questions about contact tracing linger, but with several cases sick and infectious for more than a week before getting tested and isolating, the system was already up against it.

Extra resources have been called in.

When the pandemic is quelled, the nation and the state need to properly review what worked and what didn’t.

Authorities need to be better prepared for the next pandemic.

There have been calls made for a royal commission into Victoria’s response, led by the Australian Medical Association and echoed by the state opposition.  

The idea certainly has merit, especially when you consider a royal commission was held after Black Saturday claimed 173 lives.

The findings have improved the way bushfires are managed in Victoria.

But any commission/inquiry/review would need to look beyond Victoria’s borders if it was to get to the bottom of how the whole deadly pandemic has affected us all.

Perhaps that is why the idea has fallen on deaf ears in Canberra.

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